Episodit

  • Sarah's Country has your sneak peek into E Tipu 2022: The Boma Agri Summit speaker lineup at the highly anticipated June 2022 event is set to catalyse the future of Aotearoa’s primary industries and you could get on the guest list to Sarah's Country E Tipu Cocktail Party when you enter the draw to win a double pass to E Tipu & dinner with Sarah Perriam at 5th Street (valued at $2,500!)

    Sarah Perriam sits down with three of the E Tipu 2022 keynote speakers ahead of the event which gives you a preview of the insightful, thought-provoking discussions you need to be a part of in Christchurch on 21-22 June 2022.

    Sarah discusses topics ranging from the changing world of the director responsibilities and how it’s led to as he describes ‘gun-shy, arse-protecting governance’ halting progress from one of our country's most esteemed and influential professional directors, how we can bolster mātauranga Māori and kaupapa Māori in our agricultural science with a young AgResearch scientist, and how New Zealand agritech business needs greater ambition with an expat US-based vertical farming CEO.

    Arama Kukutai - CEO, Plenty and Partner, Finistere Ventures — Aotearoa FundLouise Hennessy - Scientist and early career ambassador, AgResearchRob Campbell - Chair of Interim Health, Environmental Protection Agency & NZ Rural Land Co.

    CLICK HERE TO ENTER TO WIN E TIPU 2022 TICKETS & DINNER WITH SARAH!

    All entries will receive an exclusive invite to Sarah's Country E Tipu Cocktail Party at O.G.B's in Christchurch on Tuesday 21st June. The prize draw closes on Sunday 5th June 2022

    ABOUT E TIPU 2022

    E Tipu 2022 features two days of talks from global and local leaders in food and fibre, plus interactive workshops, expert panels and special Q&As, innovative exhibits, valuable cross-sector networking and more.

    Designed for changemakers from across the food and fibre sector, the summit tackles major questions around how we can be more innovative, collaborative, sustainable and profitable — now and into the future.

    E Tipu 2022 is a truly hybrid event — offering an in-person summit at Christchurch Town Hall and a virtual experience for attendees from around the world.

    In-Person and Virtual Early Bird Tickets are available now at etipu.boma.global

  • In an environment where farmers & growers may be thinking it's all coming at them, Becks Smith can see the light at the end of the tunnel when we condense the overwhelm and see the challenges through a more holistic approach.

    New Zealand farmers naturally have an inter-generational view of stewardship of their land, but sometimes need support to bring the right expertise together when they are on the next level of their sustainability journey.

    Becks Smith discusses with Sarah Perriam, host of Sarah's Country, how her career journey as a vet in Central Otago, alongside farming with her husband's family, is evolving into the social enterprise The Whole Story.

    She shares her insights into how to take small steps towards change and how important to pull an advisory board around our farmers that are all on the same page.

    "We sometimes make changes and don't reflect on what the outcome was. I am seeing powerful changes when farmer's bring the right support around them to help them reflect on their decision making," explains Becks Smith, The Whole Story.

  • Puuttuva jakso?

    Paina tästä ja päivitä feedi.

  • Did you know that globally agriculture is one of the last industries to digitise? And for those farmers that will embrace the market access requirement to prove the provenance and verify the farm practices will ultimately win.

    But imagine if technology as a tool actually made you a better farmer? Perhaps more tolerant to climatic conditions, faster decision making in risky situations and free up time to actually do the thing you enjoy... farming... or boating/golf/fishing!

    As the Farmax annual conference wraps up, Sarah Perriam catches up with the two CEOs on the merger of Farmax, the predictive modelling farm software and Farm IQ, the farm management software - Will Noble & Gavin McEwan.

    "If NZ's pastoral agriculture wants to retain its place as a premium supplier to the world, we need to digitise our supply chain and the supply chain starts at the farm," explains Gavin McEwan, Farmax

    LINKS

    Learn more about Farm IQ

    Learn more about Farmax

    This episode is the first in a new weekly series for 2022 on Sarah's Country 'Tell us what you really think! hosting the opinions of those involved intimately with some of the big issues facing New Zealand's primary sector.

  • In a special episode for 'Shaping our Future' on Sarah's Country released on 2022 International Woman's Day, Sarah Perriam discovers where women's role has come, the current is and can to in the New Zealand primary sector with female empowerment leader in rural New Zealand, Lindy Nelson.

    Lindy is a woman on a mission farming with her husband David, is the Chair of Safer Farms and founded the Agri-Women's Development Trust which has unleashed the confidence and talents of over 4,000 women who have found leadership roles that are shaping our future.

    In this episode, Lindy provides her wisdom to all listeners on the tipping point of women's contribution to agriculture at a time of great importance from social division to climate change.

    "In Native American wisdom, they describe the wings of humanity as one male wing & one female wing. The male wing has been flying too strongly and the female wing is unfurling to bring new strength and balance. If we look at women's role as we aren't fighting for a place, we are bringing balance and support,"

    Lindy Nelson

    This episode is a part of our new weekly series for 2022 on Sarah's Country 'Shaping our future' where we help New Zealand farmers & growers navigate the big issues to be more prepared for the challenges and opportunities ahead!

  • How do those tasked with implementing environmental policy best engage with farmers to come up with solutions that are best for the land and are fit for purpose?

    Ministry for the Environment has partnered with Sarah's Country to hit the road across the lower North Island in late 2021 to get out of Wellington and onto the farm to hear & see directly from farmers.

    In this third and final episode as part of the three-part series, Sarah Perriam takes Director of Policy Implementation & Delivery, Sara Clarke, meets Rangitikei Rivers Catchment Collective Chair and three-generation farmer, Roger Dalrymple along with dairy farmer, Greg Maughan.

    Sara is joined by her colleague, Gin Loughnan, Manager of the Climate & Water Agriculture team at the Ministry for the Environment who is keen to work together with catchment groups to ensure that freshwater farm plans are workable and avoid duplication.

    "The first thing we have to do is get farmers to understand why they are putting their environment plans on paper when bankers will tell you we can't get farmers to pull together farm budgets yet. It's a massive leap!" stresses Roger Dalrymple, Waitatapia Farming

    TOP 10 things in THIS EPISODE

    Sara Clarke & Gin Loughnan sits down with the Rangitikei farmers to discuss:

    1. Over 300 farmers have joined the sub-catchment groups of the Rangitikei Rivers Catchment Collective "which will tell you that if you give farmers the challenge they will be empowered to create the solutions"

    2. Farmers need environmental policy guidance that is apolitical and doesn't change between government terms where the pathway doesn't change on them.

    3. The narrative that New Zealand farmers are doing it all wrong and portraying our practices as third-world when dairy farmer, Greg Maughan was working in Indonesia and reading this message looking at polluted waterways.

    4. Gin asks how the government can support the community ownership of the solution around freshwater quality.

    5. Roger's experience with dealing with a spectrum of farmers to bring them along and to educate them on where the changes need to happen takes time, more collaborative science and improved connectivity.

    6. Can freshwater farm plans be justifying what farmers are already doing and change the conversation around proving the good work than it being led as a government, box-ticking exercise?

    7. Roger & Greg explain that community catchments only work for 3-6 months of the year for farmers as calving, lambing, shearing, harvesting and weaning takes their focus and therefore the milestones to achieve outcomes need to be set at a time that works with the farming calendar.

    8. Sustainable Land Use Initiative (SLUI) under Horizon District Council cost between $12-$14,000/per farm that was funded by Horizon for erosion control and soil mapping are great management tools.

    9. Roger advises against the integrated environmental farm plan being digital-only due to internet accessibility and the digital literacy of farmers but may lead to catchment support to help all farmers to get farm environment plans.

    10. Gin & Sara want to know what role industry bodies are playing in supporting farmers. Roger points out that the industry groups don't have the time to bring farmers along on the journey because the government's policy consultation timeframes are too tight.

    links

    Learn more about Freshwater Farm Plans

    This episode is the first in a new weekly series for 2022 on Sarah's Country 'Table Swap' out discussing the big issues facing New Zealand's primary sector around farmers' kitchen tables working on ways to move forward collectively.

    WIN ONE OF THREE PREMIUM PASSES TO THE FARMAX CONFERENCE (9th & 10th March 2022) complete with a Farmax subscription (valued at $200)!

    CLICK HERE (Entries Close 7th March 2022)

  • How do those tasked with implementing environmental policy best engage with farmers to come up with solutions that are best for the land and are fit for purpose?

    Ministry for the Environment has partnered with Sarah's Country to hit the road across the lower North Island in late 2021 to get out of Wellington and onto the farm to hear & see directly from farmers.

    In this first episode as part of the three-part series, Sarah Perriam takes Director of Policy Implementation & Delivery, Sara Clarke, to meet Grant Charteris at Forest Road Farm, farming with his wife Sally in the Ruahine foothills at the top of the Tukituki River catchment.

    After a farm tour of the work the Charteris' have done that saw them win the 2021 Elworthy Award for the premier environmental accolade for deer farmers, Sara meets also with local young farmer Hugh Abbiss at Foley Farming Enterprises to sit down for this episode.

    "It's really hard to make a plan when the goalposts keep shifting, with the layers of rules between regional council & national policy statements. There's too much misinformation and direction," stresses Grant Charteris, Forest Road Farm.

    TOP 10 things in THIS EPISODE

    Sara Clarke sits down with Hawke's Bay farmers, Grant Charteris & Hugh Abbiss to discuss:

    1. How will or won't Overseer continue to play into the proposed freshwater farm plans and what about measuring outcomes versus the move to regulating input controls & farming practices?

    2. The Tukituki catchment are already working within Farm Environment Management Plans under Plan Change 6 with Hawke's Bay Regional Council, so how is more layers of rules from the national policy statement going to make a difference to the path they are on?

    3. The frustration of getting clear direction from their local regional council who aren't getting clear direction from the central government so it stifles farmers appetite in investing in environmental work with a lack of security of the direction.

    4. The leading farmers will pave the way to pull the laggard farmers up but not all farmers are in the financial position to achieve the Ministry's gold standard and it will take a decade of actions to sustainably fund it within the cost structures of farming the way they are.

    5. They have recently formed the Mangonuku Catchment Group and have shared goals that every landowner can get in behind and believe it's the best forum for getting useable data for change as well as the support needed.

    6. Hugh discusses the changes he's implemented such as direct drilling, catch crops and nutrient management and how to make more from less.

    7. What does "fit-for-purpose" really mean when the freshwater farm plans aren't thinking about the whole integrated approach to make it sustainable to work.

    8. Grant learns that not everyone from Wellington doesn't listen, and really excels in explaining his farming system and environmental actions actually out on his farm.

    9. Better understanding needs to be taken into account through true farmer consultation, not hand-picking a panel based on the outcome you have already

    10. If you stifle innovation you won't get the desired outcome all because the government want change to happen too fast, otherwise the leading farmers will sell to pine trees.

    LINKS

    Learn more about Freshwater Farm Plans

    This episode is the first in a new weekly series for 2022 on Sarah's Country 'Table Swap' out discussing the big issues facing New Zealand's primary sector around farmers kitchen tables working on ways to move forward collectively.

    CLICK HERE TO ENTER THE FEBRUARY PRIZE DRAW! WIN ONE OF THREE PREMIUM PASSES TO THE FARMAX CONFERENCE (9th & 10th March 2022) complete with a Farmax subscription (valued at $200)!

  • Not all NZ farmers have their heads in the sand about He Waka Eke Noa as Sarah discovers a group of them have done your homework on the alternative pricing options for you to simply listen and make a submission on our weekly panel, "Tell us what you really think!".

    Farmers Mark McCoard (Taihape), Kerry Worsnop (Gisborne) & Graeme Gleeson (Waikato) shed some frank reality with host, Sarah Perriam on what amendments to the farm-level levy could look like to have a fairer emissions reduction and payment scheme.

    Download the group's flyer & open letter to farmers below.

    "He Waka Eke Noa is merely an accounting system and who gets inspired to change based on an accounting system! It should be an aspiration for the sector to be warming neutral by 2030 and when we have achieved that the pricing should stop," urges Kerry Worsnop, Gisborne farmer.

    LINKS:

    Download the group's Open Letter to Farmers (PDF, 120 kb).

    Download the group's suggested changes in this flyer (PDF, 2.2 MB).

    Learn more about He Waka Eke Noa

    Attend a roadshow throughout February on the options developed by the He Waka Eke Noa partnership as alternatives to the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS).

    LATEST UPDATE

    The consultation will now close in late March 2022 and the He Waka Eke Noa Partnership will report its recommendations to Ministers by 31 May 2022 (rather than 30 April 2022).

    This episode is the first in a new weekly series for 2022 on Sarah's Country 'Tell us what you really think! hosting the opinions of those involved intimately with some of the big issues facing New Zealand's primary sector.

    CLICK HERE TO ENTER THE FEBRUARY PRIZE DRAW! WIN ONE OF THREE PREMIUM PASSES TO THE FARMAX CONFERENCE (9th & 10th March 2022) complete with a Farmax subscription (valued at $200)!

  • The level of data now being collected on farms on a daily basis is massive but it's not working together in a collaborative way for farmers to manage the data. It is also useful for brands to verify the environment's regeneration when sourcing their product.

    NZ Merino has recently partnered with Silicon Valley technology company, Actual to provide insights into each ZQRX growers’ sustainability credentials. Guided by science and starting with carbon emissions, this work will include the ability to model mitigations on-farm to guide future investment, arm brands with information to source responsibly manufactured wool, and provide growers with tangible plans to further their positive environmental impact

    "Our objective is to partner with the global best on each index point of the 15-point ZQRX regenerative framework such as Actual, Savoury Institute & Toitu Envirocare," - Tim Loftus, NZ Merino.

    Tim Loftus has recently joined NZ Merino as the General Manager of Sales & Marketing at NZ Merino following a career in marketing sustainability with Kathmandu & icebreaker.

    Sarah discusses with Tim the global signals from the consumer and what it truly means to be market-led as well as the importance of farmers data ownership.

    This episode is the first in a new weekly series for 2022 on Sarah's Country 'Shaping our future' where we help New Zealand farmers & growers navigate the big issues to be more prepared for the challenges and opportunities ahead!

    CLICK HERE TO ENTER THE FEBRUARY PRIZE DRAW! WIN ONE OF THREE PREMIUM PASSES TO THE FARMAX CONFERENCE (9th & 10th March 2022) complete with a Farmax subscription (valued at $200)!

  • How do those tasked with implementing environmental policy best engage with farmers to come up with solutions that are best for the land and are fit for purpose?

    Ministry for the Environment has partnered with Sarah's Country to hit the road across the lower North Island in late 2021 to get out of Wellington and onto the farm to hear & see directly from farmers in this new series, Table Swap.

    In this first episode as part of the three-part series, Sarah Perriam takes Director of Policy Implementation & Delivery, Sara Clarke, to meet Grant Charteris at Forest Road Farm, farming with his wife Sally in the Ruahine foothills at the top of the Tukituki River catchment.

    After a farm tour of the work the Charteris' have done that saw them win the 2021 Elworthy Award for the premier environmental accolade for deer farmers, Sara meets also with local young farmer Hugh Abbiss at Foley Farming Enterprises to sit down for this episode.

    "It's really hard to make a plan when the goalposts keep shifting, with the layers of rules between regional council & national policy statements. There's too much misinformation and direction," stresses Grant Charteris, Forest Road Farm.

    TOP 10 things in THIS EPISODE:

    Sara Clarke sits down with Hawke's Bay farmers, Grant Charteris & Hugh Abbiss to discuss:

    1. How will or won't Overseer continue to play into the proposed freshwater farm plans and what about measuring outcomes versus the move to regulating input controls & farming practices?

    2. The Tukituki catchment are already working within Farm Environment Management Plans under Plan Change 6 with Hawke's Bay Regional Council, so how is more layers of rules from the national policy statement going to make a difference to the path they are on?

    3. The frustration of getting clear direction from their local regional council who aren't getting clear direction from the central government so it stifles farmers appetite in investing in environmental work with a lack of security of the direction.

    4. The leading farmers will pave the way to pull the laggard farmers up but not all farmers are in the financial position to achieve the Ministry's gold standard and it will take a decade of actions to sustainably fund it within the cost structures of farming the way they are.

    5. They have recently formed the Mangonuku Catchment Group and have shared goals that every landowner can get in behind and believe it's the best forum for getting useable data for change as well as the support needed.

    6. Hugh discusses the changes he's implemented such as direct drilling, catch crops and nutrient management and how to make more from less.

    7. What does "fit-for-purpose" really mean when the freshwater farm plans aren't thinking about the whole integrated approach to make it sustainable to work.

    8. Grant learns that not everyone from Wellington doesn't listen, and really excels in explaining his farming system and environmental actions actually out on his farm.

    9. Better understanding needs to be taken into account through true farmer consultation, not hand-picking a panel based on the outcome you have already

    10. If you stifle innovation you won't get the desired outcome all because the government want change to happen too fast, otherwise the leading farmers will sell to pine trees.

    LINKS

    Learn more about Freshwater Farm Plans

    This episode is the first in a new weekly series for 2022 on Sarah's Country 'Table Swap' out discussing the big issues facing New Zealand's primary sector around farmers kitchen tables working on ways to move forward collectively.

    CLICK HERE TO ENTER THE FEBRUARY PRIZE DRAW! WIN ONE OF THREE PREMIUM PASSES TO THE FARMAX CONFERENCE (9th & 10th March 2022) complete with a Farmax subscription (valued at $200)!

  • With so much concern circling around the consultation on the alternative pricing options for New Zealand's greenhouse gas tax/levy (call it what you wish!), we break down the reality of the challenge with our esteemed guests on the first in our weekly panel, "Tell us what you really think!".

    Agricultural economist, Phil Journeaux, and rural commentator and former agriculture professor, Keith Woodford, have a candid discussion with host, Sarah Perriam on how pastoral livestock farming would look if its 5% carbon emissions were taxed under the Emissions Trading Scheme.

    "We have huge change occurring and the rules are getting put in place now and farmers don't understand the long-term impact," stresses Keith Woodford.

    LINKS

    Learn more about He Waka Eke Noa

    Download the consultation document (PDF, 4.8 MB).

    Attend a roadshow throughout February on the options developed by the He Waka Eke Noa partnership as alternatives to the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS).

    LATEST UPDATE

    The consultation will now close in late March 2022 and the He Waka Eke Noa Partnership will report its recommendations to Ministers by 31 May 2022 (rather than 30 April 2022).

    This episode is the first in a new weekly series for 2022 on Sarah's Country 'Tell us what you really think! hosting the opinions of those involved intimately with some of the big issues facing New Zealand's primary sector.

    CLICK HERE TO ENTER THE FEBRUARY PRIZE DRAW! WIN ONE OF THREE PREMIUM PASSES TO THE FARMAX CONFERENCE (9th & 10th March 2022) complete with a Farmax subscription (valued at $200)!

  • High-value crops are often discussed on Sarah's Country as the potential to return more to farmers from fewer inputs. Whilst the industry for hemp seed and oil is becoming more established in New Zealand, the agronomic and market development for fibre has a way to go.

    In late December 2022, NZ Natural Fibres (co-owned by Carrfields NZ & Hemp NZ) received a $3.2million Sustainable Food & Fibre Futures Fund to develop its hemp growing, processing and marketing capability to“go further, faster” towards taking a global leadership position in the development of industrial and consumer products made from hemp fibre.

    "Once you get past wool-hemp hybrid yarns there's smart fibres such as carbon fibre in high-performance sport equipment, satelittes or America's Cup boats and even using hemp for carbon storage like batteries," - Colin McKenzie, CEO, NZ Natural Fibres.

    Carrfields was originally approached by Hemp NZ when they were looking for a factory to process the hemp fibre and the partnership was born with Carrfields contracting history and field experience with growing specialty crops.

    "It grows very quickly in a short amount of time so it might have less fertiliser requirements than other crops and oftern fertiliser can be quite a large part of a crop's carbon emissions," - Travis Ryan-Salter, Senior Research Officer, Carrfields.

    links

    Learn more about NZ Natural Fibres

    MPI backs project to establish internationally competitive hemp seed processing plant (MPI.govt.nz)

    Agricultural firms team up to make wool and hemp blended products (Stuff.co.nz)

    This episode is the first in a new weekly series for 2022 on Sarah's Country 'Shaping our future' where we help New Zealand farmers & growers navigate the big issues to be more prepared for the challenges and opportunities ahead!

    FEBRUARY PRIZE DRAW! WIN ONE OF THREE PREMIUM PASSES TO THE FARMAX CONFERENCE (9th & 10th March 2022) complete with a Farmax subscription valued at $200:

    https://www.sarahscountry.com/articles/win-farmax

  • The best way to kick back into gear for 2022 is of course with the chunkiest talking point in smoko rooms, dairy sheds and board tables in the primary sector "What is He Waka Eke Noa and why should I care?"

    With the stresses in the face of Omicron affecting processing plants, tractors parked up waiting for the deluge of rain to bugger off to harvest crops it may seem too hard to wrap your head around another complicated pressure.

    "Doing nothing is not an option, so I've created a whole episode for you to understand what it means for you," - Sarah Perriam, host Sarah's Country.

    New Zealand's agriculture emissions will be in the ETS regardless, but how is still up for discussion. However, we are short on time with feedback to the Minister's presented by the partnership in May 2022.

    This is a massive deal for our & the next generation as we determine how New Zealand’s agriculture sector can balance pastoral farming's financial viability let alone survival in the face of pines towards 2050 whilst paying our fair share for greenhouse gas emissions.

    "As a sector, we have to accept our emissions, reduce and adapt. Otherwise, farming is in ETS and the cost of it will be out of our control," - Jim van der Poel, Dairy NZ Chair

    IN THIS EPISODE

    He Waka Eke Noa is a partnership with industry, Māori and Government. It's the largest pan-sector collaboration in history with negotiations spanning 2 years.

    In this episode, Sarah Perriam breaks this down with:

    - Kelly Forster, Director of He Waka Eke Noa

    - Andrew Morrison, Chair of Beef + Lamb NZ

    - Sirma Karapeeva, CEO Meat Industry Association

    - Jim van der Poel, Chair Dairy NZ

    - Innes Moffat, CEO Deer Industry NZ

    - Anna Heslop, Communications Manager, Foundation for Arable Research

    LINKS

    Learn more about He Waka Eke Noa

    Download the consultation document (PDF, 4.8 MB).

    Attend a roadshow throughout February on the options developed by the He Waka Eke Noa partnership as alternatives to the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS).

    LATEST UPDATE

    The consultation will now close in late March 2022 and the He Waka Eke Noa Partnership will report its recommendations to Ministers by 31 May 2022 (rather than 30 April 2022).

  • The angst and noise of 2021 have led to a division in New Zealand's primary sector.

    However, the division appears to come down to whether farmers & growers are in the camp of a mindset that is optimistic, open-minded to change and unfearful of the future. Or not.

    "Positivity doesn't mean your ignoring life's stress, you're just approaching hardship in a productive way," explains Dana Muir, Head of Natural Capital, BNZ.

    As the last Sarah's Country Sister for the year, Dana Muir, Head of Natural Capital at BNZ, explains how the New Zealand farmers & growers focused on the megatrends of our global consumers are well advanced to be successful, future-fit businessmen and women.

    And there may be more of them than you realise!

    BNZ's 'Shift Happens' survey shows that 53% of farmers & growers feel that the changing landscape of the primary sector was an "opportunity for their business".

    Also, 42% of farmers & growers said they "would diversify their land use to meet consumer expectations", but the majority of those surveyed do believe that the pace of regulations pace is too fast.

    Dana explains that regulations appear to be merely aligned to megatrends globally as well as corporates rising demand of ESG (Environmental, Social & Governance) considerations in their decision making of the sourcing of their products in their supply chain.

    She urges that farm environment plans & emission reduction plans will help our farmers & growers tell a better story of the food & fibre from their farms.

    Sustainability-linked loans that BNZ pioneered with Southern Pastures can help incentive change and support farmers & growers with the right tools to be more ambitious than regulation.

    The rise of the conscious investor has seen the global market for sustainable investing in 2021 surge from USD $50 billion in Q1 2021 to USD $150 billion by Q4 2021.

    BNZ aspires to have $10 billion of sustainability linked loans by 2025.

    __________________________

    "Have a wonderful, well-deserved break! Set your sights on a prosperous 2022 where we can continue to be defiantly hopeful. Let's strive for more than the bare minimum of what is required of us to get ahead of the global signals. Thank you for being a valued member of Sarah's Country's community with record listenership in 2021, and I value your continued support more than you will ever know!! Merry Christmas" - Sarah Perriam

  • When the directive from global food giants, such as Danone and Nestle pledges to source nearly a quarter of their milk globally from regenerative dairy farms by 2025, you pay attention.

    Announced this week was a unique partnership between Synlait Milk and Danone, AgResearch and the Ministry for Primary Industries' (MPI) Sustainable Food and Fibre Futures Fund to study soil health between conventional and regenerative practices on 10 farms in Waikato, Canterbury & Otago over five years.

    This week's Change Maker, Hamish Reid, Head of Sustainability & Brand at Synlait says we will achieve added value by profiting from purpose and regenerative meet our consumer's demands.

    Thanks to our partners at Farmlands for supporting Sarah's Country this season.

  • The one thing this current government has given us is a lot to talk about in rural media!

    Recorded on the Saturday prior to the Groundswell protest, ACT Party Leader David Seymour joined Sarah to discuss a wide range of government policy that is overwhelming the primary sector that has seen them take to the streets in their tractors.

    They discuss the sector's representation in Wellington, hate speech by politicians towards farmers to Rogernomics.

    Sarah has an entertaining one-hour chat with the ACT Party leader's stance on the RMA, the Zero Carbon Act through to Mental Health and pine trees.

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands Co-Operative for partnering with Sarah's Country this season!

  • As the COP26 Climate Change Summit has concluded, a serendipitous scientific finding at Lincoln University virtually eliminates the methane emitted from effluent ponds and if uptook by 2030 will half dairy's emmission targets.

    As this week's Sarah's Country Change Maker, Mike Manning, General Manager Innovation and Strategy at Ravensdown, explains the breakthrough discovery of the EcoPond system to target methane with an additive normally used in the treatment of drinking water.

    Nearly all dairy farms use effluent ponds and they are the second-largest source of on-farm methane emissions. An average NZ dairy farm of around 400 cows that installed EcoPond could cut total farm methane emissions by about 4 to 5%, depending on the individual farm.

    They also found that EcoPond reduced the risk of Dissolved Reactive Phosphate loss to water by up to 99% meaning that this essential nutrient can be recycled with reduced risk of water contamination. The EcoPond system also strips out E.coli so that the dairy effluent is much safer to irrigate to pasture.

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands Co-Operative for partnering with Sarah's Country this season!

  • What led me to Sue was a string of fate, and now I want to share her with the world as this week's Sarah's Country Sister.

    Sue McGaw is a specialist native plant consultant from North Canterbury who works with farmers to design their riparian plantings into biodiversity nodes to ensure 99% success rate, all year round bird feed, resilence from pests, weeds, droughts, and floods and Rongoā Māori, the traditional healing properties.

    At 63 years old, after 25 years of landscape design, Sue's imposter syndrome that she no one would listen to her without a Master's she embarked on completing in Ecology.

    Sue's lifelong mission is to pass on her knowledge to catchment groups and farmers to get it right the first time and not just plant what you like the look of!

    To connect with Sue feel free to email her, [email protected]

  • We are excited for you to meet the three emerging food and fibre sector leaders who have been awarded the 2022 Nuffield New Zealand Farming Scholarships.

    This group comes from the most diverse range of backgrounds we have seen in recent times and each of the scholars brings talent, passion, perspective, and a track record of performance.

    Covid 19 restrictions mean this year’s scholarship recipients’ formal awards ceremony at Parliament, will be delayed until February 2022, when Minister O’Connor will award the scholarships in person.

    In this episode, you will meet the 2022 Nuffield New Zealand Farming Scholarship recipients along with CEO for the New Zealand Rural Leadership Trust (NZRLT), Chris Parsons as this week's Change Makers.

    Parmindar Singh, a Waikato based Dairy Farm Manager, Company Director, and recent master’s graduate.

    Anthony Taueki, a horticulturalist from Hawke’s Bay, Tū Te Wana Kaiako at Fruition Horticulture, and a Councillor for the Youth Food and Fibre Network.

    Completing the trio is Wellington-based Lucie Douma, Principal Adviser for the Ministry for Primary Industries. Lucie is a master’s graduate from Oxford’s Mansfield College and

    from a Southland farming background along with CEO of Rural Leaders, Chris Parsons.

    For more on the 2022 Value Chain Innovation Programme:

    Rural Leaders have made the decision to shift the Value Chain Innovation Programme date from Mid-January to May next year.

    For more information on the programme and how to apply: https://ruralleaders.co.nz/value-chain/

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands Co-Operative for partnering with Sarah's Country this season

  • Brave leadership has been a fabric of our primary sector for the past century and now is a time to continue that attitude in the face of what many think is just a New Zealand government challenge when our farming cousins around the world are facing the same challenges.

    Science entrepreneur and agri-business commentator, Anna Campbell, is walking the talk transitioning from AbacusBio, a highly respected science, and technology firm operating from offices in Dunedin and Rotorua New Zealand, and Edinburgh, United Kingdom, to co-founding natural health business, Zestt Wellness, to support immunity and improve lung health.

    As this week's Sarah's Country Sisters, Anna and Sarah discuss:

    - Her opinion's on New Zealand food & fibre's science commercialization moving to private equity and offshore capital markets.

    - Her empathy attending the last farmer protest with her farming mum and her son of agriculturalists turned off a career in the sector along with the international animal scientists saying they feel they will be the last generation, the pressures on the livestock industry is a global challenge.

    - The opportunities for New Zealand's natural health products from plants are being hindered by our antiquated regulation and international scientific collaboration.

    - Her advice on women leadership in the sector by men leading that change by opening doors and taking women seriously, as well as women deepening their networks with other women.

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands Co-Operative for partnering with Sarah's Country this season.

  • Brave leadership has been a fabric of our primary sector for the past century and now is a time to continue that attitude in the face of what many think is just a New Zealand government challenge when our farming cousins around the world are facing the same challenges.

    Science entrepreneur and agri-business commentator, Anna Campbell, is walking the talk transitioning from AbacusBio, a highly respected science, and technology firm operating from offices in Dunedin and Rotorua New Zealand, and Edinburgh, United Kingdom, to co-founding natural health business, Zestt Wellness, to support immunity and improve lung health.

    As this week's Sarah's Country Sisters, Anna and Sarah discuss:

    - Her opinion's on New Zealand food & fibre's science commercialization moving to private equity and offshore capital markets.

    - Her empathy attending the last farmer protest with her farming mum and her son of agriculturalists turned off a career in the sector along with the international animal scientists saying they feel they will be the last generation, the pressures on the livestock industry is a global challenge.

    - The opportunities for New Zealand's natural health products from plants are being hindered by our antiquated regulation and international scientific collaboration.

    - Her advice on women leadership in the sector by men leading that change by opening doors and taking women seriously, as well as women deepening their networks with other women.

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands Co-Operative for partnering with Sarah's Country this season.