Episodes

  • Episode #28: The Ghost Army (Season 2, Episode 8)

    · 00:25:53 · ArtCurious Podcast

    This episode is sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!In a time where the arts are ever-undervalued, it is increasingly important for us not just to support the arts in our communities, but to look back through periods of history where artists were applauded for making a significant difference. And in the case of one very special American troop in the midst of World War Two, artists and creative types were tasked specifically with using their skills to preserve people. Art here became a life-saving force- literally. A force for good, even through multiple means of deception.We are indebted to ghostarmy.org for their images, information, and wonderful documentary!// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.Twitter / Facebook/ InstagramEpisode CreditsProduction and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.Additional music credits:"Silent Movie Car Chase (ID 709)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Tethered" by Nctrnm is licensed under BY 4.0 - Based on a work at https://soundcloud.com/nctrnm/; "So Low" by Art of Escapism is licensed under BY-SA 4.0; "Makie Elkino" by William Ross Chernoff's Nomads is licensed under BY 4.0; "Leaping Leopards" by Ash Turner is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Poldoro" by Milton Arias is licensed under BY-SA 4.0; "Trombone Trio for Trombone Quartet" by Curtis Hasselbring is licensed under BY 4.0 ___________________________________________________________________Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:The Ghost Army documentary and official site: ghostarmy.org The Atlantic: The Ghost Army: The Inflatable Tanks that Fooled HitlerSmithsonian Magazine: When an Army of Artists Fooled HitlerHyperallergic: The Artist-Filled Shadow Army of World War IIAtlas Obscura: A Visual Guide to the Fake Fleets and Inflatable Armies of World War IIHistory Channel: Push Renewed to Award WWII Ghost Army with Congressional Gold Medal  ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

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  • Episode #27: CURIOUS CALLBACK: What Happened to the Amber Room? (UPDATED Episode #8)

    · 00:50:24 · ArtCurious Podcast

    This episode is sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!This is a rebroadcast of our eighth episode, which originally aired on November 4, 2016.  It's a fan favorite, and it ties in rather nicely to the theme of our current season! Even if you've listened to this episode before, you're not going to want to miss this, as it updates our show based on new information.One of the most awe-inspiring sights in and around St. Petersburg, Russia, is the Catherine Palace, a rococo summer residence for the imperial family of yore. Up until World War II, The Catherine Palace housed something so incredible, so coveted, and so gorgeous that for hundreds of years, travelers fro all over the world flocked to admire it, referred to as the "Eighth Wonder of the World." And then, in the early 1940s with the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union, this priceless creation was stolen. And to this day, it has still never been found.What happened to the Amber Room?// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.Twitter / Facebook/ InstagramEpisode CreditsProduction and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.Additional music credits:"Hermitage" by Dee Yan-Kee is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Rumbo de grises" by Circus Marcus is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "modum" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY 4.0; "Trush Nightingale (ID 608)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; Like the sky" by Damiano Baldoni is licensed under BY 4.0; "The Warm Shoulder" by Mary Lattimore is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Seven Lights" by Sergey Cheremisinov is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Our Giant's Alone" by Art of Escapism is licensed under BY-SA 4.0; "owl's secret" by The Owl is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Gardarike" by Tri-Tachyon is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Remember Trees?" by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under BY 4.0 - Based on a work at http://chriszabriskie.com  Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out here. Not to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:The Mystery of the Nazis and the Vanished Amber RoomCould Long-Lost Amber Room Be Stashed in a Nazi Bunker in Poland?A Brief History of the Amber RoomMystery of the Amber Room: Video ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

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  • Episode #26: Hitler's Führermuseum (Season 2, Episode 6)

    · 00:26:05 · ArtCurious Podcast

    This episode is sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!One of the reasons that I decided to center this second season of the ArtCurious Podcast around art and World War Two is that there are so many different stories that we can tell about how art and war intersect-- especially and most critically during this war to end all wars. As I discussed in episode #21, the first of the season, it may seem on the surface that there aren’t many direct correlations between World War Two and the arts, but in fact, there were many very tangible connections-- and you can even say that there were physical connections between the two as well. Because while the lives of millions were in the balance during the run of the war, so were those of the visual arts as well. Thousands of paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints, once safely ensconced in homes or collections, were suddenly uprooted at the whim of one man, with one very particular museum in mind for them. Today, we’re digging into the story behind one of the most significant museums never built-- Hitler’s Fuhrermuseum-- and was it really going to be as great as it purported to be?// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.Twitter / Facebook/ InstagramEpisode CreditsProduction and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.Additional music credits: "Lädschad" by Dee Yan-Kee is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "La brise" by Circus Marcus is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "Arrival" by Misha Dioxin is licensed under BY 4.0; "Rise" by Kyle Preston is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "The Signals" by Sergey Cheremisinov is licensed under BY-NC 4.0___________________________________________________________________Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the link below:Daily Beast: Inside Hitler's Fantasy Museum ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

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  • Episode #25: The Draft, Doctrine, and The Duck (Season 2, Episode 5)

    · 00:28:36 · ArtCurious Podcast

    This episode is sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!When I was a kid growing up in the 1980s, one of my favorite things to do was watch old Mickey Mouse cartoons-- I loved seeing Mickey interact with Pluto and Goofy, and could probably have watched hours of these cartoons, if you let me. But one character especially stood out for me, and quickly became my favorite--  I loved the scrappy and grumpy Donald Duck. I still do. And while some of my best-loved episodes revolved around Donald’s skirmishes with Chip and Dale, or around the exploits of his nephews, Huey, Dewey and Louie, I still remember seeing numerous cartoons featuring Donald as a soldier during World War Two. Looking back on my childhood, it seems funny and bizarre to me now that I was exposed to American World War Two propaganda. But it’s true-- and it happened with somewhat regularity for someone like me, who had consistent access to the Disney Channel.  Of course, as a child, I didn’t really think much of it- it just seemed like yet another Donald Duck cartoon to me. But now, I look back and find myself really curious. How did the Walt Disney and his team, especially a blustery cartoon duck, get involved so specifically in wartime propaganda?// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.Twitter / Facebook/ InstagramEpisode CreditsProduction and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.Music Credits: "Back to the Grindstone" by Dee Yan-Kee is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Jessie Cave Duo (ID 479)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-NC 4.0; "Assembly line work" by Dee Yan-Kee is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "King of the air march" by Charles Daab is licensed under BY-NC 3.0 US; "Silent Park Inside Your Soul" by Alex Mason & The Minor Emotion is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Bindweed (Instrumental Version)" by Axletree is licensed under BY 4.0___________________________________________________________________Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:Time Magazine: How WWII Changed Walt DisneyOpen Culture: Donald Duck’s Bad Nazi Dream and Four Other Disney Propaganda Cartoons from World War IIDer Spiegel: Donald Versus Hitler: Walt Disney and the Art of WWII PropagandaThe Telegraph: How Donald Duck helped win Second World War – and beat Mickey to the jobComplex: The Most Racist Moments in Disney Cartoons ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

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  • Episode #24: American Propaganda Posters of WWII (Season 2, Episode 4)

    · 00:28:10 · ArtCurious Podcast

    This episode is sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!If I was to choose the single most recognizable figure from World War Two for an average American to identify, I would ask you to picture a brunette with an arched eyebrow,  her hair tied up neatly in a red-and-white polka-dot kerchief, flexing her right arm, baring her bicep, and fiercely making eye contact with the viewer. The words “We can do it!” blare in a dark blue word bubble over her head to confirm her determination. Yep. You know her. You love her. She’s colloquially referred to as “Rosie the Riveter,” even though the term is a misnomer here, and her image was created by illustrator J. Howard Miller in 1943 for the Westinghouse Electric corporation as a design to boost morale internally. Today, it is one of the most widely recognizable and widely disseminated images of the 20th century. The funny thing about the “We Can Do It” poster is that its current ubiquity is in contrast with its actual usage back in the 1940s. It was only one of the posters printed for Westinghouse Electric’s morale-boosting campaign, each poster-- about 40 in all-- were only on display in the Westinghouse factories in Pittsburgh and in midwestern Cities for two weeks. Two weeks- that’s not a very long time to have a motivational poster up on display. This makes it almost an oddity, compared to other propaganda posters in the United States during the Second World War. And that’s not all-- it’s also one of the calmer and more positive, both in terms of message and in gender politics, than most-- because as we’re about to see, others were more graphic, more manipulative...and sometimes, far more terrifying.On this episode, we're going to take on American World War Two propaganda posters: what they were, who created them, and how America was fighting the war via words and pictures, as well as manpower.// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.Twitter / Facebook/ InstagramEpisode CreditsProduction and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett."Coffee and Time" by P C III is licensed under BY 4.0 (Based on a work at www.pipechoir.com); "Onistwave" by P C III is licensed under BY 4.0; "Pulsars" by Podington Bear is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "The Soul Leaves The Body In Eternal Glory" by Jozef van Wissem is licensed under BY-NC-ND-3.0; "soli" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY-NC 4.0___________________________________________________________________Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:Oberlin College: Representations of Women in WWII PropagandaWomen of WWII: Recruitment PostersMuseum of Modern Art: Press release for War Poster ExhibitionMuseum of Modern Art: National War Poster Competition (1942-43)Museum of Modern Art: The Museum and the War EffortNational Archives Exhibition: Powers of Persuasion: Poster Art from World War Two ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

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  • Episode #23: Combat Artists of WWII (Season 2, Episode 3)

    · 00:25:43 · ArtCurious Podcast

    Today's episode is brought to you by Audible - get a FREE audiobook download and 30 day free trial at www.audibletrial.com/artcurious. Over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player. In the winter of 1945, a World War II infantryman for the United States would be supplied with gear that was to be carried and trekked from location to location, regardless of weather, ailment, or occurrence. All of this gear alone could easily weigh a good 50 to 60 pounds. Add on a rifle or pistol, bullets and any appropriate add-ons needed to maintain, clean, and restock a weapon, and you are talking a serious load to haul around. To a handful of these men, however, it wasn’t their guns, their helmets, or their first aid kits that were the most significant pieces of equipment that they transported to the battlefield. No-  there was a more specialized tool of utter importance. As one soldier, Edward Reep, noted, quote, “I fought the war more furiously perhaps with my paintbrush than with my weapons.”Today, we're discussing a group of dedicated and talented artists who threw themselves in the middle of war in order to capture the experience and create art about it.// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram___________________________________________________________________Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:PBS: They Drew Fire Documentary resourcesSmithsonian: Edward Reep BiographyHistorynet.com: Fire for Effect: The Price El Paso Times: Coverage of Tom Lea exhibition  (2016)Hektoen Journal: Peleliu as a Paradigm for PTSD: The Two-Thousand Yard StareEpisode CreditsProduction and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. Music credits: "Lacrima D'esperide" by Damiano Baldoni is licensed under ; "Hope" by Borrtex is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Demonstrations (ID 526)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-NC 4.0; "Broken Photosynthesis" by Kyle Preston is licensed under BY-NC 4.0  ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

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  • Episode #22: Hitler the (Failed) Artist (Season 2, Episode 2)

    · 00:26:51 · ArtCurious Podcast

    This episode is also sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!Please note that some might find this episode offensive. I discuss Adolf Hitler as a person and have opted to show images of his artworks here. Note that by no means do I condone Hitler as a person, but I simply choose to place his interest in art in historical context. In June 2015, an auction house in Nuremberg, Germany, made headlines for a group of 14 small works sold for a sum of around $450,000. But when it comes to art and art auctions, we have to face a truth: a grand total of four hundred and fifty thousand dollars, spread out over the sale of fourteen separate pieces of mediocre quality, at a small auction house in Europe? Really, that isn't a fantastic haul, and shouldn't have garnered too much media interest. And yet it was a big deal. Why? What was so great about them? Well, it actually wasn't about quality or greatness at all. It was more about notoriety, because the artist was one of the most abhorrent human beings in all of history. The artist was Adolf Hitler.In this episode, we contemplate the way that fine art inspired, affected, and ultimately molded the man who would become the biggest architect of terror in the 20th century. // Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.Twitter / Facebook/ InstagramWant more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:Artnet.com: Hitler's Artwork Sells for $450,000 at Nuremburg AuctionHyperallergic: Hitler’s Failed Art Portfolio Goes to AuctionLA Times Blog: Would You buy this painting by Adolf Hitler?The Telegraph: Hitler Sketches that Failed to Secure His Place at Art Academy to be AuctionedThe Telegraph: Adolf Hitler Art Portfolio to Be Auctioned (Pictures) Episode CreditsProduction and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. Music: "Maroon" by Misha Dixon is licensed under BY-NC 4.0 (edited for time); "Like the sky" by Damiano Baldoni is licensed under BY 4.0; "Utopia's Darkness" by Julie Maxwell's Piano Music is licensed under BY-ND 4.0 (based on a work at http://www.juliemaxwell.com); "Chance" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Realness" by by Kai Engel is licensed under BY-NC 4.0 ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

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  • BONUS EPISODE: Happy Birthday, ArtCurious Podcast!

    · 00:26:46 · ArtCurious Podcast

    Today marks the one year anniversary since we launched our very first episode! This is a special episode for you, our listeners. Many of you called, emailed, and contacted us on social media to ask questions big and small. Here are some of my favorites.Most of all, thank you. I do this for you, and without your ears, we wouldn't be here. Thank you for a year of love and support!Bonus images referred to in this episode: Pablo Picasso's masterpiece, Guernica, from 1937: Artist unknown (School of Fontainebleau), Portrait présumé de Gabrielle d'Estrées et de sa soeur la duchesse de Villars, circa 1594: 

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  • Episode #21: Season Prologue- The Relationship Between Art and War (Season 2, Episode 1)

    · 00:20:54 · ArtCurious Podcast

    This episode is sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!It was the most widespread war in history, involving the participation of more than one hundred million people from around the world, including the greatest powers across the globe: the United States, Great Britain, France, Germany, China, Japan, Italy, and the Soviet Union. It affected life in myriad ways: economically, politically, industrially, scientifically, ideologically. And its reach was one of the most horrible. Between the deaths on the battlefield and the mass killings of civilians, an estimated 50 to 85 million fatalities occurred, making it the deadliest conflict in all of recorded human history.  And yet, at the same time, it spurred on glimpses of positivity in the midst of this darkness: giving rise to the so-called Greatest Generation, and leading to advances in medicine and aviation, in information technology, and many other sectors.This was World War Two. But what did the war have to do with art? And how are the effects of the war still being felt today?// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.Twitter / Facebook/ InstagramLooking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out here. Not to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission.  ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.Episode CreditsProduction and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. "The heaven is far" by Damiano Baldoni is licensed under BY 4.0; "machinery" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "aspirato" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "бить настоящим" by Kosta T is licensed under BY 4.0; "Dancing Sparrows A (ID 609)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-NC 4.0; "world of ruin" by Damiano Baldoni is licensed under BY 4.0 

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  • Announcements from ArtCurious!

    · 00:01:58 · ArtCurious Podcast

    Hi ArtCurious listeners,  I’m so excited to announce that I’m coming back to you with a whole new season of episodes beginning on Monday, July 31st. I’ve loved working on this project and can’t wait to share it with you, so mark your calendars now and be sure to subscribe to us on iTunes or the podcatcher of your choice to guarantee that you don’t miss this or any of our future episodes.I also have another exciting opportunity for you. Next month,  we will be celebrating our one year anniversary! To commemorate it, I’ll be releasing a special “ask me anything” mini-episode, and YOU are invited to participate. Send me any questions or comments that you like, and I will try and answer as many as I can. And you get a chance to be part of our history!Here’s how it’s done:1. Email me at artcuriouspodcast@gmail.com with "AMA" in the subject line2. Contact us via the website3. Hit us up on Twitter or Instagram @artcuriouspod, or leave us comments on our Facebook site4.  If you want to leave us a voice message (and possibly hear your own voice on the show), call and leave a message at area code 919-526-0212.DEADLINE: July 26Thank you, all, for an exciting first year and a thrilling second season. Looking forward to sharing more with you soon. 

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  • CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #5: Death and Disaster, Warhol and Weegee

    · 00:43:55 · ArtCurious Podcast

    This is a rebroadcast of our fifth episode, which was originally released on October 13, 2016. Subscribe now to the podcast so that you don't miss our new episodes beginning in late July.Death has always been a part of art history. That's one of the beautiful things about art-- it can detail and document and celebrate every facet of our existence. And so much of the great art that we know and love today works in the capacity to stave off one of the terrible side effects death-- being forgotten. Portraits, stone monuments, ancient coins-- they all aim to ensure that the subjects depicted will be remembered and revered for all eternity.But Andy Warhol’s take on mortality wasn't about memorializing. He instead focused on the direct causes of death, or the aftermath of a terrible accident. His series, Death and Disaster, is one of the most well-known and polarizing of his career. But Warhol wasn't the first artist to focus on the everyday tragedy of death as a subject to quite this revealing and exploitative extent. No, that honor might very well belong to someone else-- an immigrant photographer working in Manhattan in the 1930s and 1940s. In this episode, we discover the subject matter and motivations behind Andy Warhol's Death and Disaster series, and relate them to the work of the greatest crime scene photographer in history, Weegee. //SUBSCRIBE and review us on iTunes HERE! And follow us on Twitter and on Instagram for more artsy goodness:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspodWant even MORE information? Check out the links below:Weegee as WitnessThe Original NightcrawlerWeegee's Day at the BeachArt Portfolio: WeegeeDeath and Death and Death by WarholAndy Warhol, the Death and Disaster Series and Prestige

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  • CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #3: The Semi-Charmed Life of Elisabeth Vigeé Le Brun

    · 00:46:02 · ArtCurious Podcast

    This is a rebroadcast of our third episode, which was originally released on September 12, 2016. Subscribe now to the podcast so that you don't miss our new episodes beginning in late July.Marie Antoinette, Queen of France, had an image problem: she was seen as frivolous, silly, and out-of-touch. In order to combat her poor press, the royal court commissioned a series of portraits of the queen to make her more relatable and sympathetic. Such images act as excellent propaganda machines, giving Marie Antoinette a much-needed positive spin. But what is even more marvelous is the backstory of the artist who created these portraits-- because the painter who was chosen to portray the highest woman in the land was… another woman.Talk about a revolution. In the third episode of the ArtCurious Podcast, we'll look at the lucky and semi-charmed life of Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun, one of the most popular painters of 18th-century France and the official court painter of Marie Antoinette. //SUBSCRIBE and review us on iTunes HERE! And follow us on Twitter and on Instagram for more artsy goodness:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspodWant even MORE information? Check out the links below:Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun's memoirs She Painted Marie Antoinette (and Escaped the Guillotine)The Praise and Prejudices Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun Faced in her Exceptional 18th-Century CareerVigée Le Brun: Woman Artist in Revolutionary France 

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  • Episode #20: Sofonisba Anguissola: Great (Woman) Artist

    · 00:27:01 · ArtCurious Podcast

    Earlier this spring, I saw a hashtag making the rounds online, especially on Twitter and Instagram. Half the time, I only just vaguely pay attention to the trending terms on social media, but this one hit me right away. For a lot of people, including myself, it was like seeing an old beloved friend again- because this isn’t a new hashtag. It’s over a year old and was initiated originally by the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. in conjunction with Women’s History Month, celebrated every year in March.  It read #5WomenArtists and was meant as a kind of dare. As the museum’s digital editorial assistant, Emily Haight, posted on their blog, “Ask someone to name five artists and responses will likely include names such as Warhol, Picasso, van Gogh, Monet, da Vinci—all male artists. Ask someone to name five women artists, and the question poses more of a challenge.”It’s a sad, but true, statement. Can many of us--especially those without in-depth artistic training or interest-- really name five or more women artists? Maybe, if you’re lucky, you can remember Frida Kahlo or Georgia O’Keeffe. And bonus points if you can recall our previous discussion on Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun. But especially in terms of artists who were around prior to the 20th century, the game grows much harder.Why? What’s the problem of the woman artist? And how can we fix it?  Today, we’re talking about women artists-- the historical difficulties in becoming an artist, the challenges present therein, and the limitations and legacies of one very important Renaissance painter.Today’s special episode of ArtCurious is the end result of a collaboration with art historian Ellen Oreddson and her excellent blog, How to Talk About Art History. Ellen has her own contribution to this topic on her site, where she lists five artists, inspired by the five women artists hashtag, and briefly discusses why each has been left out of the traditional art historical canon. Don't miss this insightful and fascinating post!// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out here. Not to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:Italy Magazine: Sofonisba Anguissola- A Renaissance WomanSmarthistory: Sofonisba AnguissolaArtNews: Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?National Museum of Women in the Arts Blog: Challenge Accepted: Can You Name Five Women Artists?

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  • Episode #19: Conservation and Controversy

    · 00:24:13 · ArtCurious Podcast

    Conservators are art heroes: they transform damaged or dirty works of art into beautiful, fresh works for public consumption. Then why is it that conservation has been at the center of some of the biggest art historical controversies of the last fifty years? What does a conservator really do, and what happens when conservation goes too far?          // Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!Many thanks to the incredible Stephanie Pryor for research assistance!Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out here. Not to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:NPR: Art Conservators at Work: A Living ExhibitSmithsonian Magazine: "True Colors"Hyperallergic: With Its Own Arts Center, Beast Jesus Rises AgainHuffington Post: “Elderly Woman’s Hilarious Failed Attempt At Restoring A 19th Century Fresco In Borja, Spain.”ArtNet News: “Appalling Restoration Destroys Giotto Frescoes at the Basilica of Saint Francis in Assisi Parts of the priceless medieval frescoes are now lost forever.”

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  • BONUS EPISODE: What is Art? (With A Thousand Things to Talk About)

    · ArtCurious Podcast

    We are incredibly thrilled to release a bonus episode with our friend, Andrea Parrish, at A Thousand Things to Talk About! This daily podcast is the perfect start to your morning, with a brief 2-3 minute episode with thought-provoking questions and research. A Thousand Things to Talk About also offers the occasional "deep dive," and we're so excited to be a part of this one-- What is Art? It's a question that seems simple, but in reality, is it?Listen here, and subscribe and review A Thousand Things to Talk About. Follow the show at the links below! And don't forget to  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show along the way, too!@musetopics on Twitter@musetopics on Instagram@musetopics on FacebookWant more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:The Art Story on DadaThe New York Times: Is it Art? Is it Good? And Who Says So?The Brooklyn Rail: Is it Possible to Define Art? Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: The Definition of ArtFirst Principles: The Treasonous Clerk: St. Augustine and the Meaning of ArtBook recommendation: Mosche Barasch, Modern Theories of Art 2: From Impressionism to KandinskyMoMA: "But is it Art?" Constantin Brancusi vs. the United StatesObscenity Case Files: Miller vs. CaliforniaArt on Trial: The Arts, the 1st Amendment, and the Courts

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  • Episode #18: Diagnosis: Art History

    · 00:25:00 · ArtCurious Podcast

    Over the centuries, there have been numerous examples of fine artists creating works of art that deliberately work with and within contemporaneous medical thought, portraying people with particular ailments or diseases. But what about if we turn that concept around a little bit? What happens when those in the medical field turn to paintings or sculptures from the past and retroactively investigate the health of the individuals depicted therein? What happens when art history turns into a diagnosis?                // Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out here. Not to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:Boston Globe: Monet? Gaugin? Using Art to Make Better DoctorsNew York Times: Studying Art with the Eye of a PhysicianWall Street Journal: Doctors Enlist Paintings to Hone SkillsThe Guardian: The Fine Art of Medical DiagnosisThe Guardian: Did the Mona Lisa Have Syphilis? 

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  • Episode #17: The Casino of the Spirits

    · 00:26:26 · ArtCurious Podcast

    Venice-- it's the most serene and beautiful city in Italy, and possibly the whole world. But Venice at night-- all darkened and quiet-- takes up the most space in my imagination. I seriously love the depictions of Venice as enigmatic, shadowy, and even dangerous. Without cars or streetlights or other modern comforts, you might feel like you’ve stepped back in time and that around any given corner, you could find… anything. All of this lends Venice this air of inscrutability and mystery. And over time, locals and visitors alike have reveled in this sensation as fodder for myth-making and storytelling. Some stories really stick, lasting for centuries and becoming embedded into the city itself, through its buildings, monuments, and specific locations. And there’s one building that has had plenty of legends built around it. This particular elegant structure had an illustrious past, having once been a meeting place where Italian Renaissance artists discussed their craft, caroused, and gambled. But it’s also the location where relationships soured, crimes were committed, and death inevitably followed. Today, some people won’t even enter this particular building because it is feared to be haunted, cursed… or both.// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out here. Not to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:Glory of Venice exhibition at the North Carolina Museum of ArtRead Vasari's take on Morto da FeltreWikipedia's Entry on Morto da FeltreMysterious Venice: The Casino of the Spirits (In Italian)Italian Mysteries: Haunted Venice

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  • Episode #16: The Muse

    · 00:20:02 · ArtCurious Podcast

    Sometimes when I am looking at a particularly fascinating work of art, I find myself overwhelmed with awe-- for the creative act itself and the technical prowess that was needed to bring it to fruition. I’ve often had those moments where I have thought to myself, “Wow. How did this all come about? What is the inspiration behind this piece?” And any conversation about inspiration in the arts inevitably brings up a discussion about muses. This episode looks at the relationship--and occasional romance-- between artists and their muses, with a particular emphasis on one woman whose connection to two brothers illustrates this exchange in a compelling way. // Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!       Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out here. Not to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:Artventures Blog: Manet and Morisot: The Tale of Love and Sadness in the PortraitsSaper Galleries: The Women of Pablo PicassoHuffington Post: Ten Amazing Female Artists and Their Male MusesThe Telegraph: Picasso's MusesProjection Systems Blog: The Origin of Painting 

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  • Episode #15: Hans-Joachim Bohlmann and Serial Art Vandalism

    · 00:26:00 · ArtCurious Podcast

    A few months ago, I began looking into occurrences of art vandalism-- the purposeful destruction or harm of works of art that have occurred consistently, especially throughout the 20th century. As I read up, I saw that most of these events were one-offs: single moments where one person made a rash and ridiculous choice to lash out at a particular work of art. But then, I began to notice one name popping up over and over again- a German man who, over his lifetime, damaged over fifty works of art, creating a name for himself and a lasting impression on the art world. This episode, in a continuation of our Bigger Picture series, digs deeper into art attacks and examine the life and legacy of the vandal Hans-Joachim Bohlmann.// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!            Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out here. Not to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission.                                              

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  • Episode #14: Samuel F. B. Morse's Gallery of the Louvre

    · 00:27:40 · ArtCurious Podcast

    How many know that the inventor of the telegraph and co-creator of Morse code--Samuel F. B. Morse-- was a successful artist, too? And crazily enough, one of his paintings in particular, foreshadowed his interest in communication tools, providing the impetus for revolutionizing communication--and, indeed, the world as we know it. Listen in for details on Morse's masterpiece, Gallery of the Louvre.               // Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!       Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out here. Not to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:The National Gallery of Art's exhibition page: with video, exhibition brochure, and more great infoThe History Blog's Profile on Morse the ArtistSamuel Morse's Other Masterpiece: Smithsonian MagazineSamuel Morse's Early WorksSix Things You May Not Know about Samuel Morse: History.comSamuel Morse website for more details: Samuelmorse.net                                                              

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