Episodes

  • Ron Kessler, “Pragmatic Precision Psychiatry”
    Ronald C. Kessler, Ph.D. is the McNeil Family Professor of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School and Director of the World Health Organization World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative.

    Jon Roiser, “Towards mechanistic precision psychiatry"
    Jonathan Roiser is Professor of Neuroscience and Mental Health and Deputy Director of the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience.

    Precision psychiatry talks by Ron Kessler and Jon Roiser will take place at the forthcoming IoMH Annual Conference, which takes place online on Wednesday 15th September 2021: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh-conference/conference-programme

    Tickets cost £10 and can be purchased here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh-conference/conference-registration

  • Towards coproduction: Involvement in the Mental Health Policy Research Unit

    Merle Schlief, "Co-production on the PRU Covid interviews project: what we did"

    Jackie Hardy, Tamar Jeynes and Mary Birken, "Co-production on the PRU Covid interviews project: reflections - Panel discussion"

    The IoMH Annual Conference takes place online on Wednesday 15th September 2021: www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh…nference-programme

    Tickets cost £10 and can be purchased here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh-conference/conference-registration

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  • Dr Alexandra Pitman is an Associate Professor in Psychiatry in the UCL Division of Psychiatry and an Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist at Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust. Her research interests are in the epidemiology of suicide and self-harm, and preventing suicide.

    She will be giving a talk on “The impact of peer suicide, suicide attempt, and self-harm on risk of self-harm and suicidal behaviour” at the forthcoming IoMH Annual Conference, which takes place online on Wednesday 15th September 2021: www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh…nference-programme

    Poster presentations can be submitted here: www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh…ster-presentations

    Tickets cost £10 and can be purchased here: www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh…rence-registration

    If you're in crisis and need to talk right now, there are many helplines staffed by trained people ready to listen. They won't judge you, and could help you make sense of what you're feeling.

    Samaritans. To talk about anything that is upsetting you, you can contact Samaritans 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. You can call 116 123 (free from any phone), email jo@samaritans.org or visit some branches in person. You can also call the Samaritans Welsh Language Line on 0808 164 0123 (7pm–11pm every day).

    SANEline. If you're experiencing a mental health problem or supporting someone else, you can call SANEline on 0300 304 7000 (4.30pm–10.30pm every day).

    Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM). You can call the CALM on 0800 58 58 58 (5pm–midnight every day) if oyou are struggling and need to talk. Or if you prefer not to speak on the phone, you could try the CALM webchat service.

    Urgent mental health helplines (England only)

    If you live in England, you can call a local NHS urgent mental health helpline for support during a mental health crisis. Anyone can call these helplines, at any time. These helplines offer similar support to a crisis team. The NHS website has more information on urgent mental health helplines, including how to find your local helpline.

  • Professor Laurence Kirmayer from McGill University is a psychiatrist and expert in transcultural psychiatry.

    He will be giving the opening keynote talk at the 21st Australasian Conference on Traumatic Stress, which will take place online on 14-18 September 2021: www.acots.org/

    Prof Kirmayer's talk is entitled: "Landscapes of trauma: A social-ecological approach to cultural diversity in mental health research, theory and practice.".

    The 2021 ACOTS conference is a collaboration between ASTSS (the Australasian Society for Traumatic Stress Studies) and Phoenix Australia – Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health.

    The 2021 virtual conference will be of interest to a broad range of people interested in trauma, including practitioners, researchers, consumers, service developers and policy makers.

  • Dr Duleeka Knipe is a Vice Chancellor's Fellow, Bristol Medical School (PHS) at the University of Bristol.

    She will be giving a talk in the forthcoming IoMH Annual Conference, which takes place online on Wednesday 15th September 2021: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh-conference/conference-programme

    Dr Duleeka Knipe's talk is entitled: "Suicide in low and middle-income countries – what do we know?".

    Poster presentations can be submitted here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh-conference/iomh-conference-poster-presentations

    Tickets cost £10 and can be purchased here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh-conference/conference-registration

    If you are interested to read more about means restriction in Sri Lanka you can read the following blogs:
    https://theconversation.com/pesticides-and-suicide-prevention-why-research-needs-to-be-put-into-practice-102533
    https://unearthed.greenpeace.org/2021/03/24/paraquat-papers-syngenta-toxic-pesticide-gramoxone/


    If you're in crisis and need to talk right now, there are many helplines staffed by trained people ready to listen. They won't judge you, and could help you make sense of what you're feeling.

    Samaritans. To talk about anything that is upsetting you, you can contact Samaritans 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. You can call 116 123 (free from any phone), email jo@samaritans.org or visit some branches in person. You can also call the Samaritans Welsh Language Line on 0808 164 0123 (7pm–11pm every day).

    SANEline. If you're experiencing a mental health problem or supporting someone else, you can call SANEline on 0300 304 7000 (4.30pm–10.30pm every day).

    Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM). You can call the CALM on 0800 58 58 58 (5pm–midnight every day) if oyou are struggling and need to talk. Or if you prefer not to speak on the phone, you could try the CALM webchat service.

    Urgent mental health helplines (England only)

    If you live in England, you can call a local NHS urgent mental health helpline for support during a mental health crisis. Anyone can call these helplines, at any time. These helplines offer similar support to a crisis team. The NHS website has more information on urgent mental health helplines, including how to find your local helpline.

  • Professor Meaghan O'Donnell is the Head of Research at Phoenix Australia, and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne.

    She will be leading a parallel session at the The 21st Australasian Conference on Traumatic Stress will take place online on 14-18 September 2021: www.acots.org/

    Prof O'Donnell's session is entitled: "Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders’ and its treatment of PTSD".

    The 2021 ACOTS conference is a collaboration between ASTSS (the Australasian Society for Traumatic Stress Studies) and Phoenix Australia – Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health.

    The 2021 virtual conference will be of interest to a broad range of people interested in trauma, including practitioners, researchers, consumers, service developers and policy makers.

  • Professor Katherine Iverson from the Women’s Health Sciences Division of the National Center for PTSD at the VA Boston Healthcare System, and the University of Boston is a clinical research psychologist and an expert in intimate partner violence.

    She will be giving a keynote talk at the The 21st Australasian Conference on Traumatic Stress will take place online on 14-18 September 2021: www.acots.org/

    Prof Iverson's talk is entitled: "Harnessing health services research and implementation science to improve care for individuals who experience intimate partner violence (IPV): Examples from the US Veterans Health Administration".

    The 2021 ACOTS conference is a collaboration between ASTSS (the Australasian Society for Traumatic Stress Studies) and Phoenix Australia – Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health.

    The 2021 virtual conference will be of interest to a broad range of people interested in trauma, including practitioners, researchers, consumers, service developers and policy makers.

  • Professor Tony David, Director of the UCL Institute of Mental Health, talks about the forthcoming IoMH Annual Conference, which takes place online on Wednesday 15th September 2021: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh-conference/conference-programme

    Poster presentations can be submitted here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh-conference/iomh-conference-poster-presentations

    Tickets cost £10 and can be purchased here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/mental-health/iomh-conference/conference-registration

  • Professor Nicholas Procter from the University of South Australia is a mental health nurse and will speak about the use of co-design and lived experience within vulnerable populations

    He will be giving a keynote talk at the The 21st Australasian Conference on Traumatic Stress will take place online on 14-18 September 2021: www.acots.org/

    The 2021 ACOTS conference is a collaboration between ASTSS (the Australasian Society for Traumatic Stress Studies) and Phoenix Australia – Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health.

    The 2021 virtual conference will be of interest to a broad range of people interested in trauma, including practitioners, researchers, consumers, service developers and policy makers.

  • Professor Tim Dalgleish from the University of Cambridge is a clinical psychologist who specialises in transdiagnostic interventions.

    He will be giving a keynote talk at the The 21st Australasian Conference on Traumatic Stress will take place online on 14-18 September 2021: www.acots.org/

    Prof Dalgleish's talk is entitled: "Transdiagnostic approaches to human distress in the aftermath of trauma".

    The 2021 ACOTS conference is a collaboration between ASTSS (the Australasian Society for Traumatic Stress Studies) and Phoenix Australia – Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health.

    The 2021 virtual conference will be of interest to a broad range of people interested in trauma, including practitioners, researchers, consumers, service developers and policy makers.

  • Professor Zachary Steel, President of the Australasian Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (https://www.astss.org.au/) helps us prepare for the 21st Australasian Conference on Traumatic Stress, which is taking place online on 14-18 Sep 2021.

    The 2021 ACOTS conference is a collaboration between ASTSS (the Australasian Society for Traumatic Stress Studies) and Phoenix Australia – Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health.

    This year’s conference theme lays down a challenge to us all in our enduring quest to improve outcomes for those impacted by trauma. The Scientific Committee has brought together a range of international and national keynote speakers who bring their own distinct perspective to challenge the trauma field.

    Plenary sessions, panel discussions, clinical tutorials and papers will represent a range of interests and current issues in trauma research and practice.

    This year ACOTS will be a virtual conference using the highly awarded EventsAIR platform in partnership with ICMS to provide a conference platform that will allow real-time interaction and small group online meeting places and discussion groups. Those of you who had the opportunity to join the recent International Childhood Trauma Symposium will have seen what a great digital platform they provided.

    We have maximised the benefits of a virtual platform to ensure that an engaging live event with real opportunities to interact and an ongoing digital resource that you can view and access for 12 months.

    Conference website: https://www.acots.org/
    Conference programme: https://www.acots.org/conference/conference-program/
    Twitter coverage of the conference: https://twitter.com/search?q=%23ACOTS2021&src=typed_query&f=live

  • Dr Bob Klaber, Consultant General Paediatrician and Director of Strategy, Research and Innovation at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, speaks about the importance of kindness in relation to healthcare and quality improvement.

    https://twitter.com/BobKlaber

    Find out more about the International Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare Europe 2021, which took place on 9-11 June 2021 internationalforum.bmj.com/europe/

  • Don Goldmann (Harvard Professor and Chief Scientific Officer, Emeritus at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement) and Amar Shah (Forensic Psychiatrist, Chief Quality Officer at East London Foundation NHS Trust, and National Improvement Lead for Mental Health at the Royal College of Psychiatrists) speak about the importance of equity.

    https://twitter.com/dagoldmann
    https://twitter.com/DrAmarShah

    Find out more about the International Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare Europe 2021, which took place on 9-11 June 2021 internationalforum.bmj.com/europe/

  • Dr. Cat Chatfield, Research Integrity Editor at The BMJ (https://twitter.com/drcatchatfield) and Dr. Daljit Hothi, Home HD Lead, Consultant Paediatric Nephrologist, Associate Medical Director at Great Ormond Street Hospital (https://twitter.com/DalHothi_HD_QI) speak about the importance of workforce wellbeing.

    Find out more about the International Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare Europe 2021, which took place on 9-11 June 2021 https://internationalforum.bmj.com/europe/

  • Anna Motz - Working Psychotherapeutically with Women’s Invisible Trauma.

    Consultant Clinical and Forensic Psychologist working in the Offender Care Service at the Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust, who has extensive clinical experience working with women in prison and in the community, and with the staff teams who support them.

  • Professor Peter Kinderman, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Liverpool will be speaking at the BIGSPD 2021 online conference, which takes place on 15-16 June 2021. His talk is entitled: "Beyond disagreement and consensus - managing multiple perspectives."

    Visit the conference website to find out more:
    https://bigspd.org.uk/online-conference-june-2021/

  • Prof Grainne McAlonan, Professor of Translational Neuroscience in the Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences at King's College London.

    Synopsis: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is clinically diverse, and its etiological mechanisms are poorly understood. To inform prognosis and generate intervention opportunities we need a better understanding of causal pathways; and subsequently, a means to examine target engagement. There is fresh hope however, based on evidence that multiple risk factors for ASD and related neurodevelopmental conditions converge to disrupt the balance between excitatory glutamate (E) and inhibitory GABA (I). This will likely alter the activity and structure of brain circuits which underpin (especially social) cognition and behaviour. Professor McAlonon’s research is directly testing this hypothesis by using MRI to examine spontaneous functional activity and microstructure in the brain of neonates with and without vulnerabilities for neurodevelopmental disorders. Her research has also begun to investigate whether E/I differences persist into adulthood in ASD, and if they are ‘responsive’ to pharmacological modulation. In her keynote talk, Professor McAlonan will share some of her early progress in these areas.

    Biography: Professor Grainne McAlonan studied Medicine at University of Cambridge and Imperial College London and completed a PhD in Behavioural Neuroscience at University of Cambridge.  After clinical and research posts in the UK, she worked for over a decade in The University of Hong Kong before returning to the IoPPN. She uses MRI as a translational tool to link brain and behaviour in people with neurodevelopmental conditions such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD); and to ‘back’ (and ‘forward’) translate to laboratory models. Her current research is informed by her work in the National ADHD and Autism Service for Adults at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM) and she is Clinical Disorders Cluster Lead for the NIHR-Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre. Professor McAlonan is a group leader within the MRC Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at IoPPN and is a lead investigator within the EU-AIMS-2-TRIALS consortium – a European network hosting the world’s largest grant for autism research. She is responsible for fetal/neonatal/infant brain imaging studies of children vulnerable to neurodevelopmental conditions and for pharmacology studies in adults with ASD.

  • Professor Terrie E. Moffitt, Professor of Social Development in the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre at King's College London.

    Synopsis: Repeated mental-health assessments in a birth cohort followed to age 45 reveal that mental disorder eventually affects virtually everyone. The predominant pattern among clinically significant cases is adolescent onset followed by a succession of different diagnoses emerging over decades. Findings challenge our field’s over-reliance on researching and treating specific mental disorders diagnosed in cross-sectional snapshots.

    Bio: Terrie E. Moffitt’s expertise is in the areas of lifelong aging, mental health, longitudinal research methods, developmental theory, neuropsychology, and gene-environment interplay. She is the associate director of the Dunedin Longitudinal Study, which follows a 1972 birth cohort in New Zealand. She also founded the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study (E-Risk), which follows a 1994 birth cohort in the UK. Dr. Moffitt is a licensed clinical psychologist, with specialization in neuropsychological assessment. Her service includes as a trustee of the Nuffield Foundation (UK), chair of the Board on Board on Behavioral, Cognitive and Sensory Sciences at the National Academies of Sciences, member of the National Advisory Council on Aging (US-NIH), and chair of the jury for the Klaus J. Jacobs Prize (Switzerland). She is an elected fellow of the US National Academy of Medicine, British Academy, UK Academy of Medical Sciences, Academia Europa, Association of Psychological Science, and the American Society of Criminology. Dr. Moffitt enjoys working on her poison-ivy farm in North Carolina. Learn more at www.moffittcaspi.com.

  • #ImpactFrameworks conference organisers Mark Taylor, Jess Romo and Shaun Leamon discuss the conference highlights over the two days and lessons learnt.

  • Dr Jenny Donovan, CEO of the Australian Education Research Organisation (AERO)

    Presentation Title: Evidence for Change

    The Australian Education Research Organisation (AERO) was established to advance an evidence-based education system. What does that mean for educators and teachers? Presumably, it implies that there needs to be some sort of change: some adjustments to practice and some shift towards greater utilisation and implementation of evidence at scale. But teachers are weary of top-down edicts that impose change without reason or support, and they are - rightly so - sceptical of the fads and grifters that come and go. So what can AERO do to effectively support changes in educators' and teachers' practices? How can it advance the generation, implementation, and use of evidence? In this talk, the inaugural CEO of AERO, Dr Jenny Donovan, will share insights about how AERO seeks to advance evidence -informed teaching practices by leveraging and enabling necessary conditions for change, as well as by supporting change at every step of the process from evidence uptake, to understanding, to implementation.