Episodes

  • In this episode Jeremy and Tim discuss the economic and social setting into which Studio 54 opened in 1977. They talk about the differences between midtown and downtown scenes, the antagonism (or lack thereof) between punk and disco, subcultural theory and escapism.

    How did disco become so popular so quickly? The guys explore the commercial phenomenon as it exploded after 1975, including the first Disco Convention in 1976 (with awards ceremony!), the in-crowd vs the suburbs, and an extended meditation on the history and value of gimmick records. Plus: has Jeremy done the Hustle?

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Books:
    Sarah Thornton - Club Cultures: Music, Media and Subcultural Capital

    Anthony Hayden-Guest - The Last Party

    Thomas Delany - Times Square Red, Times Square Blue

    Tracklist:

    Rick Dees and his Cast of Idiots - Disco Ducks

    Van McCoy - The Hustle

    Carol Douglas - Midnight Love Affair

    Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band - Cherchez La Femme

  • This is an excerpt from a patrons-only episode. To hear the full thing and a whole lot more, go to Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-episode Jeremy raises a devil’s horn salute to the gods and demons of heavy metal. He explores the etymology of the genre term, excavating its shared roots with acid rock, and explaining how heavy metal compliments our story here on LITM. With reference to Easy Rider and the misconceived ‘end of the ‘60s’, we hear about how biker culture, the legacy of the blues and changing regimes of accumulation contributed to the anguished intensity expressed in the music of Led Zeppelin, King Crimson and Iron Butterfly.

    Jeremy also explores noise, feedback and distortion as the new aesthetic tools of metal, questions why people in the late 60s would want to explore occult and black magic ideas, and finishes with a deep dive on Black Sabbath, asking: was heavy metal an expression of the blues for white guys who’s dad’s worked in the car factories of Birmingham?

    Join us next time for pt. 2.

    Produced by Matt Huxley.

    Books and Films:

    Easy Rider
    Robert Walser - Running with the Devil: Power, Gender and Madness in Heavy Metal Music

    Tracklist:

    Steppenwolf - Born to be Wild

    Blue Cheer - Summertime Blues

    The Who - My Generation (Live 1968)

    Led Zeppelin - Dazed and Confused

    Led Zeppelin - Whole Lotta Love

    King Crimson - 21st Century Schizoid Man

    Iron Butterfly - Easy Rider (Let the Wind Pay the Way)

    Black Sabbath - Black Sabbath

    Black Sabbath - Paranoid

    Black Sabbath - War Pigs

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  • In the final episode of our three-parter on punk, Jeremy and Tim stick a pin through their ears and make their way down the Kings Road for the release of Anarchy in the UK. We hear about the mercurial Malcolm McLaren, Situationism, Symbolism and SEX in discussion with the Pistols project. We uncover why John Lydon knows what he hates but not what he wants, how a prime-time curse word scandalised Britain, and ask who wasn’t at the Manchester Free Trade Hall the night the Sex Pistols played.

    Elsewhere in the episode we dig deeper into what constituted punk as a structure of feeling, contrasting authenticity with irony and asking: how serious really is all this? With Blondie, John Waters, Rimbaud, the Mercer Street Arts Center and Patti Smith. Never mine the bollocks, here’s Love is the Message…
    Produced by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:
    New York Dolls - Personality Crisis

    Patti Smith - Horses

    Blondie - X Offender

    Books:
    Frith & Hall - Art into Pop

  • This is an excerpt from a patrons-only episode. To hear the whole thing and much more besides, visit Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Earlier this month UNESCO added Berlin techno to its List of Intangible Cultural Heritage, a register to recoginize and safeguard important traditions, practices and expressions. This news was met with consternation from music fans over how this honour completely overlooked the birthplace of techno, Detroit. For this patrons-only episode, Jeremy and Tim react to the news by pulling out a dozen or so of their favourite Detroit techno cuts to discuss.

    We hear about the ‘Belville Three’, post-Fordism, Alvin Tofler and the relationship between Chicago and Motor City. The guys dwell on the aesthetic of coldness and futurity that characterised much of the Detroit sound, folding in the Panthers, jazz and unidentified flying objects into records from Underground Resistance, Carl Craig, Drexciya and Theo Parish. Plus, we hear one of the first records Jeremy ever bought, memories of squat parties past, and a de rigour David Mancuso cameo.

    Tracklist:
    Model 500 - No UFOs
    Rhythim Is Rhythim - It Is What It Is
    R-Tyme - R-Theme
    Underground Resistance - The Theory
    The Martian - Star Dancer
    K-Hand - Starz
    Innerzone Orchestra - Eruption
    Innerzone Orchestra - Bug in the Bass Bin
    The Aztec Mystic - Jaguar
    Drexciya - Birth Of New Life
    Carl Craig & Pepe Braddock - Angola (Carl Craig Mix)
    Theo Parish - Falling Up
    Innerzone Orchestra - People Make the World Go 'Round

  • In this episode we continue our trio of episodes on Punk by examining some crucial mid-70s proto-Punk antecedents. Via the lean funkiness of Dr Feelgood Jeremy and Tim explore the interesting British formation of pub rock, with its R’n’B roots and distinct danceability. This leads to a discussion on the slipperiness of Rock’n’Roll as a term and its tensions with ‘rock’ proper. We also hear an early influence on Post-Punk and meet the influential Stiff Records at its foundation.
    In the second half of the show we make a second encounter on the show with the Ramones, and ask: what were they really up to? Authenticity, performance, historiography and hagiography all come under the microscope as we lead to the first definitively British Punk record: New Rose by The Damned.
    Join us next time for Blondie and the Sex Pistols.
    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.


    Tracklist:
    Dr Feelgood - She Does it Right
    Dr Feelgood - Keep it Outta Sight
    Nick Lowe - So It Goes
    The Ramones - Blitzkrieg Bop
    The Saints - (I’m) Stranded
    The Damned - New Rose

  • This is an excerpt from a patrons-only episode. To hear the whole thing and a huge number of other conversations, head to Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons episode Jem and Tim once again share what’s been on their turntables recently. We hear two tracks - one contemporary and one not - from the UK Asian Underground, along with a consideration of the cosmopolitan aesthetic of artists like Bally Sagoo and Nitin Sawhney. Tim reflects on trips to the WOMAD festival and digs into trip hop while Jem shares a powerful Qawwali cut. Elsewhere we hear Swedish afrobeat, extremely psychedelic roots reggae, free love, a compilation for Gaza, Messages from the Stars and more…

    Tracklist:
    Nitin Sawhney - Charu Keshi Rain
    Nora Dean - Angie La La
    Bally Sagoo - Noorie
    Morelo - Promise (from ‘For Gaza’ comp by Planet Turbo Records)
    The RAH Band - Messages from the Stars
    Orgōne - Strike
    Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan - Shamas-Ud-Doha, Badar-Ud-Doja
    Olumo Soundz - Sunday Jump
    June Jazzin - Shine Your Brightest Light

    Books:

    Sanjay Sharma, John Hutnyk, Ashwani Sharma (Eds) - Dis-Orienting Rhythms: The Politics of the New Asian Dance Music

  • Welcome to Series 6 of Love is the Message! We hope you enjoyed the series of conversations with writers and academics that comprised Series 5, but now we are returning to our usual format to examine a watershed year: 1977.

    In this first episode we are unpacking Punk. What is it? A musical style, a subgenre of rock, a fashion sensibility, an attitude, a structure of feeling? In the first of three shows on Punk, Jeremy and Tim unfurl a general genealogy of the term as we build towards the release of Anarchy in the UK in two episodes’ time. They discuss where the term came from and how it was codified; the importance punk placed on realness and spontaneity; and contrast Punk’s nostalgic and avant garde modes.

    Tim and Jeremy make reference to three bands not immediately thought of as Punk - The Seeds, The MC5 and The Stooges - to uncover what musical work was taking place in the late 60s and early 70s that could be viewed as proto-punk, and use these bands to show the problems of rock historiography in recounting the history of Punk. And, this being LITM, we of course spend some time untangling the Punk vs Disco dichotomy.

    We hope you’ll join us as we continue our long march through the 1970s and beyond!

    Become a patron at patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:
    The Seeds - Pushin’ Too Hard
    The MC5 - Kick Out the Jams
    The Stooges - Funhouse

  • This is an excerpt from a patrons-only episode. To hear the whole thing and a lot more besides, head to Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons’ episode we conclude our trio of episodes on Glam Rock.

    Tim and Jeremy pick up where they left off with a walk on the wild side. This leads to a discussion of the relationship between Lou Reed, Bowie and Iggy Pop in the early 70s. They discuss the undisputed glam anthem Cum on Feel the Noize from Birmingham’s finest Slade, replete with its football terrace chant and fist-pumping energy. And on the mellower side, explore the idea of glam as torch song, with entries from international treasure Elton John and a return to the show for Roxy Music.

    Jeremy and Tim conclude the episode with an acceptance of the might of Queen and a brief scintilla of postmodernism - much more of that to follow.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:

    Lou Reed - Walk on the Wild Side

    David Bowie - Moonage Daydream

    Slade - Cum On Feel The Noize

    Suzi Quatro - Glycerine Queen

    Elton John - Goodbye Yellow Brick Road

    Roxy Music - In Every Dream Home a Heartache

    Queen - Killer Queen

  • This is an excerpt from a patrons-only episode. To hear the whole show, and a whole lot more besides, head to Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod to sign up.

    In this patrons’ episode we move into the second of three episodes on Glam. The third part of this trilogy will be dropping in your feed sooner than our normal schedule so hold tight for that.

    Tim and Jeremy discuss that big beast of British rock, Roxy Music. They consider Brian Ferry’s cultivation of a White British vocal style, the effects of art college on this and so many other contemporaneous UK bands, Ferry’s eventual styling as ‘Frank Sinatra in quotation marks’, and the emergence from within Roxy of one of the most influential producers of the Twentieth Century - Brian Eno.

    Also in the episode the guys go deep on Ziggy Stardust and unpack the desire of so many 70s musicians to just be taken seriously. Plus, the shadow of Dylan, Cornelius Cardew, and more Marc Bolan.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:

    Roxy Music - Re-Make/Re-Model

    Roxy Music - Virginia Plain

    David Bowie - Ziggy Stardust

    T.Rex - Children Of The Revolution

  • In this episode Jeremy and Tim are joined by writer, historian, and friend of the show Simon Reynolds to discuss British musical trends of the 1970s and his life as a music journalist. Simon is arguably the most important music critic writing today, having penned seminal books on post-punk, electronic dance music, feminist rock and much more. In this interview he mostly talks about his most recent book, ‘Shock and Awe: Glam Rock and Its Legacy, from the Seventies to the Twenty-First Century’, sharing stories from his childhood interest in the decadent world of Glam.

    The three discuss how so many artists came to aestheticise a rejection of suburbia, the purply gauze of Top of the Pops, and thinking the Situationists were a band. They unpick how Punk is imagined and historicised versus how it was experienced, how Simon came to reappraise the 60s against a hostile critical culture, and consider the role of the music press historically and today.

    For patrons, our extended edition also includes a discussion around Simon’s 2011 book ‘Retromania: Pop Culture’s Addiction to its Own Past’. Tim, Jeremy and Simon recount the particular conjuncture from which the book arose, tease out its key theses, and apply those to contemporary music culture.

    Simon Reynolds is the author of ‘Blissed Out: The Raptures of Rock’, ‘The Sex Revolts: Gender, Rebellion and Rock 'N' Roll’ with Joy Press, ‘Energy Flash: A Journey Through Rave Music and Dance Culture’, ‘Rip It Up and Start Again: Postpunk 1978–1984’, ‘Bring The Noise: 20 Years of Writing About Hip Rock and Hip-Hop’, ‘Retromania: Pop Culture's Addiction to Its Own Past’ and ‘Shock and Awe: Glam Rock and Its Legacy, from the Seventies to the Twenty-First Century’. His next book, ‘Futuromania: Electronic Dreams from Moroder to Migos’ is forthcoming.

    Tracklist:
    Scott Joplin - The Entertainer
    Ian Dury & the Blockheads - Plaistow Patricia
    The Rezillos - Top Of The Pops
    The Specials - Ghost Town

    Led Zeppelin - Whole Lotta Love

  • UNLOCKED - We've made public this previously patrons-only episode following the death of Can singer Damo Suzuki. If you'd like to become a patron, visit Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    W do you call it? Krautrock, space rock, the Great Komische Music? It’s all German to me. In a little under two hours the guys cover the history of post-WW2 Germany (East and West), anti-Communist geopolitics, what you want to hear when you’re tripping, Pop Art, post-rock and playfulness, all in reference to the music of Can, NEU!, Ash Ra Tempel and more.

    We hear about the characteristics of the German counterculture from which many of these players came, the various tendencies of revolutionary European socialism, the Green Party, and the problems of De-Nazification. We consider the avant-garde compositions of Karlheinz Stockhausen, the impact of American acid rock, Ancient Egypt, and the many ways James Brown’s funk filtered into the motor rhythms of Dusseldorf 1971. More than anything, we survey a formidable body of work that is at once mesmeric and danceable - both things we like here at Love is the Message!

    Produced by Matt Huxley.

    Books:
    Julian Cope - Krautrock Sampler: One Head’s Guide to the Great Kosmische Musik
    David Stubbs - Future Days: Krautrock and the Building of Modern Germany

    Tracklist:
    Ash Ra Tempel & Timothy Leary - Timeship
    Karlheinz Stockhausen - Spiral (Realization A)
    Amon Duul ii - Yeti (Improvisation)
    Ash Ra Tempel - Amboss
    Kraftwerk - Stratovarius
    Tangerine Dream - Genesis
    Tangerine Dream - Flute Organ Piece
    Can - Halleluwah
    NEU! - Hallogallo
    Can - Moonshake
    Kraftwerk - Autobahn
    Harmonia & Eno '76 - Atmosphere
    Kraftwerk - Trans Europe Express

  • This is an excerpt from a patrons-only episode. To hear the whole thing, plus dozens of hours more discussion and conversation, head to patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons’ episode we continue our look at musical currents of the 1970s by pulling on our platform boots, pasting on some eyeliner and getting ready for Glam Rock. In the first of two episodes, Tim and Jeremy excavate the pre-history of this strange trans-Atlantic phenomenon, which expresses both fascinating cultural insights and some pretty bad music (to our ears). Tim and Jeremy discuss the concept of glamour itself, the glamorous side of Hippy culture, and clothing and makeup as forms of self-expression. They also get stuck into 60s Garage Rock, focusing on The Stooges and The Velvet Underground, to consider ideas of decadence, masculinity, mass culture, Warhol and more, before - via a detour through the singular artistry of David Bowie - teeing up two recognisable faces of early Glam: Marc Bolan and Alice Cooper. Next episode we’ll be continuing on to Roxy Music, the New York Dolls, later Bowie, Slade, and the legacy of this strange musical force. Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:The Pleasure Seekers - What a Way to DieThe Velvet Underground - Venus in FursThe Stooges - TV EyeAlice Cooper - I’m EighteenDavid Bowie - The Man Who Sold The WorldAlice Cooper - School’s OutT. Rex - Hot Love

    Books:Philip Auslander - Performing Glam Rock: Gender and Theatricality in Popular MusicSimon Reynolds Book - Shock and Awe: Glam Rock and Its Legacy, from the Seventies to the Twenty-First CenturyColin Campbell - The Romantic Ethic and the Spirit of Modern Consumerism

  • To hear an extended version of this conversation, become a patron at Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this episode Jeremy and Tim are joined by historian and New Yorker Kim Phillips-Fein to discuss a crucial event in the Love is the Message story: the 1975 New York City fiscal crisis. Kim’s book ‘Fear City: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics’ is widely regarded as the definitive text on the matter, so she was the perfect person to talk to, and she brought some great music recommendations to boot.

    The three discuss both the long- and short-term backdrop to the crisis, charting how the city’s unique social democratic municipal system of rent controls, hospitals and education changed across the twentieth century, before examining how the centre of international capital came extremely close to bankruptcy. Kim explains the financial mechanisms which animated the crisis and the political choices that precipitated it. She elucidates President Ford’s predicament during the crisis, the effects of ‘white flight’, and reminds us that New York was itself an industrial city rapidly de-industrialising.

    This being Love is the Message, naturally we also hear about the extraordinary cultural creativity of the time and examine its material causes, including changing democraphics and the transformation of Soho. Finally, Tim Jeremy and Kim consider what happened next, and how the fiscal crisis has been historicised to serve a particular ideology.

    Kim Phillips-Fein is the Gardiner-Kenneth T. Jackson Professor of History at Columbia University. Her book ‘Fear City: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics' was named a finalist for the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for History. She is also the author of ‘Invisible Hands: The Making of the Conservative Movement from the New Deal to Reagan’.

    Tracklist:

    Television - Venus

    The Dils - Class War

    The Rolling Stones - Shattered

    Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five - The Message

  • This is an excerpt from a patrons-only episode. To hear the whole show, plus much more, head to Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    On this festive edition of What We’re Listening To, Jeremy and Tim share selections from their turntables alongside thoughts on religion, atheism, death - and Blondie. We hear psychedelic jazz from north India and northern England, a brace of uplifting Gospel anthems from Pastor T.L Barrett, and some free-wheeling spiritual jazz from the Bronx via Puerto Rico. A smattering of seasonal song is dispersed throughout the selections, and with an eye on the horrors of the last two months in the Middle East, an uplifting call for peace to sign off on.
    We will be taking a short break for Christmas and New Year but will be back in mid-January with more LITM. Tune in, turn on, get down…

    Produced by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:

    Manish Pingle - Raga Puriya Kalyan
    Erobique (ft. Florence Adooni) - Mam Tola
    Matthew Halsall - An Ever Changing View
    Pastor T.L. Barrett And The Youth For Christ Choir - I Shall Wear a Crown
    Pastor T.L. Barrett And The Youth For Christ Choir - Jingle Bells
    Blondie - Yuletide Throwdown
    Antonio Ocasio ft. Nina Hadzi Antich - That Something
    Alfredo Linares - La Musica Por Dentro (Remixed by Jose Parla & Phenomenal Handclap Band)
    Joseph Macwan - Climb That Mountain (3AM Mix)
    Mike Anthony - Why Can't We Live Together

  • This is an excerpt from a patrons-only episode. To hear the full show, and much more, head to Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this episode Tim and Jeremy begin a series of shows for patrons that flesh out some of the other musical currents of the UK and Europe in the late 60s and early 70s, beginning with… well, what do you call it? Krautrock, space rock, the Great Komische Music? It’s all German to me. In a little under two hours the guys cover the history of post-WW2 Germany (East and West), anti-Communist geopolitics, what you want to hear when you’re tripping, Pop Art, post-rock and playfulness, all in reference to the music of Can, NEU!, Ash Ra Tempel and more.

    We hear about the characteristics of the German counterculture from which many of these players came, the various tendencies of revolutionary European socialism, the Green Party, and the problems of De-Nazification. We consider the avant-garde compositions of Karlheinz Stockhausen, the impact of American acid rock, Ancient Egypt, and the many ways James Brown’s funk filtered into the motor rhythms of Dusseldorf 1971. More than anything, we survey a formidable body of work that is at once mesmeric and danceable - both things we like here at Love is the Message!

    Produced by Matt Huxley.

    Become a patron at Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    For rights reasons, we can only play excerpts of the tracks we discuss. However, if you'd like to listen along in full, with updates every episode, follow our Spotify playlist at: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1ZylmJYk5SxyyTI2OQp0iy

    Books:Julian Cope - Krautrock Sampler: One Head’s Guide to the Great Kosmische MusikDavid Stubbs - Future Days: Krautrock and the Building of Modern Germany

    Tracklist:Ash Ra Tempel & Timothy Leary - TimeshipKarlheinz Stockhausen - Spiral (Realization A) Amon Duul ii - Yeti (Improvisation)Ash Ra Tempel - AmbossKraftwerk - StratovariusTangerine Dream - GenesisTangerine Dream - Flute Organ PieceCan - HalleluwahNEU! - HallogalloCan - MoonshakeKraftwerk - AutobahnHarmonia & Eno '76 - AtmosphereKraftwerk - Trans Europe Express

  • This is an excerpt from a patrons-only episode. To hear the full show, plus much more, sign up at Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons episode, Tim and Jeremy continue their investigation into the musical cultures of Europe and the UK of the 1970s. For this show, pull on your wide-leg jeans, pop a dexy and talc the floor, because we’re talking Northern Soul. We hear about Mod culture, subcultural theory, Quadraphenia, and clubs like the Twisted Wheel, the Wigan Casino and the Blackpool Mecca. Tim and Jeremy excavate a particular wistful, romantic and nostalgic affect to the mid-60s Soul music that fuelled these all-night dances in the north of England, and consider to what extent the dancers were seeking escapism. We also hear about Rave, Jackie Chan and Paul Mason, so get out on the floor and keep the faith!

    Tracklist:
    Don Gardner - My Baby Likes To Boogaloo
    Small Faces - All Or Nothing
    Christine Cooper - Heartaches Away My Boy
    Dobie Grey - Out on the Floor
    The Flirtations - Nothing But A Heartache
    Kariya - Let Me Love You For Tonight
    Gloria Jones - Tainted Love
    Geno Washington & the Ram Jam Band - Bring It To Me Baby
    Tobi Legend - Time Will Pass You By

    Books:

    Stephen Catterall and Keith Gildart - Keeping The Faith: A History of Northern Soul
    Stan Cohen - Folk Devils and Moral Panics
    Watch Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore by Mark Leckey here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dS2McPYzEE

    Watch Paul Mason’s Keeping The Faith doc here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJsgkXdlkgs

  • In this week’s episode, Tim and Jeremy are joined by writer, critic and academic Emily J. Lordi to discuss her 2020 book The Meaning of Soul (and much more besides). Emily talks about how she got into writing about Black music and the particular status Soul held in academia at the start of her career. The three consider changing historiographies of Black culture, talk over some key canonical texts, and contrast Soul with scholarship on Blues and Jazz.
    Emily explains how her analysis looks beyond lyrics in its appraisal of the political content of Soul, and how through an evaluation of a shift between sacred and secularised notions of the genre, we can see an articulation of a collective subjectivity representative of the congregational traditions from which the music draws on.
    Elsewhere, Tim, Jeremy and Emily consider ‘the crew’ in Soul and Hip Hop, Disco’s relationship to Soul, Gladys Knight and the Pips and Minnie Ripperton. For patrons, the three dig into Emily’s concept of ‘Afro-Presentism’, Beyonce, Janelle Monáe, contemporary R’n’B, and the affect of resilience.

    Emily J. Lordi is a writer, professor, and cultural critic whose focus is African American literature and Black popular music. She is professor of English at Vanderbilt University and the author of three books: Black Resonance (2013), Donny Hathaway Live (2016), and The Meaning of Soul (2020).

    Produced by Matt Huxley.

    Check out the back catalog, reading lists, playlists and more at our website: https://www.loveisthemessagepod.co.uk/

  • In this week’s episode, Tim and Jeremy are joined by writer and scholar Mark Anthony Neal. Mark’s 1999 book ‘What the Music Said: Black Popular Music and Black Public Culture’ is a crucial text for us here at Love is the Message, so it was fantastic to have him join the show to discuss his life and work in music. We discuss how the Black popular music of the past 60 years provides an insight into black socio-political life, via Gospel, Soul, Hip Hop and more. Mark explores how his upbringing in the South Bronx, from spending Sunday mornings with his parents to heading to the Apollo to see the Jackson 5 and Aretha, shaped his view of the Black public sphere. The interview provides Jem and Tim with the opportunity to trace their interest in the progressive potential of the 1970s back to the slave experience, the development of spirituals that became a channel for acts of resistance, the African American church’s reversioning of Christianity as a space of Black communion and expression, the importance of the jook and the rent party for expressions of Black pleasure. These spaces contributed to the shaping of an increasingly radical Black politics, from the burgeoning civil rights movement to Black Power, with rhythm and blues, soul and funk. We discuss the late-80s turn toward commodity culture within Hip Hop and consider what happened politically to black musicians into the 90s.

    For patrons, Mark, Tim and Jeremy also discuss early disco, Black dance music and Saturday Night Fever; consider the aspirational, entrepreneurial mindset of many of the 70s pioneers; and the role of sampling as an act of Black archival work undertaken by caretakers of Black musical lineage, bringing us right up to the listening practices of today.

    Mark Anthony Neal is the Professor of Black Popular Culture in the Department of African and African-American Studies at Duke University host of the weekly webcast ‘Left of Black’ in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University. He is the author of ‘What the Music Said: Black Popular Music and Black Public Culture’, ‘Soul Babies: Black Popular Culture and the Post-Soul Aesthetic’, ‘Songs in the Keys of Black Life: A Rhythm and Blues Nation’, ‘New Black Man: Rethinking Black Masculinity’ and ‘Looking for Leroy: (Il)Legible Black Masculinities’.

    Produced by Matt Huxley.

    Become a patron to hear an extended version of this conversation by visiting patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    Check out the back catalog, reading lists, playlists and more at our website: https://www.loveisthemessagepod.co.uk/

    And listen along our Spotify playlist featuring music from the series at: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1ZylmJYk5SxyyTI2OQp0iy

    Tracklist:

    The Sugarhill Gang - Rapper's Delight

    The Jackson 5 - Dancing Machine

    Eugene McDaniels - Headless Heroes

    Eric B. And Rakim - Paid in Full

    Ray Charles - (Night time Is) The Right Time

    The Isley Brothers - Fight the Power

    Marvin Gaye - What’s Going On

    Sly & The Family Stone - Stand!

    Bessie Smith- Back Water Blues

    LL Cool J - The Boomin' System

  • This is an excerpt from a patrons-only episode. To hear the full show, plus many more hours of conversation, become a patron at Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons episode Tim and Jeremy offer music on the theme of war and peace. They reflect on the ongoing conflict in Palestine, discussing the current unfolding crisis and taking a longer view on Israeli history. We hear about the ecstatic peace of John Coltrane, a lesser-known companion to Edwin Starr’s ‘War’, why Tim loves the Human League but New Order not so much, and consider the Promised Land. Tim and Jeremy also share music by Palestinian musicians Sama’ Abdulhadi and Kamilya Jubran, talk about Jem’s experiences DJing the country, Boiler Room as an unexpected anti-imperialist organisation, and the pitfalls of cultural appropriation.

    Produced by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:John Coltrane - Peace on Earth (Live At Shinjuku Kosei Nenkin Hall, Tokyo, Japan / July 22, 1966)Edwin Starr - Stop The War NowThe Human League - The Lebanon Sama' Abdulhadi - Reverie Mutado Pintado presents Sworn Virgins - Michelle (Acid Arab Mix)Bashar Murad - MaskharaJoe Smooth - Promised Land (Club Mix)Willie Hutch - Brother s Gonna Work it OutKamilya Jubran & Werner Halser - Wa (pt.1)Maurice Ravel - Kaddish

  • In this week’s episode, Tim and Jeremy welcome writer and academic Gayle Wald to the show to tell us about the life and times of Sister Rosetta Tharpe. Christened on social media ‘the queer black woman who invented rock’n’roll’, yet derided in 1970 as ‘a blacked up Elvis in drag’, Sister Rosetta’s story disrupts the received narrative of rock history. We hear about her religious upbringing, hitting the road with her evangelist mother; playing in the Cotton Club, the Decca Records studios, and from the centre field of a football stadium (in her wedding dress!); and being feted by Johnny Cash at the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame.

    Sister Rosetta’s story concerns misogyny, Pentecostalism, the evolution of the electric guitar, gossip, Little Richard and more, and Gayle is the perfect person to share it with us.

    This is an edited version of the full interview. To hear more about Sister Rosetta as well as about Gayle’s book on the television programme ‘Soul!’ - a groundbreaking piece of public broadcasting that brought black thinkers, activists and musicians to the TV screen - and her forthcoming work on the eminent children’s musician Ella Jenkins, become a patron.

    Gayle Wald is a professor of English and American Studies at George Washington University and a Guggenheim Fellow. She is the author of 'Crossing the Line: Racial Passing in U.S. Literature and Culture’, ‘Shout, Sister, Shout!: The Untold Story of Rock-and-Roll Trailblazer Sister Rosetta Tharpe’ and ‘It's Been Beautiful: Soul! and Black Power Television’.
    Produced by Matt Huxley.
    Become a patron at Patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Check out the back catalog, reading lists, playlists and more at our website: https://www.loveisthemessagepod.co.uk/

    Produced by Matt Huxley.
    Tracklist:
    Sister Rosetta Tharpe - Rock Me
    Sister Rosetta Tharpe - Up Above My Head

    Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Marie Knight - Didn’t It Rain
    Sister Rosetta Tharpe - Strange Things Happening Every Day
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