Episodes

  • Welcome to the Conscious Creators Show; where through intimate and insightful interviews with authors, actors, musicians, entrepreneurs and other podcasters, you'll learn tools and tactics to 10x your creativity and strategies to grow and monetize your audience.

    On today’s episode, we have Ron Klabunde, the Founder & CEO of Generosity Feeds.

    It's hard to think of a worse experience than losing a job. Even if you're young, and the stakes aren't as high, it's still terrifying to feel like you've lost control of your life.

    You can drive yourself crazy thinking about all the "what ifs". What if you can't find another job? And on top of all that, what if you came to the realization that it was your own arrogance that put you in that position in the first place? What would you do?

    But his story doesn't start there. At one particularly low point, Ron found himself at rock bottom with nowhere to go. But instead of giving up, he used his experiences to become a force for change in the world.

    But deciding to change doesn't mean all the problems disappear. Despite his drive and desire to do good, founding a non-profit wasn't easy. And Ron describes growing Generosity Feeds as an emotional roller coaster, and something that took everything he had to give.

    In today's episode, Ron talks about that emotional journey, how he got through the darkest moments, and the one thing that lead him to start Generosity Feeds in the first place.

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — send an email directly to Ron and Sachit at ron@replenishfoundation.org and sachit@platformsmedia.com Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.

    Episode Highlights:

    Why you should hire employees better than yourself. How to help your team play to their strengths. How non-profit and for-profit companies can work together toward mutual benefit. Why generosity is the new gold standard. The hard, yet rewarding, effort it takes to do work that matters and have an impact.

    Tweetable Quotes:

    "What I discovered is that my pain was able to help other people heal from their own stories and I could become far more real with people." @GenerosityFeeds

    Resources Mentioned:

    Generosity Feeds Replenish Foundation MOD Pizza The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Baby Bathwater Institute My Billion Dollar Mistake Salesforce Email Ron Ron on LinkedIn

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — send an email directly to Ron and Sachit at ron@replenishfoundation.org and sachit@platformsmedia.com Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.
  • Show Notes from the Stay Grounded Podcast: "It’s the pursuit and the process of doing something — not the outcome — that actually matters."

    This episode turned out a little different than our usual format! I’ve spoken with Sachit Gupta countless times. So in this episode, I was keen to see what would happen if we dived down the rabbit hole with zero expectations.

    And the result was pure gold!

    Sachit is the deep-thinking, creative genius behind Platforms Media – a company that helps amplify podcasters, authors, and other creatives by creating win-win partnerships with brands. Through this platform, Sachit has worked on marketing campaigns with top podcasters including Tim Ferriss of the Tim Ferriss Show, Andrew Warner of Mixergy, and Seth Godin, as well as social media influencers and international sports stars. In addition to his work with top creatives, Sachit is also the host of the Conscious Creators Show – where he helps his listeners make a life through their art without selling their souls.

    Creativity runs through his blood and I was excited to learn more about his take on this crucial topic. But we didn’t stop there… As the deep-dive continued, Sachit and I explored a delicious mix of topics that stretched from fear, courage, curiosity, to how to live a fulfilling life.

    If you’re curious to be a fly-on-the-wall as two creatives discuss creativity, life, and more, this is your chance! Check it out now.

    "Creation is something where you can take anger, rage or negative feelings and turn it into something positive without harming other people."

    This is one of those episodes where our conversation will get you thinking and contemplating about your own creativity and life. So if you’re ready to be challenged and engage in deep thought with myself and today’s guest, dive in now.

    In this episode, you’ll discover:

    Why society is driven by creation. How to define creativity and where inspirational sparks come from. How to get clear on your best next steps and why the answers come when you take action. Why helping someone else gets you out of a funk and creates space for creativity. How to reach out to friends you haven’t contacted for a while – and why it’s important to do this. Why we’re scared of being seen starting something small. The danger of believing ‘borrowed’ stories. And more…

    Be sure to watch out for the listener challenges too and let us know how they impact your life!

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  • Welcome to the Conscious Creators Show; where through intimate and insightful interviews with authors, actors, musicians, entrepreneurs and other podcasters, you'll learn tools and tactics to 10x your creativity and strategies to grow and monetize your audience.

    In today’s episode, Dan Clark, CEO of Brain.fm talks about how a near-death experience led him to re-evaluate his life, how he found Brain.fm and his journey from contacting customer support to becoming CEO. We also talk about his early childhood experiences, being picked on and learning martial arts, and how that relates his ‘why’ behind Brain.fm.

    If you enjoy this episode, feel free to reach out to Sachit and Dan at sachit@platformsmedia.com + dan@brain.fm.

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — click here to send a Tweet directly to Dan and Sachit or find Dan on Instagram. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.

    Episode Highlights:

    Dan had a near-death experience that led him to reevaluate his life. He discovered Brain.fm and had a healthy skepticism about it. Dan didn’t finish college because he found that his body clock didn’t work with the schedule, and he had the same experience when he tried going into advertising. He found Brain.fm so incredibly valuable to him, so he contacted customer support persistently until he was put in touch with the Founder. They weren’t able to hire him for what he was charging, but he decided to work for them for free to prove his value. Dan believes he got that discipline and persistence from training in martial arts. Dan is always trying to optimize communication. Ask yourself why you want something and why you’re doing something so you can align all of your goals to that why. One of the biggest challenges we have in today’s society is plugging into deep focus and then disengaging from it on a set schedule. Some people aren’t made for that. Using Brain.fm has helped people with everything from general focus and productivity to PTSD, ADHD, and autism. The idea of music being capable of changing lives and mental states is not new. Brain.fm is different from the pop science theory of binaural beats, which does not have as much scientific backing as the audio research done for Brain.fm. Dan got grant funding to research alternative treatments for ADHD and therefore validate the science behind Brain.fm. Right now, Brain.fm is used for focus, relaxation, sleep, and meditation. Their next step is to improve what they already have before they expand what they do. They are working on integrating wearable technology to measure an individual’s baseline and change the music selection based on your needs. Developing workout music requires changing the fundamental ideas behind the music because unlike focus music, for which the goal is you ignoring the music, workout music requires focus on the music itself to distract you from your workout. Sachit asks Dan what their process is for developing new products. Dan says they have a resident neuroscientist on staff. You can use Brain.fm as part of the Pomodoro method. Dan struggled with focus as a kid, dealing with bullying and other distractions. For productivity, Dan emphasizes forming good habits rather than relying on tools. Every morning, Dan gets an iced coffee and writes. For Dan, work sprints are the most effective way to structure his day. Multitasking does not work or increase productivity, so Dan limits the number of times he context switches each day. Understand that everyone is different; people with the same goal will have different reasons for doing it. Dan thinks of his company like a ship—when he helps people, he expects them to help him back. Even if he’s the captain of the ship, he can’t run it alone. Common traits that Dan sees in entrepreneurs are perseverance and the ability to find meaning in things that happen. Dan had a severe stutter as a child and he sees the speech coaching he got in elementary school as one of the most valuable things he received in his education. Dan bought a bracelet in Laos that he hasn’t removed in 6 or 7 years because it reminds him why he’s doing the work he does; the extreme poverty he witnessed while traveling inspired him to take full advantage of every opportunity he gets with full gratitude and commitment. Dan approaches trying new things with a genuine love of a challenge. Everything Dan approaches, he challenges himself to accept both the worst case scenario and the best case scenario, within the bounds of what’s realistic. For example, before jumping out of an airplane, he accepted that the worst case scenario would be that he’d be uncomfortable for 2 minutes and not enjoy himself.

    3 Key Takeaways:

    A crucial part of goal setting is determining your why. No productivity tool will help you focus without good habits to back it up. Reframe trying new things as an exciting challenge to conquer.

    Tweetable Quotes:

    “Everyone has different goals, and different reasons why they’re doing an action. And when you first find the core belief of why someone wants to do something, that is a great way to start.” –Dan Clark

    “Human beings are the only animal on this earth that I’m aware of that can learn and change their own behavior, and we have the conscious ability to be able to do that.” –Dan Clark

    "As people, as our brains work, we don’t really multitask.” –Dan Clark

    “We have certain belief structures about the world that we live in, about who we are as a person, that can limit us into being the true version of ourselves.” –Dan Clark

    Resources Mentioned:

    Brain.fm Reboot: Leadership and the Art of Growing Up Email Dan: Dan@brain.fm

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — click here to send a Tweet directly to Dan and Sachit or find Dan on Instagram. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.
  • SJ Murray — Storytelling, Screenwriting Kung-fu and the Difference Between Community Building and Networking

    Welcome to the Conscious Creators Show; where through intimate and insightful interviews with authors, actors, musicians, entrepreneurs and other podcasters, you'll learn tools and tactics to 10x your creativity and strategies to grow and monetize your audience.

    On today’s episode, we have SJ Murray, an Emmy-nominated screenwriter, teacher, and storyteller. We discuss what it means for her to be a storytelling, how to unlock your innate creativity, different storytelling models, the importance of community-building, and what it means to take the ego out of creating.

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — click here to send a Tweet directly to SJ and Sachit or find SJ on Instagram. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.

    Episode Highlights:

    What does it mean to be a storyteller? For SJ, she wants to tell stories that are both challenging and leave the world better than it was. She believes in ethical storytelling. In terms of brain chemistry, there doesn’t appear to be any difference in how our brains react to a story whether we are the storyteller or the viewer. SJ has loved studying what makes stories work and then bringing it full circle to apply it to her own writing. What is “screenwriting kung-fu”? Learning structural rules can set your creativity free rather than constrain it. Some examples of storytelling structure are found in Aristotle’s three-act structure and Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey. Distinguish between helpful notes and helpful council from people with a strong track record and unfounded criticisms. We have been sold the myth that the messiness of humanity is the source of all our problems, but what if we operated from the assumption that we’re all imperfect and that’s normal? SJ believes everyone should reflect on what brings them joy and fulfillment. Loneliness can have negative effects on your health as severe as smoking a pack of cigarettes a day. SJ distinguishes between networking and community by emphasizing that networking is inherently transactional. Community is making a commitment to get to know people over time. If we rush to create, what we create won’t endure. Embrace creativity because it’s what you do, not for the external validation. Screenwriting has constraints in a way novels do not. How has SJ’s experience in sports and dance informed her creative process? Training means you go through the motions until inspiration strikes. All stories are predictable if you understand story structure, but they shouldn’t feel predictable. A great story will make you feel smart for predicting what happens or surprises you by deviating from it. Animation is special because it isn’t bound by the constraints of being human. Even worlds that aren’t our own require rules of engagement so the audience understands how it works. A core principle of SJ’s community-building is that she’s not at the center of it; the people who come are the value, not her. A leader does a lot of the invisible work for the sake of the work, not the recognition, like the conductor of an orchestra whose back is to the audience. The distinction between creativity and business is harmful and useless; creatives should hone their business acumen and business professionals should hone their creativity. SJ had an experience with a teacher when she was very young who mocked her art in front of her class, and it meant she didn’t write creatively again for 20 years. Encouragement at a young age and the countering of adverse experiences at a young age are crucial for developing creatively. If you hear that whisper urging you to create, it’s never too late to listen to it. SJ didn’t reconnect with creative writing until she was forced into a class in college. You don’t have to constantly prove yourself.

    3 Key Takeaways:

    Creativity is innate in all of us and it’s never too late to access it. Learning the rules and structures of storytelling can be creatively freeing instead of limiting. Childhood experiences are formative in how you perceive what you’re capable of doing. Encouragement is crucial for young people.

    Tweetable Quotes:

    "We have this relationship with creativity where we want it to just be innate. And creativity in its rawest form is innate. I mentioned that earlier, I think we all have it, we’re all predisposed to create.” –SJ Murray

    “By studying some rules of structure, they can become amazing storytellers and set their creativity completely free.” –SJ Murray

    “Happiness is not about a warm fuzzy feeling like we think about it today. Joy is a feeling, sadness is a feeling, but happiness is being attuned with your purpose.” –SJ Murray

    “I like to operate from the assumption that everybody’s human and therefore everybody’s imperfect, and their lives are not supposed to be not messy.” –SJ Murray

    “The greatest prizes we win in life are the ones we don’t try to win.” –SJ Murray

    “Life got so much better for me the day I quit trying to prove myself.” –SJ Murray

    Resources Mentioned:

    Aristotle’s Poetics The Hero’s Journey Basics of Story Design: Book, Course From Plato to Lancelot: A Preface to Chrétien de Troyes (Medieval Studies) SJ Murray: Website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — click here to send a Tweet directly to SJ and Sachit or find SJ on Instagram. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.
  • Welcome to the Conscious Creators Show; where through intimate and insightful interviews with authors, actors, musicians, entrepreneurs and other podcasters, you'll learn tools and tactics to 10x your creativity and strategies to grow and monetize your audience.

    On today’s episode, we are joined by Sahil Lavingia, Designer and CEO of Gumroad who’s also a painter and writer. We discuss creativity, design, and what he thinks makes people really happy. Learn what Sahil is creating now, how he structures his time in a way that allows him to pursue several large projects, his reflections on his failure to build a billion dollar company and why his success in business is not the only thing that defines his self-worth.

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — click here to send a Tweet directly to Sahil and Sachit or find Sahil on Instagram. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.

    Episode Highlights:

    What does it mean to be a creator? In Sahil’s eyes, a creator is someone who values the creative process and making stuff as an essential part of their identity. Almost everyone in his mind is a creator, it's just how strongly people identify with that as one of their core purposes in life. Sahil shares the creative projects he is working on now. He just started learning Blender for 3D rendering. He’s also painting and learning form language. He has spent a lot of time analyzing his own style. Sahil is a minimalist. He enjoys a simple interface that is text-heavy. He also enjoys technology and software that feels more real with shadows and tactile elements. He remembers thinking about fonts in the early days of his life. Sachit and Sahil reflect on the design of businesses, contrasting Panda Express and Chipotle. We use implicit signals to know where to go in buildings and how to navigate through them. Inevitably, even if you aren't a designer you engage in design. The more you design, the more instinct you develop around designing. You develop unconscious competence. With painting there's a lot of directly applicable, actionable lessons he can apply to design. He's still trying to figure out what it means to have a single focal point. There's an informational hierarchy in web design. The importance of clarity is important to him as a designer and as a CEO. Sahil describes how he sets up his week to address different problems. When Sahil moved to the Bay Area ten years ago, he wanted to be an integral part of the tech and startup community. They discuss Sahil's admiration for the way Bill Gates lived the American dream. He loved the idea of being in control of his life, time, and location. Sahil discusses his view on money and wealth. He feels more motivated by influence and fame than by money. When he was raising investor money for Gumroad, he felt validated. So many people think there's something on the other side of a door they can't open. Sahil is not convinced that the things we do for money will make us happy. It's easy to get detached from the reason you started in the first place. Sahil is good at shipping fast. Even with painting, he started sharing early. They discuss sharing metrics in general and how competitors also approach sharing metrics. At one point, Sahil moved to Provo, Utah, because he wanted to take a science fiction course with Brandon Sanderson. There, he earned he wanted things that were different from everyone around him. Gumroad is just one of the many things that define him. They talk about billion-dollar businesses vs. lifestyle businesses. There's something around picking a community that you like and building a business for that community. They're building out a roadmap right now on the Gumroad side. Education is the core theme. On a personal level, he's trying to figure out what type of creator he wants to be.

    3 Key Takeaways:

    Even if you aren’t a designer, you engage with design. Even if you don’t consider yourself a creator, you likely create. The things that will make people happy are truly accessible to everyone. Your self-definition can encompass more than your success in achieving a particular goal.

    Tweetable Quotes:

    "To be a creator... for me, is someone who values the creative process and making stuff as sort of an essential part of their identity." – Sahil Lavingia

    I really believe now that the most essential things that make people really happy are accessible to everybody.” – Sahil Lavingia

    “Influence and fame are much more sort of what I need to feel good, for better or worse.” – Sahil Lavingia

    I'm a multi-faceted person and Gumroad is like one of the things that I do but it's not the thing that necessarily defines me.” – Sahil Lavingia

    "Most businesses are that normal path right down the middle. They do care about their lifestyle but they also want to have an impact." – Sahil Lavingia

    Resources Mentioned:

    Gumroad “Inventing on Principle” (talk) “We Are What We Build” (talk) Sahil’s post on Medium about the journey of Gumroad Walt Disney vision map Sahil Lavingia’s Website, Twitter, Newsletter

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — click here to send a Tweet directly to Sahil and Sachit or find Sahil on Instagram. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.
  • Welcome to the Conscious Creators Show; where through intimate and insightful interviews with authors, actors, musicians, entrepreneurs and other podcasters, you'll learn tools and tactics to 10x your creativity and strategies to grow and monetize your audience.

    On today’s episode, we learn from James Altucher, an entrepreneur, author, venture capitalist and podcaster, who pursues creativity every day. Hear how James has prioritized building skills through an exciting career that spans multiple careers, from investing to chess and from startups to standup. We also explore common themes he’s discovered in his pursuit of learning from 500+ top performers on his show.

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — click here to send a Tweet directly to James and Sachit or find James on Instagram or TikTok. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.

    Episode Highlights:

    James outlined his vital daily practice in a viral blog post. When he doesn’t do this practice consistently, his life feels off. He needs a daily practice to be at his best. Sometimes when you're an entrepreneur so many things can go wrong. It can be very difficult and stressful. There was a time when James felt blocked and on the precipice of depression. He realized he wasn't doing his daily practice and even just starting it again helped him. Are you taking care of yourself in tiny ways? Are you just attempting to do 1% more for your physical health, emotional health, creative health, and spiritual health? James describes an experience where someone was stealing from him and he decided to take extreme ownership. Are you improving your relationships and distancing yourself from toxic relationships? Are you eating well, sleeping well, and exercising? James likes to get good at the things he’s passionate about. By interviewing peak performers and reading about them he seeks to understand how to skip a line. Are there smart things you can do to achieve better performance faster? There’s a physical and emotional component to getting better at something. When you skip a line in any field, you're going to have people who don't like you. In order to achieve any kind of peak performance, you have to find your own unique voice in that area of life. If you just improve a little bit each day, your improvement gets compounded. James shares the story of how Richard Branson started Virgin Air. The ability to “ready, fire, aim” is a key characteristic of high achievers. Peak performers have a dedication to learning. In general, peak performers are very kind people that you want to be around. James shares an experience that demonstrates Ken Langone’s intensity. Many peak performers are very intense and they know exactly where to drill down to get the most information possible and as quickly as possible to understand the situation. Peak performers bring intensity and curiosity to everything. Brian Grazer produces movies because he's insanely curious. He schedules one curiosity conversation every week. Peak performers don’t accept no as an answer. Tyra Banks knew ANTM would succeed but was turned down again and again. James has confidence when he is excited about something. He's only able to persuade people when he's excited about something. In his late 40s, he decided he wanted to try standup comedy once. He tried it and loved it. Smoking crack bias = thinking the activities you have invested in have value no matter what. Always ask what you aren’t looking at. A lot of the skills people think they need to learn are not actual skills. Entrepreneurship is not a skill. It's an umbrella of skills. James found standup comedy to be a very complicated skill to acquire. They discuss the cumulative effects of becoming good at one skill and how that does and does not transfer to other areas. Standup comedy helped public speaking but public speaking did not help standup comedy. In the 90s, James created websites for big companies and started his first business. He quickly realized you need to be able to convince people about your vision. Because he had a technological background, he knew every company needed a website. There's no wall between business and creativity. Art is very much a business endeavor. Building a platform is a business skill. His morning is devoted to writing and creativity. Writing has been the flagship of his creativity for thirty years. Software development helps James to understand or manage software development projects. He keeps track of the latest developments in software so that he's never behind the times. He programmed software to model the stock market. Having a software background helps you to understand what is the simplest, most rational solution to a situation. When you have too many factors, you're probably analyzing incorrectly. He professionally self-published Choose Yourself. Figure out who the gatekeepers are and how to get around them. In every area of your life, you can choose yourself. He wasn't focused on money and instead did what his art wanted him to do. The best way you can prove yourself is by being the best you that you can be. He still feels insecure and has felt that way since he was a child. James shares his funny Madoff story that doesn’t work for standup. James tells us about his HBO web show. Interviewing is an ongoing thing that you learn. I think it's an art form. When interviewing, prepare really well so that the person is shocked by how much you know about them. Sometimes a good podcast is really about the entertainment value. You only need a little bit of the podcast to be educational. No matter what, you have to be good at something. Deliver value. Be entertaining. Find the right platform.

    3 Key Points:

    Decide to be 1% better each day in ways that serve your emotional, physical, creative, and spiritual health. Learning from others allows you to “skip a line” and get better at gaining a skill more quickly. The cumulative effects of becoming good at one skill can often transfer to other skills.

    Tweetable Quotes:

    "I like to get good at things I'm passionate about." – James Altucher

    In order to achieve any kind of peak performance, you have to find your own unique voice in that area of life.” – James Altucher

    “If your compass is pointing in a direction, that's the only direction you should go in.” – James Altucher

    There's no wall between business and creativity.” – James Altucher

    "Figure out who the gatekeepers are and how you get around the gatekeepers." – James Altucher

    Resources Mentioned:

    “How to Be the Luckiest Guy on the Planet in Four Easy Steps” Extreme Ownership (book) Ken Langone Brian Grazer Stillness Is the Key (book) Choose Yourself! (book) Joe Rogan podcast Andrew Warner podcast James Altucher’s TikTok, Podcast, Website, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — click here to send a Tweet directly to James and Sachit or find James on Instagram or TikTok. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.
  • Welcome to the Conscious Creators Show; where through intimate and insightful interviews with authors, actors, musicians, entrepreneurs and other podcasters, you'll learn tools and tactics to 10x your creativity and strategies to grow and monetize your audience.

    On today’s episode, we have Cathryn Lavery, the founder of BestSelf Co. She shares how she started a successful business around becoming your Best Self. Learn how Cathryn transitioned from work in architecture to product design and entrepreneurship and hear about some of her best strategies for managing your time effectively.

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — click here to send a Tweet directly to Cathryn and Sachit or find Cathryn on Instagram. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.

    Episode Highlights:

    Cathryn has always had entrepreneurial impulses. She sold cupcakes on the school playground and drop-shipped Dawson’s Creek DVDs to the UK in her teens. She is always trying to use her resources as much as possible and stretch a dollar as far as possible. Cathryn shares the story of how she got her first job in New York City and handled numerous setbacks in the hiring and onboarding process. She started doing freelance and design projects on the side to manage the uncertainty around her start date. When you’re managing people, instead of just telling them what to do, show them what success looks like. It can be very stressful for employees to always feel like they are messing up. She tried to learn how to deal with uncertainty. A year into making things and shipping them herself on the side, she was making more than she was at her day job. She took the measured risk to leave her day job by giving herself time to see if her business was going to work. She feels more productive when she has limited time. Initially, Cathryn was doing all the work by herself. Eventually, she learned how to hire a team and to create systems. As soon as she can optimize anything in her life, she will do it. Having systems has helped Cathryn be more creative. Her week is planned in a way that she knows when to be creative. Wednesday is a focus day for everyone without meetings or Slack. Sometimes your week can fill up with random meetings. You need constraints to give you some structure. Cathryn describes her hiring flow which was designed to capture people who follow instructions and will fit in well with the culture of her team. Cathryn describes why hiring her designer was an exception to her usual hiring process and why hiring a designer requires different criteria. Finding someone that likes to do what you want them to do for work in their free time is really good. Employees should prove their value. Cathryn has managed to maintain friendly relationships with people she had to let go of. Her philosophy on firing is that a company is like a rowboat. If not everyone is rowing, it doesn’t work. At the end of the day, everyone else's jobs are in jeopardy if the business doesn't succeed. In 2015 she launched a successful Kickstarter campaign for the Best Self journal. For three years Cathryn was spending a ton of time on self-development and learning about entrepreneurship. She created a PDF that she wanted to turn into a journal but it was going to be too expensive to make so she turned to Kickstarter. She realized she was a product person once she had already created software and then had it ready to sell and didn't want to sell it. She also had an Amazon drop shipping company that taught her how to sell on Amazon. Cathryn’s public goal for the Kickstarter was 15k but her personal goal was 200k. They hit their funding goal in 28 hours and raised $323k in 34 days. Cathryn created the product around lessons she had learned about productivity. Customers can fill out the journal and be successful. She has learned to productize what has worked for her. When she reached her stretch goal, it felt awesome but she was also exhausted after running a crowdfunding campaign for 34 days. Cathryn shares the why around Best Self. How do I help people become more intentional with their life without having to spend ten years learning how to do it? Time is the currency of life. Being productive so you can do the things you love matters more than saving time for the sake of saving time. Cathryn shares inspiring success stories from customers who have loved her products. Having a co-founder is like being married. She is grateful that she is at a point in her life where she gets to deal with the problems she deals with. Cathryn shares how she has grown in her business. She now knows how to weigh advice based on the person she's hearing it from. To learn about business, Cathryn picked twenty-two books in five categories and read them all before she quit her job. Best Self will continue creating products to help people improve their lives. She wrote a blog post about time management and later that became a product. Being your best self is about more than hitting your goals in one area.

    3 Key Takeaways:

    One of the biggest lessons Cathryn learned before taking her business full-time is to provide clear expectations and show people what success looks like. Having systems and optimizing her time has allowed Cathryn to be more creative. Cathryn has created successful products around strategies and systems that have worked for her personally.

    Tweetable Quotes:

    I'm always trying to make sure that I use my resources as much as possible, as far as possible.” – Cathryn Lavery

    “As soon as I can optimize anything in my life, I will do it.” – Cathryn Lavery

    "Time is basically what anyone has. It's like the currency of life." – Cathryn Lavery

    Being productive to get more done in your day so that you can achieve more goals or spend`more time with the people you love or do the thing you love. That is what matters more than saving time for the sake of saving time.” – Cathryn Lavery

    “Being your best self is about more than hitting your goals in one area.” – Cathryn Lavery

    Resources Mentioned:

    BestSelf Co. Shopify Build a Business Competition Cathryn Lavery’s blog, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — click here to send a Tweet directly to Cathryn and Sachit or find Cathryn on Instagram. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.
  • Welcome to the first episode of the Conscious Creators Show; where through intimate and insightful interviews with authors, actors, musicians, entrepreneurs and other podcasters, you'll learn tools and tactics to 10x your creativity and strategies to grow and monetize your audience.

    On today’s episode, we have Phil Towle, a renowned performance coach who has worked with famous musicians and athletes such as Metallica, Dick Vermeil (Superbowl Winning Coach of St. Louis Rams), Tom Morello (Rage Against the Machine) and many more.

    Phil shares how he finds fulfillment in helping others become the frontman of their own dreams. Learn how Phil moved past egoic motivations to find his true calling and how we can make serving others a priority that will help us connect with our highest selves.

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — email Sachit and he’ll share it with Phil. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.

    Episode Highlights:

    This episode begins with lyrics from one of Phil's songs, titled “Hitchin’ a Ride”. “Hitchin’ a Ride” meant he knew he wanted to get to a place beyond where he currently was. It functioned as a compass. Phil had a long, rich career in psychotherapy and was on the verge of making transitions into using psychology to help people achieve their highest potential at the time he wrote the lyrics to “Hitchin’ a Ride”. Everything that he did, in earthly terms successful or failure, has been part of getting to where he is now. Phil knew he was meant to accomplish something special but didn't know what it was yet. He learned that where he was then was not about being a frontman, but about helping other people become the frontman of their dreams. When his ego was pushing him to self-centeredness, he didn't feel comfortable. The best part of humanity is in serving the greater good. Trial and error will help us see when discomfort is healthy and when it is not. Phil defines a crisis as a self-inspired intervention or interruption in a direction you’re heading that needs to be re-evaluated. A crisis can be a gift because it can help you refocus. People generally come to Phil because they're stuck or there's something they feel uncomfortable about. Even people at the top of their game face discomfort, they just choose to take action. The best part of emulating someone else is seeing that they've found a way to achieve at a high level in their profession. Trying to be who you are not or sacrificing your dreams creates mental illness. When we allow fear to decide our dreams for us, we can feel depressed. Every famous person that we know carries unresolved fears. Many times they will ride the wave of external validation at the expense of their own personality. Please pay attention to your own personality and the things that may get in the way of your own ambition. Consider doing some of the inner work now. External validation can never replace self-worth. When you're getting external validation it can be hard to look inward. When the pain of avoiding our personality hurts enough then we start paying attention. There are some individuals that can teach us that there's a sensible way to go about success. Tragic figures teach us in their own way to pay attention. You can ask what needs to change. Transformation is within our grasp if we can be a little more patient and a little more self-reflective. Fame has become an outcome rather than a tool. We don’t understand fame until we get there. Fame in itself as an end-game is an illusion. There's a lot that gets sacrificed. There are many people who have taken their responsibility as someone who is famous to start projects that serve humanity. There is an intrinsic part of every one of you that understands that part of our spiritual DNA is to serve our sisters and brothers. Phil challenges you to follow up and write to Sachit about how listening to this episode inspired you to serve someone. (Email Sachit) The objective of the Conscious Creators Show is to share stories so people can learn from them. There's a common thread of people wanting to be part of a cause. There's no solo act that achieves anything of greatness on its own. Self-serving becomes more important when we're afraid. Service is an automatic priority when we want to improve relationships. We must acknowledge what our part in it is. With bands, Phil is most happy that before every concert and public appearance they come together in prayer. They need to have a moment before they go on stage that signals togetherness. When we give grace to our relationships, when we give gratitude to our relationships, in that moment of time we are speaking the truth about ourselves, our love for one another, and the human beings that we come in contact with. Conflicts in our relationships are projections of our own fears and insecurities. As creators, we face conflict about whether to go for something or not. Phil feels good that he's taken risks even when he has failed. Many of the big things he's done he wasn't necessarily ready for. You have to decide for you when it's a red light, a green light, or a yellow light. Be prepared for a yes and know what your motives are when you offer to help.

    3 Key Takeaways:

    Everyone carries unresolved fears. Through patience and introspection, we can work through aspects of our personality that get in the way of our ambition. Making serving others a priority will help us connect to our inner being and our highest selves. You can choose to feel good about the risks you’ve taken even when you fail.

    Tweetable Quotes:

    When I am helping other people fulfill themselves, that's where my satisfaction and fulfillment and calling is.” – Phil Towle

    “It's trying hard to be who we're not or sacrificing our dreams, whatever those dreams are, that in some ways creates mental illness.” – Phil Towle

    "The people that have achieved at the highest level, that I've worked with, are no different than anybody else. Perhaps we could say they did not allow their fears to become more important than their dreams." – Phil Towle

    External validation can never replace self-worth.” – Phil Towle

    “Collaboration has to become more important than self-serving.” – Phil Towle

    Resources Mentioned:

    Phil Towle Website, LinkedIn

    Actions:

    Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts or on your favorite podcast app and let us know what you think by leaving a rating and a review. Thank our guest and let them know what you thought of today’s episode — email Sachit and he’ll share it with Phil. Head on over to Creators.Show to get new episodes, exclusive guides like our guide on “How to Connect With Busy Influencers”, partner deals and additional bonuses.