Episodes

  • LSEIQ Ep5 - Why haven't we won the War on Drugs? [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Dr John Collins, Dr Michael Shiner, Danny Kushlick | We hope you’ve enjoyed listening to this year's programme of public events and that you'll stay tuned for the exciting programme of events we have lined up, for the new academic year beginning in September. In the meantime we have a brand new podcast series that we think you might enjoy. LSE IQ is a monthly podcast where we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. Recent episodes have tackled questions such as 'Whats the future of work?', 'Is social media good for society?' and 'What can Brexit tell us about the white working class?'. To give you a taste of LSEIQ the latest episode, which asks 'Why haven't we won the War on Drugs?', is available for you here in our public events podcast feed. To listen to other episodes and to subscribe, search for LSEIQ in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq . We’d like to hear your opinion too so why not join the discussion on social media using the hashtag #LSEIQ and please also consider leaving a review on iTunes or the Apple podcast app.

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  • Islam in World Politics: Against the Conventional Wisdom [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): John Sidel | Today’s on-going conflicts in Iraq, Syria, and elsewhere and recurring terrorist incidents have helped to reproduce and reinforce the conventional wisdom about Islam as an increasingly powerful force in world politics. In this lecture, by contrast, Professor John Sidel suggests a contrary – and contrarian – perspective: that the apparent increase in violence is a reflection more of the diminishing strength and solidity of Islam as a collective basis for social identity and political unity.

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  • New Developments in the Economics of Crime [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Stephen Machin | The lecture will present evidence on the determinants of criminality, with a focus on how economic incentives matter for crime. A particular emphasis will be placed on new empirical developments in the economics of crime field, and the use of large scale microdata in research designs that enable causal effects to be identified. Some of the areas to be covered include: crime and the labour market; the economic returns to crime; online crime; and the impact of policing on crime.

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  • Fate of the West: the battle to save the world's most successful political idea [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Bill Emmott | Liberal democracies of the West are in decline. A former editor of the Economist explains how they must change in order to recover and thrive. When faced with global instability and economic uncertainty, it is tempting for states to react by closing borders, hoarding wealth and solidifying power. We have seen it at various times in Japan, France and Italy and now it is infecting all of Europe and America, as the vote for Brexit in the UK has vividly shown. This insularity, together with increased inequality of income and wealth threatens the future role of the West as a font of stability, prosperity and security. Part of the problem is that the principles of liberal democracy upon which the success of the West has been built have been suborned, with special interest groups such as bankers accruing too much power and too great a share of the economic cake. So how is this threat to be countered? States such as Sweden in the 1990s, California at different times or Britain under Thatcher all halted stagnation by clearing away the powers of interest groups and restoring their societies' ability to evolve. To survive, the West needs to be porous, open and flexible. From reinventing welfare systems to redefining the working age, from reimagining education to embracing automation, Emmott will lay out the changes the West must make to revive itself in the moment and avoid a deathly rigid future. Bill Emmott (@bill_emmott) was the editor-in-chief of the Economist from 1993 to 2006, and is now a writer and consultant on international affairs. He is a regular contributor to the Financial Times, La Stampa and Nikkei Business. His latest book is The Fate of the West: The Battle to Save the World's Most Successful Political Idea. Brian Klaas (@brianklaas) is an LSE Fellow in Comparative Politics and author of The Despot's Accomplice: How the West is Aiding & Abetting the Decline of Democracy.

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  • Farewell to Globalization: Farewell to the Liberal World Order? The Populist Revolt from Brexit to Trump and beyond [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Michael Cox | Until very recently nearly everybody – with a few critical exceptions – insisted that globalization was the only way forward for the world as a whole. Yet globalization is now under challenge: and not in the developing countries where billions still live in poverty but in the rich nations of the West. How has this come about and how serious is the opposition to globalization?

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  • First Confession: a sort of memoir [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Lord Patten | Chris Patten will in this talk use each phase of his life as a spur to reflect upon its contemporary situation - education, America, conservatism, Ireland, China, Europe and finally the question of links between violence and religion. Lord Patten was the last Governor of Hong Kong and will reflect on the current situation there as it marks the 20th anniversary of its handover on 1st July. Chris Patten is currently Chancellor of Oxford University. As a British MP (1979-92) he served as Minister for Overseas Development, Secretary of State for the Environment and Chairman of the Conservative Party, being described afterwards as 'the best Tory Prime Minister we never had' (Observer). He is author of the international bestsellers, East and West (1998), Not Quite the Diplomat: Home Truths about World Affairs (2005), and his new book is First Confession: A Sort of Memoir. Kevin Featherstone is Head of the European Institute, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

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  • Good Growth by Design – A Vision for London [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Sadiq Khan, Professor Ricky Burdett, Professor Sadie Morgan, Jackie Sadek | Sadiq Khan, the Mayor of London, will set out his personal vision for London's future development, and discuss his plans to ensure that the city’s growth benefits all Londoners. London’s population is at an all-time high, and continues to grow as fast as any period since the 19th century. This growth brings challenges of increasing pressures on housing, workspace, local services, infrastructure and heritage, but also brings opportunities to strengthen London’s position as one of the world’s greatest cities. In A City for All Londoners, Sadiq Khan set out his intention to write this new chapter in London’s development according to the principles of ‘good growth’. For this one-off event the Mayor will describe what good growth will mean for London and Londoners, and how he intends to work with London’s developers, architects, planners, local authorities and communities to deliver it. Following his speech, Sadiq Khan will join a panel who will respond to his vision. Sadiq Khan (@MayorofLondon) was elected as Mayor of London in May 2016. Prior to this, he was the MP for Tooting from 2005 to 2016. Sadiq was appointed Minister of State for Communities in 2008 and later became Minister of State for Transport, attending Cabinet. He was also Crossrail Minister. In 2010, Sadiq was appointed Shadow Lord Chancellor and in 2013 appointed Shadow Minister for London. In 2015 he led the Labour Party campaign in London in the General Election. Ricky Burdett (@BURDETTR) is Professor of Urban Studies at the LSE and Director of LSE Cities and the Urban Age Programme. Sadie Morgan is a founding director of leading architectural practice dRMM. Jackie Sadek (@JackieSadek) has 30 years’ experience in property development and urban regeneration, specializing in public-private sector partnerships. Tony Travers is Director of the IPA and LSE London. The Institute of Public Affairs (@LSEPubAffairs) is one of the world's leading centres of public policy. We aim to debate and address some of the major issues of our time, whether international or national, through our established teaching programmes, our research and our highly innovative public-engagement initiatives. LSE Cities (@LSECities) is an international centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science that carries out research, education and outreach activities in London and abroad. Its mission is to study how people and cities interact in a rapidly urbanising world, focussing on how the design of cities impacts on society, culture and the environment. LSE London (@LSE_London) is the London School of Economics' specialist research centre focusing on analyses of London's economy and broader metropolitan issues in a comparative context. The centre has a strong international reputation particularly in the fields of labour markets, social and demographic change, housing, finance and governance, and is the leading academic centre for analyses of city-wide developments in London. It is an interdisciplinary group involving staff from a number of departments who have particular expertise in economics, geography, government and planning.

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  • The Evolution of Global Inequalities: the impact on politics and the economy [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Professor Branko Milanovic | Branko Milanovic will discuss the recent evolution in global inequality and focus on the political implications of the important changes in the global distribution of income. Branko Milanovic (@BrankoMilan) is Senior Scholar at the Luxembourg Income Study Center and Visiting Presidential Professor, Graduate Center, City University of New York. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Martin White Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of the LSE International Inequalities Institute. The International Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.

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  • Emerging Financial Markets: Into the Mainstream, Unintended Policy Consequences and Secular Trends [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Andrew Dell, CEO Africa, HSBC | With growth and economic influence shifting South and East, this lecture presents a personal view of how global trends make this economic process inevitable as well as how global regulatory changes in response to the Global Financial Crisis have unintended consequences in developing economies.

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  • Britain and France [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Edward Llewellyn | Edward Llewellyn, newly installed UK Ambassador in Paris and former Chief of Staff for David Cameron, will reflect on Anglo-French relations in the first Maurice Fraser Memorial Lecture. Edward Llewellyn (@EdLlewellynFCO) is British Ambassador to France and former Chief of Staff to David Cameron (2011-2016). Kevin Featherstone is Head of the European Institute, Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics at LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

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  • International Law and New Wars [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Professor Christine Chinkin, Professor Mary Kaldor, Dr Javier Solana | By failing to address 'new wars' international law has added to insecurity. Is it time for a second generation human security resting upon the laws of humanity? This event launches Christine Chinkin and Mary Kaldor's new book International Law and New Wars, which examines how international law fails to address the contemporary experience of what are known as 'new wars' - instances of armed conflict and violence in places such as Syria, Ukraine, Libya, Mali, the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan. International law, largely constructed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, rests to a great extent on the outmoded concept of war drawn from European experience - inter-state clashes involving battles between regular and identifiable armed forces. The book shows how different approaches are associated with different interpretations of international law, and, in some cases, this has dangerously weakened the legal restraints on war established after 1945. It puts forward a practical case for what it defines as second generation human security and the implications this carries for international law. Christine Chinkin is Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. Mary Kaldor is Director of the Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit. Javier Solana is President at ESADE Center for Global Economy and Geopolitics and Distinguished Fellow at The Brookings Institution. Professor Toby Dodge is Director of the LSE Middle East Centre, a Professor in the International Relations Department at LSE, and a Senior Consulting Fellow for the Middle East, International Institute for Strategic Studies, London. The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation for women in conflict-affected situations around the world.

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  • Working the Phones: investigating control and resistance in the modern workplace [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Jamie Woodcock, Dr Alpa Shah | Jamie Woodcock goes undercover in a call centre to reveal the plight of over a million workers employed in the UK’s least-loved service industry. In the six months he spent ‘working the phones’, Jamie observed – and succumbed to – pockets of resistance to management, surveillance and control. Join Jamie as he recalls his experience, illustrating how call centres have become emblematic of the post-industrial service economy, which prompts him to question whether the gig economy will be subjected to a similar fate. Jamie Woodcock (@jamie_woodcock) is an LSE Fellow in LSE's Department of Management. Alpa Shah (@alpashah001) is Associate Professor (Reader) in the Department of Anthropology at the LSE. Bev Skeggs (@bevskeggs) is Professor of Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a globally diverse academic community at the heart of the LSE, taking a unique interdisciplinary, academically in-depth approach to the study of management and organisations.

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  • Marketplaces and Market Design [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Professor Alvin Roth | Nobel laureate Alvin Roth will deliver this year’s Morishima Lecture on the topics of game theory, market design and experimental economics. Alvin Roth is the Craig and Susan Shaw Professor of Economics at Stanford University. He was awarded the 2012 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics Sciences jointly with Lloyd Shapley, for their work on the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design. Nava Ashraf is Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She is also Director of Research of the Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and Social Entrepreneurship. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE.

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  • Can an Occupation Become Unlawful? Israeli practices in the Palestinian territories and third party responsibilities [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Professor Michael Lynk, Dr Valentina Azarova, Dr Federica Bicchi, Dr Victor Kattan, Hugh Lovatt | Editor's note: We apologise for the poor audio quality of this podcast. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict presents us with a paradox. While it has generated notable developments in international law, it seems to be unaffected by international law. Closing this apparent gap requires an examination of what international law stands for in the current situation, when Israel’s presence in the occupied Palestinian territories shows every sign of permanence. What has UN Security Council Resolution 2334 added to the debate? How should we assess the lawfulness of Israeli practices in the occupied territories? Has Israel’s prolonged occupation become illegal? And what does this mean for Palestinian rights and third state responsibilities? This lecture, followed by the discussants’ comments and Q&A, will be the opportunity to analyse concepts and issues from an academic perspective. Michael Lynk is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law, Western University, in London, Ontario. Valentina Azarova (@ValentinaAzarov) is Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Global Public Law, Koç University, Istanbul. Federica Bicchi is Associate Professor of International Relations at LSE. Victor Kattan (@VictorKattan) is Senior Research Fellow at the Middle East Institute and an Associate Fellow at the Faculty of Law at the National University of Singapore. Hugh Lovatt (@h_lovatt), Policy Fellow and Israel/Palestine Project Coordinator for ECFR’s Middle East and North Africa Programme. Toby Dodge (@ProfTobyDodge) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the Middle East Centre at LSE. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is now in its 89th year, making it one of the oldest, and largest in the world.

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  • Inequalities: changing the terms of the debate [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Jee Kim, Professor Amartya Sen, Katy Wright | Inequalities is a common, if often unstated, theme in the news. How the causes and consequences of inequalities are presented matters, so how do we change the current narratives? Jee Kim is leading the Narratives Initiative as part of the global Atlantic Fellows programme. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University. He is the recipient of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Economics and is an LSE Honorary Fellow. Katy Wright (@KatyWright) is Head of Global External Affairs at Oxfam. Beverley Skeggs (@bevskeggs) is the incoming Director of the Atlantic Fellows Programme at the III, starting in September 2017, she is currently Professor of Sociology, at Goldsmiths, University of London where she has worked since 2004. If you are interesed in attending this public event, you may be interested in attending the International Inequalities Institute annual conference entitled Challenging Inequalities: developing a global response taking place at 9:30am to 5:30pm on Wednesday 14 June 2017. The International Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.

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  • The End of Globalisation, the Return of History [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Stephen D. King | Globalisation, long considered the best route to economic prosperity and the apparent norm for decades, may not be as inevitable as we think. It now threatens to go abruptly into reverse. What went wrong? And what is the likely impact upon our future prosperity? Stephen D. King (@KingEconomist) is senior economic adviser at HSBC, a specialist adviser to the House of Commons Treasury Committee and an author. His latest book is Grave New World: The End of Globalization: The Return of History. Nick Oulton is an associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, a member of the Centre for Macroeconomics and a Visiting Professor at UCL. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.

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  • LSE Election Night Party 2017 - Panel 1 [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Professor Patrick Dunleavy, Dr Jennifer van Heerde-Hudson | The outcome of the 2017 General Election will be crucial in steering the UK’s approach to Brexit negotiations, and for setting the tone of UK public policy for the next Parliament. Join LSE academics and guest speakers for an evening of lively analysis and debate on the potential winners, losers, and consequences for the UK and beyond. 9.25pm - Introduction and Welcome – Professor Julia Black. 9.30pm - Panel 1: What to expect. Speakers: Professor Patrick Dunleavy, Dr Jennifer van Heerde-Hudson. 10.20pm - Panel 2: British Politics. Speakers: Professor Tim Bale, Professor Matthew Goodwin, Cordelia Hay. 11.35pm- Panel 3: Brexit. Speakers: Professor Sara Hobolt, David Goodhart, Professor Anand Menon, Professor Simon Hix. 12.15am - Panel 4: Economy and Welfare. Speakers: Professor Tim Besley, Dr Stephanie Rickard, Vicky Pryce. 12.55am - Panel 5: Defence and Foreign Policy. Speakers: Professor Mick Cox, Dr Brian Klaas, Dr Yu Jie. 1.35am - Final Analysis and Goodnight – Professor Tony Travers.

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  • LSE Election Night Party 2017 - Panel 2 [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Professor Tim Bale, Professor Matthew Goodwin, Cordelia Hay | The outcome of the 2017 General Election will be crucial in steering the UK’s approach to Brexit negotiations, and for setting the tone of UK public policy for the next Parliament. Join LSE academics and guest speakers for an evening of lively analysis and debate on the potential winners, losers, and consequences for the UK and beyond. 9.25pm - Introduction and Welcome – Professor Julia Black. 9.30pm - Panel 1: What to expect. Speakers: Professor Patrick Dunleavy, Dr Jennifer van Heerde-Hudson. 10.20pm - Panel 2: British Politics. Speakers: Professor Tim Bale, Professor Matthew Goodwin, Cordelia Hay. 11.35pm- Panel 3: Brexit. Speakers: Professor Sara Hobolt, David Goodhart, Professor Anand Menon, Professor Simon Hix. 12.15am - Panel 4: Economy and Welfare. Speakers: Professor Tim Besley, Dr Stephanie Rickard, Vicky Pryce. 12.55am - Panel 5: Defence and Foreign Policy. Speakers: Professor Mick Cox, Dr Brian Klaas, Dr Yu Jie. 1.35am - Final Analysis and Goodnight – Professor Tony Travers.

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  • LSE Election Night Party 2017 - Panel 3 [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Professor Sara Hobolt, David Goodhart, Professor Anand Menon, Professor Simon Hix | The outcome of the 2017 General Election will be crucial in steering the UK’s approach to Brexit negotiations, and for setting the tone of UK public policy for the next Parliament. Join LSE academics and guest speakers for an evening of lively analysis and debate on the potential winners, losers, and consequences for the UK and beyond. 9.25pm - Introduction and Welcome – Professor Julia Black. 9.30pm - Panel 1: What to expect. Speakers: Professor Patrick Dunleavy, Dr Jennifer van Heerde-Hudson. 10.20pm - Panel 2: British Politics. Speakers: Professor Tim Bale, Professor Matthew Goodwin, Cordelia Hay. 11.35pm- Panel 3: Brexit. Speakers: Professor Sara Hobolt, David Goodhart, Professor Anand Menon, Professor Simon Hix. 12.15am - Panel 4: Economy and Welfare. Speakers: Professor Tim Besley, Dr Stephanie Rickard, Vicky Pryce. 12.55am - Panel 5: Defence and Foreign Policy. Speakers: Professor Mick Cox, Dr Brian Klaas, Dr Yu Jie. 1.35am - Final Analysis and Goodnight – Professor Tony Travers.

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  • LSE Election Night Party 2017 - Panel 4 [Audio]

    · LSE: Public lectures and events

    Speaker(s): Professor Tim Besley, Dr Stephanie Rickard, Vicky Pryce | The outcome of the 2017 General Election will be crucial in steering the UK’s approach to Brexit negotiations, and for setting the tone of UK public policy for the next Parliament. Join LSE academics and guest speakers for an evening of lively analysis and debate on the potential winners, losers, and consequences for the UK and beyond. 9.25pm - Introduction and Welcome – Professor Julia Black. 9.30pm - Panel 1: What to expect. Speakers: Professor Patrick Dunleavy, Dr Jennifer van Heerde-Hudson. 10.20pm - Panel 2: British Politics. Speakers: Professor Tim Bale, Professor Matthew Goodwin, Cordelia Hay. 11.35pm- Panel 3: Brexit. Speakers: Professor Sara Hobolt, David Goodhart, Professor Anand Menon, Professor Simon Hix. 12.15am - Panel 4: Economy and Welfare. Speakers: Professor Tim Besley, Dr Stephanie Rickard, Vicky Pryce. 12.55am - Panel 5: Defence and Foreign Policy. Speakers: Professor Mick Cox, Dr Brian Klaas, Dr Yu Jie. 1.35am - Final Analysis and Goodnight – Professor Tony Travers.

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