Episodes

  • In this week's podcast Tim and Jeremy begin a multi-show examination of the music of Brazil in the Twentieth Century, starting in part one with the emergence of Samba in the late 1920s, Bossa Nova, and the first shoots of what would become Tropicalia. We hear about the complex and hybrid makeup of the nation, considering its Indigenous, African and European sources, and the role of slavery and colonialism on the vast nation.

    Tim and Jeremy talk about how music, and especially Samba, was used to cohere a new idea of Brazilian-ness, mobilised to express and represent a new national identity. We learn about new instruments like the cuica and surdo, and end with the introduction of a titan of Brazilian music, Jorge Ben. 

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.   

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down! 

    Become a patron from as little as £3pcm by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:
    Almirante & o Bando de Tangarás - Na Pavuna
    Ary Barosso - Aquarela Do Brasil
    Geraldo Pereira - Cabritada Mal Sucedida
    João Gilberto - Bim Bom
    Luiz Bonfá - Manhã De Carnaval
    Stan Getz & Joao Gilberto - The Girl From Ipanema
    Bola Sete And His New Brazillian Trio - Soul Samba
    Jorge Ben - Más Que Nada
    Jorge Ben - Rosa Más Que Nada

    Books:
    Bryan McCann - Hello, Hello Brazil: Popular Music in the Making of Modern Brazil
    Gilberto Freyre - The Masters and the Slaves

  • This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only bonus episode, Jeremy and Tim have a conversation about what music has been on their turntables recently.  Jeremy brings a pair of Indian compositions from very different ends of the musical spectrum: a steel strung guitar played like a sitar, and one of ten famous 'ragas to a disco beat'. Joining the dots between Indian Classical, '60s American fingerpickers and today, we also hear a new-ish release on show favourite International Anthem from reformed Post-Rocker Jeff Parker, and tuck into some 2010s electronic Afro-Disco from London's Ibibio Sound Machine.

    Tim shares a number of new discoveries, including the riotous contemporary Ghanian gospel of Alotgté Oho and a deeply psychedelic dancefloor freakout from Nico Gomez. We end with the new release from our friends at Beauty and the Beat, a tried-and-tested remix from our friend Kay Suzuki of some fantastic Guadalupian Gwoka.  

    This is part of a rough series of more conversational, unplanned episodes reflecting on what's been on our record players recently and what we've been up to that we'll be releasing to patrons to say thank you for your support.  

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    The tracks discussed are: Jeff Parker - Four Folks
    Vishwa Mohan Bhatt - Raag Bageshree
    Don Cherry - Om Shanti Om
    Alogté Oho - Doose Mam
    Ibibio Sound Machine - The Talking Fish
    Nico Gomez and His Afro Percussion Inc. - Baila Chibiquiban
    Charanjit Singh - Raga Bhairav
    Gaoulé Mizik - A Ka Titine (Kay Suzuki Gwoka Dub)  

    Order your copy of Excursions in Gwoka vol . 1 from Beauty and the Beat here: https://beautyandthebeat1.bandcamp.com/album/excursions-in-gwoka-vol-1-batb-005

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  • This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only episode Tim concludes reading from his essay Decolonising Disco—Counterculture, Postindustrial Creativity, the 1970s Dance Floor and Disco, published recently in the collection Global Dance Cultures in the 1970s and 1980s: Disco Heterotopias, edited by Flora Pitrolo and Marko Zubak.  Picking up where he left off in part 1, Tim introduces us to Sylvere Lotringer, the French critic who straddled both the worlds of academic Post-Structuralism and the Downtown NYC scene, itself a 'heterotopic' formation (after Foucault). We hear about the hybridity and convergence of the city's overlapping scenes in the early '80s, embodied by musicians like Arthur Russell, before the AIDS and Crack crises, Reaganomics and shifts in the art world caused this exciting collectivism to give way to more individualist modes of creation and production.

    In the final part of the essay, Tim shows how music from Africa, Latin America and Europe was a central component of what he calls 'Discotheque music' (ie records you would hear on the DJ-led dancefloors) which produced the original disco sound. With reference to SalSoul, Saturday Night Fever, Nigerian disco, contemporary reissue labels and more, Tim makes the case for these non-American, largely non-white musics to be included in an expanded edition of the disco archive. Lots of great musical examples are used in this show to illustrate the essay.

    Tracklist:
    The B52s - Rock Lobster
    The Peech Boys - Don't Make Me Wait
    Public Enemy - Public Enemy Number 1
    Fela Kuti - Shakara
    The Lafayette Afro Rock Band - Djungi
    Black Blood - A. I. E. (A Mwana)
    Tony Allen with Africa 70 - Afrodisco Beat
    Orlando Julius - Disco Hi-Life
    King Sunny Adé - 365 is My Number / The Message
    N'draman Blintch - Cosmic Sounds
    Khalab ft. Tenesha The Wordsmith - Black Noise

  • In this week's podcast Jeremy and Tim turn their atteniton to the musical cultures of 1965-1975 on some of the smaller islands of the Caribbean: Trinidad, Guadalupe and Haiti. We hear about Trinidad's particular combination of Afro-diasporic and South Asian populations during Imperial rule, how Calypso mediated the island's relationship to the British Empire, the emergence of the steel pans on the island in the face of persecution, and how American Soul influences gave rise of Soca.

    Tim and Jeremy also discuss the archipelago of Guadaloupe - not a country but a department of France - and it's two great Twentieth Century musics, Zouk and Gwaka. They discuss the history of Haiti, from its successful slave revolt to the many political pressures its suffered subsequently, and it's Compas music, along with the particularities of the spiritual practice of Voodoo on the island. Plus, cricket lovely cricket!

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!

    Become a patron from as little as £3pcm by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:
    Trinidad All-Star Percussion Band - Excerpt from British news reel
    Lord Kitchener - London is the Place for Me
    Lord Kitchener - Black Power
    Lord Kitchener - Victory Calypso
    Lord Shorty - Soul Calypso
    Lord Shorty - Indrani
    Les Vikings de la Guadeloupe - Assez Palé
    Exile One - One Favor
    Ensemble Aux Calebasses De Nemours Jean Baptiste - Donnez moi La Main
    Shleu-Shleu - Ceremonie Loa

    You can find friend of the show Cedric Lassonde's compilation of Gwoka Moderne, Lèspri Ka: New Directions in Gwoka Music from Guadeloupe 1981-2010, here: https://timecapsulespace.bandcamp.com/album/l-spri-ka-new-directions-in-gwoka-music-from-guadeloupe-1981-2010

    Books:
    CLR James - The Black Jacobins

  • This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only episode Tim reads from his essay Decolonising Disco—Counterculture, Postindustrial Creativity, the 1970s Dance Floor and Disco, published recently in the collection Global Dance Cultures in the 1970s and 1980s : Disco Heterotopias, edited by Flora Pitrolo and Marko Zubak. Drawing together arguments from all three of Tim's books covering the party culture of the 1970s and early 1980s, the piece re-historises the so-called 'genre wars' of Disco, Punk and Hip Hop / Rap to better represent the fluidity between these scenes and musics as part of a city-wide music culture.

    Tim continues to assert this radical creative potential of  the post-Fordist conjuncture in '70s music culture, and concludes by asking: what happened to the influence of music from the Global South on Disco; how did Disco go from the fringes of US culture to becoming a colonializing force itself; and how might we begin decolonialising Disco?

    We've split the essay into two halves, with part two to follow in a fortnight.

    Edited and produced by Matt Huxley.

    Tune in, turn on, get down!

    Tracklist:

    Cristina - Disco Clone
    The Salsoul Orchestra - You're Just The Right Size
    The Pointer Sisters - Yes We Can Can
    Booker T and the MG's - Melting Pot
    James Brown - Give It Or Turn It Loose
    Dinosaur - Kiss Me Again
    The New York Dolls - Personality Crisis

    Books:

    Tim Lawrence - Love Saves The Day: A History of American Dance Culture, 1970-1979
    Tim Lawrence - Life and Death on the New York Dance Floor, 1980-1983
    Tim Lawrence - Hold on to Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-1992
    David Harvey - A Brief History of Neoliberalism
    Anthony Haden-Guest - The Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night
    Simon Reynolds - Rip It Up and Start Again
    Nelson George - The Death of Rhythm and Blues

  • This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only episode, Jeremy and Tim conclude their mini-series ‘Heavy Dub Theory’ (for now). They talk about the work of the French radical philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, introducing three of their key concepts: the molar and the molecular; deterritorialisation and deterritorialisation; and the refrain. We then hear how these philosophical analytical ideas can be applied to Dub.

    Later in the episode we consider the changing role of the producer in Dub and the ways in which this problematised authorship; contrast dub riddims with NYC remix culture, and finally ask whether dub and reggae can be thought of as truly psychedelic musics.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:

    Sound Dimension - Real Rock
    Bounty Killer - Roots, Reality and Culture
    Modern Romance - Salsa Rappsody (Dub Discomix)
    Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry - Bed Jamming
    Disco Dub Band - For the Love of Money

  • In this week's episode Jeremy and Tim travel to New Years Day 1959 as Che Guevara's forces defeat Batista to complete the Cuban Revolution. We hear about the military embargo imposed by the USA on their island neighbour, its impact on life for musicians on both sides of the border, and is resonances with American foreign policy in Latin America more broadly.

    Tim and Jeremy also consider the nationalisation of the Cuban record industry, the pros and cons of state sponsorship on music creation, and how Communists across the world have addressed the problem of vernacular popular music's status within the culture industry. Plus, the Cha Cha Cha source of a foundational piece of Garage Rock, the Bay of Pigs, and why cymbals were banned for being 'too jazzy'.

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!

    Become a patron from as little as £3pcm by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:
    Cuarteto D' Aida - Yo Si Tumbo Caña
    The Kings Men - Louie Louie
    René Touzet - El Loco Cha Cha Cha
    Orquesta Cubana de Música Moderna - The Man I Love
    Irakere - Bacalao Con Pan
    Grupo De Experimentación Sonora Del ICAIC - Granma
    Los Van Van - Chirrin, Chirran

    Books:
    Timothy Brennan - Secular Devotion: Afro-Latin Music and Imperial Jazz
    Ned Sublette - Cuba and its Music

  • In this week's episode we move away from Jamaica across the Caribbean Sea to Cuba. To explain the theological precursors to modern Cuba, Jeremy and Tim start with the history of slavery on the island and the influences of Congolese and Uruban religious and musical practices the trafficked people brought with them. We hear about pantheism, master drummers and a musical culture centered around danced devotional rituals where percussion was key.

    Later in the show we cover Batista's brutal takeover of the island, the emerging links between Cuban and New York musicians, Rhumba, and the phenomenal popularity of Mambo. Join us next week, where revolution's in the air.

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!

    Become a patron from as little as £3pcm by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:

    Grupo Oba-Ilú - Oshún
    Conjunto Kubavana de Alberto Ruiz - Rumba en el Patio
    Afro-Cubans - Sopa de Pichon
    Afro-Cubans - Tanga
    Dizzy Gillespie & Chano Pozo - Manteca
    Perez Prado - Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White
    Tito Puente - Night Ritual
    Rolando Aguiló - Descarga Roja

    Books:
    Ned Sublette - Cuba and its Music
    Timothy Brennan - Secular Devotion: Afro-Latin Music and Imperial Jazz

  • This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only episode, Tim and Jeremy continue their deep exploration of the aesthetics of dub. We begin with a history of MCing, toasting and chatting in Jamaican music, taking in famed MCs like U-Roy alongside NYC contemporaries like DJ Kool Herc. This opens up a conversation about spontaneity, improvisation and liveness that problematises received ideas about ownership, authorship, and the musical work itself.

    Via a brief refresher on Critical Theory and Continental Philosophy, Jeremy and Tim explore the tensions between the musical performance and its recording, the power of repetition, and why dub's self-conscious experimentation with studio production makes it the most innovative medium of twentieth century music. We also get a healthy dose of Hauntology, '90s electronica and Socrates to complete the picture.

    We'll be back in a fortnight with the next iteration of Heavy Dub Theory.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:

    Sir Lord Comic And His Cowboys - Ska-Ing West
    Sir Lord Comic - Jack Of My Trade
    U-Roy - Dynamic Fashion Way
    U-Roy - Wake The Town
    Bedouin Ascent - Broadway Boogie Woogie
    Rhythm & Sound - Music Hit You
    Mad Professor - Ragga Doll
    Omni Trio - Half Cut

    Books:

    Jeff Chang - Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation
    Lloyd Bradley - Reggae: The Story of Jamaican Music
    Jacques Derrida - Spectres of Marx

  • LITM returns with the second half of our examination of the life and work of Bob Marley and the Wailers. Jeremy and Tim pick up the story in 1973, with the release of Burnin', the band's split, and the launch of Marley in the rock star mode. A discussion on the strange case of Eric Clapton's cover of I Shot the Sheriff follows, along with Marley's first international smash, No Woman, No Cry.

    Tim and Jeremy proceed to the release of Exodus in 1977 - also the year of an assassination attempt on Marley - and dig into the politics of a turbulant late '70s Jamaica, the Socialist PM Michael Manley, and the complexities of Marley's own political appeal to love and peace in the face of extreme political violence. The episode concludes with the singer's cancer diagnosis, a late return to explicit radical anti-colonialism, and eventual death in 1981, with time given to parsing his singular posthumous legacy. 

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!

    Become a patron from as little as £3pcm by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:

    Bob Marley & the Wailers - Burnin' and Lootin'
    Bob Marley & the Wailers - I Shot the Sheriff
    Eric Clapton - I Shot the Sheriff
    Bob Marley & the Wailers - No Woman, No Cry
    Bob Marley & the Wailers - Exodus
    Bob Marley & the Wailers - Waiting in Vain
    Bob Marley & the Wailers - Redemption Song

    Books:

    Lloyd Bradley - Bass Culture: When Reggae was King
    Dick Hebdidge - Subcultures

  • Unlocked - for a number of personal reasons, we've been unable to record the episode on Bob Marley and the Wailers. In its stead, we've taken this opportunity to unlocked both parts of our interview with Daphne A. Brooks, previously only available to patrons. Become a patron from £3pcm to access much more of this material at www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod. We'll be back to pick up with Afro-Psychedelia very soon.

    In this episode Daphne talks with Tim and Jeremy about the writers, practitioners and 'organic intellectuals' who have created a new discourse around Black female sound, taking in figures such as the writer and collector of field recordings Zora Neale Hurston, the writer, journalist and singer Pauline Hopkins, and the writer and playwright Lorraine Hansberry. They dig into what it means to hold precious these forgotten figures, affectionate writing praxis, and the relationship between curatorial or archival work and contemporary music making. In part 2, coming in a fortnight, we will hear about some of the contemporary artists featured in the book, including Janelle Monáe and Beyonce.

    Daphne A. Brooks is William R. Kenan, Jr. professor of African American studies, American Studies, Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Music at Yale University; she is also director of graduate studies.She specializes in African American literary cultural performance studies, especially 19th century and trans-Atlantic culture. She is a rock music lover and has attributed her research interests in black performance to being a fan of rock music since a very young age.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:

    Zora Neale Hurston - Wake Up Jacob (trad. recorded 1928 in the field)
    Mamie Smith - Crazy Blues
    Elvie Thomas & Geeshie Wiley - Over To My House
    Elvie Thomas & Gershie Wiley - Last Kind Words Blues

    Books:
    Daphne A. Brooks - Liner Notes for the Revolution: The Intellectual Life of Black Feminist Sound
    Daphne A. Brooks - Jeff Buckley’s Grace
    Zora Neale Hurston - Their Eyes Were Watching God
    Pauline Hopkins - Of One Blood

  • Unlocked - for a number of personal reasons, we've been unable to record the episode on Bob Marley and the Wailers. In its stead, we've taken this opportunity to unlocked both parts of our interview with Daphne A. Brooks, previously only available to patrons. Become a patron from £3pcm to access much more of this material. We'll be back to pick up with Afro-Psychedelia very soon.

    In this episode we conclude our two-part interview with Black Feminist scholar and music critic Daphne A. Brooks. Following from our previous show, Daphne disucsses some of the contemporary figures in her new book Liner Notes for the Revolution: The Intellectual Life of Black Feminist Sound, including Janelle Monáe, who along with the Wonderland Arts Collective engage in an act of intellectual worldbuilding around her music, and the deep archival searching of jazz singer Cécile McLorin Salvant. With reference to Beyoncé Tim, Jeremy and Daphne consider to what extent we are living through an ascendent period of Black feminist consciousness and discuss the way such Black female megastars are held in cultural production.

    We also took advantage of speaking with Daphne to ask her about the Harlem Cultural Festival, the so-called 'Black Woodstock' which the excellent new film and firm LITM favourite Summer of Soul documents, as well as to commemorate the recent passing of two titans of Black cultural writing, Greg Tate and bell hooks. We are so grateful to Daphne for being so generous with her time, insight and humour.

    Daphne A. Brooks is William R. Kenan, Jr. professor of African American studies, American Studies, Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Music at Yale University; she is also director of graduate studies.She specializes in African American literary cultural performance studies, especially 19th century and trans-Atlantic culture. She is a rock music lover and has attributed her research interests in black performance to being a fan of rock music since a very young age.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:

    Janelle Monáe - Make Me Feel
    Cécile McLorin Salvant - Ghost Song
    Beyoncé - ***Flawless
    Burnt Sugar - Conduction #5
    Burnt Sugar - Rock'n'Roll Suicide

  • This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    This is the audio from our recent patrons-only 'Live Conversations' between ourselves and our patrons, which took place over Zoom in March of this year. Tim, Jeremy and our guests discussed the role of the internet in music fandom, the relative importance of mediating figures like critics and DJs, the impact of the net on the record market and its infrastructure, and ask whether DJs can still truly break a record from behind the booth.

    We also talked about how strongly subcultural affiliation and music are linked in the 2020s, the perils of (sub)genrification, pluralistic listening, and whether dance music culture is - or has ever been - politicised.

    We intend to hold these events semi-regularly, so do come along to the next one if you can.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tune in, Turn on, Get down!

  • In this week's episode Tim and Jeremy focus on the early life and work of Bob Marley & The Wailers. They explore the role Marley and the group played in bringing Reggae to the world, with the singer becoming a singular and ubiquitous figure in culture in the process. Beginning with their first Ska singles from the mid-'60s, we hear how the original 1965 recording of One Love articulated a nascent form of philosophical universalism, with love as a political virtue to overcome difference. We also follow Marley on his journey towards Rastafarianism, and reintroduce Island Records' Chris Blackwell to the show.

    Tim and Jeremy discuss the powerful, dub-inflected production of the Wailers' second album Soul Rebels, consider the anti-imperialism of rootsyness, and explore the recording and marketing of their follow up, Catch A Fire.

    We'll be back in a fortnight with part two of our deep dive on Marley. One Love.

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down! 

    Become a patron from just £3 per month by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:
    The Wailers - Simmer Down
    The Wailers - One Love (1965)
    Bob Marley & The Wailers - Soul Rebel
    Bob Marley & The Wailers - Rebel's Hop
    Bob Marley & The Wailers - Concrete Jungle

    Books:
    Timothy White - Catch a Fire: The Life of Bob Marley

  • This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only episode, Jeremy and Tim begin a multi-part exploration of what we're calling Heavy Dub Theory: a deep dive on the aesthetic, musicological and theoretical understandings of dub. We start with a discussion of the materiality of bass as expressed in the concept of Bass Materialism - how bass frequencies behave in space, are felt in our bodies, and how bass music rejected and upset prevailing musical expressions of white heteropatriarchal culture.

    We also consider how dub composition is organised around subtraction rather than addition - a fact it shares with the contemporaneous school of Minimalism - and make the case that dub is anti-climactic, anti-telos, and ultimately breaks with traditional musical conceptions of time all together.

    We'll be back in a fortnight with the next iteration of Heavy Dub Theory.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:

    A Tribe Called Quest - Vibes and Stuff
    Steve Reich - Come Out
    King Tubby & Observer All Stars - Rema Dub
    King Tubby & Jacob Miller - City Of The Weakheart Dub
    Peter Tosh - Mystic Man

    Books:

    Paul C. Jasen - The Low End Theory; Bass, Bodies and the Materiality of Sonic Experience
    Julian Henriquez - Sonic Bodies
    Steve Goodman - Sonic Warfare
    Jeremy Gilbert & Ewan Pearson - Discographies
    Tricia Rose - Black Noise
    Henri Bergson - Matter and Memory

  • In this week's episode Jeremy and Tim move through the late 20th century to trace dub's echoing influence on Disco, Post-Punk, early House and the music of the British Rave scene. Dub's aesthetics of space, minimalism, and bass-centric production are revealed on the New York dancefloor through the early remix experiments of Walter Gibbons and the studio work of Francois K, as well as in the punk clubs of London and the after-party living rooms of late '80s ravers.

    Tim and Jeremy consider how the Clash came to lean heavily on their fascination with Dub and Rastafarianism; how Reggae as a musical vocabulary was repeatedly drawn on for distinctly Feminist musical projects with explicitly experimental aims; and spend some time discussing one of UK music's most singular figures, Andrew Weatherall.

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!  

    Become a patron from just £3 per month by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:

    First Choice - Let No Man Put Asunder (Walter Gibbons Mix)
    Disco Dub Band - For the Love of Money
    The Slits - Shoplifting
    The Clash - White Man in Hammersmith Palais
    The Clash - The Magnificent Dance
    Vivien Goldman - Launderette
    Tom Tom Club - Genius of Love
    Chip E - Like This
    Sandee - Notice Me (Notice the House Mix)
    The Orb - Earth (Gaia)

    Books:
    Vivien Goldman - Revenge of the She-Punks

  • This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only bonus episode, Jeremy and Tim have a conversation about what music has been on their turntables recently.

    In a genre-busting and wide-ranging discussion we consider potential connections between the current wave of excellent ambient psychedelic jazz releases from labels like Chicago's International Anthem with '90s Post Rock and the '70s Minimalism; explore the fresh and surprising offerings of '70s Belgium and the unusually Cuban sounds of '60s Senegal; and consider how Reggae covers of American and British pop songs are expressions of Gilroy's Black Atlantic.

    Also in this episode we hear a Brazilian Tropicalia tune about the apparent founder of a universal mystic gnostic philosophy, contemplate the religion and theology of Late Antiquity, enjoy an exciting spurt of post-Jungle energy from contemporary London, and end with a playful and trippy dub remix fresh from a party.

    This is part of a rough series of more conversational, unplanned episodes reflecting on what's been on our record players recently and what we've been up to that we'll be releasing to patrons to say thank you for your support.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    The tracks discussed are:

    Jamie Branch - Birds of Paradise
    Placebo - Dag Madam Merci
    Prince Buster - A Change is Gonna Come
    Idrissa Diop - Caridad
    Jorge Ben - Hermes Trismegisto Escrreveu
    The Tornadoes & Tyra Hammond - You Got Me Thinking
    Parris and Call Super - Poison Pudding
    Desmond Chambers - Haly Gully (Toby Tobias Version)

  • In this week's episode Tim and Jeremy dive headlong into Dub. They discuss the changing meaning of the term, the difficulties in charting the history of the music, and explore the work of two of the pioneers of the sound, Lee 'Scratch' Perry and King Tubby. Jeremy and Tim discuss the sonic properties of dub, including the innovative use of reverb and delay, as well as the distinctive vocal practice of toasting and the starring role performed by the bass in this new musical form.

    Tim and Jeremy also talk about why the innovations of Dub took place in Jamaica, the importance of addition and subtraction to the dub producers, and the persistent dialectic between seriousness and playfulness out of which so much Dub emerges. In this spirit, we also hope you enjoy the special LITM theme music version. Back in a fortnight with more - stay dubwise. 

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!  

    Become a patron from just £3 per month by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:

    Les Paul & Mary Ford - How High The Moon
    Richie Havens - Indian Rope Man
    Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger & The Trinity - Indian Rope Man
    Bob Marley & the Wailers - African Herbsman
    Lee 'Scratch' Perry - African Herbsman (Dub Version)
    King Tubby & Augustus Pablo - King Tubby Meets the Rockers Uptown
    Junior Byles - Curly Locks
    Augustus Pablo - Curly Dub
    Sir Gibbs - People Grudgeful
    The Abyssinians - Satta Massagana
    Joe Gibbs - Satta Amasa Gana Version
    King Tubby - Weeping Dub

    Books:
    Michael Veal - Dub: Soundscapes and Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae

  • This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    Continuing our ongoing patrons-only reading series, Tim picks up where he left off in his 2004 book 'Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture 1970-1979'. I'm sure you'll all have heard him reference the book the show, and many of you will have read it, so here we present a reading series of the book to compliment the Love is the Message project.

    In Chapter 1 part 3, we hear about the original parties thrown by David Mancuso in his home at 647 Broadway. Tim describes the make up of the crowd, the lengths David went in preparing for the party, his innovations in décor, and the freedom people found dancing there.

    Thank you for your continued support of the show - we couldn't do it without you.

    Expect to hear much more from the book in the coming months, as well as more patrons-only content and a new series of the main show.

    Tune in, turn on, get down!

  • In this week's episode Jeremy and Tim focus on the birth of Reggae in Jamaica. Beginning with the island's first popular music, Ska, we hear how the music of Alton Ellis and Desmond Decker transformed into Rocksteady, with it's slower pulse, rootsy feel and serious lyrical turn. Set against the backdrop of Kingston's high crime rate and Rudeboy culture, Tim and Jeremy recount how this music took on the feeling of suffering and anguish many Jamaicans experienced in their lives. We hear how these musicians began to look less to America for their musical inspirations than to the island's Mento folk traditions as the Reggae sound began to crystalize in the late '60s.

    Also in this episode, we are introduced to the pioneering producer and performer Lee 'Scratch' Perry (more from him next episode), explore the emerging link between Reggae music and Michael Manley's socialist People's National Party, and consider the problematic gender and sexual politics of a genre so focused on emancipation and liberation. Join us next time as we dive deep into Dub...

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!  

    Become a patron from just £3 per month by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:

    Alton Ellis and the Flames - Girl I Have Got A Date
    Alton Ellis - Rock Steady
    Desmond Dekker & The Aces – Israelites
    Lee 'Scratch' Perry - People Funny Boy
    Junior Byles - Beat Down Babylon
    The Abyssinians - Satta Massagana
    Marcia Griffiths - The First Cut is the Deepest

    Books:
    Lloyd Bradley - Bass Culture: When Reggae Was King