Episodes

  • On the morning of October 25, 1943, the body of twenty-two-year-old Lion Brewery heiress, Patricia Lonergan, was discovered in a locked room in the New York apartment she shared with her infant son. Patrica was nude and had been bludgeoned with a candelabra. Suspicion quickly fell on her estranged husband, Wayne Lonergan, who had fled the country to Canada, where he was serving in the Royal Canadian Air Force.

    Wayne Lonergan was apprehended a few days later and returned to New York, where he was charged with the murder and two days later confessed to killing Patricia in a jealous rage. Despite his confession, Lonergan’s case went to trial and quickly became one of the most sensational trials of the decade. While the murder itself was a terrible tragedy, the extensive press coverage and intense public interest was on Wayne’s sexual identity and the supposedly scandalous lives of the two high society figures at the center of the case.

    Wayne was ultimately found guilty of the murder and served more than two decades in prison, after which he was deported back to Canada, where he resided until his death. Few people ever doubted that Wayne had indeed killed his wife; however, to this day many have questioned whether his sexuality and the couple’s nontraditional marriage biased the jury against him and led to an unfair trial.

    Thank you to the incredible Dave White (of Bring Me the Axe and 99 Cent Rental Podcasts) for research!

    References

    Anderson-Minshall, Diane. 2021. Did this queer man kill his wife? March 24. Accessed June 18, 2024. https://www.advocate.com/crime/2021/3/24/did-queer-man-kill-his-wife#rebelltitem1.

    Buffalo News. 1943. "Boats grapple for vanished RCAF uniform." Buffalo News, October 28: 1.

    Dunne, Dominick. 2001. "The Talented Mr. Lonergan." Vanity Fair, July 01.

    Levine, Allan. 2020. Details Are Unprintable: Wayne Lonergan and the Sensational Cafe Society Murder. Guilford, CT: Lyons Press.

    New York Times. 1944. "35 years to life given to Lonergan." New York Times, April 18: 1.

    —. 1942. "Husband is held for questioning in heiress' murder." New York Times, October 26: 1.

    —. 1944. "Lawyers rebuked in Lonergan case." New York Times, February 17: 20.

    —. 1944. "Lonergan choked wife, Grumet says." New York Times, March 23: 21.

    —. 1944. "Lonergan confession read; tells of bluedgeoning wife." New York Times, March 28: 1.

    —. 1944. "Lonergan defense is ended abruptly." New York Times, March 30: 1.

    —. 1944. "Lonergan guilty in second degree of slaying wife." New York Times, April 1: 1.

    —. 1943. "RCAF cadet's wife slain in home here." New York Times, October 25: 1.

    —. 1944. "State asks death in Lonergan case." New York Times, March 31: 1.

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  • On the morning of August 1, 1966, twenty-five-year-old Charles Whitman arrived at the University of Texas Austin campus a little before noon, carrying with him several rifles, pistols, and a shotgun contained within a military footlocker. After talking his way past a guard, Whitman climbed to the twenty eighth floor of the campus clocktower and walked out onto the observation deck, then began firing at the people on the ground below. In the span of a just over an hour and half, Charles Whitman killed fifteen people and wounded thirty-one others before finally being shot and killed by a police officer who’d managed to make his way to the top of the tower. Investigators later learned that, prior to arriving on the UT campus, Whitman had also murdered his mother and his wife.

    In 1966, mass shootings were virtually unheard of in the United States and Whitman’s spree killing shocked the nation. By most accounts, Charles Whitman was the picture of an all-American man, which made his actions all the more confusing. He was well-liked, had a successful military career, a beautiful wife, and once out of the military, he began pursuing a college degree in preparation for the next phase of his life. But behind the façade of American middle-class success lurked a deeply troubled man whose personal history and acute medical problems would eventually go a long way to explaining his actions on the morning of August 1.

    Thank you to the incredible Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for research!

    References

    Austin American-Statesman. 1966. "U.T. sniper shoots 33." Austin American-Statesman, August 1: 1.

    Colloff, Pamela. 2006. "96 minutes." Texas Monthly, August 1: 104.

    —. 2016. "Memorial day." Texas Monthly, August 1: 22.

    Flemmons, Jerry. 1966. "UT tower sniper kills 14, dies in hail of police gunfire." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 2: 1.

    Governor's Committee. 1966. Report to the Governor; Medical Aspects, Charles J. Whitman Catastrophe. Fact-finding report, Houston, TX: Texas Department of Public Safety.

    Krebs, Albin. 1966. "The Texas killer: Former Florida neighbors recall a nice boy who liked toy guns." New York Times, August 2: 15.

    Lavergne, Gary. 1997. Sniper in the Tower: The Charles Whitman Murders. Denton, TX: University of North Texas Press.

    New York Times. 1967. "U. of Texas to reopen ." New York Times, June 18: 25.

    Stuever, Hank. 1996. "96 minutes, 30 years later." Austin American-Statesman, July 29: 1.

    Texas Department of Public Safety. 1966. Statement of John and Fran Morgan. Intelligence Report, Houston, TX: State of Texas Department of Public Safety.

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  • On Thanksgiving Day 1934, police in Tulsa, Oklahoma found the dead body of John Gorrell Jr., a Kansas City dental student, slumped behind the wheel of his car, which had come to a stop at a downtown intersection. Gorrell had been shot in the head twice with his own gun and his wallet and other valuables were missing, leading police to conclude he had been killed in a botched robbery. Just one day later, the residents of Tulsa were shocked to learn that Gorrell hadn’t been killed by a robbery, but by his friend Phil Kennamer, and his motive wasn’t robbery.

    At the peak of the Great Depression, newspaper reports of violent crime were nothing new. In this case, however, the victim was the son of a prominent local physician and his killer the son of a well-known US District Court judge. The privileged backgrounds of the victim and killer were enough to captivate the residents of Tulsa, but as the strange details of the story slowly emerged in the days that followed, the case quickly grew from local sensation to national fascination. In the weeks and months that followed, countless front pages (and then some) were dedicated to the lurid details of what the press soon dubbed the “Society Gang Killing;” a story of disaffected youth who, bored with their wealth and privilege, turned to crime and violence for the sake of entertainment and excitement.

    Thank you to the incredible Dave White of Bring Me The Axe Podcast for Research!

    References

    Biscup, Walter. 1935. "Verdict of jury leaves punishment of Gorrell's slayer to Judge Hurst." Tulsa World, February 22: 1.

    Frates, Kent. 2014. "The Society Gang Killingg." This Land, July 15.

    Freese, Jim. 2016. Murder in the Name Of Love: The Phil Kennamer Trial. Tulsa, OK: Freese Publishing .

    Miami Daily News-Record. 1934. "Sheriff refuses to act on Phil Kennamer's version of case, involving associates." Miami Daily News-Record, December 13: 1.

    —. 1934. "Doubt cast on gang theory in Tulsa slaying." Miami Daiy News-Record, December 3: 1.

    Morrow, Jason. 2015. Deadly Hero: The High Society Murder that Created Hysteria in the Heartland. Tulsa, OK: Independent.

    Muskogee Daily Phoenix and Times-Democrat. 1935. "Counsel declares he could not tell right from wrong." Muskogee Daily Phoenix and Times-Democrat, February 15: 1.

    New York Times. 1934. "Death car driver a suicide in Tulsa." New York Times, December 10: 38.

    —. 1935. "Girl takes stand to Aid Kennamer." New York Times, February 16: 30.

    —. 1935. "Kennamer reveals 'extortion letter'." New York Times, January 27: 15.

    —. 1935. "Kennamer tells of fatal shooting." New York Times, February 19: 10.

    Phillips, Harmon. 1935. "Kennamer Case goes on aftwer threat of mistrial." Tulsa Tribune, February 13: 1.

    —. 1935. "Phil Kennamer back to jail with 25 years in prison as penalty for Gorrell killing." Tulsa Tribune, February 24: 1.

    —. 1935. "State blocks quick opinion by doctor that Kennamer shot youth while insane." Tulsa Tribune, February 16: 1.

    Tulsa Tribune. 1934. "Anderson tells plan of Kennamer Trial." Tulsa Tribune, December 15: 1.

    —. 1935. "New clues seen in notes from Phil Kennamer." Tulsa Tribune, January 3: 3.

    —. 1934. "Phil Kennamer inisists slaying his own actions." Tulsa Tribune, December 2: 5.

    —. 1934. "Police call Born suicide." Tulsa Tribune, December 10: 1.

    —. 1935. "Opposing Kennamer case legal batteries promise fiery clash of courtroom tactics." Tulsa Trribune, January 23: 7.

    Tulsa World. 1935. "Judge Kennamer weeps as he describes Phil's abnormalities." Tulsa World, February 16: 1.

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  • From about 1910 to 1912, an alarming number of axe murders were occurring across the American South and Southwest. Though many would speculate as to the identity of perpetrator, including the theory that a single individual was responsible, many of these murders would remain unsolved and contribute to macabre urban legends that endure to this day. In New Orleans, however, the brutal axe murders of at least five Black families in 1911 and 1912 are attributed to Clementine Barnabet, an African American teenager who confessed to the crimes.

    Despite having confessed to as many as thirty-five murders, and having been convicted and incarcerated for one, the veracity of Barnabet’s claim has long been in doubt. Tried and convicted on very little evidence, Barnabet’s story changed many times following her arrest and eventually came to include sensational and highly questionable claims of her belonging to a Voodoo religious sect that engaged in human sacrifice. Not only were these claims unsupported by any real evidence, but they also suggested the girl may have been suffering from profound mental illness and had nothing whatsoever to do with the murders in and around New Orleans. But if Clementine Barnabet wasn’t the killer, why did she confess to such brutal, wicked crimes?

    Thank you to the incredible Dave White or Bring Me the Axe Podcast for research!

    References

    Crowley Daily Signal. 1911. "Brutal murder of negro family is discovered in West Crowley." Crowley Daily Signal, Janaury 26: 1.

    —. 1909. "Rayne scene of brutal murder." Crowley Daily Signal, November 13: 1.

    —. 1911. "Six murdered in Lafayette." Crowley Daily Signal, November 27: 1.

    Crowley Signal. 1911. "Negro murderer was convicted." Crowley Signal, October 28: 5.

    Fort Wayne News. 1912. "Seventeen murders were confessed to." Fort Wayne News, October 25: 17.

    Lafayette Advertiser. 1912. "Clementine Barnabet sane." Lafayette Advertiser, October 22: 4.

    —. 1911. "Horrible crime." Lafayette Advertiser, February 28: 1.

    Monroe News-Star. 1911. "Butchery of human beings." Monroe News-Star, November 28: 1.

    —. 1912. "Sacrifice sext slaughter 26." Monroe News-Star, January 23: 1.

    New Iberia Enterprise and Independent Observer. 1913. "Blood lust cut out of Clementine Barnabet." New Iberia Enterprise and Independent Observer, August 9: 1.

    Osborne, Jeffery. 2012. Preventing Lethal Violence Neighborhood by Neighborhood; Proceedings of the 2012 Homicide Research Working Group Annual Symposium. Conference Proceedings, New York, NY: Homicide Research Working Group.

    The Times. 1912. "Five negroes are murdered in a Lake Charles cottage." The Times, January 22: 1.

    —. 1912. "Gives names of 3 of "ax gang"." The Times, April 3: 1.

    —. 1912. "Negro woman confessed to slaying 20." The Times, April 2: 1.

    The Times-Democrat. 1912. "Amplifies confession." The Times-Democrat, April 4: 6.

    Times-Democrat. 1912. "Blood and brain from living person spattered girl's clothes." Times-Democrat, January 18: 2.

    Unknown. 1912. "Voodoo's horrors break out again." Atalanta Journal, March 11: 50.

    Weekly Iberian. 1912. "Hoodoo doctor arrested and identified by Clementine Burke." Weekly Iberian, April 13: 2.

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  • Well- DAMN SAM! It’s Listener Tales 87! This week’s episode is brought to you by WORST ROOMMATES EVER! Inspired by the show coming back to Netflix on 6/26 for SEASON TWO-We pull stories about creepy cohabitators that are brought to you, BY you, For you, FROM you, and ALLLLL about you! This week we hear about ex-roommate parting curses, previous spectral owners who HATE the updated decor tastes, a roomie who whispers sinister things in the wee hours, a horrifying close call, and the ghost story of two ghouls in love!

    If you’ve got a listener tale please send it on over to [email protected] with “Listener Tales” somewhere in the subject line :)

    Sifting through the show notes for "Worst Roommate Ever" information? Check it out on Netflix at https://www.netflix.com/title/81031682?source=35

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  • On the afternoon of March 28, 1937, Easter Sunday, Joseph Gedeon and his daughter, Ethel, arrived at the home of Gedeon’s wife, Mary, for a planned Easter dinner. The Gedeon’s had been separated for some time but had agreed to have dinner together as a family, which included their other daughter, Veronica, a moderately successful pulp magazine model. When they entered the apartment, it appeared as though no one was home; however, upon checking the bedroom where his daughter slept, Joseph Gedeon found the nude body of his daughter lying lifeless on the bed and immediately called the police.

    During an initial search of the apartment, investigators found the body of Mary Gedeon stuffed under her bed; like her daughter, she had been strangled to death. In a third bedroom, police also found the body of Mary’s boarder, Frank Byrnes, who’d been stabbed several times in the head and neck with a long, thin implement. There was no sign of a forced entry, no sign of a struggle, and nothing appeared to be missing from the apartment. Given that Veronica had been found nude, and Mary was clothed but her underwear had been torn away, investigators assumed the murders were a sex crime.

    Still caught in the grip of the Great Depression, New Yorkers welcomed anything that could distract from the unpleasant realities of daily life and the salacious murder of a pulp magazine model—a sex crime, no less—was exactly what they were looking for. The story dominated the press, as reporters and tabloid journalists dug into Veronica’s personal life and dating history and published lurid photos from her past. But when the killer was finally caught and the motive revealed, the story was far stranger and tragic than anyone had imagined.

    Thank you to the wonderful David White of the Bring Me the Axe Podcast for research!

    References

    Brooklyn Daily Eagle. 1937. "Cops question ex-lodger in triple murder." Brooklyn Daily Eagle, March 29: 1.

    —. 1937. "Doubts student is killer." Brooklyn Daily Eagle, April 6: 1.

    —. 1938. "Irwin's guilty plea." Brooklyn Daily Eagle, November 15: 10.

    Buffalo Evening News. 1938. "Irwin, ruled insane, sent to Dannemora." Buffalo Evening News, December 10: 1.

    2015. A Crime to Remember. Directed by Jeremiah Crowell. Performed by Jeremiah Crowell.

    New York Daily News. 1937. "3 murdered in model's flat." New York Daily News, March 29: 1.

    —. 1937. "Gray hair in model's hand chief clue in triple murder." New York Daily News, March 30: 1.

    —. 1937. "Willful Ronnie 'made fools of men,' dad says." New York Daily News, March 30: 3.

    New York Times. 1938. "139-year sentence imposed on Irwin." New York Times, November 29: 48.

    —. 1937. "Fingerprint clues found at scene of triple murder." New York Times, March 31: 1.

    —. 1937. "Gedeon gets bail." New York Times, April 3: 1.

    —. 1937. "Gedeon questioned again in murders; solution held near." New York Times, April 1: 1.

    —. 1937. "Irwin flown here; boasts of killings." New York Times, June 28: 1.

    —. 1937. "Irwin, wild-eyed, meets reporters." New York Times, September 1: 20.

    —. 1937. "Women jam court to glimpse Irwin." New York Times, Jukly 1: 56.

    People v. Robert Irwin. 1938. 166 Misc. 751 (Court of General Sessions of the County of New York, March 24).

    Schechter, Harold. 2014. The Mad Sculptor: The Maniac, the Model, and the Murder That Shook the Nation. Boston, MA: New Harvest.

    United Press. 1937. "Sculptor hunted as triple killer in Gedeon cases." Buffalo Evening News, April 5: 1.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • On the afternoon of March 28, 1937, Easter Sunday, Joseph Gedeon and his daughter, Ethel, arrived at the home of Gedeon’s wife, Mary, for a planned Easter dinner. The Gedeon’s had been separated for some time but had agreed to have dinner together as a family, which included their other daughter, Veronica, a moderately successful pulp magazine model. When they entered the apartment, it appeared as though no one was home; however, upon checking the bedroom where his daughter slept, Joseph Gedeon found the nude body of his daughter lying lifeless on the bed and immediately called the police.

    During an initial search of the apartment, investigators found the body of Mary Gedeon stuffed under her bed; like her daughter, she had been strangled to death. In a third bedroom, police also found the body of Mary’s boarder, Frank Byrnes, who’d been stabbed several times in the head and neck with a long, thin implement. There was no sign of a forced entry, no sign of a struggle, and nothing appeared to be missing from the apartment. Given that Veronica had been found nude, and Mary was clothed but her underwear had been torn away, investigators assumed the murders were a sex crime.

    Still caught in the grip of the Great Depression, New Yorkers welcomed anything that could distract from the unpleasant realities of daily life and the salacious murder of a pulp magazine model—a sex crime, no less—was exactly what they were looking for. The story dominated the press, as reporters and tabloid journalists dug into Veronica’s personal life and dating history and published lurid photos from her past. But when the killer was finally caught and the motive revealed, the story was far stranger and tragic than anyone had imagined.

    Thank you to the wonderful David White of the Bring Me the Axe Podcast for research!

    References

    Brooklyn Daily Eagle. 1937. "Cops question ex-lodger in triple murder." Brooklyn Daily Eagle, March 29: 1.

    —. 1937. "Doubts student is killer." Brooklyn Daily Eagle, April 6: 1.

    —. 1938. "Irwin's guilty plea." Brooklyn Daily Eagle, November 15: 10.

    Buffalo Evening News. 1938. "Irwin, ruled insane, sent to Dannemora." Buffalo Evening News, December 10: 1.

    2015. A Crime to Remember. Directed by Jeremiah Crowell. Performed by Jeremiah Crowell.

    New York Daily News. 1937. "3 murdered in model's flat." New York Daily News, March 29: 1.

    —. 1937. "Gray hair in model's hand chief clue in triple murder." New York Daily News, March 30: 1.

    —. 1937. "Willful Ronnie 'made fools of men,' dad says." New York Daily News, March 30: 3.

    New York Times. 1938. "139-year sentence imposed on Irwin." New York Times, November 29: 48.

    —. 1937. "Fingerprint clues found at scene of triple murder." New York Times, March 31: 1.

    —. 1937. "Gedeon gets bail." New York Times, April 3: 1.

    —. 1937. "Gedeon questioned again in murders; solution held near." New York Times, April 1: 1.

    —. 1937. "Irwin flown here; boasts of killings." New York Times, June 28: 1.

    —. 1937. "Irwin, wild-eyed, meets reporters." New York Times, September 1: 20.

    —. 1937. "Women jam court to glimpse Irwin." New York Times, Jukly 1: 56.

    People v. Robert Irwin. 1938. 166 Misc. 751 (Court of General Sessions of the County of New York, March 24).

    Schechter, Harold. 2014. The Mad Sculptor: The Maniac, the Model, and the Murder That Shook the Nation. Boston, MA: New Harvest.

    United Press. 1937. "Sculptor hunted as triple killer in Gedeon cases." Buffalo Evening News, April 5: 1.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • A massive interstate search was launched to find Marion’s killer and within a few days, police arrested nineteen-year-old William Edward Hickman, a former co-worker of Perry Parker. During his interrogation, Hickman confessed to kidnapping and murdering Marion, claiming that a god he referred to as “Providence” had instructed him to do it. That confession prompted Hickman’s attorneys to take advantage of the state’s new law accepting a legal defense of not guilty by reason of insanity; however, a jury disagreed, and Hickman was found guilty and executed at San Quentin Prison the following year.

    Because of the shocking cruelty and brutality of the murder, the well documented and exciting search for the killer, and the sensational nature of the defense, the story of Marion Parker’s murder and the trial that followed dominated the media and occupied several pages of all the major papers across the state for months. For these reasons and more, it remains one of the most notorious murders in California history.

    References

    Associated Press. 1928. "Hickman to have new judge." Fresno Bee, January 25: 1.

    —. 1927. "Confession stuns mother." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 4.

    Berger, Jackson. 1927. "Kidnapper tries to dash out brains in frenzy." Los Angeles Times, December 25: 1.

    Los Angeles Record. 1927. "Hunt kidnappers of girl." Los Angeles Record, December 16: 1.

    Los Angeles Times. 1927. "'Fox' ponders 'crazy' plea." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1.

    —. 1927. "Fugitive caught in breakneck race with Oregon officers." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 1.

    —. 1927. "Hickman believed in Seattle." Los Angeles Times, December 22: 1.

    —. 1927. "Hickman pronounced sane." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1.

    —. 1927. "Hickman's finger-prints found in apartment." Los Angeles Times, December 21: 1.

    —. 1927. "'I liked her' declares youth while he sobs." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 1.

    —. 1927. "Kidnapper grows sullen when 'pal' proves alibi." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1.

    —. 1928. "New crimes confessed by Hickman." Los Angeles Times, October 14: 3.

    —. 1928. "New horror in Hickman case." Los Angeles Times, February 2: 1.

    —. 1928. "Slayer makes self-analysis." Los Angeles Times, February 2: 2.

    Neibaur, James. 2016. Butterfly in the Rain: The 1927 Abduction and Murder of Marion Parker. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

    New York Times. 1928. "Hickman sentenced to hang April 27." New York Times, February 15: 25.

    —. 1928. "Hickman's father goes to his aid." New York Times, February 1: 13.

    —. 1927. "Youth arrested in child slaying at Los Angeles." New York Times, December 19: 1.

    Overton, Gerald. 1928. "Hickman goes to death on gibbet." Fresno Bee, October 19: 1.

    Rasmussen, Cecilia. 2001. "Girl's grisly killing had city residents up in arms." Los Angeles Times, February 4.

    San Francisco Examiner. 1927. "Kidnapped girl's body tossed omn lawn." San Francisco Examiner, December 18: 1.

    State of California v William Edward Hickman. 1928. 204 Cal. 470 (Supreme Court of California, July 5).

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • On the afternoon of December 15, 1927, twelve-year-old Marion Parker was checked out of her Los Angeles junior high school by a man claiming to be an employee of her father, Perry Parker, an employee at a bank in the city. The man claimed Parker had been in an accident and he was to bring the girl to see her father, but this was just a ruse to abduct the girl. The following day, Marion’s parents received several cryptic ransom letters demanding $1,500 in gold in exchange for the safe return of their daughter. On December 17, Perry Parker delivered the money to the kidnapper, who took the money, then dumped Marion’s dead, mutilated body out of the car before speeding away.

    References

    Associated Press. 1928. "Hickman to have new judge." Fresno Bee, January 25: 1.

    —. 1927. "Confession stuns mother." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 4.

    Berger, Jackson. 1927. "Kidnapper tries to dash out brains in frenzy." Los Angeles Times, December 25: 1.

    Los Angeles Record. 1927. "Hunt kidnappers of girl." Los Angeles Record, December 16: 1.

    Los Angeles Times. 1927. "'Fox' ponders 'crazy' plea." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1.

    —. 1927. "Fugitive caught in breakneck race with Oregon officers." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 1.

    —. 1927. "Hickman believed in Seattle." Los Angeles Times, December 22: 1.

    —. 1927. "Hickman pronounced sane." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1.

    —. 1927. "Hickman's finger-prints found in apartment." Los Angeles Times, December 21: 1.

    —. 1927. "'I liked her' declares youth while he sobs." Los Angeles Times, December 23: 1.

    —. 1927. "Kidnapper grows sullen when 'pal' proves alibi." Los Angeles Times, December 24: 1.

    —. 1928. "New crimes confessed by Hickman." Los Angeles Times, October 14: 3.

    —. 1928. "New horror in Hickman case." Los Angeles Times, February 2: 1.

    —. 1928. "Slayer makes self-analysis." Los Angeles Times, February 2: 2.

    Neibaur, James. 2016. Butterfly in the Rain: The 1927 Abduction and Murder of Marion Parker. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

    New York Times. 1928. "Hickman sentenced to hang April 27." New York Times, February 15: 25.

    —. 1928. "Hickman's father goes to his aid." New York Times, February 1: 13.

    —. 1927. "Youth arrested in child slaying at Los Angeles." New York Times, December 19: 1.

    Overton, Gerald. 1928. "Hickman goes to death on gibbet." Fresno Bee, October 19: 1.

    Rasmussen, Cecilia. 2001. "Girl's grisly killing had city residents up in arms." Los Angeles Times, February 4.

    San Francisco Examiner. 1927. "Kidnapped girl's body tossed omn lawn." San Francisco Examiner, December 18: 1.

    State of California v William Edward Hickman. 1928. 204 Cal. 470 (Supreme Court of California, July 5).

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • On the afternoon of June 22, 1954, Agnes Ritchie was preparing ice cream for two customers in her shop when two teenage girls, Pauline Parker and Juliet Hulme, burst through the front door, screaming for help and saying one of their mothers had been killed. Agnes and her husband followed the girls into the nearby wooded area, where they found the badly beaten and obviously dead body of Honorah Parker. The couple wasn’t able to get much out of either girl, only that the woman had slipped and hit her head, but their behavior was strange and something about the whole scene didn’t feel right.

    Just two days later, Parker and Hulme were charged with the murder of Pauline’s mother, Honorah Parker. According to the prosecution, the girls had developed an intense bond and had created romantic fantasy in the months leading up to the murder that bordered on obsessiveness. In 1954, the girls’ relationship became threatened when Hulme’s parents divorced and began talking of relocating. Fearing they would be separated and never see one another again, Parker and Hulme killed Honorah, believing that her death would put an end to any plans to relocate.

    The story of Honorah’s murder and the trial that followed quickly spread across New Zealand and Australia and eventually made its way around the globe. Among other things, the case challenged existing beliefs about young women and their capacity for violence, but just as important were the sensational and salacious mentions of insanity and homosexuality that were often more implied than explicitly stated.

    Thank you to David White, of the Bring Me the Axe Podcast, for research :)

    References

    Brisbane Telegraph. 1954. "Conspired to Kill." Brisbane Telegraph, August 23: 1.

    —. 1954. "Teenagers remanded, police blame girl's passion for horses." Brisbane Telegraph, June 24: 1.

    Chun, Louise. 1995. "Slaughter by the innocents: The case of the schoolgirl killers shocked New Zealand." The Guardian, January 30.

    Graham, Peter. 2011. So Brilliantly Clever: Parker, Hulme and the Murder that Shocked the World. Wellington, NZ: Awa Press.

    Neustatter, Angela. 2003. "‘I was guilty. I did my time’: Anne Perry, the novelist whose past caught up with her." The Guardian, November 20.

    Newcastle Sun. 1954. "Girls shrugged at charge of murder." Newcastle Sun, July 16: 1.

    The Age. 1954. "Girls smile at N.Z. sentence." The Age , August 30: 1.

    —. 1954. "Defence says N.Z. girls insane as mother killed." The Age, August 25: 9.

    —. 1954. "Description of quarrel." The Age, July 17: 3.

    —. 1954. "Doctor says both girls certifiable." The Age, August 27: 5.

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  • A community frantically searches for two missing boys who disappeared in a dense forest. Days pass with no leads, but a man's prophetic dream leads to their discovery.

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  • On the evening of May 22, 1992, Betty Wilson returned home from an AA meeting to find her husband, Dr. Jack Wilson, had been beaten and stabbed to death in what she assumed was a burglary gone wrong. Betty ran to a neighbor’s house to call 911, and police arrived at the Wilson’s house a short time later to secure the scene.

    At first, investigators agreed with Betty’s theory that Jack had surprised a burglar and was then killed. The problem, however, was that nothing appeared to have been taken, nor did it appear that the house had been ransacked. A few days later, a tip led detectives to James White, who quickly confessed that he murdered Jack Wilson at the request of Betty and her twin sister, Peggy Lowe, with whom he was in love. 

    Betty Wilson and her sister, Peggy, were both arrested and went on to be tried for capital murder, while James White accepted a plea deal in exchange for testifying against both women. After a brief trial, a jury found Betty guilty, and she was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Peggy Lowe, on the other hand, was tried for the same crime, but just a few months after her sister’s verdict was read, Peggy was found not guilty. How was it both women could face the same charges, under the same circumstances, and be tried with the same evidence, but receive opposite outcomes?

     Thank you to David White, of Bring Me the Axe podcast, for research!

    References

    Associated Press. 1992. "Friends of accused express disbelief." Montgomery Advertiser, July 13: 13.

    —. 1992. "Suspect's former lover quits post." Montgomery Advertiser, June 24: 18.

    —. 1992. "Twin sisters suspects in man's murder." Selma Times-Journal, June 7: 7.

    Betty Woods Wilson v. State of Alabama. 1995. 690 So. 2d 449 (Court of Criminal Appeals of Alabama, May 5).

    Carey, Bob. 1998. "The Murder." Old Huntsville: History and Stories of the Tennessee Valley, 1.

    Dunnavant, Robert. 1992. "Shelby man says he killed doctor to win twin's love." Birmingham Post-Herald, June 6: 1.

    1996. Forensic Files. Produced by Paul Bourdett. Performed by Ed Freeman.

    Marshall, Mike. 2006. "Serving time for murdering husband, Betty Wilson remarries in prison." Dothan Eagle, May 3: 3.

    Newberry, Paul. 1993. "Surprise testimony in Wilson murder trial." Anniston Star, February 28: 1.

    —. 1993. "Wilson defense mocks, picks apart testimony ." Birmingham Post-Herald, February 25: 1.

    Reeves, Jay. 1993. "Betty Wilson silent as jury gets her case." Anniston Star, March 2: 2.

    —. 1993. "Deliberation starts in case of woman accused of plotting husband's slaying." Montgomery Advertiser, March 3: 1.

    Richardson, Sandee. 1993. "Wilson trial begins." Birmingham Post-Herald, February 24: 1.

    Schutze, Jim. 2023. By Two and Two: The Scandalous Story of Twin Sisters Accused of a Shocking Crime of Passion. New York, NY: Open Road Media.

    Sikora, Frank. 1993. "Mrs. Wilson's disgust toward husband detailed." Birmingham Post-Herald, February 27: 1.

    Thornton, Donna. 2022. "Filmmaker contends doctor's wife wrongly convicted." Montgomery Advertiser, August 29: 1.

    Wilson, Betty. 1998. "The Betty Wilson story." Old Huntsville: History and Stories of the Tennessee Valley, 1.

    Witt, Elaine. 1993. "Mrs. Wilson guilty, gets life in prison." Birmingham Post-Herald, March 4: 1.

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  • Weirdos!! It’s a SPECIAL BONUS EPISODE brought to YOU by our friends at Audible! Today we’re joined by Sheena Melwani to chat about the Audible original, “Desperate Deadly Widows”! Join the “Weirdos’ Audiobook Club’ AND the conversation as we talk about our favorite characters, themes, and scenes! Haven’t listened yet? Don’t worry about it, friend! Go to Audible.com/weirdos for YOUR free trial! And don’t forget to click the episode post on Instagram to comment YOUR favorite part of the book, and discuss with other Weirdos who enjoyed the title, as well!

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  • It’s Listener Tales 86 This week’s episode is brought to you by... Dads, coffee cups, and whoppers! We hear about an encounter with big foot, an EVP from a ghost hunt at a cemetery, dreams haunted by a pregnant woman, and the underlying story of the crime that lead to hauntings at the Field farm!

    If you’ve got a listener tale please send it on over to [email protected] with “Listener Tales” somewhere in the subject line :)

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  • Part four focuses on Fred & Rose West's final crimes, and the events leading up to their arrest. Their subsequent trials would become the focus of the nation as people learned of the atrocities performed at their home.

    Thank you to the wondrous Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for Research!

    References

    Amis, Martin. 2000. When darkness met light. May 11. Accessed March 21, 2024. https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2000/may/11/features11.g2.

    BBC News. 1998. Fred West 'admitted killing waitress'. March 25. Accessed March 19, 2024. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/69928.stm.

    —. 2001. How many more did Fred West kill? September 27. Accessed March 19, 2024. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1567038.stm.

    —. 2021. The 12 victims of Fred and Rosemary West. May 27. Accessed March 18, 2024. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-57182844.

    Bennett, Will. 1995. Step-daughter Charmaine was first to die. November 22. Accessed March 19, 2024. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/stepdaughter-charmaine-was-first-to-die-1583071.html.

    Birmingham Evening Mail. 1974. "Missing girls theory." Birmingham Evening Mail, January 7: 1.

    Birmingham Post. 1968. "Missing waitress mystery deepens." Birmingham Post, January 23: 2.

    —. 1974. "Student missing for six days may return ton university-police." Birmingham Post, January 2: 2.

    —. 1968. "Yard detectives join search for Gloucester girl." Birmingham Post, January 9: 1.

    Campbell, Duncan. 1995. "How a string of girls came to die in depraved and appalling circumstances." The Guardian, October 7.

    Duce, Richard. 1995. "West's suicide avenged killings, QC tells jurors." The Times, November 16.

    Duce, Richard, and Bill Frost. 1995. "Court told of depravity at 25 Cromwell Street." The Times, October 7: 4.

    Evening Post. 1968. "Helicopter joins hunt for Mary." Evening Post, January 8: 1.

    Evening Standard. 1974. "Have you spotted this girl?" Evening Standard, July 4: 18.

    Frost, Bill. 1995. "Cromwell Street murders case man is dead." The Times, Janaury 2.

    Frost, Bill, and Richard Duce. 1995. "I'm being made a scapegoat, says West." The Times, November 2.

    —. 1995. "No place for sentiment, West jurors are told." The Times, October 4.

    —. 1995. "West: I fell under Fred's spell." The Times, October 31.

    Gloucester Echo. 1994. "Did builder know Mary?" Gloucester Echo, March 8: 3.

    —. 1994. "Graden bodies: Who were they?" Gloucester Echo, March 2: 1.

    Gloucestershire Echo. 1995. "From angelic child to coldest of killers." Gloucestershire Echo 5.

    —. 1995. "Fred West found dead." Gloucestershire Echo, January 2: 1.

    —. 1995. "I'll see you in court, Rose." Gloucestershire Echo, January 4: 1.

    Knight, Adam. 2014. Fred West's brother denies incest claims. November 7. Accessed March 17, 2024. https://www.herefordtimes.com/news/11587578.fred-wests-brother-denies-incest-claims/.

    Lee, Adrian, Tim Jones, and Damian Whitworth. 1996. "Fred West's brother hangs himself." The Times, November 29.

    Ovington, Paul. 1974. "Hunt steps up as fear grows for Lucy, 21." Western Daily Press and Times, January 4: 1.

    Sounes, Howard. 1995. Fred & Rose: The Full Story of Fred and Rose West and the Gloucester House of Horrors. New York, NY: Open Road Media.

    United Press International. 1995. "British jury convicts West of 10 murders." UPI Archive, November 22.

    West, Mae, and Neil McKay. 2018. Love as Always, Mum: The True and Terrible Story of Surviving a Childhood with Fred and Rose West. London, UK: Seven Dials Press.

    Williams, Martin. 1994. "'Our sister is still alive'." Gloucester Echo, February 26: 1.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • Part three focuses on the pattern formed by the West's subsequent murders, as well as a hiatus from killing that was marked by countless sexual assaults.

    Thank you to the wondrous Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for Research!

    References

    Amis, Martin. 2000. When darkness met light. May 11. Accessed March 21, 2024. https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2000/may/11/features11.g2.

    BBC News. 1998. Fred West 'admitted killing waitress'. March 25. Accessed March 19, 2024. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/69928.stm.

    —. 2001. How many more did Fred West kill? September 27. Accessed March 19, 2024. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1567038.stm.

    —. 2021. The 12 victims of Fred and Rosemary West. May 27. Accessed March 18, 2024. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-57182844.

    Bennett, Will. 1995. Step-daughter Charmaine was first to die. November 22. Accessed March 19, 2024. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/stepdaughter-charmaine-was-first-to-die-1583071.html.

    Birmingham Evening Mail. 1974. "Missing girls theory." Birmingham Evening Mail, January 7: 1.

    Birmingham Post. 1968. "Missing waitress mystery deepens." Birmingham Post, January 23: 2.

    —. 1974. "Student missing for six days may return ton university-police." Birmingham Post, January 2: 2.

    —. 1968. "Yard detectives join search for Gloucester girl." Birmingham Post, January 9: 1.

    Campbell, Duncan. 1995. "How a string of girls came to die in depraved and appalling circumstances." The Guardian, October 7.

    Duce, Richard. 1995. "West's suicide avenged killings, QC tells jurors." The Times, November 16.

    Duce, Richard, and Bill Frost. 1995. "Court told of depravity at 25 Cromwell Street." The Times, October 7: 4.

    Evening Post. 1968. "Helicopter joins hunt for Mary." Evening Post, January 8: 1.

    Evening Standard. 1974. "Have you spotted this girl?" Evening Standard, July 4: 18.

    Frost, Bill. 1995. "Cromwell Street murders case man is dead." The Times, Janaury 2.

    Frost, Bill, and Richard Duce. 1995. "I'm being made a scapegoat, says West." The Times, November 2.

    —. 1995. "No place for sentiment, West jurors are told." The Times, October 4.

    —. 1995. "West: I fell under Fred's spell." The Times, October 31.

    Gloucester Echo. 1994. "Did builder know Mary?" Gloucester Echo, March 8: 3.

    —. 1994. "Graden bodies: Who were they?" Gloucester Echo, March 2: 1.

    Gloucestershire Echo. 1995. "From angelic child to coldest of killers." Gloucestershire Echo 5.

    —. 1995. "Fred West found dead." Gloucestershire Echo, January 2: 1.

    —. 1995. "I'll see you in court, Rose." Gloucestershire Echo, January 4: 1.

    Knight, Adam. 2014. Fred West's brother denies incest claims. November 7. Accessed March 17, 2024. https://www.herefordtimes.com/news/11587578.fred-wests-brother-denies-incest-claims/.

    Lee, Adrian, Tim Jones, and Damian Whitworth. 1996. "Fred West's brother hangs himself." The Times, November 29.

    Ovington, Paul. 1974. "Hunt steps up as fear grows for Lucy, 21." Western Daily Press and Times, January 4: 1.

    Sounes, Howard. 1995. Fred & Rose: The Full Story of Fred and Rose West and the Gloucester House of Horrors. New York, NY: Open Road Media.

    United Press International. 1995. "British jury convicts West of 10 murders." UPI Archive, November 22.

    West, Mae, and Neil McKay. 2018. Love as Always, Mum: The True and Terrible Story of Surviving a Childhood with Fred and Rose West. London, UK: Seven Dials Press.

    Williams, Martin. 1994. "'Our sister is still alive'." Gloucester Echo, February 26: 1.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • Part two delves into Fred's life after he met Rose, exploring the origins of the affair leading to their marriage and the beginning of the sadistic crimes that would horrify the world at large.

    Thank you to the wondrous Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for Research!

    References

    Amis, Martin. 2000. When darkness met light. May 11. Accessed March 21, 2024. https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2000/may/11/features11.g2.

    BBC News. 1998. Fred West 'admitted killing waitress'. March 25. Accessed March 19, 2024. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/69928.stm.

    —. 2001. How many more did Fred West kill? September 27. Accessed March 19, 2024. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1567038.stm.

    —. 2021. The 12 victims of Fred and Rosemary West. May 27. Accessed March 18, 2024. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-57182844.

    Bennett, Will. 1995. Step-daughter Charmaine was first to die. November 22. Accessed March 19, 2024. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/stepdaughter-charmaine-was-first-to-die-1583071.html.

    Birmingham Evening Mail. 1974. "Missing girls theory." Birmingham Evening Mail, January 7: 1.

    Birmingham Post. 1968. "Missing waitress mystery deepens." Birmingham Post, January 23: 2.

    —. 1974. "Student missing for six days may return ton university-police." Birmingham Post, January 2: 2.

    —. 1968. "Yard detectives join search for Gloucester girl." Birmingham Post, January 9: 1.

    Campbell, Duncan. 1995. "How a string of girls came to die in depraved and appalling circumstances." The Guardian, October 7.

    Duce, Richard. 1995. "West's suicide avenged killings, QC tells jurors." The Times, November 16.

    Duce, Richard, and Bill Frost. 1995. "Court told of depravity at 25 Cromwell Street." The Times, October 7: 4.

    Evening Post. 1968. "Helicopter joins hunt for Mary." Evening Post, January 8: 1.

    Evening Standard. 1974. "Have you spotted this girl?" Evening Standard, July 4: 18.

    Frost, Bill. 1995. "Cromwell Street murders case man is dead." The Times, Janaury 2.

    Frost, Bill, and Richard Duce. 1995. "I'm being made a scapegoat, says West." The Times, November 2.

    —. 1995. "No place for sentiment, West jurors are told." The Times, October 4.

    —. 1995. "West: I fell under Fred's spell." The Times, October 31.

    Gloucester Echo. 1994. "Did builder know Mary?" Gloucester Echo, March 8: 3.

    —. 1994. "Graden bodies: Who were they?" Gloucester Echo, March 2: 1.

    Gloucestershire Echo. 1995. "From angelic child to coldest of killers." Gloucestershire Echo 5.

    —. 1995. "Fred West found dead." Gloucestershire Echo, January 2: 1.

    —. 1995. "I'll see you in court, Rose." Gloucestershire Echo, January 4: 1.

    Knight, Adam. 2014. Fred West's brother denies incest claims. November 7. Accessed March 17, 2024. https://www.herefordtimes.com/news/11587578.fred-wests-brother-denies-incest-claims/.

    Lee, Adrian, Tim Jones, and Damian Whitworth. 1996. "Fred West's brother hangs himself." The Times, November 29.

    Ovington, Paul. 1974. "Hunt steps up as fear grows for Lucy, 21." Western Daily Press and Times, January 4: 1.

    Sounes, Howard. 1995. Fred & Rose: The Full Story of Fred and Rose West and the Gloucester House of Horrors. New York, NY: Open Road Media.

    United Press International. 1995. "British jury convicts West of 10 murders." UPI Archive, November 22.

    West, Mae, and Neil McKay. 2018. Love as Always, Mum: The True and Terrible Story of Surviving a Childhood with Fred and Rose West. London, UK: Seven Dials Press.

    Williams, Martin. 1994. "'Our sister is still alive'." Gloucester Echo, February 26: 1.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • In this four part series, we dive into the horrific crimes of Fred & Rose West. We begin by exploring Fred's formative years which laid a foundation for his callousness and depraved appetites.

    Thank you to the wondrous Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for Research!

    References

    Amis, Martin. 2000. When darkness met light. May 11. Accessed March 21, 2024. https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2000/may/11/features11.g2.

    BBC News. 1998. Fred West 'admitted killing waitress'. March 25. Accessed March 19, 2024. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/69928.stm.

    —. 2001. How many more did Fred West kill? September 27. Accessed March 19, 2024. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1567038.stm.

    —. 2021. The 12 victims of Fred and Rosemary West. May 27. Accessed March 18, 2024. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-57182844.

    Bennett, Will. 1995. Step-daughter Charmaine was first to die. November 22. Accessed March 19, 2024. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/stepdaughter-charmaine-was-first-to-die-1583071.html.

    Birmingham Evening Mail. 1974. "Missing girls theory." Birmingham Evening Mail, January 7: 1.

    Birmingham Post. 1968. "Missing waitress mystery deepens." Birmingham Post, January 23: 2.

    —. 1974. "Student missing for six days may return ton university-police." Birmingham Post, January 2: 2.

    —. 1968. "Yard detectives join search for Gloucester girl." Birmingham Post, January 9: 1.

    Campbell, Duncan. 1995. "How a string of girls came to die in depraved and appalling circumstances." The Guardian, October 7.

    Duce, Richard. 1995. "West's suicide avenged killings, QC tells jurors." The Times, November 16.

    Duce, Richard, and Bill Frost. 1995. "Court told of depravity at 25 Cromwell Street." The Times, October 7: 4.

    Evening Post. 1968. "Helicopter joins hunt for Mary." Evening Post, January 8: 1.

    Evening Standard. 1974. "Have you spotted this girl?" Evening Standard, July 4: 18.

    Frost, Bill. 1995. "Cromwell Street murders case man is dead." The Times, Janaury 2.

    Frost, Bill, and Richard Duce. 1995. "I'm being made a scapegoat, says West." The Times, November 2.

    —. 1995. "No place for sentiment, West jurors are told." The Times, October 4.

    —. 1995. "West: I fell under Fred's spell." The Times, October 31.

    Gloucester Echo. 1994. "Did builder know Mary?" Gloucester Echo, March 8: 3.

    —. 1994. "Graden bodies: Who were they?" Gloucester Echo, March 2: 1.

    Gloucestershire Echo. 1995. "From angelic child to coldest of killers." Gloucestershire Echo 5.

    —. 1995. "Fred West found dead." Gloucestershire Echo, January 2: 1.

    —. 1995. "I'll see you in court, Rose." Gloucestershire Echo, January 4: 1.

    Knight, Adam. 2014. Fred West's brother denies incest claims. November 7. Accessed March 17, 2024. https://www.herefordtimes.com/news/11587578.fred-wests-brother-denies-incest-claims/.

    Lee, Adrian, Tim Jones, and Damian Whitworth. 1996. "Fred West's brother hangs himself." The Times, November 29.

    Ovington, Paul. 1974. "Hunt steps up as fear grows for Lucy, 21." Western Daily Press and Times, January 4: 1.

    Sounes, Howard. 1995. Fred & Rose: The Full Story of Fred and Rose West and the Gloucester House of Horrors. New York, NY: Open Road Media.

    United Press International. 1995. "British jury convicts West of 10 murders." UPI Archive, November 22.

    West, Mae, and Neil McKay. 2018. Love as Always, Mum: The True and Terrible Story of Surviving a Childhood with Fred and Rose West. London, UK: Seven Dials Press.

    Williams, Martin. 1994. "'Our sister is still alive'." Gloucester Echo, February 26: 1.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • We are joined by Christopher Cassel, Director of 'Pathological: The Lies of Joran Van Der Sloot', We discuss his documentary which dives deep into the crimes of the Van Der Sloot, and the countless people his actions have negatively impacted.

    Want to see the documentary? Stream it now on Peacock!

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • On the afternoon of May 30, 2005, the senior students from Mountain Brook High School gathered at the airport in Aruba to make their return flight to Alabama after their celebratory trip, when chaperones noticed that one of the students was missing. Eighteen-year-old Natalee Holloway was last seen around 1:30 am that morning, leaving a bar with a student from the local International School of Aruba, but no one had seen or heard from her since and when they checked the hotel, Natalee’s luggage and other belongings were still in her room. 

    It would take nearly twenty years before her killer was held responsible and the truth about her disappearance was brought to light.

    Thank you to the wondrous Dave White of Bring Me the Axe Podcast for Research!

    References

    ABC News. 2006. Exclusive: van der Sloot talks about night out. February 22. Accessed March 26, 2024. https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=1648218.

    Associated Press. 2005. "Three young suspects can be held in case of missing girl, judge rules." New York Times, June 12.

    —. 2005. "Two suspects to be held in girl's case." New York Times, June 9.

    —. 2012. "Natalee Holloway declared dead by judge six years after disappearance." The Guardian, January 12.

    Burrough, Bryan. 2006. "Missing White Female." Vanity Fair, November 20.

    Chandler, Kim. 2023. "Attorney describes Joran van der Sloot's confession." Montgomery Advertiser, November 11: 1.

    CNN News. 2010. Interpol: Van der Sloot tried to extort Holloway's mother. June 9. Accessed March 27, 2024. http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/06/08/us.van.der.sloot.alabama/.

    CNN Wire. 2012. Van der Sloot sentenced to 28 years for Peru murder . January 13. Accessed March 27, 2024. https://www.cnn.com/2012/01/13/world/americas/peru-van-der-sloot-sentence.

    Holloway, Beth. 2007. "My daughter disappeared." Good Housekeeping, November 1: 185.

    Holloway, Dave, R. Stephanie Good, and Larry Garrison. 2023. Aruba: The Tragic Untold Story of Natalee Holloway and Corruption in Paradise. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishing.

    Lybrand, Holmes, Jean Casarez, and Evan Perez. 2023. FBI details how van der Sloot’s confession in Natalee Holloway’s death came together. October 24. Accessed March 27, 2024. https://www.cnn.com/2023/10/24/us/joran-van-der-sloot-holloway-plea-deal/index.html.

    Lyman, Rick. 2005. "Missing woman's case spurs discussion of news coverage." New York Times, August 7.

    NBC News. 2005. Aruban police again search landfill for Holloway. July 28. Accessed March 26, 2024. https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna8745217.

    —. 2010. Van der Sloot admits Holloway family extortion plot: 'Why not?'. September 6. Accessed March 27, 2024. https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna39023617.

    Nelson, Andrew. 2005. "Missing teen's friends, family continue hope." Birmingham Post-Herald, June 6: 24.

    News, ABC. 2006. "Dutch teen tells Primetime about night with Natalee Holloway." ABC News, February 23.

    Norton, Michael. 2005. "FBI answers mother's plea to aid search." Montgomery Advertiser, June 4: 1.

    Robinson, Carol. 2023. Listen to Joran van der Sloot describe Natalee Holloway’s final moments in chilling confession. October 18. Accessed March 27, 2024. https://www.al.com/news/2023/10/listen-to-joran-van-der-sloot-describe-natalee-holloways-final-moments-in-chilling-confession.html.

    Robinson, Carol, and Ivana Hrynkiw. 2023. Joran van der Sloot confesses to killing Natalee Holloway: ‘You terminated her dreams,’ mother says. October 18. Accessed March 27, 2024. https://www.al.com/news/2023/10/joran-van-der-sloot-expected-to-plead-guilty-in-natalee-holloway-extortion-case-today-latest-updates.html.

    Robinson, Gene. 2005. "Missing white women and the media." Washington Post, June 14.

    The Independent. 2010. "Sex, lies and a murder suspect with a story to sell." The Independent, June 23.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.