Episodes

  • Read the blog here

    Welcome to this week’s healthcare Knowledge Knugget! As a part of “The Executive Innovation Show” podcast, we’re bringing you the hot topics, questions we receive each week, game-changing ideas, best practices, and tips. During today’s topic, Carrie Chitsey talks about how telehealth is used in healthcare and critical components of developing new patient workflows. 

    We have seen a ton of lessons learned during COVID. A lot of practices, urgent care clinics, behavioral health, really anything across the board, had to overnight learn new patient workflows. In today’s Knowledge Knugget, we’re going to be covering “10 Things to Consider When Using Telehealth: Patient and Provider Workflows”. 

    Front Staff Patient Experience Patient PreferenceInsurance CopaysAfter Hours Follow Up Appointments New Patient ConsultsProvider Scheduling Provider Windshield TimeTraining and Technology 

    If you ruled out telehealth during COVID and you miss some of these steps, now's a great time to go back and fine-tune. 

    Some of these steps that you might've missed because you were moving a hundred miles an hour, in crisis. As we move to the new normal, which is the hybrid model of seeing patients in person and telehealth, now's a great time to go back and start looking at these steps. Find which ones you missed, which ones you didn't have time for, and which ones you need to prioritize now. 

    Filled with insightful information, “The Driving Forces of Telehealth Adoption During COVID” infographic is now ready for download. Listen to the healthcare podcasts where we talk about all the use cases for telehealth. Subscribe to the podcast and rate us! Have a Knowledge Knugget idea? Reach out and submit today. 

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • https://onetouchtelehealth.com/post/telehealth-in-nephrology

    Welcome to this week’s healthcare Knowledge Knugget! As a part of “The Executive Innovation Show” podcast, we’re bringing you the hot topics, questions we receive each week, game-changing ideas, best practices, and tips. During today’s topic, Carrie Chitsey talks about telehealth in nephrology. 

    Telehealth has seen a huge rise in nephrologists and renal care adoption. COVID has forced telehealth and it will be here to stay post-COVID. We are going to go over 7 main areas in which we’ve seen telehealth being used successfully in renal care. 

    1. Keeping Vulnerable Patients Safe 

    When you have a very vulnerable population that still has to go to dialysis three times a week, how do you keep the physicians and patients safe?

    2. Dietitians for New Renal Patients 

    How do you communicate a very important factor for renal patients? Their diet. Telehealth gives dietitians the ability to mobilize and virtualize: 

    Home Dialysis Patients Patients in Facilities Conversations with Caregivers Appointments about a renal dietand more.

    Dietitians that service multiple dialysis centers now can stay in one location or work from home and still see their patients without traveling. 

    3. Pre-End Stage Renal Disease Education  
    As we look at the rising number of patients that are going to have kidney disease, having those initial consults with the nephrologists to see how to lower and change patients’ number is important. 

    4. Medication 
    Medication refills and office checkups can all be done through telehealth to keep both patients and the nephrologists safe as well. 

    5. Nursing Homes and Skilled Facilities 
    For nephrologists who do have patients in nursing homes and skilled facilities that are limiting the flow of people, telehealth can play a very important role. Doctors still need to be able to see those patients. 

    6. Home Dialysis Patients 
    More and more patients are moving to home dialysis. These patients aren’t in the dialysis center but still need to see their nephrologists. To keep these vulnerable patients at home and provide proactive care, telehealth leads the way.  

    7. Equipment Education and Assistance 
    While these renal care patients are doing home dialysis they still may have issues with equipment, such as their Baxter machine. They may even need more supplies or tech support. This is supercritical and can be done through video chat/telehealth. Provide immediate care and support without having to enter the home. 

    As we look at telehealth in nephrology, this is just the tip of the iceberg. In nephrology, we’ll be seeing a hybrid model to provide more proactive care to renal patients. Providers will be able to use telehealth to see patients at home, in facilities, and more. Nephrologists were pushed into telehealth overnight but are now really seeing the benefits. 

    Patients are commenting on how convenient telehealth is. When you have patients that have to do dialysis three times a week and see a doctor, convenience is critical. With COVID adoption and the bill that the presidential admission passed about home dialysis in 2025, this is a much-needed push for the industry. 

    Filled with insightful information, “The Driving Forces of Telehealth Adoption During COVID”, the infographic is now ready for download. Listen to the healthcare podcasts where we talk about all the use cases for telehealth. Subscribe to the podcast and rate us! Have a Knowledge Knugget idea? Reach out and submit today. 

    https://mkting.onetouchtelehealth.com/telehealth-coronavirus-infograph

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Missing episodes?

    Click here to refresh the feed.

  • Read the blog here.

    Welcome to the Executive Innovation Show Podcast, brought to you by One Touch Telehealth. During this podcast, host Carrie Chitsey talks with Tim Spooner. 

    Tim Spooner is a CEO and Physical Therapist, a self-insured owner of Spooner Physical Therapy with 22 locations, and founder of Spooner MSD Solutions. Tim is on the front lines fighting for employers to receive the best care, at the best price for their employees. As both a buyer and provider of healthcare, Tim is in a unique position to understand the obstacles many employers face when it comes to medical overspend.

    Listen to this episode of The Executive Innovation Show Podcast as we discuss: 

    Overnight, healthcare executives had to detect and comprehend how to keep patients safe during this Coronavirus pandemic. From virtual payments to virtual care, the healthcare industry had to adapt. Tim Spooner describes their strategic moves across locations to keep patients out of the waiting room and ER. There are a lot of lessons learned from COVID and new gameplans to be strategized. In a post-COVID world, do we bring everything back within the four walls or do we continue with virtual care? Is telehealth for physical therapy here to stay? What does Tim Spooner think? Listen to his answer here. Are seniors able to adapt to telehealth? Carrie Chitsey and Tim Spooner provide examples of the positive outcomes they’ve seen within the senior community and virtual health. What is a musculoskeletal disorder and did you know that it affects four out of five people that are walking around every day? Tim Spooner details how they are working to care for patients before they need surgery. While MSD patients are normally perceived as seniors or blue-collar workers, this is not always the case. What shifts are being seen between the younger and older generations regarding treatment?85% to 90% of musculoskeletal disorders can be treated with conservative care, but why aren’t they? At times, patients can delay treatment until it becomes worse - leading to the prescription of opioids and possibly addiction. Can we stop some of the trickle effects of opioid addiction with proactive physical therapy?As always we ask, what is keeping Tim Spooner up at night? Find out by listening to the podcast. 

    Learn more about how Tim Spooner and Spooner Physical Therapy help people achieve health through movement here.

    Have you watched our recent webinar? One Touch Telehealth’s on-demand telehealth webinar, “COVID Telehealth Adoption: Why Simple Patient & Physician Experience is Critical” is now available here

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the blog here

    Welcome to this week’s healthcare Knowledge Knugget! As a part of “The Executive Innovation Show” podcast, we’re bringing you the hot topics, questions we receive each week and game-changing ideas, best practices and tips. During today’s topic, Carrie Chitsey talks about how telemedicine improves the quality of care for patients. 

    Improve Access to Care for Chronic Care Patients 

    As we look at a post COVID world, how has telehealth improved the quality of care for patients? With forced telehealth adoption of both patients and physicians, this has really shed a light on access to care for those who live in rural demographics, FQHCs, and population health who may have not had access to care previously. With COVID, and the effort to keep patients safe, this prompted Medicare and Medicaid to unlock codes and make care more accessible while keeping patients at home and safe. 

    Improving Patient Quality of Care with Telehealth 

    Now, you see specialty providers who have moved to 80 to 90% telemedicine. Telehealth has allowed physicians to continue care for existing patients and the most vulnerable. How do we keep patients out of the hospital and reduce hospital admissions during COVID? When you look at the quality of care for high risk patients that have chronic care, whether that’s cardiology, nephrology, pulmonology or even oncology, telehealth helps keep them at home. 

    This has also led to more touch points with patients, whether in a dialysis center or cancer center. Physicians and providers who would normally only see these patients once a month or once a quarter are being more proactive. Proactive care for the patients population that have chronic conditions are now hearing more from their doctors during COVID. 

    Save Patients and Providers Time 

    With the average telemedicine program appointment being only 4 to 7 minutes, more touch points are now available. The average patient spends two hours and 15 minutes going to an in-person appointment, but only spends five minutes with the provider. With telemedicine, you are able to free up providers time. Instead of going room to room they are able to still provide patient care in real time.  

    Building Proactive Relationships with Providers

    Lastly, when you look at populations who use the ER as their primary care such as population or Medicaid patients, telehealth allows them to establish a relationship with a primary care provider. So now, they can use telehealth and see their primary care provider with a more proactive approach instead of reactive. This not only improves quality of care but also reduces healthcare costs. 

    You can see the benefits of telehealth services on many fronts from not only chronic care patients but also behavioral health, primary care and much more. Telemedicine paves the way for the improvement in quality of care across the industry.  

    Watch the on-demand webinar "COVID Telehealth Adoption: Why Simple Patient & Physician Experience is Critical" and listen to the healthcare podcasts where we talk about all the use cases for telehealth. Subscribe to the podcast and rate us! Have a Knowledge Knugget idea? Reach out and submit today. 

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the blog here. 

    Welcome to today's Knowledge Knugget, as a part of “The Executive Innovation Show” podcast, we’re bringing you the hot topics, questions we receive each week, and game-changing ideas, best practices, and tips. During this week's segment, Justin Knott, President of Intrepy Marketing answers the question - how to market your telemedicine solution. 

    How to Market Your Telemedicine Solution 

    So you've picked a telemedicine software, which almost every practice has at this point. If you haven't, you need to get on that very quickly, so you can open your digital doors and start seeing patients again.

    As a healthcare marketing agency these tips have been really effective, helping practices adapt to the technology, increase patient retention, start seeing more patients, and scale their telemedicine visits. 

    Tip #1 - Place an Announcement on Your Website

    It's super easy, but surprisingly people are just still not doing it is you got to get the information up on your practice website. Easy enough again, get it up on your website. So once you've chosen a telemedicine provider, you want to make sure that you have COVID related information that you can deliver to your patients on your website. 

    Tip #2 - Communicate. Communicate. Communicate. 

    Assume your patients know nothing. They don't know that you're open. They don't know how to do telemedicine because oftentimes that is true. So leverage your social media platforms to put out a series of posts about how you're handling COVID, the fact that you are offering telemedicine, and how they can book appointments.

    Tip # 3 - Online Appointment Booking 

    Some EMRs out there offer it and you can iFrame it on your website. There's also a lot of HIPAA compliant online appointment booking, softwares that you can integrate. It's just going to make things a whole lot easier when people get on your website to go ahead and book an appointment and receive the information about telemedicine and see you. 

    Tip #4 - Text Messaging to Reduce No Show Rates

    Next up, Justin Knott recommends that you have text messaging capabilities for a couple of different reasons. And again, your EMR may provide it. If not, I would recommend finding a solution for it.

    Tip #5 - Simplicity is Key! 

    When looking for a telemedicine provider, make sure you have one that limits the amount of steps required to get them on there. The more likely it is for human error to be involved, which you really want to avoid. Otherwise you're spending more time tech in troubleshooting than you are actually on the point of care for your patients, which is what this is all about. 

    Pro Tips

    Justin recommends making sure that you have some type of backup telemedicine option and FaceTime or Skype for business. Something like that can be a really easy backup in the event of latency or downtime because telemedicine platforms are being stretched a little bit more than they ever have to say the least. 

    That's today's healthcare Knowledge Knugget, part of The Executive Innovation Show. Feel free to submit questions or be featured on the Knowledge Knugget. Subscribe to our YouTube, Vimeo, and the podcast channels to get your Knowledge Knugget on Thursdays.

    Watch the on demand webinar "COVID Telehealth Adoption: Why Simple Patient & Physician Experience is Critical" and listen to the healthcare podcasts where we talk about all the use cases for telehealth.

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the blog here.

    Welcome to the Executive Innovation Show Podcast, brought to you by One Touch Telehealth. During this podcast hear host Carrie Chitsey, with Becky Brown and Rebecca Werner. For #MentalHealthAwarenessMonth, listen to Mental Health COVID: Behind the Front Lines – Seniors & First Responders. 

    Becky Brown, LCSW, SUDC has been working with Valley Behavioral Health since 1997 in various capacities, including both clinical and operational. She is now the Chief Operating Officer and has used her expertise to support the operations team and the continued growth of the company as the healthcare landscape continues to rapidly change. 

    Rebecca Werner is the Chief of Operations for Whitemarsh Community Ambulance Association (WCAA), the primary 911 Advanced Life Support (ALS) ambulance serving Whitemarsh Township in Montgomery County Pennsylvania. 

    Listen to this episode of The Executive Innovation Show Podcast as we discuss: 

    The mental health crisis has risen with the recent COVID pandemic. We talk with Becky Brown, the COO of Valley Behavioral Health, about what the past two months have looked like. Has she seen any changes in mental health? And what demographics are being largely affected? Becky states that their behavioral health organization has had to pivot heavily to telehealth services. Listen as Becky Brown states the steps Valley Behavioral Health is taking to look after it’s senior population. How can you extend the reach of behavioral health during isolation? With the new requirement of a telepsych evaluation as a senior patient comes into a facility, what is Becky Brown’s prediction on the future of mental health post-COVID for seniors? Post-COVID, will we see a hybrid model/blended model of in-person visits and telehealth appointments? Will we see a surge in creativity on how to care for patients? Listen as Rebecca Werner, Chief of Operations for Whitemarsh Community Ambulance Association, talks about being on the front lines of COVID as a first responder and how life has changed for them.  While on the front lines, first responders still have a family at home. How do they deal with the thought of potentially bringing COVID home with them and manage that anxiety?      “Life as we know it has changed.” Rebecca Werner describes the daily changes that have happened since COVID.Mental health for first responders is huge. How do you keep employees' mental health a priority post-COVID? Carrie and Rebecca discuss the advantages of peer-to-peer support and the benefits it will have for EMTs post-COVID. Rebecca Werner details the importance of talking about mental health issues. How do we rid the stigma?      As always, we ask Becky and Rebecca, what’s keeping them up at night. Hear their answers on the podcast. 

    Stay up to date with Becky Brown and Valley Cares by checking out their e-therapy solutions.

    Keep up with Rebecca Werner, the Chief of Operations for Whitemarsh Community Ambulance Association (WCAA).

    Learn more about One Touch Telehealth and how telehealth can be beneficial for mental health during COVID-19. Download the “Telemental Health and Its Impact on the Future of Behavioral Health" White Paper

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the blog here.

    Welcome to today's special edition Knowledge Knugget during Mental Health Awareness Month. During this week's segment, Carrie Chitsey answers the questions, what is telepsychiatry and why is there a rising demand pre and post COVID. 

    What is Telepsychiatry? 

    Telepsychiatry is normally referred to when talking about the psychiatric assessment and/or evaluation of a patient via telehealth. This can be in the form of a psychiatrist to the patient, regardless of the location.

    It can also be referred to the psychiatry consultation in regards to medication management, either prescribing medication or ongoing the continuum of care.

    You may have also heard it being referred to as provider to provider. We are seeing more and more where you have a facility, primary care physician, or an ER doctor that is doing consultations with psychiatry or a telepsych consult. 

    Where is The Need for Telepsychiatry? 

    With the shortage of rural access to mental health, there's been an increase in the need for telepsychiatry in: 

    Skilled Nursing FacilitiesLong-Term CareSenior Living FacilitiesClinics Youth Mental Health Hospital Systems

    Youth Mental Health 

    As we look at youth, child protective services, and the foster care system, there is a growing need for telepsychiatry. With this vulnerable population, psych evaluations need to be done in a very timely fashion, 24 to 48 hours. The problem that arises is that it is very hard to transport youth and get to them, they need to be with a case manager or social worker. So to be able to do that remotely for mental health needs during COVID, this has increased dramatically. 

    What Are The Benefits of Telepsychiatry? 

    Improve Access to Care

    For rural areas where time is a sensitivity and there's a shortage, it will allow mental health care to be done remotely. This could be psych evaluations, assessments, and/or appointments . This will also give the psychiatrist a broader reach. By cutting down driving time. 

    Reduce Admissions to ER 

    It is critical to have instant access to care to reduce the need for ER admissions. With the shortages right now in the US, being able to get HIPAA compliant evaluations done instantaneously through telepsychiatry will truly play a role in accomplishing that. 

    Ongoing Continuum of Care 

    When talking about medication management, ongoing care, and moving away from site evaluations to therapy and medication, telepsych can play a huge role in a patient's treatment plan. By being part of that continuum of care, this can reduce no show rates, readmission, and relapse rates. 

    That's today's healthcare Knowledge Knugget, part of The Executive Innovation Show. Feel free to submit questions or be featured on the Knowledge Knugget. Subscribe to our YouTube, Vimeo, and the podcast channels to get your Knowledge Knugget on Thursdays.

    Download our latest mental health white paper "Telemental Health & The Impact on the Future of Behavioral Health" and listen to the healthcare podcasts where we talk about all the use cases for telehealth.

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the Blog Here

    Welcome to this week’s healthcare Knowledge Knugget! As a part of “The Executive Innovation Show” podcast, we’re bringing you the hot topics, questions we receive each week, and game-changing ideas, best practices, and tips. During today’s topic, Dr. Shikha Jain, MD talks about how telehealth is being used in oncology during COVID-19. 

    Dr. Shikha Jain, MD is an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Hematology and Oncology and the physician director of social media and communication at the Rush University Cancer Center.

    Dr. Shikha Jain, MD goes through some great use cases that they're doing during COVID and really what is the future of telehealth for cancer care post-pandemic.

    As we look at this patient population who's highly prone with low immune systems, it really is critical to keep them at home. We should use telehealth as follow-ups to their chemo, to the radiation. Allowing the oncologist to be able to prioritize who they actually need to physically see and who they need to be touching base with. 

    There are two sides to this. There's the preventative testing, which has been kind of put on hold during COVID. Then there are actual cancer patients who are going through the process of chemoradiation that oncologists really are keeping a very close eye on this patient population. 

    How Has COVID-19 Impacted Cancer Care Across The Country? 

    We have found that COVID-19 is a very easily transmissible disease, meaning it's very easy to pass between people, even in some people who don't have any symptoms. And so the challenge for Dr. Jain’s cancer patients has been how to continue their treatment without putting them at unnecessary risk. Providers are doing what they can without exposing them to potential patients who do have coronavirus.

    Practices across the country have done a variety of things in order to help prevent the spread and protect our patients. One thing that has been done pretty much globally at this point in the United States is telemedicine. So many patients who don't need to be physically seen are able to access their physicians and their care teams over the phone and through video visits. 

    Telehealth has been found to be very effective because patients are able to have a clinic visit when they don't necessarily need to come in. This way they won't have to visit the hospital or the clinic and be unnecessarily exposed. Patients seem to enjoy this type of visit because they're able to do it from their own home.

    Has Cancer Care Become More Personalized?

    One thing that has happened with COVID-19 is cancer care has become even more personalized. we have found that the patients who really need to be seen are actually coming in to be seen. Those who may benefit from televisits will also be using the benefit of telehealth in the future. 

    It is likely that telemedicine will continue to be incorporated in cancer care and that is hopefully one silver lining and one positive that comes out of this global pandemic. We will be able to incorporate these more convenient ways of seeing patients and providing patient care in the future. 

    Learn more about One Touch Telehealth and how telehealth can help providers improve quality care for oncology patients. Register for the “COVID Telehealth Adoption: Why Simple Patient & Physician Experience is Critical” webinar here



    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the blog here.

    Welcome to the Executive Innovation Show Podcast, brought to you by One Touch Telehealth. During this podcast, host Carrie Chitsey talks with Dr. Tim Ihrig and Kim Kuebler. 

    Timothy Ihrig, M.D., M.A. is Chief Medical Officer at Crossroads Hospice and Palliative Care. He is the founder and CEO of Ihrig MD & Associates. 

    Dr. Kim Kuebler is the Founder and Director of the Multiple Chronic Conditions Resource Center, highlighted by the U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services for providing interdisciplinary resources to improve care for the largest and fastest-growing U.S. patient populations. 

    Listen to this episode of The Executive Innovation Show Podcast as we discuss: 

    Today we talk with two doctors who are on the front lines of palliative and hospice care, Dr. Tim Ihrig and Dr. Kim Kuebler. With more seniors looking to age at home, how has this changed the industry? Listen to this in-depth conversation about the future of palliative care and how virtual care is making a huge impact. Should we be thinking about the end of life palliative and hospice care as separate or the same? What’s the difference? Listen as Dr. Tim Ihrig of  Crossroads Hospice and Palliative Care details his sentiments on “stealing hope” from patients. Are we selling false dreams to patients? How can doctors do a better job of helping a patient receive a higher quality of life other than aggressive treatments that will hinder their ability to live? What question should doctors be asking to make sure that the patient has a good quality of life? Dr. Ihrig states that “We should stop focusing so much on that endpoint and shift it and say, how do you want to live?". He expresses that we should be moving away from healthcare reform and talk about how we can reform care. Dr. Ihrig believes that it starts with honest conversations, empowering people to ask questions, shifting the narrative. Dr. Kim Kuebler has worked both on the chronic disease and pain management sides of healthcare. How does pain management fit in with palliative care? She breaks down some insightful statistics about chronic pain management across the country today.What is the difference between palliative care and hospice care? Should palliative care start when the patient has been diagnosed with a chronic disease?Can technology help transform pain management programs in the future? How can primary care physicians implement remote monitoring plans with technology like telehealth that helps decrease overall health care costs and improve patient care?As more patients get access to their health information, how is the conversation changing with their doctors?As always, we ask these healthcare executives what is keeping them up at night. Listen to their answers here. 

    Keep up with Dr. Tim Ihrig by connecting on LinkedIn

    Get more resources on pain management from Dr. Kim Klueber and Multiple Chronic Conditions Resource Center. 

    Learn more about One Touch Telehealth and how telehealth can help providers improve access to care for patients with chronic conditions. Download our “What Is Telehealth?" White Paper to learn more. 

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Welcome to the Executive Innovation Show Podcast, brought to you by One Touch Telehealth. During this podcast hear host, Carrie Chitsey, with Chantell Preston. 

    Chantell Preston is the Chief Executive Officer and a founding partner of Facilities Management Group who operates multiple freestanding emergency rooms and hospitals located in Texas and Nevada. Chantell is also an avid investor in technology based healthcare companies as well as a Lead Partner for The Active Aging and Longevity Fund for Portfolia Venture Capital. 

    Listen to this episode of The Executive Innovation Show Podcast as we discuss: 

    How has the coronavirus shifted ERs around the country to not only keep patients safe but also their employees? Listen as Chantell Preston details the steps taken to transform the ER from brick and mortar to adding telehealth for virtual care. While COVID-19 has led to an increase in emergency room visits, Preston reminds us that other patients will still have emergencies. How can your ER accommodate these patients and reduce the potential exposure to the virus?Are you letting the community know that your doors are still open? With a rise in patients not wanting to come into waiting rooms where potential COVID-19 patients could be, how do you sustain the business? Listen to Chantell Prestons’ talk about ways to supplement the walk in traffic.  What are executives going to be thinking in the future, post-COVID-19, about virtual visits and telehealth? With such a shakeup to everyday life, how will this change the way healthcare executives think about physical locations and expanding beyond the four walls of a hospital? One big change in healthcare we will see post-coronavirus is innovation. Chantell believes healthcare executives will take a look at technology and how it will help us prepare for the future. She states that we will see more proactive healthcare versus reactive healthcare.  Some healthcare systems and companies will be laying off employees and reevaluating their business plans for the future. As an avid investor and lead partner in Portfolia Venture Capital , does Chantell Preston’s healthcare investment strategy change? Listen as Carrie and Chantell talk about the necessities a healthcare company will need to succeed post COVID.Chantell Preston details what other physicians and healthcare CEOs can do to keep their business afloat and keep their staff and patients safe. From efficiency to looking at other sources of revenue, she gives her advice here. As always, we ask Chantell what’s keeping her up at night. 

    Keep up with Chantell Preston as she makes waves through healthcare by connecting with her on LinkedIn

    Learn more about One Touch Telehealth and how telehealth can help your ER or urgent care provide virtual care through telehealth keeping employees and patients safe. Download our “What Is Telehealth?" White Paper to learn more.

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Welcome to the Executive Innovation Show Podcast, brought to you by One Touch Telehealth. During this podcast hear host, Carrie Chitsey,  with Dr. Brian Bluth (Bluth Medical Associates, LLC). 

    Dr. Brian Bluth is trained and board-certified in family medicine. He is the owner and sole-practitioner in private practice since 2009 in rural Oklahoma. He gained interest in rural medicine while in residency in Des Moines Iowa. He especially loved the aspect of full-spectrum medicine the rural setting allows for, including traditional outpatient care, inpatient care, ER coverage, Obstetrics, pediatrics, geriatrics including nursing home director, and surgical procedures including colonoscopy, EGD and laparoscopic surgeries.

    Listen to this episode of The Executive Innovation Show Podcast as we discuss: 

    As the Coronavirus becomes more widespread across the country, we talk with Dr. Brian Bluth, a family medicine doctor, about the changes he's seen across the healthcare ecosystem this past week and a half. With the emergence of COVID-19, more practices are seeking to utilize telehealth for virtual visits. Dr. Bluth talks about how previously they hadn't used telemedicine in a major fashion but now it has become 70 to 80% of their appointments. Telehealth appointments have become a necessity for patients, nurses, and doctors to keep them safe from the potential spread of the virus. While people around the country are being placed on Stay-At-Home orders, they still need their medications and check-ups. Seniors will need the help, management, and medical care direction that home health provides. As an at-risk population to the coronavirus,  telehealth is needed to provide proper care. As the cancellation of appointments mounts, revenue is being lost. For practices that had telehealth or telemedicine on the roadmap for the future, they are now looking to implement it instantly. Hear Dr. Bluth talk about what providers need to be doing in this time to reduce cancellations and increase revenue? Since Dr. Brian Bluth and staff had a telehealth platform in place, moving to virtual appointments was more seamless than those practices implementing telehealth for the first time. Listen as Dr. Bluth details what your practice needs to do to set up procedures and a system to accommodate potential coronavirus patients. CMS has lifted restrictions on HIPAA compliance to allow things like Zoom, FaceTime and other video tools during this crisis. Should providers and physicians of small and mid-sized practices avoid previous HIPAA compliant standards now? Hear Dr. Bluth's advice on using tools like FaceTime. "It's not just the encryption of the video, but it's the encryption of the information." Carrie and Dr. Bluth talk about why even in this time of crisis, it's important to be HIPAA compliant not only the video but also the information of the patient. How will this change in telehealth affect healthcare long term? As more patients and doctors begin using telehealth and seeing a spike in satisfaction, telehealth will be here to stay. 

    How is Dr. Brian Bluth making sure his community gets the care they need? Visit his website to find out. 

    Learn more about One Touch Telehealth and how telehealth can help your practice provide better patient care via our “What Is Telehealth?" White Paper

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the blog here.

    Welcome to the Executive Innovation Show Podcast, brought to you by One Touch Telehealth. During this podcast, the host, Carrie Chitsey, has a round table with five Generation Z students from Anderson High School, here in Austin, Texas to hear directly from these Gen Z’s about all things healthcare! We dive deeper into their healthcare preferences for PCPs, how they like to be communicated with and more. 

    Listen to “Understanding Gen Z: Healthcare Preferences (Part 3)” as we discuss the following: 

    A lot is going on in healthcare right now. There has been a noticeable shift from going to your primary doctor with more urgent care and retail clinics popping up. You can even go to your local pharmacy to be seen for a cold, sinus issues, etc. And now with healthcare technology like telehealth being accepted by private insurance, the landscape has truly changed. What is Gen Z’s preference for seeing a doctor for minor ailments such as the cold or flu? Would they rather make an appointment with their local doctor and go to them? Or would they rather run into a retail clinic? Listen to their answers here. Are you losing patients to consumer-facing telehealth companies? Where does these Gen Zs' relationship stand with primary care physicians? Do they have one? We talk with these Austin, Texas Gen Zers and they discuss what they are looking for in a PCP. As digital natives, they are looking for online patient scheduling to telehealth.During the live in-person recording, we discuss the healthcare preferences of Gen Z when it comes to after-hours. If given the option, they would rather communicate via telehealth with their PCP then going to local retail clinics and third-party apps. What does Gen Z think about mental health? How should it be taught to students? Who should be the one guiding them on things like depression, anxiety, and dealing with suicidal thoughts? As a generation directly caught in the social media highlight reel era, how are they seeing mental health being handled? Are schools teaching mental health to Generation Z students in the right way? Listen as we discuss how they feel. “I feel like if the school were to [teach about mental health], they themselves need to get educated.” How can we bridge the mental health condition education gap? How can we understand Gen Z’s preferences for therapists? Is there too much of a stigma behind going to see a mental health professional? We get their sentiments on peer-to-peer video counseling. Dive deeper into their thought process when it comes to peer-to-peer video support. How would they like to start the communication channel? Listen as they describe their ability to identify bots for real people. 

    That brings us to the end of this awesome three-part series, ``Understanding Gen Z.” Take a listen to both part one (Communication and Hiring) and part two (Banking)! Subscribe to the podcast now. 

    Download our playbook where we define "What is Telehealth?". We’ll cover use cases, benefits, top implementation areas and why Telehealth is NOT video conferencing. Learn why you need to implement to not lose any Gen Z patients. 

    A special thanks to Anderson High School. 

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the Blog Here

    Welcome to this week’s healthcare Knowledge Knugget! As a part of “The Executive Innovation Show” podcast, we’re bringing you the hot topics, questions we receive each week and game-changing ideas, best practices and tips. Today’s topic is one you’ve seen all over the news, the coronavirus. 

    We have gotten tons of requests and it has truly been a floodgate in the telehealth business since Trump’s 8.3 Billion bill that was passed on Friday. This bill lifts the previous telehealth restrictions in Medicare for the Coronavirus. Everyone is going full-court press and trying to figure out how to keep seniors at home and safe in lieu of coming into the ER, clinics and to doctor’s offices waiting rooms. 

    So what does that mean? As you know there have been a lot of positive changes for the telehealth reimbursement in 2019 with payer support. In addition, to Medicare Advantage that went into effect in January of 2020. But what does that mean with these new restrictions lifted?

    If you are a practice group, hospital, clinic and you’re serving senior patients in nursing homes, skilled nursing facilities, OR with chronic care conditions, you need to have a telehealth solution in place. By doing those routine appointments via telehealth, you are keeping these folks and others safe and at home. 

    In addition, people that don’t want to go into the ER or urgent care to try and limit their exposure. There's been a huge surge in consumer-facing telehealth and telehealth in general. Obviously, if someone has symptoms of the Coronavirus, you’re not going to be able to do those tests through telehealth but you can use telehealth to determine who needs to come in and who doesn’t. 

    Looking at the appointment types that you have today, such as people who have had surgeries that need to do a post-surgical follow up that are high risk because of infection and wound care. If you are a practice, a hospital or clinic and telehealth has been on your roadmap, with these restrictions lifted, this has opened up the ability to reach this patient safely and at home. 

    So if your business on the healthcare side is being affected by a surge of people coming in and having symptoms but also normal patient interactions, you need to think about how not to cancel those appointments. 

    If you have any questions on what that means to your healthcare organization with those Medicare restrictions being lifted or the billable codes that are available today, we are here to help.

    Stay tuned to the Knowledge Knugget of The Executive Innovation Show. every Thursday as we provide more detail and answer the questions you may be having. We’ll continue to update on the Medicare restrictions lifted on our social channels so be sure to follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn. You’ve seen a lot of officials from the American Hospital Association, American Telehealth Association and as well as President Trump promoting telehealth. 

    Download our playbook where we define "What is Telehealth?". We’ll cover use cases, benefits, top implementation areas and why Telehealth is NOT video conferencing. This white paper will be useful to you or someone on your team if you like others trying to figure out telehealth for the Coronavirus quickly. 

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the blog here.

    Welcome to the Executive Innovation Show Podcast, brought to you by One Touch Video Chat. During this podcast, the host, Carrie Chitsey, has a round table with five Generation Z students from Anderson High School, here in Austin, Texas to hear directly from these Gen Z’s about all things banking! What are these Gen Z’s banking preferences and what are they truly looking for in a banking relationship? 

    Listen to “Understanding Gen Z: Banking Preferences (Part 2)” as we discuss the following: 

    We kick off the show by understanding these Gen Zs’ banking preferences and why. We get answers on when they first got their checking accounts and debit cards. Do they prefer big traditional banks or would they rather use a community bank or a local credit union? What draws Gen Zs to become bank customers? While a mobile app is table stakes across the industry what other technologies does this generation find necessary? Listen to find out what your bank needs to have to attract these Gen Z customers.Security is a huge factor for these Gen Zers. One of the buzzwords with their mobile banking and personal finances was Face ID. Learn how this security feature plays into their decision making with financial institutions. As bank branches continue to close down, we get to the root of the problem. Gen Z isn’t visiting the branch as often anymore. When was the last time they stepped into the branch? Why aren’t branch visits a necessity for these young consumers vs. other generations? Growing up with the power of the internet, members of Gen Z are searching for authenticity! When searching for financial advice on investing, they want unbiased opinions. Do they trust big banks or do they believe they have their own “secret agenda”?Skipping the branch and using in-app features to apply for financial services such as car loans are becoming the new norm. How will banks still keep the trust of customers without their visits to the branch? What’s the deal with 1-800 numbers? How is this generation utilizing them or are they even using them at all? Do they prefer a call center or branch when they need to talk to someone?  

    This is part two of our three-part series, “Understanding Gen Z”. Subscribe to the podcast now to get notified for part 3, where we’ll talk about healthcare next week.

    To learn more on The Future of Banking, Virtual Banking Beyond Four Walls, download our latest White Paper or watch our webinar on demand. 

    A special thanks to Anderson High School for allowing the students to participate. 



    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Welcome to this week’s healthcare Knowledge Knugget! As a part of “The Executive Innovation Show” podcast, we’re bringing you the hot topics, questions we receive each week and game-changing ideas, best practices and tips. Today’s topic comes from Carol Ermis.

    Carol Ermis is the Revenue Cycle Director for Orthopaedic Specialist of Austin in Austin, Texas. She has worked in the field of medical billing and coding for 20 years with the last 14 years being dedicated to the revenue cycle of orthopedic surgery.

    Hear her answers to the following questions:

    What are the patient types that make the most sense to use telehealth for consultations in orthopedics?

    It makes sense to use telehealth for patients who live far away from the office and patients who live in rural areas where there's often a shortage of specialists. It may also make sense for patients who live out of the state or for patients who don't have transportation available to them to come to the office. 

    Patients who are in a nursing home or who have been admitted to the hospital and can't medically be safely or easily transported to the office. 

    What appointment types in orthopedics do not require a physical exam and can they be converted to telehealth to free up waiting rooms?

    Surgical follow-ups, wound checks that don't require a suture removal or staple removal can be done via telehealth.

    Also, appointments that are basically the doctor delivering diagnostic information to the patient. So if the patient has had an MRI or a CT scan done and the doctor has reviewed the films and is delivering information to the patient about their diagnosis, about their treatment options and answering the patient's questions.

    What are the most common billable codes in orthopedics with the GT modifier for telehealth? 

    Right now, most commercial payers will cover telemedicine visit services and they're advising healthcare providers to bill an evaluation and management code for telemedicine appointments. That's 99201 - 99205 which is your standard outpatient office visit codes for new or established patients. 

    Ask which specific billing codes you should use and whether they recognize the GT modifier. If they have a published policy about their coverage of telemedicine, review it before you call and be armed with that information about their coverage policies when you contact them. 

    That has been today's Knowledge Knugget with Carol Ermis. If you have any additional questions, you can find her on LinkedIn. 

    That's today's healthcare Knowledge Knugget, part of The Executive Innovation Show. Feel free to submit questions or be featured on the Knowledge Knugget. Subscribe to our YouTube, Vimeo, and the podcast channels to get your Knowledge Knugget on Thursdays.

    Download our playbook where we define "What is Telehealth?". We go over top implementation areas for telehealth such as post and pre-surgery consults in orthopedics. We also layout the top benefits of telehealth and even more use cases. 



    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the blog here.

    Welcome to the Executive Innovation Show Podcast, brought to you by Live Video Interviews and One Touch Video Chat.  During this podcast, the host, Carrie Chitsey, has a round table with five Generation Z students from Anderson High School, here in Austin, Texas to hear directly from these Gen Z’s how they like to communicate, think about college and what they are looking for in an employer.

    Listen to “Understanding Gen Z: Communication and Hiring Trends (Part 1)” as we discuss the following: 

    During our live studio recording, we ask these Gen Zs about their communication preferences, how they use the internet and mobile phone today. Do they prefer to download apps for one time use or just visit the mobile website? With storage space on their cell phones being a premium, does every companies' app get a download? When did they get their first cell phones? At a much younger age than you or I, our teen guests discuss the grade they got their first phone and why. Listen to the podcast as we discover if this generation prefers a text, call or FaceTime? From video homework help to maintaining relationships from far distances, hear just how Gen Z is making the most of video calls. Are college gap years the new normal for this younger generation? We discuss the next steps for these upperclassmen. Is a college degree still seen as the end goal? After seeing millennials strapped with debt, it’s something Gen Z is thinking about even more. Hear their sentiments on college and the factors that play into the next steps of their lives. How are job boards looked at by Gen Z? Do they find them helpful or daunting? Is there a disconnect between experience needed and the current experience gained by this young generation? What is this generation looking for in a job? Is it culture, company values, career path advancement or pay? Their answers differ from Millennial generations. Find out how by listening. 

    This is part one of our three-part series, “Understanding Gen Z”. Subscribe to the podcast now to get notified for parts 2 and 3, where we’ll talk banking and healthcare for the next two weeks.

    Download the White Paper, “Reach & Recruit a Passive Front-Line Talent Pool” to learn more about how you can connect to the next generation’s top talent. 

    A special thanks to Anderson High School for allowing the students to participate. 

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the blog here

    Welcome to this week’s healthcare Knowledge Knugget! As a part of “The Executive Innovation Show” podcast, we’re bringing you the hot topics, questions we receive each week and game-changing ideas, best practices and tips. Today’s topic comes from Dr. Richard Harris.

    Dr. Richard Harris is the Founder of Great Health and Wellness, a personalized medicine company in Houston, Texas. He is both a physician and a pharmacist. 

    Today he is going to talk about how you can extend telepharmacy into the home, the future role of the pharmacist and how to improve health through prescription adherence. Lastly, we’ll be talking about genetics testing. Is this telehealth service of telegenetics best staffed by physicians or by pharmacists? 

    What role can pharmacists play in patients’ supplements and diet? 

    Dr. Harris believes that pharmacists can play an extremely large role in this area and that will allow them to practice at the top of their license. Hear what else he has to say by listening. 

    How can pharmacists extend the services to the home with telepharmacy? 

    A big way the pharmacist can extend services to home with telepharmacy is adherence to medications and side effects. We know that in the real world there's about a 50 to 60% medication adherence rate, but we estimate that in order to be successful, therapy needs to be around 80% adherent. So pharmacists, by doing checkups in the home through telepharmacy could ensure adherence rates and better optimization and outcomes to therapy. 

    Pharmacists can also do health coaching, where they're walking people through other things associated with that disease state and they can also provide direct patient care through telepharmacy. 

    Whose role is it to help patients better understand genetic testing and patient outcomes?

    As an internal medicine physician, a lot of Dr. Harris’ colleagues are not very interested in this subject at all, which he feels is a shame because genetic testing, a new neutral genomic testing can really be a game-changer for someone's chronic conditions or for preventative states. 

    He thinks the pharmacist can take a very proactive role in this area to offer these services in the clinic and be taught how to provide high-quality information about Nutrigenomix in genetic testing. And then at the same time recommend high-quality GMP supplements. 

    He also states that pharmacists have a better understanding of general physiology because he has gone through both trainings as a pharmacist and a physician. 

    That has been today's Knowledge Knugget with Dr. Richard Harris. I hope you found the information informative and helpful. You can follow him on Instagram and Twitter or his podcast, The Strive For Great Health

    That's today's healthcare Knowledge Knugget, part of The Executive Innovation Show. Feel free to submit questions or be featured on the Knowledge Knugget. Subscribe to our YouTube, Vimeo, and the podcast channels to get your Knowledge Knugget on Thursdays.

    Download our playbook where we define "What is Telehealth?". We go over specialty areas such as telepharmacy and telegenetics. This playbook is packed with useful information for you to consume. Get it here. 

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the blog here.

    Welcome to the Executive Innovation Show Podcast, brought to you by One Touch Telehealth. During this podcast, the host, Carrie Chitsey, talks with Dr. Sina Haeri and Dr. Annelise Swigert. 

    Dr. Sina Haeri is board-certified in maternal-fetal medicine and obstetrics and gynecology and served as a surgeon in the U.S. Army, currently working with Access Physicians, 

    Dr. Annelise Skor Swigert is a board-certified Ob/Gyn. She is a leader, both locally and nationally, in women’s health care initiatives. She is currently the CEO of Premier Ob/Gyn of MN.

    Listen to “Virtual Primary Care in Women's Health” as we discuss the following: 

    In this podcast, we talk about all things women’s health. What are these physicians seeing on the front lines in women’s health? Listen as Carrie Chitsey, Dr. Sina Haeri, and Dr. Annelise Swigert discuss how women’s health has changed over the past few years from communication preferences to certain generational changes. Dr. Sina Haeri talks about today’s generational patient. From being more “tech-savvy” and showing less loyalty to an OB/GYN to self-empowerment. Dr. Annelise Swigert is also seeing that Millennial patients are looking for technological advances from their healthcare providers. She details how customer experience plays a larger role in selection criteria for an OB/GYN and/or primary care provider than loyalty. We are seeing more mergers and consolidation with big health systems of local practices. What top things should local OB/GYNs be thinking about to stay competitive and deepen relationships within their local community? Dr. Sina Haeri has been using virtual care in women's health and telehealth for some time now. Listen as he talks about how telehealth can improve work/life balance. How is AccessPhysicans reducing the maternal mortality rate in rural areas? Listen as Dr. Haeri explains how AccessPhysicians can cut down moms traveling out of rural areas to see a subspecialist to 3%. By improving access to care it will bring down maternal mortality. With the Millennial and Gen Z generations, are PCPs and OB/GYNs still as important as previous generations felt? The relationship with the physician will not be as solidified as in past generations. As Dr. Haeri highlights, telehealth is not meant for all appointment types and consultations. Listen as he and Dr. Swigert give insight on what they believe are good that can be done virtually in prenatal care, OBGYN and women’s health. From chronic disease management and contraceptive counseling hear other use cases these physicians feel that can be done virtually. Dr. Swigert details how telehealth can be huge for women’s mental health. With postpartum depression, virtual care should be a priority for your practice. As always, we ask these doctor’s “What’s keeping them up at night?” Want to learn more about AccessPhysicians? Click the link here

    Dr. Swigert is a women's health visionary, connect with her on LinkedIn

    Download our new white paper, "What is Telehealth?". Learn more about the benefits of telehealth, top implementation areas and how you can incorporate virtual primary care for women's health.

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the blog here.

    Welcome to this week’s healthcare Knowledge Knugget! As a part of “The Executive Innovation Show” podcast, we’re bringing you the hot topics, questions we receive each week and game-changing ideas, best practices and tips. Today’s topic comes from Dr. Valentine Ugwu. He is going to talk about specific use cases of telemedicine in prenatal care.

    Dr. Valentine Ugwu is an OBGYN -Full Fellow of American College of OBGYN’s (ACOG) and a Board-Certified Primary Care Physician. Also, he has a Master’s in Business Administration (MBA). His health care experience spans about 23-years.

    Listen and or watch the Knowledge Knugget above as Dr. Valentine Ugwu answers the following questions discussing the benefits of telemedicine for prenatal care:

    How can telemedicine in prenatal care help rural areas to have more frequent visits with patients? 

    Pregnancy should be a wonderful time for a mother and her unborn baby but can be challenging without the support and medical care needed as can be provided with prenatal care.

    This becomes even more of a concern with the limited access to care that comes with the rural areas. It is no news that since 2010 to date, approximately 1 in 5 hospitals in rural communities across the country have closed due to limited funding, migrating population to urban areas amongst other issues. To get the access they must travel long distances in most circumstances. These issues of course impact this important population ”pregnant women” gravely as they are starved of care and become open to dire complications as their only options are showing up in the emergency room where most physicians are not trained to offer care to them and the only option is to have them “flown“ out of the facility.

    Promoting telehealth will help ease these pressures as women can use their mobile devices to communicate with providers like myself for remote access to prenatal care.

    Also teaching them to measure their weights, blood pressures, growth of their pregnancy with tape measurements, and listening to their baby’s heart using a device. 

    Of course, this is only applicable to pregnancies considered low risk (which is most pregnancies). High-risk pregnancies and low-risk pregnancies determined to have eventual concerns on virtual visits will warrant physical evaluations.

    You work servicing the border and surrounding areas as a physician, how much windshield time do you spend per week or month driving to locations? 

    Given my passion for women’s health and rural medicine, I do work in the border environment and commit an average of 10-12 hours a week ensuring I travel to deliver care to my population. 

    If an average telemedicine prenatal care appointment is 4 to 7 mins, describe the benefits as a physician being in one location seeing more patients. (Video relationship and patient convenience, not missing appointments, compliance). What is most beneficial in your mind?

    In my opinion patient inconvenience (Lack of transport to nearest facilities or finances) is one of the most challenging reasons for patient’s noncompliance with prenatal care. So, to be able to bridge this gap with telehealth has unquantifiable benefits. It does also help the physician reduce burnout with travel and the hazards of long-distance traveling when not needed.

    Subscribe to our YouTube, Vimeo, and the podcast channels to get your Knowledge Knugget on Thursdays.

    Download our playbook where we define "What is Telehealth?". 

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)

  • Read the Blog

    Welcome to this week’s healthcare Knowledge Knugget! Today, we will be talking about the 10 Telemental Health Benefits and Use Cases. Watch the video to learn more about how people are using telemental health and some very specific uses cases?

    Mental Health
    How can telemental health reduce those no show rates? It allows you to look at somebody that's coming in for therapy sessions once a week, whatever it may be and allowing them for certain times and appointment times to be able to do that through video telehealth.

    Senior Care
    A lot of seniors are going through mental health issues and they don't know how to explain it. Being able to do video appointments in the comfort of their own home and talking to them about things like depression or anxiety from retiring or being in isolation.

    Youth Mental Health
    Attending an in-person youth mental health appointment is a double-edged sword. With telehealth technology and telemental technology being browser-based, the school doesn't have to buy any expensive hardware or software.

    Foster Care
    Children that are in foster care are on Medicaid and it's very hard given the guidelines of foster care for foster parents to be able to take off work or even get somebody to give the foster child a ride to mental health appointments.

    Medicaid Access
    The last one in this bucket of youth is Medicaid access. Normally it is very hard to get a Medicaid appointment for mental health. If you're a mental health professional with a private practice and you're not taking Medicaid, you should look at the reimbursement, you might reconsider and it can help for youth and population health and even seniors.

    Rural Health
    The next use case is rural health. There's a lot of shortage areas. And so reaching those rural areas where people are driving an hour and a half, two hours to appointments to rule in community hospitals for mental health, um, is as a big area.

    Facilities Using Virtual Care
    So a lot of your rural and community hospitals don't have enough mental health professionals on staff and they can't give people to live in those rural areas.

    Psych Evaluations
    There's a lot of shortage of being able to get that immediate psych eval, whether it's a treatment facility and it's an admission that you needed, whether it's a foster care system, whether it's a rural community hospital, there's a large shortage in psych.

    Follow-up Appointments
    Whether the patient is discharged from the hospital and you're putting it on the patient to then go find a mental health professional or your jotting down some names or giving a sheet to go get a mental health professional, there's a big breakage in that happening.

    Treatment Facilities
    All the telemental health that goes on in a substance abuse treatment facility daily, weekly, whether you're in 30, 60, 90-day rehab and you're getting discharged, you build this relationship with that mental health professional and now you're kind of out on your own.

    Feel free to submit questions or be featured on the Knowledge Knugget. Subscribe to our YouTube, Vimeo, and the podcast channels to get your Knowledge Knugget on Thursdays.

    Download our latest telemental white paper and listen to the healthcare podcasts where we talk about all the use cases for telehealth.

    Support the show (http://www.helpinghumans.care)