Episodi

  • Could giving up alcohol really change your life? Whilst some of us may currently be alcohol free for Dry January, many of us have haven’t given our drinking habits much thought. We often look at improving our diet and moving more but is alcohol the elephant in the room that could be holding us back?

    Feel Better Live More Bitesize is my new weekly podcast for your mind, body and heart. Each week I’ll be featuring inspirational stories and practical tips from some of my former guests.

    Today’s guest is performance coach and author Andy Ramage. Andy is co-founder of the habit-changing program One Year No Beer that invites people to try 28, 90 or 365 days alcohol free. He believes it’s possible to become the most productive, present and healthiest version of yourself just by making this one change.

    We discuss how alcohol is linked to many parts of our lives and why Andy described himself as a ‘middle lane drinker’ before he gave up alcohol 6 years ago. He explains why taking a tactical break from alcohol could bring a surprising host of benefits and how his own experience changed his life.

    Andy believes the greatest discovery you'll ever make is your authentic self and that by removing alcohol you allow yourself the chance to be you again. 

    What could be more powerful than that?

    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/85

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. 

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Improving the quality of our sleep is arguably the single most effective thing that we can do to reset our brains and recharge our bodies, yet many of us just aren’t getting enough. But what is the optimal amount of sleep and what can we do if we struggle to get enough? I’m delighted to welcome back onto the podcast the world-leading sleep researcher, Professor Matthew Walker to answer these questions and more. Matthew is author of the international best-selling book ‘Why We Sleep’, Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology at the University of California and a fountain of knowledge when it comes to all things sleep.

    My last conversation with Matthew back on episode 70 of the podcast was one of the most popular to date. A few months ago, I asked my podcast listeners to let me know what further questions they would like Matthew to answer and in this conversation, I put some of those questions to him.

    We cover how many of us feel that we don’t have enough time to sleep for 7-9 hours but how rather than stealing time from us, getting more sleep can actually make us more productive. And even grabbing an extra 15 minutes of sleep a day will have benefits for our overall healthspan. Matthew shares some brilliant tips on how we can regain control of our sleep and for those who are really struggling, he explains that there is an alternative to sleeping pills that is just as effective in the short term, but much more effective long term.

    We cover so much ground in this conversation, including polyphasic sleep (sleeping for periods of time throughout the day), unbroken sleep and why lying awake in bed for long periods of time can affect our ability to sleep in the future. Matthew shares the fascinating and dramatic changes that have occurred in the way we sleep and dream following the coronavirus pandemic and why it has allowed what he calls “the revenge of the night owls.”

    We delve into REM sleep and how it is one of the best forms of therapy – the brain can literally re-wire negative memories when we sleep. Finally, we cover sleep trackers, caffeine and how sleep impacts our immunity. This really is a fascinating conversation, full of fresh insights and actionable tips that we can all put into practice today. I hope you enjoy listening.

    Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/147

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. 

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Episodi mancanti?

    Fai clic qui per aggiornare il feed.

  • The start of a new year is the time many of us look to make changes in our lives, incorporating healthy habits and removing unhelpful ones. Feel Better Live More Bitesize is my new weekly podcast for your mind, body and heart. Each week I’ll be featuring inspirational stories and practical tips from some of my former guests.

    This week’s guest is Professor BJ Fogg, a leading expert in behaviour change Methods for building habits have often focussed on repetition, willpower and motivation. BJ believes there’s a simpler approach. Habit formation is linked to our emotions and by creating a feeling of success we can wire in a habit. We discuss my own experience with patients as well as the results he has seen with his own program.

    Finally, BJ reveals how easy it is to form new habits by using his 3-step method. When you do something and feel successful, that behaviour becomes more automatic. Feeling good can be the key to forming new healthy habits that last a lifetime……

    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/108

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. 

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Do you believe habits are ‘good’ or ‘bad’? Are you constantly trying to create better habits and quit those that don’t serve you? Today’s guest has insights that will help get your 2021 off to a great start by truly understanding what habits are – and how to optimise them.

    James Clear is an entrepreneur and New York Times best-selling author of Atomic Habits a handbook for anyone who wants to finally get to grips with successful behaviour change. He shares his learnings via his hugely popular newsletters, to help people use the psychology of habit formation to live healthier, fuller lives.

    We talk about ‘designing your environment’, building a tribe around you who support what you want to achieve and finding the path of least resistance to what you want to do. When it comes to good versus bad habits, James says it’s more about which are effective – are they serving you?

    We also discuss how true behaviour change is really identity change. Every action you take towards your goal is a vote for the person you wish to become. You’re no longer that someone who tries to go for a run three times a week, you’re a runner. James says we can all begin by asking ourselves ‘Who do I want to become?’ then looking at what habits we might need to build that identity.

    This is such a useful conversation, packed with practical tips, and I think it’s a great way to kick off the year. I know you’re going to feel fired up to seek out your new identity once you listen. 

    Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/145

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. 

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Today’s conversation will stop you in your tracks. It’s powerful, confronting and challenging and I am so grateful for my guest’s honesty, empathy and willingness to share the wisdom of her 93 years. Dr Edith Eger is a Holocaust survivor, psychologist and expert in the treatment of post-traumatic stress but above all, she’s an incredible human being with an extraordinary story to share. Her latest book, The Gift: 12 Lessons to Save Your Life, is quite simply a phenomenal read and in my view a must-read for all of us.

    As a Jew living in Eastern Europe under Nazi occupation, Edith was taken to Auschwitz concentration camp with her parents and sister, at the age of 16. She explains how she found her inner resources, how she came to view her guards as the real prisoners, turn hate into pity and, incredibly, she even describes her horrific experience as ‘an opportunity’. She has liberated herself from the prison of her past through forgiveness.

    I’m acutely aware that for many of us listening, myself included, it’s hard to put our own problems alongside anything Edith has faced. Which makes her teaching that, ‘There’s no hierarchy in trauma’ all the more beautiful. Edith is not here to make us put our own suffering into perspective and overcome it. Rather, she explains, we can learn to come to terms with pain, reframe it and become stronger.

    We cover so many different topics in this conversation, from parenting and relationship wisdom to insights on semantics and depression. Edith’s message to us is that we can change the thoughts and behaviours that are keeping us imprisoned in the past. I felt grateful and humbled to have had the opportunity to speak to Edith and the conversation really changed me. I hope you get as much out of it as I did.

    Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/144

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. 

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • CAUTION ADVISED: this podcast contains mild swearing and themes of an adult nature.

    Final episode of 2020 - It’s that time of the year again when the mics are turned and it’s me in the hot seat. Today, I sit down with colleague and close friend, Dr Ayan Panja and reflect on the past year.

    For me, 2020 has been a year of great introspection during which I have reflected upon my values and the definition of success – what does success really mean? We discuss how I believe that one of the most important things we can all do, is find out what success means to us. Otherwise, we can end up rushing around, trying to do more in order to live up to an idea of success that society has defined for us.

    Authenticity is a topic that has been spoken about a lot on the podcast this year and has been at the forefront of my mind and we discuss how I have been striving to put this at the heart of everything I do both personally and professionally. A huge part of my working week is dedicated to this podcast and we chat about some of my favourite and most impactful episodes of the year.

    As you may know, I have also spent a large part of this year writing my brand-new book, Feel Great, Lose Weight and we talk about why I decided to write this book and how I hope that it will help me in my mission to improve the lives of 100 million people.

    This is such a wide-ranging conversation, but at its core this is simply a raw and authentic interaction between two very good friends. I hope you enjoy it.

    Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/143

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. 

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • This is a very special end of year episode that I hope serves as a celebration of the conversations I have had on the podcast this year. My team and I have put together some of the very best ideas shared on my show which I believe, if you start implementing, will immediately start to transform your health and happiness.

    The central theme is looking after our minds, which has never been more important. Whether it be controlling our reaction to stressors, managing anxiety, spending time alone with our thoughts OR cultivating resilience and learning to be more present: this special episode will help you on your journey to become your true, authentic self.

    We’ll hear:

    Rich Roll on the importance of having time alone with our thoughts and why we need discomfort in order to grow.

    Jay Shetty explaining why so many of us these days are not living lives that are truly ours.

    Tom Bilyeu discusses identity, how to become resilient and how to view criticism as a gift.

    England Football Team Psychologist Pippa Grange shares her belief that most of us are performing at life not living it. She explains why we should stop holding back, put fear aside and allow ourselves to live the life we want to live.

    Brian MacKenzie reveals how we can use the power of our breath to become more present and help counteract the constant stimulus of modern-day life.

    James Nestor explains why the way we breathe is so important for the health of our body and for the health of our mind.

    Psychotherapist Julia Samuel talks about the many ‘living losses’ we are experiencing through the pandemic and that how we respond to change, in many ways, determines how our lives will unfold.

    And finally Peter Crone - AKA The Mind Architect - explains why we all need to slow down in order to find true happiness in our lives.

    This is a powerful episode that I really enjoyed listening back to - I think you will too!

    Show notes and the full podcasts are available at drchatterjee.com/142

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. 

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sleep is one of the most important pillars of health. Our bodies and our brains are designed to function during the day and rest at night.

    Feel Better Live More Bitesize is my new weekly podcast for your mind, body and heart. Each week I’ll be featuring inspirational stories and practical tips from some of my former guests.

    This week’s guest is award-winning journalist, Linda Geddes.

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hour cycles that are kept in time by light and dark cycles. These rhythms can become disrupted by changing our exposure to light which can affect our sleep and make us feel sluggish during the day.

    Exposure to bright light after sunset is a modern phenomenon. Darkness is a signal to our bodies that it’s time to rest and access to bright light and screens at night disrupts these signals.

    There are simple things that we can do to help reset our circadian rhythms. Linda shares the findings of her own experiment of getting rid of light at night in her own home.

    Finally, she gives her tips on what we can all do to get more light into our days and darken our nights.

    Access to sunlight, even in winter, is crucial for living a happy and fulfilling life. I hope you feel inspired to get outside!

    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/77

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. 

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Today’s guest joins me fresh from a run of autumn camps with the England football team. He’s their manager, Gareth Southgate OBE, and I speak to him about his new book, Anything Is Possible. It’s not really a football memoir, but more a guide to life and there are brilliant lessons for all of us in there – non-football fans included!

    Gareth had an illustrious career as a professional football player in the 1990s and as England manager, took the England team to the semi-finals of the 2018 FIFA World Cup for the first time in 28 years. We discuss how Gareth achieved this by employing psychologists (such as my former guest Pippa Grange), modelling emotional intelligence and communicating with each player as an individual. He promotes a mindset of positive drivers not negative drivers: focusing on what players might achieve, rather than what might go wrong. Most importantly, he reinstated a sense of fun. I love his humble, warm, inclusive approach. Under his watch, footballers have started to look more like role models again.

    Gareth explains how he used to be a shy teenage player and with his book, he aims to help youngsters get over self-limiting beliefs, nerves and anxieties and learn to be brave – and he shares some great dressing-room stories with me as examples. It may be written for children and young people, with Gareth’s role as ambassador for The Prince’s Trust in mind, but it contains universal wisdom for all ages.

    I had so much to ask him, and we managed to cover topics from how players cope without a crowd, to how he breaks the news when someone’s not made the team and the real meaning of bravery. We talk about the pressures on players from social media but also how it can be a force for good, helping Raheem Stirling and Marcus Rashford change attitudes and lives through their respective campaigns against racism and childhood hunger.

    I can’t emphasise enough that you don’t need to be into football to appreciate this conversation. It’s about having confidence, working hard, taking responsibility and being authentic. It was such an honour to speak with Gareth and he’s certainly reignited my love of the beautiful game. I can’t help but agree with him that when we come together in a positive way over sport, it has the potential to change the world. I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did.

    Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/140

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • CAUTION ADVISED: this podcast contains swearing.

    Our subconscious mind can control our behaviours and thoughts, creating negative thought patterns and limiting beliefs.

    This week’s Feel Better Live More Bitesize guest is writer, speaker and thought leader in human potential, Peter Crone, a.k.a The Mind Architect.

    Peter explains that we can’t create the life of someone that we don’t yet believe ourselves to be and in order to do this we need to stop looking back at history we can’t change and start looking forwards. We all have the power to break free from the limitations of our subconscious in order to free our mind and start living the life we were born to live.

    Peter believes that with the right mindset and approach to life we can start to experience true freedom and happiness. And who wouldn’t want that?

    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/82

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. 

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Today's conversation is about one of my favourite topics – compassion. Compassion doesn’t just make us feel good but it can have powerful effects on our health and longevity. That’s something today’s guest has proved to great effect. Dr Julian Abel is a recently retired consultant in palliative (end of life) care and joint leader of the Frome Project, which aimed to end loneliness and improve health in a town in Somerset, by building community connections. In providing compassionate alternatives to medical intervention, Frome saw emergency hospital admissions drop by 30 per cent along with improved quality of life scores, health outcomes and costs.

    In this conversation Julian shares the evidence behind using compassion as a therapeutic tool, explaining that good social relationships are more powerful than pretty much any other intervention we have, including giving up smoking, drinking, diet, or exercise in helping us live longer. Compassion is far from the soft approach, it is in fact more powerful than many of the medicines we have.

    Julian also talks about his own experience as a palliative care doctor and the lessons he learned from people at the end of their lives. He shares many uplifting and empowering stories that will convince even the biggest skeptic that compassion and connection should be at the centre of everything we do – after all, it is what makes us uniquely human.

    Show notes available at https://drchatterjee.com/138

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Imagine if you could reverse ageing and cognitive decline and improve your brain health purely through your mindset and approach to life.

    Feel Better Live More Bitesize is my new weekly podcast for your mind, body and heart. Each week I’ll be featuring inspirational stories and practical tips from some of my former guests.

    This week’s guest is Daniel Levitin, a neuroscientist, cognitive psychologist and bestselling author. He explains why what we do day-to-day affects not just our short-term health, but also how our brain changes with age.

    Daniel describes 3 personality traits, or mindsets, that are the key ingredient to longterm health and happiness. By cultivating a mindset of conscientiousness, curiosity & gratitude we can slow the ageing process.

    These are simple and fun things we can do now to live a live a healthy and fulfilling life both today and into our old age.

    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/112

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. 

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In times of uncertainty, anxiety and stress, taking care of your wellbeing is more important than ever and no one knows this better than my guest on today’s episode. Arianna Huffington is author and businesswoman who founded the original ‘internet newspaper’, The Huffington Post. She’s also one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World and on Forbes’ Most Powerful Women list.

    After collapsing at her desk from sleep deprivation and exhaustion in 2007, Arianna became more passionate about the connection between wellbeing and performance. She therefore launched a company called Thrive Global with a mission of ending the stress and burnout epidemic by offering individuals, companies and communities sustainable, science-based solutions to wellbeing.

    Arianna and I share a desire to show millions of people globally that habit change and healthy living doesn’t have to be hard. We are both passionate that tiny ‘microsteps’ that we can all take each day, can have a dramatic impact on our health and the quality of our lives.

    Arianna talks me through her Thrive app, which is like a ‘health coach in your pocket’ and how it uses the concept of ‘microsteps’ to show that behaviour change doesn’t have to be a huge commitment. Small things you can do that, if regular and consistent, will add up to significant and lasting benefits.

    We discuss the idea of ‘compassionate directness’ as a way of resolving tensions both at home and at work. Arianna shares her wisdom on sleep, motherhood, on creating boundaries when working from home, and on having rituals to mark the end of the day. We also speak about the importance of solitude and discuss how modern life is sending many of us back to ancient wisdom and texts such as the Bhagavad Gita.

    This conversation is full of brilliant tips and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. 

    Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/136

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The power to achieve anything you want in life is within you - whether it’s improving your health, starting a business or getting a relationship back on track.

    Feel Better Live More Bitesize is my new weekly podcast for your mind, body and heart. Each week I’ll be featuring inspirational stories and practical tips from some of my former guests.

    This week’s guest is Marie Forleo, a US entrepreneur, writer, philanthropist and an unshakeable optimist.

    Marie explains why a growth mindset is so important and how comparing ourselves to the curated lives of others online can be toxic. She suggests practical ways we can counteract this by choosing to create before we consume.

    Marie has interviewed many successful and influential people and she reveals the one thing that they all have in common.

    She believes you should do everything you can to follow your dreams. Your contribution and voice matter and your gift is unique - there never has been or ever will be another you.

    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/86

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.  

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • CAUTION ADVISED: this podcast contains swearing.

    When I started these podcasts, back in January 2018, my aim was to connect with people who had new and exciting views on how we can feel better and get more out of life. Little did I know that would lead me to today’s episode, where I chat to one of the world’s most famous Hollywood actors.

    Matthew McConaughey might not immediately spring to mind as a self-help guru. Yet for his 2014 Oscar acceptance speech he memorably shared some of the tenets by which he lives his life and to which he owes his success. And Matthew now shares his wisdom in his new book, ‘Greenlights: Raucous stories and outlaw wisdom’, which has already become a bestseller all over the globe. Based on the journals he’s kept since he was a teenager, it’s part autobiography, part guide to living – and 100 per cent inspiration.

    I was so pleased to learn Matthew wanted to come on the podcast and was prepared to give me 90 minutes of his time, something almost unheard of in stars of his magnitude. But as you’ll hear in this episode, Matthew isn’t your typical movie star.

    Authenticity is very important to Matthew, as is his quest to, in his words, “Be more me.” And that starts with eliminating what is not you. In Matthew’s own life, key examples include his decision to leave law school and become an actor, and later to turn down vast sums of money to leave the rom-com genre behind. Whilst he acknowledges the financial privilege that allowed him to take these risks, his lesson is about being true to yourself and your values, which is relevant for all of us. He says we should make sure we are feeding our soul account as well as our bank account, investing spiritually as well as financially.

    We cover so many topics during this entertaining chat, from our favourite U2 album to the current state of society as well as the incredible value of journaling. Whilst Matthew’s approach isn’t to give advice, there’s plenty of wisdom in the colourful stories and examples from his life that he shares. The beautiful thing about living, he says, is that you’re the author of your life’s story. So be cool to your future self. That’s some pretty awesome A-list advice I think we can all benefit from.

    Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/134

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Every act of kindness is significant and has more impact than you can imagine.

    Feel Better Live More Bitesize is my new weekly podcast for your mind, body and heart. Each week I’ll be featuring inspirational stories and practical tips from some of my best former guests. This week’s guest is pharmacist-turned-author Dr David Hamilton.

    David explains why kindness is contagious and how just one small act of kindness is proven to have a ripple effect that reaches over 100 more people.

    When you’re kind to someone, it’s not just that person who benefits. Kindness makes you happier. It’s good for your heart and helps support your immune system. It slows ageing and it also improves relationships. He explains why your kindness matters and how you can take up the 7 Day Kindness Challenge. Kindness is important now more than ever – let’s help it spread.

    Show notes and the full podcast are available at drchatterjee.com/104

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website. 

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Do you find it hard to resist the ping of a new email, the urge to scroll on social media, or watch the next episode when streaming? Do you wish you could stop checking, clicking, liking and sharing? Then put down your phone and listen to this episode.

    My guest today is Adam Alter, an associate professor of marketing and psychology, bestselling author of ‘Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and The Business of Keeping Us Hooked’ and an expert on the compulsive nature of technology. Adam explains how tech companies make it their business to know exactly how to keep us engaged for hours on end. He shares some of the hooks embedded in products to ‘catch’ us, such as variable reinforcement (those likes and shares on social media), goals and rewards, and a lack of stopping cues (there’s always another video cued up, another game level to play…). And how do they know all these techniques work? Big data. They simply look at what makes us click.

    Tech giants prey on our capacity for ‘behavioural addiction’, which like other addictions can undermine our mental health and relationships. Playing with a phone is not just trivial distraction it can have real consequences, especially for our children – something that as a parent really concerns me. Adam suggests we should be teaching our kids ‘digital hygiene’ in schools and I couldn’t agree more.

    Of course, there are many positive uses of tech, like education, admin, communicating with loved ones we can’t see in person. But when screen time starts to harm our wellbeing, Adam says we need to look at what psychological needs it’s meeting. What’s lacking in our lives that leads us to numb the discomfort by picking up that phone or tablet?

    But it’s not all doom and gloom. Adam says, it is possible to live a rich, meaningful, healthy life in our tech-driven age. And we discuss some of the solutions we’re both using to wean ourselves and our families off screens. We agree it’s about intention, using tech where we need and enjoy it, but making a conscious decision to do without it at other times. Starting with an hour or two a day when you put your phone out of sight is a great example.

    If, like me, you’ve recently watched The Social Dilemma, Netflix’s fascinating (and scary) take on persuasive technologies and surveillance capitalism, I think you’ll really appreciate Adam’s insights – and his reassurance that tech addiction is not a human failing. 

    Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/132

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • It’s a bold claim: that (almost) everything you’ve been told about food is wrong. But by the end of today’s conversation, I think you’ll be questioning what you previously thought was true and embarking on a new way of eating that’s right for you.

    My guest, Tim Spector, is a Professor of Genetic Epidemiology and Head of the Department of Twin Research at King’s College London. He’s a leading expert on the gut microbiome whose work has transformed what we know about nutrition and health.

    Tim’s latest work highlights how much we really don’t know about food. Aside from the consensus that plant foods are good for us, ultra-processed junk foods are not, there’s very little evidence or expert agreement on anything else. So there’s most definitely not a one-size-fits-all ‘correct’ way to eat.

    During our chat we cover calorie counting, artificial sweeteners, the dangers of ultra-processed foods and how poor science lets the food industry maintain that its products are healthy, simply because they’ve not been proven to be harmful. We discuss the benefits of fasting, and the perception that you need to graze all day. The diet industry perpetuates the myth that if we don’t have a snack to hand at all times, we’ll have an energy dip, lack focus and we might even faint! For most of us, it’s actually the reverse that’s true.

    With this in mind, we agree that nutrition should be at the heart of the curriculum in schools. Our children can cope at school without mid-morning and afternoon snacks. I share Tim’s passion that we should be teaching our children how to recognise real versus fake food with the same enthusiasm that we teach them to read and write.

    I find the concept of personalised nutrition hugely empowering. As Tim states in his most recent book, ‘You are very unlikely to be average’. I’ve seen it first-hand with my patients, many of whom respond completely differently to the same ways of eating. It’s why I describe my approach as ‘diet agnostic’ and, like Tim, I’d actively encourage you to start experimenting with what, how and when you eat. I hope this conversation inspires you to explore what makes you thrive. 

    Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/131

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • My goal with the podcast is to have conversations that matter. And as part of that process, I want to push and challenge myself, and by doing so, hopefully do the same for you. Today's guest is someone who entirely fits the bill. It is the one and only Dr. Deepak Chopra.

    Deepak is a medical doctor, a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine and personal transformation and Time magazine has described him as ‘one of the top 100 heroes and icons of the century’. He recently published his 91st book called ‘Total Meditation’, which offers an exploration of the physical, mental and spiritual benefits that a practice of meditation can bring.

    In our conversation today, we touch on a whole variety of different subjects, including the problem of instant gratification. We delve into how much of what we do and think is influenced by those around us. Many of us as we get older, or even in response to challenging life circumstances, whether it be grief, loss or heartache, are grappling with the eternal existential questions – Who am I? And why am I here? Deepak provides some really practical tools to help us answer these questions for ourselves. And he also shares some tried and tested techniques to help us get started with meditation.

    Deepak believes that most of us sleep walk through life and are not in control of our thoughts and feelings. The underlying theme throughout this conversation is how we can wake up to our full potential by accessing new levels of awareness that will ultimately cultivate a clear vision and help us rediscover who we really are. I found this conversation stimulating and felt my mind very much expanded afterwards. I hope it does the same for you. 

    Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/130

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Women's brain health remains one of the most under researched, under diagnosed and under undertreated fields of medicine. Women are twice as likely as men to develop Alzheimer’s and twice as likely to become anxious or depressed. They are four times more likely to suffer with headaches and migraines and they are more prone to brain tumours and strokes than men. Today’s guest says this is a clear indication of functional differences between female and male brains. And she’s made it her life’s work to learn more about it.

    Neuroscientist Dr Lisa Mosconi is director of the Women’s Brain Initiative and works at the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medical College, US, where she studies how genetics, lifestyle and nutrition shape brain health, particularly in women.

    Lisa describes her frustration at constantly being told by peers that the reason Alzheimer’s was more prevalent in women was simply because they live longer, and it’s a disease of ageing. We discuss her ground-breaking research that has exposed this bias, finding dementia brain changes can actually begin in midlife, triggered by declining oestrogen during perimenopause. Worrying as that might sound, this discovery will enable women to take control of their risk at a much earlier age. Lisa goes on to share plenty of practical, evidence-based advice to help you do that.

    I was really moved hearing Lisa talk about the beautiful changes that happen in the female brain during pregnancy and post-partum. It’s a new take on the idea of ‘Mummy brain’ and will be validating for all mothers out there to hear. She also gives a clear and candid explanation of how perimenopause alters brain function. So many of my patients in their 40s and 50s are scared by changes like forgetfulness, brain fog and anxiety. If that’s you or someone you know, Lisa’s insights and advice will be really empowering.

    I’m a passionate advocate for women’s health equality. Yet chatting with Lisa made me realise how much more work we all have to do to get topics like these out there and understood. This conversation is relevant to all of us, women and men alike. I hope it gets you thinking and talking more. 

    Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/129

    Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/

    Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

    Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk

    DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.

     

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.