Episodes


  • Deep Death (Aired January 2, 1940)

    The show was initially created around these two actors, though Trevor was then a young budding actress appearing in movies as well as radio. Producer-Director-Writer Jerry McGill had been a newspaperman and wrote the series about a crusading managing editor of the Illustrated Press. McGill took his show to heart writing stories about juvenile delinquency, drunk driving and racism, though the show was at worst melodramatic at best poignant. Hard-nosed editor, Wilson, as played by Robinson would get the story no matter what it takes. Though sometimes over the top, Robinson was excellent in his role. The stories were well written and directed by William N. Robson as well as McGill. The show was a big promoter of the free press and the first amendment with its opening sequence: "Freedom of the press is a flaming sword! Use it justly...hold it high...guard it well!" The second series began immediately in the 1943 season when the production moved from Hollywood to New York. Robinson left (Trevor left two years earlier as her career starting taking off) and McGill reorganized the series placing Edward Pawley in the role of Wilson opposite Fran Carlon as Lorelei.


  • Gasoline Cocktail (Aired December 12, 1949)

    With the possible exception of Ed Begley, Everett Sloane, Lionel Stander and Joan Lorring, none of the other featured actors in the series ever played a major role in Radio. We don't mention this to in any way detract from these fine performers' work in this program. We simply point out the novelty of this program in the annals of Golden Age Radio history. "In the Interest of Good Citizenship and Law Enforcement," MGM presented these seventy-eight programs as syndicated transcriptions. There had been a glut of such civic minded programs between the 1940s and 1950s, so it's difficult to imagine how MGM thought they might milk even more public interest out of yet another such program. But it turned out to be a very successful program for both MGM and WMGM. Crime Does Not Pay was well-received during its run.


    THIS EPISODE:


    December 12, 1949. Program #10. MGM syndication. "Gasoline Cocktail". Commercials added locally. A Transylvanian arsonist is extinguished. The date above is the date of the first broadcast of the program on WMGM, New York from which this syndicated version may have been taken. Marx B. Loeb (director), Jon Gart (composer, conductor), Burton B. Turkas (technical advisor), Bela Lugosi, Ira Marion (writer), Bob Williams (announcer). 28:39. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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  • The Iron Chancellor (Aired January 27, 1973)

    X Minus One was an NBC science fiction series that was an extension, or revival, of NBC's earlier science fiction series, DIMENSION X. which ran from Apr. 8, 1950 through Sept. 29, 1951. Both are remembered for bringing really first rate science fiction to the air. The first X Minus One shows used scripts from Dimension X, but soon created new shows from storied from the pages of Galaxy Magazine. The series was cancelled after the 126th broadcast on January 9, 1958. However, the early 1970s brought a wave of nostalgia for old-time radio; a new experimental episode, "The Iron Chancellor" by Robert Silverberg, was created in 1973, but it failed to revive the series.


    THIS EPISODE:


    January 27, 1973. "The Iron Chancellor" - NBC network, Renaissance Radio syndication, WRVR-FM, New York aircheck. "The Iron Chancellor". A robot runs amok. Sophomoric. Robert Silverberg (author), Leon Janney, Jackson Beck, Roy Fox (commercial spokesman, performer), Evie Juster, Donald Buka, Ira Shprintzen (director), Donna Phonfer (? adaptor), Sal Trepani (producer). 26:05. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


  • Detectives Are Not Always Right (Aired December 11, 1955)

    This is an Australian radio production of the classic MGM science fiction movie, Forbidden Planet. The production uses all the original electronic music and effects from the film. Length: 55 Min. What can I say? Years before Starfleet officers donned uniforms in Star Trek, it was done in Forbidden Planet. Long before Han Solo held a blaster, the guys in Forbidden Planet did it. Long before Star Trek's android Data and shortly before Lost in Space's Robby, a mechanical being played a major role in Forbidden Planet. Long before big special effects films ruled movie theaters, Forbidden Planet was packed with great effects, including astounding matte paintings. Long before electronically-created music became common, Forbidden Planet featured an all-synthesizer soundtrack that gave a futuristic and creepy feeling. Long before Leslie Nielson said, "Don't call me Shirley," he wore a spacesuit and wielded a ray gun.


  • Special Guest Is Fred Astaire (Aired February 17, 1948)

    After five years on the Vaudeville circuit, by his own account Hope was surprised and humbled when he and his partner Grace Louise Troxell failed a 1930 screen test for Pathé at Culver City, California. (Hope had been on the screen in small parts, 1927's The Sidewalks of New York and 1928's Smiles. Hope returned to New York City and subsequently appeared in several Broadway musicals including Roberta, Say When, the 1936 Ziegfeld Follies, and Red, Hot and Blue with Ethel Merman. His performances were generally well-received and critics noted his keen sense of comedic timing. He changed his name from "Leslie" to "Bob", reportedly because people in the US were calling him "Hopelessly", although in the 1920s he sometimes used the name "Lester Hope".


    THIS EPISODE:


    February 17, 1948. "Special Guest Is Fred Astaire" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Pepsodent. The program originates from Canoga Park High School, Woodland Hills, California. Fred and Bob do a skit about their start in show business. Barbara Jo Allen, the real mayor of Woodland Hills, makes a fund appeal for the United Nations Crusade For Children. Bob Hope, Fred Astaire, Jerry Colonna, Barbara Jo Allen, Trudy Erwin, Les Brown and His Orchestra, Dorothy Lovett, Wendell Niles (announcer), Jack Kirkwood, Norman Sullivan (writer), Fred Williams (writer), Larry Kline (writer), Paul Laven (writer), Ray Allen (writer), Fred Fox (writer), Roger Price (writer), Chet Castellaw (writer), Glenn Wheaton (writer), Harold Goodman (writer), Hendrix Voellaris, Al Capstaff (producer), Bob Stephenson (director). 27:11. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

  • Detectives Are Not Always Right (Aired December 11, 1955)

    This is an Australian radio production of the classic MGM science fiction movie, Forbidden Planet. The production uses all the original electronic music and effects from the film. Length: 55 Min. What can I say? Years before Starfleet officers donned uniforms in Star Trek, it was done in Forbidden Planet. Long before Han Solo held a blaster, the guys in Forbidden Planet did it. Long before Star Trek's android Data and shortly before Lost in Space's Robby, a mechanical being played a major role in Forbidden Planet. Long before big special effects films ruled movie theaters, Forbidden Planet was packed with great effects, including astounding matte paintings. Long before electronically-created music became common, Forbidden Planet featured an all-synthesizer soundtrack that gave a futuristic and creepy feeling. Long before Leslie Nielson said, "Don't call me Shirley," he wore a spacesuit and wielded a ray gun.


  • The Blood Soaked Wagon (Aired May 2, 1949)

    The author, (Sir) Arthur Conan-Doyle wrote his first Holmes story, A Study In Scarlet, in 1886. Sherlock Holmes, a fictitious character was based on a real man, Dr Joseph Bell, a renown forensic scientist at Edinburgh University whom Conan-Doyle studied under. Conan-Doyle wrote 56 self contained short stories & 4 novels (60 adventures in total) The collection is known as The Cannon. The first Sherlock Holmes film was produced in 1900. In 1939 the novels were developed as a series of films staring Basil Rathbone, establishing the trademark deerstalker, pipe & spyglass as a global visual icon. Conan Doyle wrote four novels and fifty-six short stories that feature Holmes. The first two stories, short novels appeared in Beeton's Christmas Annual for 1887 and Lippincott's Monthly Magazine in 1890, respectively. The character grew tremendously in popularity with the beginning of the first series of short stories in The Strand Magazine in 1891; further series of short stories and two serialised novels appeared until 1927.


    THIS EPISODE:


    May 2, 1949. Mutual network. "The Adventure Of The Blood-Soaked Wagon". Sponsored by: Clipper Craft Clothes. John Stanley, George Spelvin (a name traditionally used by actors who wish to remain anonymous), Arthur Conan Doyle (creator), Cy Harrice (announcer), Albert Buhrman (music), Basil Loughrane (producer, director), Howard Merrill (writer), Ian Martin. 24:25. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


  • INTRO: Bob Plays Skeeter Davis "The End of The World" (1962)
    "The Delinquent Parents" (Aired April 5, 1946)

    This Is Your FBI was sponsored during its entire run by the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States (now AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company). This is Your FBI had counterparts on the other networks. The FBI in Peace and War also told stories of the FBI, although some were not authentic. Earlier on, Gangbusters, and the previously mentioned Mr. District Attorney gave the authentic crime treatment to their stories. And Dragnet, and Tales of the Texas Rangers, took the idea on as well. Crime, especially true crime, was a genre in the magazines early on, with the Police Gazette and its predecessors in England printing lurid true crime stories prior to radio. This is Your FBI took the idea, and made it realistic, exciting and even informational.


    THIS EPISODE:


    April 5, 1946. ABC network. "The Delinquent Parents". Sponsored by: The Equitable Life Assurance Society. Frederick Steiner (music director), Dean Carlton (narrator), Jerry Devine (producer), Carl Frank (announcer), Frank Faries (writer). 29:19. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.




  • The Deadly Fight (Aired January 23, 1952)

    Barry Craig, Confidential Investigator is one of the few detective radio series that had separate versions of it broadcast from both coasts. Even the spelling changed over the years. It was first "Barry Crane" and then "Barrie Craig". NBC produced it in New York from 1951 to 1954 and then moved it to Hollywood where it aired from 1954 to 1955. It attracted only occasional sponsors so it was usually a sustainer.William Gargan, who also played the better known television (and radio) detective Martin Kane, was the voice of New York eye BARRY CRAIG while Ralph Bell portrayed his associate, Lt. Travis Rogers. Craig's office was on Madison Avenue and his adventures were fairly standard PI fare. He worked alone, solved cases efficiently, and feared no man. As the promos went, he was "your man when you can't go to the cops. Confidentiality a speciality."Like Sam Spade, Craig narrated his stories, in addition to being the leading character in this 30 minute show. Nearly sixty episodes are in trading circulation today.


    THIS EPISODE:


    January 23, 1952. NBC network. "The Deadly Fight". Sustaining. Not auditioned. "A widow who can't find tears, an obituary notice in search of a cough and a boxing champ whose biggest win is a fight, strictly off the record." Fran Carlon, Himan Brown (director), William Gargan, John Roeburt (writer), Don Pardo (announcer). 22:11 Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


  • Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Cisco Kid" - Run On The Bank (01-22-53)

    The Cisco Kid is a fictional character found in numerous film, radio, television and comic book series based on the fictional Western character created by O. Henry in his 1907 short story "The Caballero's Way", published in Everybody's Magazine, v17, July 1907, well as in the collection Heart of the West. Originally a murderous criminal in O. Henry's story, the Kid was depicted as a heroic Mexican caballero later in films, radio and television adaptations. In O. Henry's original story, the character is a 25-year-old desperado in the Texas–Mexico border country who bears little resemblance to later interpretations of the character. He kills for sport and is responsible for at least eighteen deaths. His real name is possibly Goodall ("This hombre they call the Kid—Goodall is his name, ain't it?"); no first name is given in the story.


    THIS EPISODE:


    January 22, 1953. Program #54. Mutual-Don Lee network, KHJ, Los Angeles origination, Ziv syndication. "Run On The Bank". Commercials added locally. Jack Mather, Harry Lang. 27:22. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


  • The Big Blast (Aired June 28, 1955)

    Dragnet was a long running radio and television police procedural drama, about the cases of a dedicated Los Angeles police detective, Sergeant Joe Friday, and his partners. The show takes its name from an actual police term, a Dragnet, meaning a system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects. Dragnet was perhaps the most famous and influential police procedural drama in American media history. The series gave millions of Americans a feel for the boredom and drudgery, as well as the danger and heroism, of real life police work. Dragnet earned praise for improving the public opinion of police officers. Actor and producer Jack Webb's aims in Dragnet were for realism and unpretentious acting. He achieved both goals and Dragnet remains a key influence on subsequent police dramas in many media.


    THIS EPISODE:


    June 28, 1955. Program #306. NBC network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "The Big Convertible". A man cashing bad payroll checks all over town has been using a rented car. Jack Webb, Ben Alexander. 25:02. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


  • The Clue Of The Ivory Thread (Aired March 27, 1955)

    Abbott Mysteries was a comedy-mystery radio program adapted from the novels of Frances Crane (1896-1981). Julie Stevens and Charles Webster starred as Jean and Pat Abbott, a San Francisco married couple who solved murder mysteries. In the supporting cast were Jean Ellyn, Sydney Slon and Luis Van Rooten. Moving to 5:30pm in 1946, Les Tremayne and Alice Reinheart took over the roles until the end of the series on August 31, 1947. Seven years later, the characters returned October 3, 1954, on NBC in The Adventures of the Abbotts, broadcast on NBC Sunday evenings at 8:30pm. The Abbotts were portrayed by Claudia Morgan and Les Damon. The NBC series ran until June 12, 1955.


    THIS EPISODE:


    March 27, 1955. Program #8. NBC network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "The Clue Of The Ivory Thread". Les Damon, Claudia Morgan, Frances Crane (creator), Howard Merrill (writer), Bernard L. Schubert (producer), Ted Lloyd (producer), Harry Frazee (director, recordist), Dewey Bergman (composer, conductor), Joe DeSantis, John Ridgely, Wayne Howell (announcer). 30:20. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


  • The Clue Of The Ivory Thread (Aired March 27, 1955)

    Abbott Mysteries was a comedy-mystery radio program adapted from the novels of Frances Crane (1896-1981). Julie Stevens and Charles Webster starred as Jean and Pat Abbott, a San Francisco married couple who solved murder mysteries. In the supporting cast were Jean Ellyn, Sydney Slon and Luis Van Rooten. Moving to 5:30pm in 1946, Les Tremayne and Alice Reinheart took over the roles until the end of the series on August 31, 1947. Seven years later, the characters returned October 3, 1954, on NBC in The Adventures of the Abbotts, broadcast on NBC Sunday evenings at 8:30pm. The Abbotts were portrayed by Claudia Morgan and Les Damon. The NBC series ran until June 12, 1955.


    THIS EPISODE:


    March 27, 1955. Program #8. NBC network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "The Clue Of The Ivory Thread". Les Damon, Claudia Morgan, Frances Crane (creator), Howard Merrill (writer), Bernard L. Schubert (producer), Ted Lloyd (producer), Harry Frazee (director, recordist), Dewey Bergman (composer, conductor), Joe DeSantis, John Ridgely, Wayne Howell (announcer). 30:20. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


  • The Maharani Mix-Up (Aired June 29, 1950)

    Maisie, the first in 1939, was from the book "Dark Dame" by the writer Wilson Collison,who did decades of scripting for the silver screen along with Broadway plays and magazine fiction. From the first, MGM wanted Ann Sothern to play Maisie. She began in Hollywood as an extra in 1927. "Maisie and I were just together - I just understood her," Sothern, born Harriette Arlene Lake, said after several of the films made her a star. Throughout the 1930s and '40s, Ann Sothern and Lucille Ball, like many performers in Hollywood, had not one but two careers - one in motion pictures and one on radio. MGM Studios had created the series of ten motion pictures based on a brash blonde with a heart "of spun gold." Sothern, due in great part to the Maisie films type-casting, would ultimately admit she was "a Hollywood princess, not a Hollywood queen." But in its time, the Maisie series in film and on radio made her known and loved the world over.


  • Little Phil Alquin (Aired May 9, 1934)

    As shows of this nature do it dealt with tracking killers and robbers with a recap of the justice which was enforced. The writer and director was William N. Robson. Calling All Cars episodes were dramatized true crime stories that were not only introduced by officers of the Los Angeles Police Department but were true life crime stories of the LAPD. If you are thinking early version of Dragnet, yes, but not quite as polished. Dragnet was believed to have been inspired by Calling All Cars. None of the actors on the show ever received on-air credit, but among the talent OTR fans can hear the likes of Elvia Allman, Jackson Beck, Charles Bickford, John Gibson, Richard LeGrand and Hanley Stafford, just to name a few.


    THIS EPISODE:


    May 9, 1934. Program #24. CBS Pacific network (Don Lee network "Little Phil Alquin". Sponsored by: Rio Grande Oil. A police lieutenant has just been murdered by an unknown assailant. Frederick Lindsley is introduced as "Professor Lindsley." The system cue has been deleted. Charles Frederick Lindsley (narrator). 29:50. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


  • The Maharani Mix-Up (Aired June 29, 1950)

    Maisie, the first in 1939, was from the book "Dark Dame" by the writer Wilson Collison,who did decades of scripting for the silver screen along with Broadway plays and magazine fiction. From the first, MGM wanted Ann Sothern to play Maisie. She began in Hollywood as an extra in 1927. "Maisie and I were just together - I just understood her," Sothern, born Harriette Arlene Lake, said after several of the films made her a star. Throughout the 1930s and '40s, Ann Sothern and Lucille Ball, like many performers in Hollywood, had not one but two careers - one in motion pictures and one on radio. MGM Studios had created the series of ten motion pictures based on a brash blonde with a heart "of spun gold." Sothern, due in great part to the Maisie films type-casting, would ultimately admit she was "a Hollywood princess, not a Hollywood queen." But in its time, the Maisie series in film and on radio made her known and loved the world over.


  • The Maharani Mix-Up (Aired June 29, 1950)

    Maisie, the first in 1939, was from the book "Dark Dame" by the writer Wilson Collison,who did decades of scripting for the silver screen along with Broadway plays and magazine fiction. From the first, MGM wanted Ann Sothern to play Maisie. She began in Hollywood as an extra in 1927. "Maisie and I were just together - I just understood her," Sothern, born Harriette Arlene Lake, said after several of the films made her a star. Throughout the 1930s and '40s, Ann Sothern and Lucille Ball, like many performers in Hollywood, had not one but two careers - one in motion pictures and one on radio. MGM Studios had created the series of ten motion pictures based on a brash blonde with a heart "of spun gold." Sothern, due in great part to the Maisie films type-casting, would ultimately admit she was "a Hollywood princess, not a Hollywood queen." But in its time, the Maisie series in film and on radio made her known and loved the world over.


  • INTRO: Bob plays "When I Fall In Love" by Doris Day (1952)
    "Death Is My Caller" (Aired October 21, 1947)

    Unlike many other shows of the era, The Mysterious Traveler was without a sponsor for its entire run. The lonely sound of a distant locomotive heralded the arrival of the malevolent narrator, portrayed by Maurice Tarplin, who introduced himself each week in the following manner. This is the Mysterious Traveler, inviting you to join me on another journey into the strange and terrifying. I hope you will enjoy the trip, that it will thrill you a little and chill you a little. So settle back, get a good grip on your nerves and be comfortable -- if you can! Cast members included Jackson Beck, Lon Clark, Roger DeKoven, Elspeth Eric, Wendell Holmes, Bill Johnstone, Joseph Julian, Jan Miner, Santos Ortega, Bryna Raeburn, Frank Readick, Ann Shepherd, Lawson Zerbe and Bill Zuckert. Sound effects were by Jack Amrhein, Jim Goode, Ron Harper, Walt McDonough and Al Schaffer.


    THIS EPISODE:


    October 21, 1947. Mutual network. "Death Is My Caller". Sustaining. A wealthy stockbroker named Henry Norton is visited by his old partner, Charles Blair. Blair is just out of jail after seven years...and is seeking revenge. Robert A. Arthur (writer, producer, director), David Kogan (writer, producer, director), Maurice Tarplin (as "The Traveler"), Santos Ortega, Neal O'Malley, Paul Taubman (organist), Carl Caruso (announcer), Agnes Young, Ted Jewett. 29:36. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


  • The Case Of Dr. Duncan Allen (Aired March 9, 1952)

    WHITEHALL 1 2, 1 2 Tweaked Jan. 12, 2006 This series was very similar to the Black Museum that was hosted by Orson Welles. Both the Black Museum and Whitehall 1212 drew their material from the files of Scotland Yard. The stories were true in every respect except that the names were changed to protect the innocent, as they say. The Whitehall 1212 series boasted that for the first time Scotland Yard opened its files and the producers promised to bring to the public authentic true stories of some of the most celebrated cases. Permission for these records came from Sir Harold Scott, Commissioner of the yard at that time. There is actually a Black Museum. This area is located on the lower ground floor of Scotland Yard and it does indeed contain articles that are closely associated with the solving of a crime. And "Whitehall 1212" was the actual emergency phone number for the yard at the time. The research for the shows was done by Percy Hoskins, chief crime reporter for the London Daily Express. For the benefit of American audiences, Wyllis Cooper of Quiet Please fame was hired as script writer. Interestingly enough both the Black Museum and Whitehall 1212 had all-British casts; both ran concurrently. Whereby Mutual Broadcasting System aired the Orson Welles version, NBC offered the Wyllis Cooper one.


    THIS EPISODE:


    March 9, 1952. "The Case Of Dr. Duncan Allen" - NBC network. Sustaining. A bottle of The Glenlivet in the Black Museum is the exhibit in a case of stolen uranium! Part of the final public service announcement and the system cue has been deleted. Percy Hoskins (researcher), Wyllis Cooper (writer, director). 28:50. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


  • The Case Of Dr. Duncan Allen (Aired March 9, 1952)

    WHITEHALL 1 2, 1 2 Tweaked Jan. 12, 2006 This series was very similar to the Black Museum that was hosted by Orson Welles. Both the Black Museum and Whitehall 1212 drew their material from the files of Scotland Yard. The stories were true in every respect except that the names were changed to protect the innocent, as they say. The Whitehall 1212 series boasted that for the first time Scotland Yard opened its files and the producers promised to bring to the public authentic true stories of some of the most celebrated cases. Permission for these records came from Sir Harold Scott, Commissioner of the yard at that time. There is actually a Black Museum. This area is located on the lower ground floor of Scotland Yard and it does indeed contain articles that are closely associated with the solving of a crime. And "Whitehall 1212" was the actual emergency phone number for the yard at the time. The research for the shows was done by Percy Hoskins, chief crime reporter for the London Daily Express. For the benefit of American audiences, Wyllis Cooper of Quiet Please fame was hired as script writer. Interestingly enough both the Black Museum and Whitehall 1212 had all-British casts; both ran concurrently. Whereby Mutual Broadcasting System aired the Orson Welles version, NBC offered the Wyllis Cooper one.


    THIS EPISODE:


    March 9, 1952. "The Case Of Dr. Duncan Allen" - NBC network. Sustaining. A bottle of The Glenlivet in the Black Museum is the exhibit in a case of stolen uranium! Part of the final public service announcement and the system cue has been deleted. Percy Hoskins (researcher), Wyllis Cooper (writer, director). 28:50. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.