Episoder

  • Vinay used to work at Ethereum. Now he's trying to develop Mattereum, a digital identity layer (based on blockchain technology) that can tell us with more precision where a product is in its lifecycle, and how safe it is to buy. The intention: To make us reuse stuff more, with higher trust, thus rewarding quality products over cheap, one-time use stuff.

    https://mattereum.com/ shows how it's used, but I needed to know WHY. And that's how we got here.

    After hour one, he's explained Mattereum pretty well (doesn't buying used stuff on Ebay and Amazon accomplish the same? Why do we need a blockchain solution for this? How will the quality of used goods be "supervised", and by whom? What does the future hold for Mattereum?)

    According to Vinay, a big use case for Mattereum is just around the corner. As usual, you're 5 years ahead of things if you listen to Wunderdog!

    In hour two, we go into Vinay's big ambition: How to help the coming wave of climate refugees as best as possible. The only way is to give them a framework that allows them to do labor. How does he plan to accomplish this?

    Vinay's cheap housing design http://hexayurt.com/ has already become the go-to housing at Burning Man, but there's also large-scale infrastructure to think about.



    Listen, discuss and leave reviews of the pod in your preferred player!

    Jingle by @trop1ce from Twitter. May or may not contain black holes.

    As usual, the podcast exists because of my amazing sponsors from www.patreon.com/runde 

    Today let me highlight the following Patrons:

    Roy Cato Kleveland
    Ole-Morten Duesund
    Kirsti
    Bjarte Aune Olsen
    Michael Schmichael


    and in particular:

    Lars Ivar Igesund
    Kyle Arumugam
    Kyrre Matias Goksøyr
    Are Edvardsen
    Kristoffer Karlsen
    Øyvind Grimstad Gryt
    Andreas Døving
    Berit Reppen Lorentzen
    Kristoffer Karlsen

    Patrons are incredibly cool people! You remember the Medicis, right? And none of the other noble families from Italy around the renaissance. Just the Medicis, because they supported the arts. Maybe you remember the Borgias, because they were so horrible. But ... don't be a Borgia. Be a Medici.

    Www.patreon.com/runde


  • "One of the most original thinkers in the world" (list of people who have said this at the bottom) is BACK for a second visit! Lex Fridman recently had Robin on, and we cover some of the same ground, but there can never be too many Robin Hanson conversations.

    This episode has a new jingle, by @trop1ce - who I found on Twitter. It contains a sample from a certain black hole sound published by NASA. Thank you! 

    As usual, the podcast exists because of my amazing sponsors from www.patreon.com/runde 

    Today let me highlight the following Patrons: 

    Sunniva Gylver (welcome!)
    Thomas Nøkleby (welcome!)
    Katja
    Beate Eiklid
    Bjørnar Kristiansen
    Joakim Kjenes

    and in particular: 

    Lars Ivar Igesund
    Kyle Arumugam
    Kyrre Matias Goksøyr
    Are Edvardsen
    Kristoffer Karlsen
    Øyvind Grimstad Gryt
    Andreas Døving
    Berit Reppen Lorentzen

    You patrons, you keep this going. Thank you. Remember to quit supporting whenever it should become a burden for you or if I just start making bad stuff. 

    Here are the blurbs for Robin's book "Age of Em", which was the topic of our previous Robin Hanson-episode, but which i just found right now. This is wild. Look at what these people are saying. (Also, I wonder what Robin thinks about the gender balance in this list. Oh well.)

    I'm reading a fascinating academic book, The Age of Em. .. It’s about brain emulation.Ian McEwan, Winner of the Man Booker prize Robin Hanson brings intelligence, imagination, and courage to some of the most profound questions humanity will be dealing with in the middle-term future. The Age of Em is a stimulating and unique book that will be valuable to anyone who wants to look past the next ten years to the next hundred and the next thousand.Sean Carroll The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself What happens when a first-rate economist applies his rigor, breadth, and curiosity to the sci-fi topic of whole brain emulations? This book is what happens. There's nothing else like it, and it will blow your (current) mind.Andrew McAfee  The Second Machine Age A highly provocative vision of a technologically advanced future that may or may not come true — but if it does, we'll be glad Robin wrote this book now.Marc Andreessen  Netscape, Andreessen Horowitz In this brilliant analysis, Robin Hanson shows that our hyper-smart `downloaded’ – or emulated – heirs will still have ambitions, triumphs and thwarted desires. They'll make alliances, compete, cooperate… and very-likely love… all driven by immutable laws of nature and economics. Super intelligence may be a lot more like us than you imagined.David Brin  Hugo: Existence, The Transparent Society Robin Hanson provides a richly detailed portrait of a future society where brain emulation is widespread. Drawing on physics, economics, sociology, history, and a host of other disciplines, he describes a world that is wonderfully strange and yet strikingly familiar. Far out? Yes. Fascinating? That too.Hal Varian  Google A fascinating thought experiment about the future, written with clarity and verve by somebody who thinks very deeply and freely.Matt Ridley  The Times, The Evolution of Everything Robin Hanson is one of the most important and original thinkers. His new tour de force will dazzle and delight you. Anyone who loves books should read The Age of Em.Tyler Cowen  New York Times, The Great Stagnation Robin Hanson has a remarkable mind and has written a remarkable book. He provides an encyclopedically-detailed analysis of a fascinating future dominated by brain emulations. Whether you agree or disagree with each of his specific predictions, each page will entice you to think more deeply.Erik Brynjolfsson  The Second Machine Age There are different paths to the Technological Singularity. In The Age of Em Robin Hanson explores one such possibility using methods and insight that all analysts of future technology can admire. With this book, Hanson owns the Em scenario. He casts a very bright light upon foothills of the Unknowable.Vernor Vinge  Hugo: Rainbow’s End, A Fire Upon The Deep Here we have a systematic attempt to envisage what could well be the next technological disruption of the human condition: a world after the ‘anthropocene’ which does not conform to the usual ecological scenarios. Drawing on current social and natural sciences, as well as artificial intelligence research, Robin Hanson envisages a future in which human beings are neither notably enhanced nor completely exterminated. Rather, we live in the margins of a world dominated by beings which will have been created from uploaded emulations of a selection of human brains. Hanson tackles all the issues that arise along the way: how the transition might happen and what will the world look like – both to us and to the ‘ems’ – on the other side of this great disruption. The reader does not need to agree with all the judgement calls in this expressly speculative enterprise to appreciate the great strides that Hanson has taken in specifying a world in which humans still flourish yet are no longer in the driver’s seat of epochal change. That his vision is ultimately a relatively benign one is an added bonus.Steve Fuller  Humanity 2.0 Robin Hanson is the most brilliant mind I know, and the wait for his first book is finally over. The Age of Em combines Hanson’s expertise in social science and artificial intelligence to paint a stunning vision of the future of intelligent life. The result is a noble effort to subordinate science fiction to science.Bryan Caplan  The Myth of the Rational Voter Robin Hanson integrates ferocious future forces: robotics, artificial intelligence, overpopulation, economic stagnation – and comes up with a detailed, striking set of futures we can have, if we think harder. There's many an idea in this deft book, worth the time of anyone who thinks forward with hope.Gregory Benford  Nebula: Timescape Hanson is pioneering a new style of science fiction: using calculations rather than mere stories to imagine what a world of artificial humans would be like.Kevin Kelly  Wired, The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future Age of Em is a rare wonder: a book both fully intellectually rigorous, and boldly embracing of the radical possibilities the future holds. Hanson focuses his acute analytical mind on future scenarios in which most humans are digital 'brain emulations' rather than biological humans. He shows that many aspects of this sort of world can be understood fairly effectively by us old-fashioned biological humans right now, using tools from economics, logic, psychology, sociology and other disciplines. The result is a tour de force at the intersection of imagination and rationality. Far more clearly than from any work of mere science fiction, one gleans from Hanson's book a clear idea of what a future world dominated by brain emulations or 'Ems' might actually be like.Ben Goertzel  Aidyia Holdings, Hanson Robotics, AGI Society, OpenCog Foundation Robin Hanson is one of the most original thinkers in the world - and this fascinating account of our future society is like nothing you'll read anywhere else. Astonishing stuff.Tim Harford  Financial Times, The Undercover Economist Strikes Back The Age of Em is a fascinating and provocative book about a future that will blindside most humans – but that could easily be the world that most of our descendants inhabit. Robin Hanson has a unique combination of expertise in artificial intelligence. economics, signaling, and futurology. Nobody else could have explored the implications of whole-brain emulation in such visionary yet plausible detail. It's one of the most important books you'll ever read.Geoffrey Miller  The Mating Mind, Spent, Mate. Most futurism is remarkable chiefly for its lack of imagination. The Age of Em is that rare book that pushes the boundaries of our understanding of what is possible.Tim O'Reilly  O'Reilly Media Robin Hanson is a thinker like no other on this planet: someone so unconstrained by convention, so unflinching in spelling out the consequences of ideas, that even the most cosmopolitan reader is likely to find him as bracing (and head-clearing) as a mouthful of wasabi. Now, in The Age of Em, he's produced the quintessential Hansonian book, one unlike any other that's ever been written. Hanson is emphatic that he hasn't optimized in any way for telling a good story, or for imparting moral lessons about the present: only for maximizing the probability that what he writes will be relevant to the actual future of our civilization. Early in the book, Hanson estimates that probability as 10%. His figure seems about right to me – and if you're able to understand why that's unbelievably high praise, then The Age of Em is for you.Scott Aaronson  Quantum Computing since Democritus Humanity has long dreamt of transcending this material plane. Hanson looks at the economics of future existence in digital form, as minds running on computer hardware. What he finds is neither heaven nor hell, but a form of existence that is utterly surprising, both familiar and alien. Carefully reasoned, thoroughly researched, and incisively argued, this book will change the way you look at our uploaded future, and the entire concept of the Singularity.Ramez Naam  Nexus,The Infinite Resource Hanson takes a few simple assumptions and relentlessly follows their implications to paint a fascinating and chillingly plausible posthuman future, realised in fractal-like detail. A tour de force of rigorous speculation that draws equally upon physics, economics and neuroscience, every page of The Age of Em brims with fascinating ideas.Hannu Rajaniemi  The Quantum Thief Thinkers who write about the far-future tend to care more about telling a good story than about getting the facts right. Robin Hanson is an exception to this generalization. Over the past decade, he has used our best scientific models of the world and ourselves to predict how our descendants will organize their lives a hundred years from now. The result of this effort is the book you hold in your hands—a work of rare originality, insight, and importance.William MacAskill  Doing Good Better What happens when artificial intelligence does become a perfect substitute for natural intelligence? We could easily be 100 years or more from that scenario but my foresighted colleague, Robin Hanson, has a new book The Age of Em that discusses the implications of uploads, human intelligence copied into software—Hanson’s book is the most complete and serious scenario analysis of the implications of a new technology ever written but most of us won’t live long enough to know whether he is right.Alex Tabarrok  Launching the Innovation Renaissance A straightforward extrapolation from standard economic premises that I think are too conservative, to results that most readers will think are wildly futuristic. Personally, I'd be shocked to see the future turn out this normal. But anyone who believes in standard economic theory and the computability of human intelligence would need to do a lot of fast talking to explain why the future wouldn't be at least this strange.Eliezer Yudkowsky  Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality Age of Em should be required reading for anyone writing about what happens once the mind leaves the skull. For most books about the future, you can skip the latter two thirds of every chapter. Dr. Hanson's book is so thick with ideas and insights, you'll take your time over each page.Zach Weinersmith  Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal The best way to predict the future may be to create it, but to create it you first must study it. Read this book!Robert Freitas  Nanomedicine I have known Robin Hanson since he was a graduate student at CalTech, and he has always been an original thinker. Hanson notes how little of science fiction makes sense because even stories where the physics is mostly right get the economics laughably wrong. In the nonfiction Age of Em, Hanson honors the physics and the likely future economics of emulated minds. Students of AI, virtual reality, economics, and science can benefit in multiple ways from this extraordinary work of thoughtful and courageous technological forecasting.Neil Jacobstein Chair, AI and Robotics, Singularity University at NASA Research Park, Mountain View CA Hanson puts Nostradamus to shame, foretelling humans moving from flesh and blood to abstract immortal “emulations”, computer programs made of bits, our civilization uploading to gigahertz processors exchanging gigabytes 24/7.Ralph Merkle co-inventor of public key cryptography Human life is already substantially entwined with computing machinery. It is not too soon to think about this trend's logical conclusion: human brains directly emulated in computers. The Age of Em draws upon a vast array of knowledge from the natural and social sciences to paint an extremely detailed picture of the world of our silicon descendants, who will run at different clock speeds and copy themselves at will. `Ems’ will be cultural conservatives who barely make a living and use profanity. They will routinely mock us.Michael Chwe  Jane Austen, Game Theorist

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  • Anders is a futurist and transhumanist, but also deeply concerned with the ethics and risks of all the wild technology he believes will happen. He works at Nick Bostrom's Future of Life Institute, and calls himself an "academic jack of all trades". This was more or less like trying to ride an elephant, luckily Anders managed to remember where we had digressed every time I completely lost track of how our many digressions started. I wanted to trim this episode down, because it goes EVERYWHERE. But in the end - what was I going to cut?

    This is perhaps my least focused episode, but so what? It's Anders Sandberg! 

    If you don't learn ANYTHING new in these almost 2 hours, PLEASE GET IN TOUCH WITH ME. I WANT TO TALK TO YOU, YOU INSANE MONSTER. 

    Give this podcast reviews in whatever podcast app you're listening to it in, find my patreon on patreon.com/runde and subscribe to this + comics for a dollar, remember to pet dogs and cats and don't pet walruses, and stay kind.

    Made in collaboration with NITRO STUDIOS, Oslo. 




  • First he took a PhD in gravity waves, then he got a position at Hyperloop One because of some truly shocking problem-solving skills (as far as I can tell, just listen to the episode and see if you agree), and THEN he worked at NASA JPL, where the literal rocket science happens. Every single one of these topics could have been their own 2 hour 40 minute podcast - but we hardly go there.

    This episode focuses on Casey's current endeavour after he left NASA: Terraform Industries, a carbon capture project that's designed to be ultra-scaleable - which is what the world VERY much needs. Is Casey's carbon capture project feasible? If solar power becomes cheap enough, Casey thinks so. The episode was recorded before the current war in Ukraine, and with the war, gas prices have gone up so much that Casey's technology would be profitable today.

    The war has also shown (as if that was necessary) the value of producing one's own natural gas, which Terraform's machines are promising to do. It sounds almost too optimistic to be true, but Casey's credentials speak for themselves. This may be the most optimism-inducing podcast I've recorded so far, and on twitter, you can tag me @oysteinrunde and casey @cjhandmer if you have any questions or grievances. 

    His twitter bio reads "Physicist, Immigrant, Pilot, Dad.Former Caltech, Hyperloop, NASA JPL.Founder @terraformindie", and he came to my attention when a lot of smart space people shared his essay "Starship is still not understood".
    https://caseyhandmer.wordpress.com/2021/10/28/starship-is-still-not-understood/

    If you want me to make a similar episode where we ONLY talk about SpaceX' and Elon Musk's masterpiece Starship, the spaceship that promises to really change the space industry for humankind, please find me on Instagram @rundeshow and send a PM, and do leave reviews and comments on this podcast wherever you listen to your podcasts. Spreading the word helps!

    This podcast exists because of the generous contribution of Nitro Studios, Oslo, and my great supporters at www.patreon.com/runde. They also get some neat digital comics! 

  • The second part of the Jesse Moynihan interview!

    Jesse Moynihan went from incredibly weird underground cartoonist to "household name" when his friend and colleague Tom Herpich suggested Pendleton Ward hired Jesse to join as a storyboarder/writer/artist/art director at the end of the first season of the soon-to-be legendary animated show Adventure Time.

    On the side of the enormous body of work that is Adventure Time (currently on HBO max), Jesse has also made his own, weird, spiritual, slice-of-life comic about bickering cosmic gods, Forming. With his brother Justin he's released the short Manly on youtube, via Cartoon Hangover. And he's been art director on the beautiful show Midnight Gospel (Netflix).


    Recently Jesse presented an NFT project on his instagram account @jmoyns. The ensuing debate showed that some of his regular fans saw NFTs as a betrayal of the integrity Jesse had shown through his entire career - and with great disappointment comes great interviews! I jumped on the opportunity to hear Jesse explain his thoughts on NFTs and their place in the current art scene, as I can easily say that Jesse has never been an artist known for taking "the easy route". So, what's his thoughts on the climate impact of NFTs, why he stayed away from OpenSea even though it could have meant a bigger profit, what he sees as the future for art, on building a new fanbase from the ground up, and what he wants to do next.

    I'm very proud to give you this 3,5 hour talk with one of the most awesome creators I know of! For practical reasons this talk has been cut in two.

    Jesse's patreon: https://www.patreon.com/forming

    Jesse's art can be found on Netflix (Midnight Gospel), HBO max (Adventure Time), YouTube (Manly)
    Instagram: @jmoyns


    His future project, on twitter: @jesus2rises
    On Discord: discord.gg/jesus2rises
    This podcast is, as always, produced thanks to Nitro studios, Oslo, and with the help of my supporters at https://www.patreon.com/runde 
    Patreon supporters get secret comics, sketches, full pdfs of unaccessible comics (like Olav Sleggja and Margarin and Teleboy - in english) AND extra nice drawings and maybe gifts if they meet me at festivals. This year I'm a guest at Fantasticon Copenhagen (june 25th) and Art Bubble Aarhus (sept 16th).

    If you want to support Ukraine AND get a comic from me and genius Ida Neverdahl, order our first travelogue MOSCOW from this link - http://centrala.org.uk/shop/moscow/

  • For the first non-space related episode of Wunderdog, I have a MASSIVE nugget of artistic GOLD.

    Jesse Moynihan went from incredibly weird underground cartoonist to "household name" when his friend and colleague Tom Herpich suggested Pendleton Ward hired Jesse to join as a storyboarder/writer/artist/art director at the end of the first season of the soon-to-be legendary animated show Adventure Time.

    On the side of the enormous body of work that is Adventure Time (currently on HBO max), Jesse has also made his own, weird, spiritual, slice-of-life comic about bickering cosmic gods, Forming. With his brother Justin he's released the short Manly on youtube, via Cartoon Hangover. And he's been art director on the beautiful show Midnight Gospel (Netflix).


    Recently Jesse presented an NFT project on his instagram account @jmoyns. The ensuing debate showed that some of his regular fans saw NFTs as a betrayal of the integrity Jesse had shown through his entire career - and with great disappointment comes great interviews! I jumped on the opportunity to hear Jesse explain his thoughts on NFTs and their place in the current art scene, as I can easily say that Jesse has never been an artist known for taking "the easy route". So, what's his thoughts on the climate impact of NFTs, why he stayed away from OpenSea even though it could have meant a bigger profit, what he sees as the future for art, on building a new fanbase from the ground up, and what he wants to do next.

    I'm very proud to give you this 3,5 hour talk with one of the most awesome creators I know of! For practical reasons this talk has been cut in two.

    Jesse's patreon: https://www.patreon.com/forming

    Jesse's art can be found on Netflix (Midnight Gospel), HBO max (Adventure Time), YouTube (Manly)
    Instagram: @jmoyns


    His future project, on twitter: @jesus2rises
    On Discord: discord.gg/jesus2rises
    This podcast is, as always, produced thanks to Nitro studios, Oslo, and with the help of my supporters at https://www.patreon.com/runde 
    Patreon supporters get secret comics, sketches, full pdfs of unaccessible comics (like Olav Sleggja and Margarin and Teleboy - in english) AND extra nice drawings and maybe gifts if they meet me at festivals. This year I'm a guest at Fantasticon Copenhagen (june 25th) and Art Bubble Aarhus (sept 16th).

    If you want to support Ukraine AND get a comic from me and genius Ida Neverdahl, order our first travelogue MOSCOW from this link - http://centrala.org.uk/shop/moscow/

  • In 2020, the esteemed physics professors Eugene Chudnovsky and Luis Anchordoqui published the paper “Can Self-Replicating Species Flourish in the Interior of a Star?” in Letters in High Energy Physics.

    Their paper describes a theoretical form of life wildly unlike anything else. While all life we know of is built on storing and replication information ("genes") in the long, twisted ladder-like molecule we call DNA, Eugene and Luis suggest that a combination of two hitherto unobserved phenomena predicted by string theory, cosmic strings and monopoles, could perform the tasks of DNA by combining into "necklaces".

    In this mind-expanding episode, Eugene explains:

    – What monopoles and cosmic strings are
    – How these two things could combine to form something that could store information about itself, and replicate - inside a star
    – Why this kind of life potentially could evolve a million times faster than DNA-based life
    – and finally, the very esteemed professor REALLY lets his imagination flow!

    Eugene Chudnovsky received his undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral education at Kharkiv University in Ukraine, and has been engaged in human rights for years, among many other things as Co-Chair of the Committee of Concerned Scientists. We talk a bit about his experiences in the Soviet Union before he left for the US. The episode was recorded before the invasion of Ukraine.

    Ads:

    Wunderdog exists because of my patrons. Consider joining www.patreon.com/runde if you have the opportunity. Or, more urgent:

    Ida Neverdahl & I have made a travelogue comic from Russia, MOSCOW. We participated in one of the last pro-LGBT demonstrations before it was deemed illegal, and also experienced first hand how street protesting already in 2015 were strongly regulated. The book is out in english, and the publisher, Centrala, has now put "Moscow" as part of their Ukraine help sale. Please check out MOSCOW and the other books from Centrala here. (All proceeds other than shipping go to Ukraine)

    http://centrala.org.uk/en/sale-of-comic-books-and-graphic-novels-for-ukraine/
     
    For Norwegian readers, I have a new book out, "ANTIBIOTIKA, helt og antihelt", together with Norway's foremost authority on antibiotics resitant bacteria, prof. Dag Berild. It's been called a "pedagogical bullseye" by Dagens Næringsliv and it's a short, easily digested and remembered summary of Berild's 30 years of research on how bacteria develop antibiotics resistance. Even Norway can cut our consumption of antibiotics in half without sacrificing anyone's health, and in the book we show how. April 3rd we present it at Litteraturhuset Oslo, Saklig Søndag. I will also be at Fantasticon in Copenhagen June 25th, and Art Bubble in Aarhus September 16th.

  • When studying the stellar stream GD-1, Harvard astronomer Ana Bonaca made a literally enormous discovery: Cosmic "bullet holes" in our galaxy, several light years across. Something with around a million times the mass of our sun has punched enormous holes in our galaxy. What is the "bullet" here? Is it a supermassive black hole, of the kind we only see in the center of a galaxy? Or is it a cluster of stars? Or is it something even stranger, a "bullet" made of dark matter?

    00.06.26 

    What are star clusters?

    00. 08.00 

    Is the milky way just a big star cluster? No, because the Milky way is bound together with a dark matter halo. 

    00.10.15

    The Milky Way has more mass than its amount of stars should indicate. So what is the extra, “invisible” mass? This is Ana’s favorite solution to what the cosmic bullets can be …

    01.01.04

    So, is earth safe from cosmic bullets? 

  • James Fallon is the author of The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain ... and I'm wondering if he's the kind of guy we'd send on a trip into space.

    The 72 year old Fallon got up at 05.30 to talk to me from Orange County - and with me in my studio in Oslo, I brought the 190 cm (6.3), 93 kilo ex light heavyweight mma legend Jakob "The Striking Viking" Løvstad, currently training to become a psychologist, aka punching people's brains with his brain.

    This is barely enough to contain James' boundless energy.




    This podcast is a collaboration with Nitro studio, Oslo. Theme song: Jan Krey aka Jkreyzy

    Extra material and my art for patrons at Patreon.com/runde - special thanks to these 5$ and up patrons:

    Maren Struksnæs
    Adrian Kaxrud Berntsen
    Jo Christiansen
    Halvor Harnæs Lund
    Øystein Borgersen
    Are Edvardsen
    Maisen Pedersen
    Kyle Arumugam
    Kyrre Matias Goksøyr
    Lars Ivar Igesund
    Morten F. Thomsen

    My books on www.oysteinrunde.no


  • Robin Hanson on how mind uploads could make space irrelevant.

    The Fermi paradox is the mysterious lack of traces of alien civilized life.

    Professor Robin Hanson invented a term to describe that something may doom all civilizations to die before they go interplanetary (and become visible from earth). He coined this unknown factor "The Great Filter". Today, the term Great Filter has become quite mainstream and understandable - just look at Elon Musk's pinned tweet since august: "We must pass the great filter."

    But Robin has moved on - this idea was his in 1996! We want to know what he's up to next. So this episode is not about the great filter, but about Robin's excellent, and very unique, book "Age of Em". (We'll have to save his new book "Elephant in the brain" for later - we only had two hours!)

    Robin Hanson's homepage:
    https://www.overcomingbias.com/

    The Age of Em, audiobook:
    https://tidd.ly/3nyuEAL



    This podcast is a collaboration with Nitro studio, Oslo. Theme song: Jan Krey aka Jkreyzy


    Extra material and my art for patrons at Patreon.com/runde - special thanks to these 5$ and up patrons:

    Maren Struksnæs
    Adrian Kaxrud Berntsen
    Jo Christiansen
    Halvor Harnæs Lund
    Øystein Borgersen
    Are Edvardsen
    Maisen Pedersen
    Kyle Arumugam
    Kyrre Matias Goksøyr
    Lars Ivar Igesund
    Morten F. Thomsen

    More about my books at www.oysteinrunde.no



  • Philip Lubin and Breakthrough Starshot.

    Stephen Hawking's last speeches were often about his gigantic dream project, funded by physichist and billionaire Yuri Milner: The Breakthrough Initiative. It is mindblowing in scope and ambition. Professor Philip Lubin is one of the minds that inspired one part of this initiative: Breakthrough Starshot.


    This podcast is a collaboration with Nitro studio, Oslo. Theme song: Jan Krey aka Jkreyzy 

    If you feel like supporting, write a review on iTunes!

    Extra material, and my art, is available for patrons at Patreon.com/runde - special thanks to these 5$ and up patrons:

    Maren Struksnæs
    Adrian Kaxrud Berntsen
    Jo Christiansen
    Halvor Harnæs Lund
    Øystein Borgersen
    Are Edvardsen
    Maisen Pedersen
    Kyle Arumugam
    Kyrre Matias Goksøyr
    Lars Ivar Igesund
    Morten F. Thomsen

    My books (mostly in Norwegian) can be found on www.oysteinrunde.no