Episodes

  • What are Sundown Towns?

    A sundown or sunset town was a city, town or neighbourhood in the US that excluded non-whites after dark. The term sundown came from the signs that were posted at the Towns borders stating "Negro, Don't Let the Sun Set On You Here." A stark warning that let blacks know we had to leave by sundown. To learn more listen to this informative mini episode.

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  • In this episode, we will be visiting an Ancient African folktale that tells us why Fire and Rain are enemies!Credits:Art Work by Sergey PereskokovResearch, writing, editing and production by King KurusSpecial thanks to, Ebi, Olu, Yelare & StephanieIf you enjoyed the show and would like to support the creation of more content use the links below:https://www.patreon.com/Blackhistorybuff (Patreon)https://steadyhq.com/blackhistory (Steady)https://www.paypal.me/blackhistorybuff777 (Paypal)https://www.buymeacoffee.com/483rNBY (Buy me a coffee)For regular updates click:http://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/black-history-buff-join-us (Join us)You can find us at:http://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/black-history-buff-join-us (Socal links)&https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/ (www.blackhistorybuff.com)We hope you enjoyed the show and remember Black History is World History Support this podcast

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  • During the summer of 1957 nine students enrolled at Little Rock high central high, which up until then had been an all-white school. In this episode, we go back and take a look at what those brave students went through and why. https://www.sutori.com/story/the-little-rock-nine--VWF22hN7gUFG7f3cRr7UMvgP (Click here to learn more about the Little Rock Nine)Send a voice messagehttps://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2 (Social Media links page)Also if you'd like to support me and the show use the Patreon & Buy me a Coffee Links:https://anchor.fm/dashboard/episode/ea041n/metadata/%E2%80%9Chttps://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=7938669%E2%80%9D (Support the show on Patreon)ORhttps://anchor.fm/dashboard/episode/ea041n/metadata/%E2%80%9Chttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/483rNBY (Buy me a coffee)) Support this podcast

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  • While creating my soon to be released episode about the Little Rock Nine, I got to thinking about education, school and specifically my first day at school. I started to think about people's first days in general. I decided to ask a few listeners and friends to share their first day experiences, some of which you'll hear in today's episode. I hope you enjoy it.I'd love to hear from you, and when I say hear from I mean your voices, so if you have something to say and are happy for it to be aired on the show, please leave me a message using the links below. If you're on social media, you can leave me a message using the link in my bio. Send a voice messagehttps://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2 (Social Media links page)Also if you'd like to support me and the show use the Patreon & Buy me a Coffee Links:Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffee) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: Welcome to season 2 of The Black History Buff Podcast. This season kicks off with an interview with a young man named Enosadeda OdiaseNosa is a former engineering student now fully-fledged engineer, born in London from Nigerian parents and one half of a writing team who have produced what I can only describe as an African Game of Thrones. In the interview, we discuss his background, reasons for writing the book, African History and even his favourite food. You can contact me on social media and check out a copy of Nosa's book using the link below:https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeTodays Black History Blitz is about a self-taught mathematician, astronomer, compiler of almanacs, a writer, an inventor and the man who may have completed the Design for Washing DC Capitol City of the United States of America from memory.Benjamin Banneker was born November 9th, 1731 on a farm near Baltimore that he would eventually inherit from his father. Although he occasionally attended a one-room Quaker schoolhouse, Banneker was mostly self-educated and did much of his learning through the avid reading of borrowed books. It was noted that from a young age he was particularly skilled at Mathematics.His early accomplishments included constructing an irrigation system for the family farm and a wooden clock that kept accurate time and ran for more than 50 years until his death.To listen to the podcast click the link below:https://radiopublic.com/black-history-buff-podcast-WezjVV/ep/s1!cc8f8249d7273c5ba8471ef1d6f6f768275c77b8If you'd like to become a friend of the show follow the links below:https://pod.fan/black-history-buff-podcastYou can find me at:https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: This is King Kurus from the black history buff podcast and before I get into this weeks African Proverb I just Want to say thank you to:Muleya Glenda BTaherra LAlaina DAlayA and Edward JFor joining me on Patreon and helping to sponsor the development of the show I’d also like to say thank you to Globallymobile steplegs [email protected] vDeeElHaze For leaving me 5 star reviews on Apple podcasts. These reviews really go a long way to helping people to find out about the show and well if I’m honest It’s just great to get some feedback and know that your all listening.and that brings me neatly to the subject of this week proverb. One of the hardest things about doing my style of podcast is that it’s a solo pursuit. From the research, to the writing, to finding the sound effects, then editing, posting and promoting via social, I like many many many podcasters do all this by myself and brings me to this weeks proverb which is:Listen to the episode to hear the rest https://cutt.ly/b-history (Learn more here)) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeA short promo clip for you to share with friends, family and anyone you might kinda care about. ) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: Marcus Garvey was a Jamaican activist, and entrepreneur who founded the UNIA and campaigned for a better quality of life for all black people. The Pan African red black and green colours you see and that form part of the Ghanian flag come from Garvey’s organisation. I’ll be doing an episode on Garvey soon but for today I wanted to focus on a quote from him made on February 10th 1925 from an Atlanta prison. Learn more at https://cutt.ly/b-history) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: Have you ever wondered how the medical profession came to be? or in fact who started the profession at all? Well, take a seat and prepare to be amazed because today’s episode is about Egyptian genius Imhotep the Father of modern Medicine. Imhotep, was born sometime around 2667 BCE in Egypt. A commoner by birth but genius by nature Imhotep is what is known as a {polymath} and during his lifetime mastered the Arts of Astronomy, Architecture, Poetry, Mathematics and medicine. For anyone wondering what a polymath is listen to the end of the episode for a really great explanation.Learn more at https://cutt.ly/b-history (https://cutt.ly/b-history)) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: Todays Black History Blitz is about the 7’2, Kung fu fighting, book writing legend. Kareem Abdul-Jabr one of the greatest players to ever grace the sport of basketballBorn Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor Jr, on April the16th 1947, in New York City. Alcindor was always one of the tallest kids in his class and by the age of 9 stood an impressive 5’8He began playing the sport of basketball at an early age, first impressing in high school and then after graduating in 1965 enrolling at the University of California-Los Angeles, eventually becoming the college games best player Alcindor won three National championships between 1967 and 1969 winning Most outstanding player each year.https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2 (Learn more here)) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: I'm going to be very honest here and make a confession. I'm a procrastinator, there I said it and it feels good. It’s taken me ages to finally admit that. So this particular proverb really hits home for me. “Supposing doesn't fill the grain basket “if” doesn't fill the larder.” This sounds so sounds obvious, it’s even a little easy to dismiss until you stop and think about the fact that at certain times in our past and even now, procrastination could be the difference between your family eating and not eating. Click here to find out more) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: Todays Proverb is an Igbo saying from Nigeria:“The big game often appears when the hunter has given up the hunt for the day”This saying really resonates with me as often I feel called to just quit, to give up and do something easier. I can Imagine the hunter, tired, deflated and on the verge of going home empty-handed. When suddenly their prize appears, and they forget about tiredness, hunger, that previous feeling of defeat and now the only thing that matters is overcoming their foe and getting what they came for. That ability to perform when you're at the end of your strength is what marks people out for greatness. So if you're listening to this. Don't give up, don't quit, your prize is waiting for you at the end of the day and when you see it YOU WILL have enough strength to bring it back home.https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2 (Find out more here)) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: This Episode is about an African Queen who defined Rome and carved out a place for herself in History.Kandake Amanirenas is one of the most celebrated rulers of the Ancient Kingdom of Kush, located in the region of Nubia, which we now know as Sudan. She ruled from 40BC to 10BC.Kandake - also known as Candace, Kendake or Kentake - was the title given to Queens and Queen Mothers of the region and is the origin of the modern name Candice. Kush was a civilisation centred in the North African region of Nubia. It was, In fact, one of the earliest civilisations to develop in the Nile River Valley. Kushite states rose to power before a period of Egyptian incursion into the area established an Egyptian dynasty, the 25th Dynasty, in 775 B.C.E. lasting until 653. (By the way, BC numbers work towards zero and AD numbers work away from 0, thanks Rome for making history way more confusing)The Pharaohs of this have been called the ‘Black Pharaohs’, or the ‘Ethiopian Pharaohs’.With a rich and vibrant trading culture, Kush coexisted in peace for centuries with its neighbours, due to its role in commerce and in the transportation of goods. The Kingdom of Kush represents yet another ancient African civilisation of which relatively few people outside of Africa are aware, often reducing Africa’s contribution to culture to the Egyptian legacy alone. Kush, however, is referenced in the Bible and The Kingdom was well known to the Romans. Fun fact. There are more pyramids in Sudan (Kush) than anywhere else in the world 220!"Listen to the show to find out the rest or head over to my website https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/ (www.blackhistorybuff.com) & https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/ (www.africanhistorypodcast.com)You can find the Black History Buff Podcast and more https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2 (here.)Credits:Music by - The Amazing @elanbrioCover art by @black_history_buff_777Special credit and thank you to:@[email protected]@[email protected]_black_man_podcastKat SuffolkDani CamusThank you for all your supportFind more at Patreon:https://www.patreon.com/Blackhistorybuff/postsFind us on Instagram: @blackhistorybuff777 @bhb_media_777 & @black_history_podcastand finallySupport Black history buff at Paypal:paypal.me/blackhistorybuff777Thank you for your time and attention it means the world to me Ase) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: To tide you over while Im researching and writing longer episodes I've created a new segment called Black History blitz. Short, bite sized and fun, like any good snack its best when shared with friends, so tell your friends about it. Today's Black history Blitz is about the hard-drinking, shotgun carrying wild west legend known as Stagecoach Mary. The first African American Woman to Join the US mail.Mary Fields, later to be known as Stage Coach Mary was born in Hickman County Tennessee at around 1832 Liberated from enslavement at the end of the American Civil war, Fields headed North working on Riverboats till she eventually found permanent work in an Ohio convent.Her gruff style and constant cursing raised eyebrows in the quiet convent, and though she faithfully served the nuns, news of her habitual drinking, smoking, shooting guns and wearing men’s clothing. Caused upheaval. Things came to a head when Fields and the convent’s male janitor drew guns on each other during a heated argument, it was the final straw and she was fired.Fields love of hard drinking and gunfights eventually paid off when in 1895 she won a contract from the postal service to become a Star route carrier making her the first African American woman to do soCathy Williams, we salute you! To learn more about black history please check out the black history buffhttps://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/black-history-buff-podcast/id1412528674 (podcast)https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1Z7vpy18ODUCpc8GRNHjlw?view_as=subscriber (youtube)https://twitter.com/blackhistory777?lang=en-gb (twitter)https://www.pinterest.co.uk/blackhistorybuff777/pins/ (Pinterest)https://anchor.fm/dashboard/episode/www.blackhistorybuff.com (Website)Just google black history buff and you’ll find us there or hit the link belowhttps://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2 (https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2)Oh and if you enjoyed this please share because black history is world history) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: To tide you over while Im researching and writing longer episodes I've created a new segment called Black History blitz. Short, bite sized and fun, like any good snack its best when shared with friends, so tell your friends about it. Today's Black history Blitz is about Cathy Williams. The first African American Woman to enlist in the United States Army and the only one we know about who did so posing as a man!! Williams was born in Independence, Missouri September 1844 and lived until 1893 As a teen, Williams worked as a house slave on the outskirts of Jefferson City, Missouri. Despite there being a ban against women serving in the military, Cathay Williams enlisted in the Army under the false name of "William Cathay" on November 15, 1866, passing herself off as a man. She was assigned to the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/38th_Infantry_Regiment_(United_States) (38th United States Infantry Regiment) after she passed a Brief medical examination. She was only discovered when a surgeon treating her for injuries realised she was a woman She was discharged from the Army on October 14, 1868. After having served for nearly 3 years In 2016, a bronze bust of Cathay Williams was unveiled outside the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Allen_Cultural_Center (Richard Allen Cultural Center) in Leavenworth, Kansas Cathy Williams, we salute you! To learn more about black history please check out the black history buffhttps://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/black-history-buff-podcast/id1412528674 (podcast)https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1Z7vpy18ODUCpc8GRNHjlw?view_as=subscriber (youtube)https://twitter.com/blackhistory777?lang=en-gb (twitter)https://www.pinterest.co.uk/blackhistorybuff777/pins/ (Pinterest)WebsiteJust google black history buff and you’ll find us there or hit the link belowhttps://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2 (https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2)Oh and if you enjoyed this please share because black history is world history) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: Todays episode features a scathing response to possibly the most Ill advised “take me back” letter ever and some wisdom from an ancient African proverb.Every so often, when I’m browsing the internet I’ll come across something that for some reason stops me dead in my tracks. Recently it was an image. The picture was of a sober looking dark skinned, middle aged Blackman, sporting a very full very fine beard. He had the kind of look on his face that your grandfather gives you right before asking you to “pick your own punishment” or to “go get the belt”. Children of all colours and cultures call it “The look” and it means that patience is wearing thin.The stern face in the picture belonged to a formerly enslaved man named Jourdan Anderson. Who lived during the 19th century. Very little is known about his life other, than that he was taken from his parents as a boy and sold in to a life of slavery. We know that he was born sometime around December 1825, and somewhere in Tennessee, and that he was “sold” to a General Paulding Anderson, who then “gifted” and I say that through gritted teeth, Jourdan, to his son Patrick Henry Anderson, who went by his middle name, Henry. We know that he married Amanda McGregor in 1848 and that the couple may have eventually had around 11 children and we know that in 1864 when Union troops camped out on the plantation where Anderson had been forced to labour for his entire life, that he, his family and possibly 32 other enslaved people were all freed due to President Lincon’s 1863 emancipation proclamation. This mass exodus broke the back of the plantation and ruined the finances of Patrick Henry Anderson, Jourdans former owner. Listen to show to find out the rest or head over my websitewww.blackhistorybuff.com & www.africanhistorypodcast.comOr click https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2 (here)Credits:Music by - The Amazing @elanbrioCover art by @black_history_buff_777Special credit and thank you to:@[email protected]@[email protected]_black_man_podcastKat SuffolkDani CamusThank you for all your supportand finallyThank you for your time and attention it means the world to me Ase) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: Welcome to the first of many episodes where I bring you some amazing myths and legends from the African diaspora. This episode is about a wiseman who offends a whole village and outwits a King. Listen to show to find out the rest or head over my website https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/blogs/podcast (www.blackhistorybuff.com) &https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/blogs/podcast ( www.africanhistorypodcast.com) You can find the Black History Buff Podcast https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2 (here.)Credits: Music by - Surra Susso Cover art by @black_history_buff_777Special credit and thank you to: @mum_life_with_toni @vixharrisart @chris_antonie7 @eye_black_man_podcast @sierraleonegoddess1 Kat Suffolk Dani Camus Thank you for all your support Find us on Instagram: @blackhistorybuff777 https://www.instagram.com/ (@bhb_media_777) & https://www.instagram.com/ (@black_history_podcast )) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: In this episode I take the opportunity to say thank you to the amazing supporters of the show and to you the listeners. I speak about why I started the show and give a hint at where it's going. If you want to learn more black history and more about what I do you can find me at https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/ (www.blackhistorybuff.com) & https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/ (www.africanhistorypodcast.com)You can find the Black History Buff Podcast and. more https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2 (here)Credits:Music by - The Amazing @elanbrioCover art by @black_history_buff_777Special credit and thank you to:@[email protected]@[email protected]_black_man_podcastKat SuffolkDani CamusThank you for all your supportFind more at https://www.patreon.com/Blackhistorybuff (Patreon:)https://www.patreon.com/Blackhistorybuff/postsFind us on Instagram: @blackhistorybuff777 @bhb_media_777 & @black_history_podcastand finallyThank you for your time and attention it means the world to me Ase) Support this podcast

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  • Support the show on PatreonORBuy me a coffeeShow Notes: There is a common misconception about Europe and Black people; that basically, there are no black people there other than maybe in London. As a first-generation West Indian born in London myself, I too fall victim to this strange phenomenon. Occasionally, a reader from Russia or as happened this week from Estonia will contact me and I'll think to myself “How on earth did black people get there?” Yea I know it’s dumb, but if you catch me on a miserable Monday morning, I’m liable to think anything. So, more to remind me than to educate anyone else that we are a global people, this particular slice of history is from Poland via Germany. Let me introduce you to Miss Lala also know as, Olga Kaira, “Olga the Mulatto”, “Olga the Negress”, “The Venus of the Tropics”, “The Cannon Woman” and “The African Princess.”Miss Lala was born Anna Olga Albertina Brown to Wilhelm Brown and Marie Christine Borchardt, on April 21, 1858, in the former German (but now Polish) city of Stettin (Szczecin).Miss Lala though possessed incredible strength, an all-around circus performer she worked at various times as a wire walker, trapeze artist, hand balancer, strong woman and incredibly enough an iron jaw performer. She first appeared in the circus aged 9 and found fame aged 21 in France. She toured around Europe eventually finding her way to London where she performed at the Royal Aquarium and Manchester's Gaiety Theatre.Lala was part of the troupe called Folies Bergère and the Keziah Sisters. She partnered with another strength acrobat called Theophila Szterker/Kaira la Blanche. Together they were known as Les Deux Papillons (The two butterflies).Please check out the show to learn more :)You can check out the painting mentioned in the show here:https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/blogs/the-black-history-buff-blog/test-olga-kaira (Click here)You can find the Map Mentioned https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/collections/frontpage/products/world-map-scratch-off-world-map-poster-scratchable-world-travel-map-perfect-for-student-parents-and-teachers (here )and to get the map with 50% use the discode BLACK777 at the checkoutFollow us and find out more https://www.blackhistorybuff.com/pages/social-2 (here)https://www.paypal.me/blackhistorybuff777 (Support this podcast)) Support this podcast

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