Episodes

  • Anjie chats with Bella Fascendini, a long time host of the Stanford Psychology Podcast and an incoming Ph.D. student in psychology at Princeton University. In this special episode from our Meet the Host series, Bella shares her journey into cognitive science and science communication, offering valuable tips for those considering graduate school or pursuing science communication. She also discusses one of her coolest work experiences —working with Penguin—and how it has shaped her current path.

    If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe on our Substack and consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Bella’s website: https://www.bellaxfascendini.com/

    Bella’s twitter: @BellaFascendini

    Bella’s first episode: https://www.stanfordpsychologypodcast.com/episodes/episode/4cea0f37/27-david-lagnado-how-causal-reasoning-can-help-us-make-better-judgments-and-solve-criminal-cases

    Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io

    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • Joseph chats with Prof. Jake Quilty-Dunn, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the Department of Philosophy and the Center for Cognitive Science Rutgers University. Prof. Quilty-Dunn works primarily in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Much of his research concerns distinctions between kinds of mental representations (such as iconic and discursive formats), mental processes (such as inference and association), and mental systems (such as perception and cognition). He also has broad research interests in philosophy of language, aesthetics and early modern philosophy.

    In this episode Joseph and Dr. Quilty-Dunn chat about the language of thought (LoT) hypothesis. They discuss the history of the idea, how the LoT differs from natural language, how it shows up in perception and cognition, how it compares to rival formats, and the extent to which it is learnable in development.

    References:

    Quilty-Dunn, J., Porot, N., & Mandelbaum, E. (2023). The best game in town: The reemergence of the language-of-thought hypothesis across the cognitive sciences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 46, e261

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  • Joseph and Dr. Lisa Damour discuss the portrayal of teenage emotions in Pixar's "Inside Out 2", with a focus on anxiety. Dr. Damour, who consulted for the film as a clinical psychologist, shares her experience, the teenage emotions explored in the film, how scientific insights are integrated into the story, and the societal issues it addresses.

    Dr Damour is the author of three New York Times best sellers: Untangled, Under Pressure, and The Emotional Lives of Teenagers, which have been translated into twenty-three languages. She co-hosts the Ask Lisa podcast, works in collaboration with UNICEF, and is recognized as a thought leader by the American Psychological Association. Dr. Damour is a regular contributor to The New York Times and CBS News and the creator of Untangling 10to20, a digital library of premium content to support teens and those who care for them.

    Dr. Damour serves as a Senior Advisor to the Schubert Center for Child Studies at Case Western Reserve University and has written numerous academic papers, chapters, and books related to education and child development. She maintains a clinical practice and also speaks to schools, professional organizations, and corporate groups around the world on the topics of child and adolescent development, family mental health, and adult well-being.

  • Joseph chats with Prof. Nicholas Shea, Professor of Philosophy at the Institute of Philosophy, University of London and associate member of the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Oxford. Prof. Shea is an interdisciplinary philosopher of mind and cognitive science, and has published work on mental representation, inheritance systems, consciousness, AI, and the metaphysics of mind. In this episode Joseph and Prof. Shea chat about two ways of thinking about concepts in human adults, babies, non-human animals, and artificial neural networks.

    References:
    Shea, N. (2023). Concepts as plug & play devices. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 378(1870), 20210353.
    Shea, N. (2023). Moving beyond content‐specific computation in artificial neural networks. Mind & Language, 38(1), 156-177.
    Shea, N. (2018). Representation in cognitive science. Oxford University Press.
    Shea, N. (2015). Distinguishing top-down from bottom-up effects. Perception and its modalities, 73-91.

  • Anjie chats with Dr. Nilam Ram. Nilam is a Professor of Communications & Psychology at Stanford University, and he studies how short-term changes develop across the life span and how longitudinal study designs contribute to the generation of new knowledge. Nilam is developing a variety of study paradigms that use recent developments in data science and the intensive data streams arriving from social media, mobile sensors, and smartphones to study behavioral change at multiple time scales. In this episode, we take a look at one of the paradigms that he has been working on: the Human Screenome Project, an ambitious project that has participants’ phone screens captured every five seconds for over a year as a way to record their specific ways of interacting with phones. Nilam shares how his thinking around generalizability has evolved over the course of the project.

    Nilam’s paper: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00273171.2023.2229305

    Nilam’s lab website: https://thechangelab.stanford.edu

    Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io

    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • Anjie chats with Dr. Johannes Eichstaedt, an Assistant Professor in Psychology, and the Shriram Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence at Stanford University. Johannes directs the Computational Psychology and Well-Being lab. His research focuses on using social media (Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, …) to measure the psychological states of large populations and individuals to determine the thoughts, emotions, and behaviors that drive physical illness (like heart disease), depression, or support psychological well-being. In this episode, Anjie and Johannes chat about how social media could be a lens to understand mental illnesses such as depression. Johannes also shares his thoughts on the emerging trends in social media, and how some powerful technocrats in Silicon Valley might have some huge blind spots in understanding human nature.

    If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe on our Substackand consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Links:

    Johannes’s paper: Eichstaedt, J. C., Smith, R. J., Merchant, R. M., Ungar, L. H., Crutchley, P., Preoţiuc-Pietro, D., ... & Schwartz, H. A. (2018). Facebook language predicts depression in medical records. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 115(44), 11203-11208.

    Johannes’s Twitter: @JEichstaedt

    Johannes’s lab website: https://cpwb.stanford.edu/

    Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io

    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • Anjie chats with Dr. Laura Gwilliams. Laura is an assistant professor at Stanford University, jointly appointed between Stanford Psychology, Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute and Stanford Data Science. Her work is focused on understanding the neural representations and operations that give rise to speech comprehension in the human brain. In this episode, Laura introduces her recent paper titled” Large-scale single-neuron speech sound encoding across the depth of human cortex”. She shares the insights we can derive from a recently developed technique called Neuropixels, which is essentially a tiny needle that can be placed into the human brain and record from hundreds of neurons at the same time. She also shares her personal journey into this line of work.

    If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe on our Substack and consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Laura’s paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-023-06839-2

    Laura’s personal website:https://lauragwilliams.github.io/

    Laura’s lab website:https://gwilliams.sites.stanford.edu/

    Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io

    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • Eric chats with Paul van Lange, Professor of Psychology at the Free University of Amsterdam and Distinguished Research Fellow at Oxford. He is well known for his vast work on trust, cooperation, and morality, applying these themes to everything from Covid to climate change. He has published multiple handbooks and edited volumes on these topics.

    In this chat, Eric and Paul talk about the psychological barriers that stop people from fighting climate change. What do trust and cynicism have to do with it? What are barriers to cooperation more generally? Why do selfish people often believe others are selfish too, but kind people don’t think everyone is kind? Might most strangers actually be nice, despite all the stranger danger we always hear about? Finally, Paul shares if all his work on trust and cooperation has changed how he looks at the world and compares research in psychology in Europe to the US.

    JOIN OUR SUBSTACK! Stay up to date with the pod and become part of the ever-growing community :) https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    If you found this episode interesting at all, consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.


    Links:

    Paul's paper on climate change
    Paul's website
    Paul's Twitter @PaulvanLange

    Eric's website
    Eric's Twitter @EricNeumannPsy

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you think of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • In this episode, Adani chats with Dr. Halie Olson! Halie is a postdoctoral researcher at MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Her research explores how early life experiences and environments impact brain development, particularly in the context of language, and what this means for children’s outcomes.

    Halie talks about the intriguing backstory and results of her recent pre-print paper titled “When the Brain Cares: Personal interests amplify engagement of language, self-reference, and reward regions in the brains of children with and without autism.” In particular, she discusses what it means to be really interested in something, and how our brains respond to language about things we’re personally interested in. Halie also shares how she first got involved in research, her favorite parts about science, what she is excited to work on next, and a fun book recommendation!

    If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe to our Substack and consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Halie’s paper: https://doi.org/10.1101%2F2023.03.21.533695
    Halie's website: halieolson.com

    Adani’s website: adaniabutto.com

    Podcast Twitter: @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack: https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you thought of this episode or the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • Anjie chats with Dr. Guilherme Lichand. Guilherme is an assistant professor at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University, and a co-Director at the Stanford Lemann Center. His research interest explores the sources of education inequities in the global south, and in interventions with the potential to overturn them. In this episode, Guilherme talks about his recent paper titled “The Lasting Impacts of Remote Learning in the Absence of Remedial Policies: Evidence from Brazil”. He shares his insights on how remote learning could have negative, long-term impacts on the learning outcomes, especially in places without high quality access to the facilities required by remote learning. He also shares his thoughts on whether the same patterns could generalize to remote work – that is, does work from home have negative impacts on our productivity.

    If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe on our Substack and consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Guilherme’s paper: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4209299

    Guilherme’s personal website:https://lichand.info/

    Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io

    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • Eric chats with Michele Gelfand, Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Michele’s culture lab studies the strength of cultural norms, negotiation, conflict, revenge, forgiveness, and diversity, drawing on many different disciplines. Michele is world-renowned for her work on how some cultures have stronger enforcement of norms (tight cultures), while others are more tolerant of deviations from the norm (loose cultures). She is the author of Rule Makers, Rule Breakers.

    In this chat, Eric and Michele discuss the latest insights into loose and tight cultures, what academic disciplines are tight versus loose, and how this framework explains phenomena as disconnected as Covid fears, the appeal of populist leaders, and why Ernie and Bert have so many disagreements. Michele then shares how she stays so passionate and productive, the barriers she has faced trying to be so interdisciplinary, how she deals with setbacks, and why she sometimes dresses up as a pickle.

    JOIN OUR SUBSTACK! Stay up to date with the pod and become part of the ever-growing community :) https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    If you found this episode interesting at all, consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Links

    Book: https://www.michelegelfand.com/rule-makers-rule-breakers

    How tight or loose are you? https://www.michelegelfand.com/tl-quiz

    Tight vs loose cultures: https://www.science.org/doi/abs/10.1126/science.1197754?casa_token=P4iNAMuyYeQAAAAA:gyWMq9sohJJ0LsH-bBRg844OqN8-e9AwiVb649lkXe8cXzCP5jcSmqtAojp-1Lfvg5itKyD2nPP8J4g

    Culture, threat, tightness and looseness: https://www.pnas.org/doi/abs/10.1073/pnas.2113891119

    Eric's website

    Eric's Twitter @EricNeumannPsy

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you think of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • Marginalia Episode is a collaboration between Stanford Psychology Podcast and Marginalia Science, a community committed to including, integrating, advocating for, and promoting members who are not typically promoted by the status quo in academia. In each Marginalia Episode, we feature a guest who has been featured in the Marginalia Science Monthly Newsletter. In this episode, Anjie chats with Dr. Cristina Salvador, an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. Cristina examines how culture interfaces with biology to influence our thinking, feeling, and behavior. She analyzes the influence of culture at multiple levels, including the brain, everyday language use, implicit measures, and big data. In this episode, we start our conversation on her recent paper titled “Emotionally expressive interdependence in Latin America: Triangulating through a comparison of three cultural zones.”. To learn more about Cristina, you can read the Marginalia Science Newsletter attached below.

    Episode on Marginalia Science: https://www.stanfordpsychologypodcast.com/episodes/episode/7927b876/104-special-episode-marginalia-science

    Marginalia Newsletter featuring Cristina:https://marginaliascience.substack.com/p/newsletter-september-2023

    Cristina’s paper; https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2024-15733-001.pdf

    Cristina’s lab website:https://sites.duke.edu/culturelab/

    Crstina’s twitter: @cris_esalvador

    Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io

    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao



    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • This week, Rachel chats with Oriel FeldmanHall, Professor of Cognitive, Linguistics, and Psychological Sciences at Brown University. Oriel's lab leverages methods from behavioral economics, social psychology, and neuroscience to explore the neural bases of social behavior, and the role of emotion in shaping social interactions. She has won numerous awards, including the Cognitive Neuroscience Society’s Young Investigator Award for outstanding contributions to science, the Association for Psychological Science’s Janet Taylor Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions, and the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology.

    In this episode, Oriel provides an introduction to the world of affective science, explaining how her team measures and studies emotion. She describes how the emotions that we expect to feel—and the inaccuracies in our predictions—shape our judgments and behavior, and the complex relationship between emotion and depression. We also discuss the hazards of sharing scientific findings on twitter, and how some of the best research questions originate in coffee shops.

    JOIN OUR SUBSTACK! Stay up-to-date with the podcast and become part of the ever-growing community 🙂 https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/
    If you found this episode interesting, please consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a minute but will allow us to reach more listeners and make them excited about psychology.

    Links:
    Link to the paper we discussed
    Check out more of Professor Oriel FeldmanHall's work at the FeldmanHall lab website!
    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/
    Let us know what you think of this episode or of the podcast by sending us an email at [email protected]

  • This week, Julia chats with Jacqueline Gottlieb, Professor of Neuroscience in the Kavli Institute for Brain Science and the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Institute for Mind, Brain, and Behavior at Columbia University in New York. Since joining the Columbia Faculty in 2001, she has spearheaded pioneering research on the neural mechanisms of attention and curiosity, using computational modeling combined with behavioral and neurophysiological studies in humans and non-human primates.

    In this episode, Professor Gottlieb unlocks the fundamental forces governing curiosity. She begins by explaining the ambiguity inherent in uncertainty and the balance between potential risks and rewards. Then, she reviews a recent study that suggests that we don’t always reason optimally about uncertainty. After discussing potential reasons why we might struggle with decision making surrounding uncertainty, she highlights key personality factors from the study that were associated with more successful decision making. Finally, she closes by sharing her hopes for the future of the field.

    JOIN OUR SUBSTACK! Stay up-to-date with the podcast and become part of the ever-growing community 🙂 https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    If you found this episode interesting, please consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a minute but will allow us to reach more listeners and make them excited about psychology.

    Links:

    Link to the paper we discussed

    Check out more of Professor Gottlieb’s work at her lab website!

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you think of this episode or of the podcast by sending us an email at [email protected]



  • Xi Jia chats with Dr. Michal Kosinski, an Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. Michal's research interests recently encompass both human and artificial cognition. Currently, his work centers on examining the psychological processes in Large Language Models (LLMs), and leveraging Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), Big Data, and computational techniques to model and predict human behavior.

    In this episode, they chat about Michal's recent works: "Theory of Mind Might Have Spontaneously Emerged in Large Language Models" and "Human-like intuitive behavior and reasoning biases emerged in large language models but disappeared in ChatGPT". Michal also shared his scientific journey and some personal suggestions for PhD students.

    If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe on our Substack and consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Michal's paper on Theory of Mind in LLMs: https://arxiv.org/abs/2302.02083
    Michal's paper on reasoning bias in LLMs: https://www.nature.com/articles/s43588-023-00527-x

    Michal's personal website: https://www.michalkosinski.com/

    Xi Jia's profile: https://profiles.stanford.edu/xijia-zhou

    Xi Jia's Twitter/X: https://twitter.com/LauraXijiaZhou

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • Anjie chats with Dr. Joshua Hartshorne, an assistant professor of psychology at Boston College where he directs the Language Learning Laboratory. He studies language learning from a variety of aspects, including but not limited to: bootstrapping language acquisition, relationship between language and commonsense, as well as the critical periods in learning new languages. In this episode, they chat about Josh’s recent work on second language acquisition: “Will children learn English faster if their native language is similar to English?”. Josh also shares some insights on the best way to teach language to kids and adults.


    If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe on our Substack and consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Josh’s paper: https://l3atbc-public.s3.amazonaws.com/pub_pdfs/Yun%20et%20al%202023.pdf

    Josh’s personal profile: https://www.bc.edu/bc-web/schools/mcas/departments/psychology/people/faculty-directory/joshua-hartshorne.html

    Josh’s lab website: http://l3atbc.org/index.html

    Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io

    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • This week, Julia chats with two guests from University College London, Professor Steve Fleming and Dr. Nadine Dijkstra. Professor Fleming is the Wellcome Trust/Royal Society Sir Henry Dale Fellow at the Department of Experimental Psychology and Principal Investigator at the Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging where he leads the Metacognition Group. He has received numerous awards for his work, including the William James prize from the Association for Scientific Study of Consciousness. Dr. Dijkstra is a Senior Research Fellow at the Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging at University College London. She earned her PhD in Artificial Intelligence at the Donders Institute in 2019, after which she moved to London to pursue a postdoc at UCL with Professor Fleming.

    In this episode, Dr. Dijkstra and Professor Fleming take us into the fascinating realm of how we distinguish, or at least attempt to distinguish, reality from imagination. They relate the details of a recent study, which indicates that our perceptions of reality might not be as different from our imaginations as we would like to believe. They suggest that this framework of perceptual reality monitoring could be a lens through which our brains interpret all of our experiences. In fact, this perceptual reality monitoring framework might provide an explanation of how we consciously experience the world. After discussing their recent experiment and relating it to the broader field of consciousness science, each of them shares details about their career journeys and their hopes for the future of the field.

    JOIN OUR SUBSTACK! Stay up-to-date with the podcast and become part of the ever-growing community 🙂 https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    If you found this episode interesting, please consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a minute but will allow us to reach more listeners and make them excited about psychology.

    Links:

    Link to the paper we discussed

    Check out more of Professor Fleming and Dr. Dijkstra’s work at the UCL Metacognition lab website!

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you think of this episode or of the podcast by sending us an email at [email protected]

  • Anjie chats with Dr. Bryan Brown. Bryan is a professor of teacher education at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. His research interest explores the relationship between student identity, discourse, classroom culture, and academic achievement in science education. In this episode, we chat about his recent work on adopting VR – Virtual Reality in the classroom. The title of the paper we discuss is Teaching culturally relevant science in virtual reality: “when a problem comes, you can solve it with science”. Bryan shares his insights on how VR could be a valuable tool to science education. He also talks about how he became interested in this topic.

    If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe on our Substack and consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.



    Bryan’s paper: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1046560X.2020.1778248

    Bryan’s personal profile: https://profiles.stanford.edu/bryan-brown

    Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io

    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao



    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • Eric chats with Joshua Jackson, newly minted Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science at University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business. In his research, Josh studies how culture co-evolves with psychology. He is interested in how culture has shaped the mind throughout human history, and how it continues to shape human futures. He regularly publishes in the field’s best journals with innovative methods and is by many considered a rising star in psychology.

    In this chat, Eric and Josh discuss culture and morality. Why do some cultures have a crude view of another’s morality as either all good or all bad, when some cultures have a more nuanced view? Can we ever know how kind someone truly is? How does social media impact our sense of morality? Finally, Josh shares his exciting journey across the whole globe to find his identity as an academic and opens up about the hopes and anxieties he has over becoming a professor.

    JOIN OUR SUBSTACK! Stay up to date with the pod and become part of the ever-growing community :) https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    If you found this episode interesting at all, consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.


    Links:

    Josh's paper
    Josh's website

    Eric's website
    Eric's Twitter @EricNeumannPsy

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you think of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]

  • Anjie chats with Dr. Sho Tsuji, an Assistant Professor at the University of Tokyo where she directs the IRCN baby lab. Her core research interests involve understanding how babies acquire language efficiently. In this episode, we chat about her recent work on approaching this question from a computational perspective, a paper titled “SCALa: A blueprint for computational models of language acquisition in social context”. Sho explained why a computational perspective is crucial for understanding language acquisition. She also shared her perspective on large language models as a human language acquisition researcher.

    If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe on our Substack and consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.

    Paper: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010027721001980?casa_token=qgQQnJZhAtsAAAAA:jpgo27gePFql_iSljm__ZAEcnT-3Qcemy5_QMVxL06DQO_ZJjHuGeBlFHmnnbUd-9UD5xNGK920

    Sho’s personal website: https://sites.google.com/site/tsujish/home

    Sho’s lab website: https://babylab.ircn.jp/en/

    Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io

    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao



    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) [email protected]