Episodes

  • DIALOG by artist duo knowbotiq (Yvonne Wilhelm and Christian Huebler) with researcher and project coordinator Ana Garzón Sabogal, is the seventh episode of the podcast series Seeing Into the Heart of Things; Earth and Equality Within Indigenous and Ancestral Knowledges. This collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium in fall 2021, at the Institute Art Gender Nature HGK FHNW in collaboration with CULTURESCAPES 2021 Amazonia.

    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to discussing Indigenous thought, decolonial feminisms, and the political possibilities of the mythic imagination, raising questions like: How do Indigenous cosmologies create forms for resistance? How does the Western imaginary of the Amazon, from its roots in racial capitalism to its corporate-tech, paternalistic present, cloud our understanding of how its peoples and nonhuman spirits narrate themselves?

  • CONNECTION by Vandria Borari, Brazilian artist and activist from the Borari people of Baixo Tapajós, Brazil, is the first episode of the podcast series Seeing Into the Heart of Things; Earth and Equality Within Indigenous and Ancestral Knowledges.

    This collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium in fall 2021, at the Institute Art Gender Nature HGK FHNW in collaboration with CULTURESCAPES 2021 Amazonia.

    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to discussing Indigenous thought, decolonial feminisms, and the political possibilities of the mythic imagination, raising questions like: How do Indigenous cosmologies create forms for resistance? How does the Western imaginary of the Amazon, from its roots in racial capitalism to its corporate-tech, paternalistic present, cloud our understanding of how its peoples and nonhuman spirits narrate themselves?

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  • EXTRACTION by Jeremy Narby, a Switzerland-based writer, activist, and anthropologist, is the second episode of the podcast series Seeing Into the Heart of Things; Earth and Equality Within Indigenous and Ancestral Knowledges.

    This collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium in fall 2021, at the Institute Art Gender Nature HGK FHNW in collaboration with CULTURESCAPES 2021 Amazonia.

    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to discussing Indigenous thought, decolonial feminisms, and the political possibilities of the mythic imagination, raising questions like: How do Indigenous cosmologies create forms for resistance? How does the Western imaginary of the Amazon, from its roots in racial capitalism to its corporate-tech, paternalistic present, cloud our understanding of how its peoples and nonhuman spirits narrate themselves?

  • WHAT HAPPENS TO THE LAND, HAPPENS TO THE PEOPLE by Katya García-Antón, Director and Chief Curator of the Office of Contemporary Art Norway, in Oslo, is the third episode of the podcast series Seeing Into the Heart of Things; Earth and Equality Within Indigenous and Ancestral Knowledges.

    This collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium in fall 2021, at the Institute Art Gender Nature HGK FHNW in collaboration with CULTURESCAPES 2021 Amazonia.

    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to discussing Indigenous thought, decolonial feminisms, and the political possibilities of the mythic imagination, raising questions like: How do Indigenous cosmologies create forms for resistance? How does the Western imaginary of the Amazon, from its roots in racial capitalism to its corporate-tech, paternalistic present, cloud our understanding of how its peoples and nonhuman spirits narrate themselves?

  • DEPRESSION by theater and film writer and director Pauliina Feodoroff, is the fourth episode of the podcast series Seeing Into the Heart of Things; Earth and Equality Within Indigenous and Ancestral Knowledges. This collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium in fall 2021, at the Institute Art Gender Nature HGK FHNW in collaboration with CULTURESCAPES 2021 Amazonia.

    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to discussing Indigenous thought, decolonial feminisms, and the political possibilities of the mythic imagination, raising questions like: How do Indigenous cosmologies create forms for resistance? How does the Western imaginary of the Amazon, from its roots in racial capitalism to its corporate-tech, paternalistic present, cloud our understanding of how its peoples and nonhuman spirits narrate themselves?

  • ETHNICITY by Ashfika Rahman, a visual artist from Dhaka, Bangladesh, whose work straddles visual art and documentary practices, is the fifth episode of the podcast series Seeing Into the Heart of Things; Earth and Equality Within Indigenous and Ancestral Knowledges. This collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium in fall 2021, at the Institute Art Gender Nature HGK FHNW in collaboration with CULTURESCAPES 2021 Amazonia.

    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to discussing Indigenous thought, decolonial feminisms, and the political possibilities of the mythic imagination, raising questions like: How do Indigenous cosmologies create forms for resistance? How does the Western imaginary of the Amazon, from its roots in racial capitalism to its corporate-tech, paternalistic present, cloud our understanding of how its peoples and nonhuman spirits narrate themselves?

  • WITNESSES by Kateryna Botanova, a curator, cultural critic and writer, and Quinn Latimer, a California-born poet, critic, and editor, is the sixth episode of the podcast series Seeing Into the Heart of Things; Earth and Equality Within Indigenous and Ancestral Knowledges. This collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium in fall 2021, at the Institute Art Gender Nature HGK FHNW in collaboration with CULTURESCAPES 2021 Amazonia.

    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to discussing Indigenous thought, decolonial feminisms, and the political possibilities of the mythic imagination, raising questions like: How do Indigenous cosmologies create forms for resistance? How does the Western imaginary of the Amazon, from its roots in racial capitalism to its corporate-tech, paternalistic present, cloud our understanding of how its peoples and nonhuman spirits narrate themselves?

  • Birds and cats is the ninth episode that follows a conversation with artist Laure Prouvost. The title of this podcast stems from one of the first questions Sonia Fernández Pan, the curator of this podcast asked Laure Prouvost during the conversation, inspired by the multiple characters Laure embodies through her projects. Her answer to the question about who she would like to be if she wasn't herself was "a bird", commenting on this animal's ability to fly. Sonia added that she would like to be a cat, perhaps because one of its great talents is the daily right to laziness in a world where life works relentlessly. They ended the conversation by returning to our animal relationship as bird and cat, with Laure flirting with the possibility that one catches and eats the other.

    In the many biographies that Laure Prouvost has written about herself over the years the artist strays from traditional artist biographies, describing her work according to the narrative and experiential drive of her projects and her way of naming them to ones where the institutional curriculum is replaced by a list of situations that her projects were able to create: Melting Into Another, an Occupied Paradise, Deep See Blue Surrounding You, a Waiting Room with objects, a New Museum for Grand Dad, A tearoom for Grand Ma, a lobby for love among the artists… Within these places we are no longer an impersonal audience, but characters who enter temporal worlds where fiction becomes materially present and real.

    The difference between fiction and lying is a question Sonia Fernández Pan also shared with Laure Prouvost, inspired by how she never fully reveals what is fiction and what is not in her work. The storytelling surrounding her artistic practice is another element of her work, strategically confusing spheres that the traditional art system insists on keeping apart.

    This conversation with Laure Prouvost took place in April 2022 in separate places. Sonia Fernández Pan was listening to Laure Prouvosts words from the computer and paying attention to the sound of the strokes of a drawing that Laure brought into their meeting. There are many similarities between writing and drawing. Both arise from the body; both produce a physical and intimate relationship between head and hands. The strokes of Laure's drawing added sound textures to her words. To listen to her voice and strokes, come in and enjoy.

  • When body becomes feeling, the third episode of Feminisms in the Caribbean series, arises from a conversation with the choreographer and performer Marily Gallardo. Teacher in Afro Antillean dance, she is also founder and organiser of Kalalú Danza, Afro Caribbean Cultural Research and Creative Action Lab in Santo Domingo. To Marily Gallardo it is fundamental to recognize the body as the first territory, as the most important place to construct the experience of life. This is because the body is also a denied territory, inhabited by social disciplines, above all for women. Marily Gallardo’s work is a constant affirmation practice of the body, individual, collective and communitarian at the same time.

    The changeful history of the colonization of the Caribbean has left deep scars that are still present today. This is best known by artists and cultural practitioners who work in their own way on an identity of its own for the Antilles. The term “Caribbean” here is used primarily in a geographical sense to help overcoming local antagonisms between different political systems, languages, and cultures, while allowing artists of all origins to exchange ideas and thus work together on a Caribbean identity.

    This series of podcasts aims to engage with a plurality of voices from different backgrounds to think with them on the diversity implicit in the notion of identity.

  • Feeling Words in your Mouth is the eighth episode that follows a conversation with artist Itziar Okariz. The title for this conversation is a phrase by Itiziar Okariz: "To feel the words on the tongue, to feel the words in the mouth". This statement also connects with another idea of hers: "the voice is the body of words”. Language is felt in a body that feels with language.

    Itziar Okariz speaks Basque, Spanish and English. There is an intimate relationship between language and identity. We are different depending on the language we use. Itziar's artistic practice is influenced by sculpture, a fundamental practice in the Basque context. Her actions and performances bear witness of how bodies not only take space, but how social space takes our bodies.

    Okariz's body has many things at hand: music, hair, gesture and repetition, the traditional Basque cry of Irrintzi, echo, breath, yoga, light, language and the disappearance of text... even dreams.

    Itziar turns her dreams into short paragraphs. She makes us linger over the same sentence, which is never the same sentence. She gives rhythm to her dreams, literally, she turns them into sound matter. Dreams are very intimate experiences in which others are present and absent at the same time. Dreams are similar to art actions: there are people who are part of them without ever being aware of it.

  • Growing horizontally, the seventh episode of the series The Tale and The Tongue, follows a conversation with graphic designer Katharina Hetzeneder. In Barcelona, she began to question the contribution of graphic design to social and political change. Katharina highlights the difference between working collectively and working with collectives; Katharina talkes about the notion of home and the influence of the rural—a reality she knows first-hand—and her relationship with and in urban environments.

    The conversation with Katharina Hetzeneder took place on 30 December 2021. For many people the year ends by returning to the past, just before they start to flirt with expectations and promises from the recent future. This podcast episode is both, a spell for ending and beginning another year. It is sustained by a desire for conversation, between people but also within collective events larger than individualities.

  • The Episode is part of the series "Going to the Limits of Your Longing, Research as Another Name for Care", a collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium held in spring 2021 at the Institute Art Gender Nature FHNW Academy of Art and Design in Basel.
    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to ideas and forms of artistic research that center art as a practice in service of the social. They revisit certain moments in our recent history and present of researching, producing, and exhibiting art in the name of such beliefs, namely social justice.

  • The Episode is part of the series "Going to the Limits of Your Longing, Research as Another Name for Care", a collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium held in spring 2021 at the Institute Art Gender Nature FHNW Academy of Art and Design in Basel.
    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to ideas and forms of artistic research that center art as a practice in service of the social. They revisit certain moments in our recent history and present of researching, producing, and exhibiting art in the name of such beliefs, namely social justice.

  • The Episode is part of the series "Going to the Limits of Your Longing, Research as Another Name for Care", a collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium held in spring 2021 at the Institute Art Gender Nature FHNW Academy of Art and Design in Basel.
    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to ideas and forms of artistic research that center art as a practice in service of the social. They revisit certain moments in our recent history and present of researching, producing, and exhibiting art in the name of such beliefs, namely social justice.

  • The Episode is part of the series "Going to the Limits of Your Longing, Research as Another Name for Care", a collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium held in spring 2021 at the Institute Art Gender Nature FHNW Academy of Art and Design in Basel.
    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to ideas and forms of artistic research that center art as a practice in service of the social. They revisit certain moments in our recent history and present of researching, producing, and exhibiting art in the name of such beliefs, namely social justice.

  • The Episode is part of the series "Going to the Limits of Your Longing, Research as Another Name for Care", a collection of episodes emerged from the Master Symposium held in spring 2021 at the Institute Art Gender Nature FHNW Academy of Art and Design in Basel.
    The contributions to the symposium were devoted to ideas and forms of artistic research that center art as a practice in service of the social. They revisit certain moments in our recent history and present of researching, producing, and exhibiting art in the name of such beliefs, namely social justice.

  • «Hybrid Worlds within Unusual Realities» is the fifth episode that follows a conversation with writer Giovanna Rivero.


    Author of numerous short stories and novels, essays, chronicles, and academic articles, among her many books written in Spanish are "Tukzon, historias colaterales" (2008), and more recently "Tierra fresca de su tumba".


    Living creatures of fiction is Giovanna Rivero's name for what many call characters. Another term she uses is " incarnations ", appealing to their corporeal and material dimension. The subjectivities that exist in fiction have as many bodies as there are readers who feel and embody them. Many genres flow intensely and rapidly through her novel at the same time: science fiction, detective fiction, fantasy... And of course, reality. All of them inhabit a story made up of many stories that do not follow a predictable sequence. The hybrid worlds of Tukzon are part of unusual and extraordinary realities of the world we live in.


    The sensitivity to the environment is very present in Giovanna Rivero's thinking, whose ethic calls for the importance of all lives, human and non-human, as part of a whole on and off planet Earth.

  • «The Loving Life of Friendship» is the fourth episode that follows a conversation with poet and researcher Sara Torres. Author of several poetry books, including «La otra genealogía», she also writes for various media and is currently working on her PHD «The Lesbian Text: Fetish, Fantasy and Queer Becomings at Queen Mary University of London.

    In one of her texts, «Friendship as a way of life: a culture of the lovers-friends», she begins by mentioning Michel Foucault and his conception of friendship as the center of queer becoming and relationships. What kind of relationships can exist outside the framework of the heterosexual norm? The norms of love make us love from within the norms. And can dangerously lead to love of the norms. With her concept she refers to a third space of relationship based on the encounter and practice of love: the lovers-friends ethic is about understanding that our lovers are our friends and vice versa, and that this ethic is a culture of resistance. It is a third space in a binary world. But betting on this ethic has painful consequences. The fact that relationships cannot be readable produces suffering and discomfort - if it is not monogamous and unconditional, if there is no renunciation and sacrifice, it is not perceived as real love. The realities of love instead should be more realistic. And friendly.

  • "The Camera that Listens" is the third episode that follows a conversation with artist and filmmaker Alex Reynolds. Her work constantly explores our modes of relation and affection as they appear embodied in the cinematic language. Moreover, her work both produces and is produced by modes of relation and affection through film processes, altering and expanding the narrative structures of cinema and making them more visible to the audience. In Alex Reynolds' films, viewers get invited to enter into stories and situations in a similar way to being invited to play a new game. Many of her films take place on the screen; others are events that cannot be fully seen from the outside because they include the spectator's view by their very presence in the place. Alex’ s projects show that cinema is much more than moving image but instead is a life in motion. At this point the difference between ethics and morality is a distinction making visible the unspoken scripts and narratives that also structure the public sphere of art and culture. "The Camera that Listens" brings up the gazes that filming can make possible, the gazes that inspired her to make films and thus somehow continue the gestures, rhythms and sensorial visuality of other filmmakers.