Episodes

  • Politician and educator, Atishi Marlena, and founder of some of India’s leading educational institutions, Pramath Raj Sinha talk about the purpose of education in a rapidly changing world. Can government schools provide a ‘good’ education to our children? Is the private sector the answer to a failing system? What are our children and youth really learning in their schools and colleges? All this and more in this episode on the education system in India.

    Highlights

    Has the education system veered towards producing workers for the economy, and away from producing better citizens for society? How do you learn something new, when you haven’t been trained for it? What will it take to make government schools work, and how should we be thinking of private institutions? Is it possible to create reflective spaces where students can learn values and ethics? Can excellence in education be measured?

    For more information about IDR, go to www.idronline.org. Also, follow IDR on Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and Instagram

    Read more:

    What the National Education Policy 2020 has gotten right and what it hasn’t Why Indian children can’t read Incorporating play to improve cognitive learning Standardised tests ignore indigenous knowledge, language, or problem-solving strategies Our solutions for education aren’t working Seek and you shall find

    Production by Maed in India, to find out more visit www.maedinindia.in

  • Nachiket Mor, expert in health systems design, and Dr Abhay Bang, public health expert with deep experience working at the grassroots, debate the approach India must take when fighting the second wave of COVID-19. Mor is in favour of a more centralised approach, grounded in science and trust. On the contrary, Bang believes local communities know best when it comes to their problems.

    Highlights –

    The current catastrophe we are facing in India points to the need for a stronger governance model, and a health system that inspires trust, and better serves the people. Comprehensive, high quality primary care informed by expertise has to be the bedrock of any health system. We need both science, as well as the knowledge, experience, and buy-in of local communities at the grassroots, to fight a pandemic like this one. Communities need to be at the centre of this fight, with the government, the private sector, and civil society, doing more.

    For more information about IDR, go to www.idronline.org. Also, follow IDR on Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and Instagram.

    Read more:

    How you can support nonprofits in their COVID-19 relief efforts in 2021 How is rural Bihar dealing with the second wave of COVID-19? A pandemic, an infodemic, and the fear of vaccination Mental health and COVID-19 in India Making virtual volunteering work Research, for whom? A day in the life of a hospital ward worker, who cares for COVID-19 patients at a government hospital A day in the life of a sero survey field manager, who works in the slums of Mumbai. The Wisdom of the Crowds You cannot bypass the power of communities Photo essay: The everyday lives of migrants

    This is a Maed in India production. To find out more visit www.maedinindia.in.

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  • Given the dire crisis that our country is facing because of the second wave of Covid-19, On the Contrary is taking a break this week.

    If you would like to support the fight against COVID-19, check out this page ( https://idronline.org/covid-19-in-2021-latest-updates-for-the-social-sector/ ) on IDR that is a repository of information, insights, and asks from social sector organisations/collectives at the frontlines.

    For more information about IDR, go to www.idronline.org. Also, follow IDR on Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and Instagram.

    Production by Maed in India find out more at www.maedinindia.in.

  • In the race for economic growth, who wins and who loses? In this episode, Bittu Sahgal, environmental activist and writer, and TV Narendran, CEO and Managing Director of Tata Steel, discuss the conflict between the economy, industry and environment.

    Highlights –

    The need to move beyond GDP and economic growth to include environmental indicators when assessing a country’s performance. What has been and needs to be done to ensure that industry, government, and society engage in more conversations about sustainable long-term economic growth. How the needs of industry, government, and community can be better balanced when it comes to policy-making. How to persuade businesses and governments to think and act long-term when it comes to growth strategy as well as the environment.

    For more information about IDR, go to www.idronline.org. Also, follow IDR on Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and Instagram.

    Read more:

    Sustainable Economic Development Assessment (SEDA) The Vision of a Well-Being Economy Ecology is Economy Economic growth vs climate security: We can have it all The need to invest in climate change education India ranks 168th on Environmental Protection Index India ranks 120th of 122 countries in a global water quality index CSR and sustainable development: Do Indian companies care about the environment? The environmental movement has made a few mistakes IDR Interviews | Dr. Vandana Shiva Climate finance for MSMEs Climate change cost India over 2000 lives and $37 billion in just a year

    Production by Maed in India find out more at www.maedinindia.in.

  • In this episode, business leader and ex-President of the Confederation of Indian Industry, Naushad Forbes, speaks with former journalist and philanthropist Rohini Nilekani, about what a good market looks like. They discuss what markets must include, whom they should serve, and the role they must play in enabling inclusive economic growth.

    Highlights –

    - There’s a need to create a better balance between the public (government), private, and civil society sectors, such that the benefits of the market are evenly distributed across all.

    - What is the role that markets can play in creating a more inclusive pattern of growth, one with less environmental degradation, and more equity, more justice?

    - What needs to change about the processes currently in place for economic reforms, to ensure sustainable and inclusive growth?

    - We need to create democratic and safe platforms to listen to and talk with all citizens, not just experts and people at the top, in order to ensure a more equitable economy.

    For more information about IDR, go to www.idronline.org. Also, follow IDR on Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and Instagram.

    Read more:

    Transforming systems: Why the world needs a new ethical toolkit Redesigning the aeroplane while flying: Reforming institutions Addressing inequality in India Wealth of India’s richest 1% more than 4-times of total for 70% poorest: Oxfam India must come to terms with inequality: Thomas Piketty IDR Interviews | Muhammad Yunus Amitabh Behar on the changing nature of civil society Why we must listen to farmers Creating resilience to the dream Bringing informal workers to the forefront of our economy How do you solve a problem like livelihoods? The Tyranny of Merit: What’s become of the Common Good We need new practices and ideas A new paradigm for rural livelihoods

    This is a Maed in India production, to find out more visit www.maedinindia.in.

  • Yashica Dutt, journalist and author of Coming out as Dalit, and Ashif Shaikh, Dalit activist and leader of Jan Sahas, have a conversation about caste-based violence and oppression, manual scavenging, dignity, the Black Lives Matter movement, and, what it means to be an ally in the fight against caste hierarchy.

    Highlights –

    The vulnerabilities faced by Dalit women, and their needs. How to fight caste-based discrimination in society. What needs to change within society, within the government, and within policy. How to be an ally in the movement for equality.

    For more information about IDR, go to www.idronline.org. Also, follow IDR on Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and Instagram.

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    Growing up a Dalit child in small-town India Coming out as Dalit: A memoir IDR Interviews: Bezwada Wilson Want social change? Give communities more agency Meet the man who has gifted new life to over 31,000 manual scavengers Manual scavengers: the hands that clean you The 2012 Nirbhaya gang rape and murder case The 2020 Hathras gang rape and murder case Dalitality: Inherent untouchability in planning for SC/STs

    This is a Maed in India production. To find out more about us visit www.maedinindia.in

  • Manish Sabharwal, Chairperson and Co-founder of Teamlease argues that in order to compete in a global economy, India needs greater productivity and formal employment. Renana Jhabvala, best known for her long association with SEWA (Self-Employed Women's Association) where she organised women into trade unions, argues the opposite. India’s informal economy is large and here to stay, and our labour laws must accommodate informal workers.

    Highlights –

    The size and shape of the informal labour economy in India, including its role in India’s economic growth The trade offs between a focus on greater productivity and on supporting small and informal enterprises How the policy environment excludes informal workers The need for a stronger social security net for informal workers

    For more information about IDR, go to www.idronline.org. Also, follow IDR on Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and Instagram.

    Read more:

    Reduce state-level regulatory cholestrol to aid job creation Education, labour and agriculture reforms will usher in individual freedom It’s time to compensate women’s unpaid labour Labour rights have worsened post lockdown Making labour systems work Labour reforms can help reshape India’s growth trajectory There is much in the labour codes that needs to be discussed and debated Promise and pitfalls of new labour deal Remaking India: One Country, One Destiny Making movements resilient Questioning the informal-formal binary A day in the life of labour rights activist

    Production by Maed in India

  • Former Agriculture Secretary Siraj Hussain and leader of a farmer collective, Kavitha Kuruganthi, discuss the ongoing farmer protests and what they tell us about dissent, and the process of consultation and policy reform in India.

    Highlights –

    Why the process of consultation with farmers failed What policymakers seemed to have missed, while making these reforms How citizens should protest in a democracy, in order for their dissent to be heard How we can move forward, in the spirit of democracy

    For more information about IDR, go to www.idronline.org. Also, follow IDR on Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and Instagram.

    Read more:

    Farmer’s Produce Trade and Commerce (Promotion and Facilitation) Act, 2020 Farmers (Empowerment and Protection) Agreement of Price Assurance and Farm Services Act, 2020 Essential Commodities (Amendment) Act, 2020 The farm acts: all you need to know #FarmLaws2020: A four part video series featuring farmers, investors, among others Who are arthiyas? Farmers have a right to be heard Farmers’ protests: A volunteer’s diary “These laws will make us poorer” Rebuilding democracy in the 21st century: listening to people not like us

    Production by Maed in India

  • Welcome to India Development Review's podcast, On the Contrary, a show that brings you a better understanding of the most pressing issues of our time by listening to informed yet differing perspectives. In every episode, host and thought leader, Arun Maira brings two experts from different fields, regions, and worldviews to explore their similarities and differences on a topic, to find a new, shared understanding. Tune in every Wednesday on your favourite podcasting app. For more information about IDR, go to https://idronline.org/. Production by Maed in India