Episodes

  • In this episode we revisit Paula Rego’s work to talk about the body, reproductive justice and abortion rights.


    Listen to Polyester Zine’s editor in chief, Ione Gamble and curator, writer and researcher, Maggie Matić talk to artists Polly Nor and Rene Matić about Paula Rego, their own work, and Polyester’s recent zine Saving Ourselves.


    See the Paula Rego exhibition at Tate Britain 7 July – 24 October 2021.


    **Please note that this episode contains sensitive content, including discussions on abortion which some audiences may find upsetting.**


    The Art of the Body is a Polyester Zine production for Tate. Produced by Ione Gamble, edited and produced by Olivia Graham.


    Photo: © Rikard Österlund 


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  • Black women always emerge as pioneers throughout history. From art, to science, to activism and sport, Black women are a force. We live in a world where Black women are expected to be strong. They are expected to be support systems for others, to spearhead political movements, to jump three times as high. It can feel like the world is resting on their shoulders. So how do Black women find space and time to reflect and heal?

     

    This episode of The Art Of ... explores how Black women and non-binary folk have used art and creativity as a caring space. It could be capturing and embracing healing rituals through photography, like Khadija Saye. It could also be carving out physical space for art therapy or pole dancing, where Black women and non-binary people can centre their minds and bodies. The episode presents the wealth of knowledge from Black women and non-binary people in taking care of themselves.


    The Art of Healing is a Black female-led production. It is hosted and co-produced by Pelumi Odubanjo and Shanelle Callaghan, two young curators from The Factory programme at 198 Contemporary Arts & Learning - a Black-led gallery in Brixton. Hear the hosts chat with Kelechi Okafor, Dawn Estefan, Peju Oshin, Nina Franco, Aïcha Mehrez and Alice Insley. 


    To find out more about the artists and artworks discussed visit tate.org.uk

     

    This episode was a Stance Studios production for Tate Exchange and Tate Collective, produced by Nicole Logan, Shanelle Callaghan, Pelumi Odubanjo and Assistant Produced by Deborah Shorinde. Executive Produced by Crystal Genesis.


    Photo: © Rikard Österlund 


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  • Comedy as an art form can be traced all the way back to ancient Greece. From toilet humour and sarcasm, to irony and wordplay, artists continue to use comedy within their work today. In this episode, comedian Charlie George explores how artists have used comedy throughout art history and asks 'is it okay to laugh at art?'


    Hear from artist Abondance Matanda, art historian Alice Procter and assistant curators James Finch, Helen O'Malley and Katy Wan as they chat about their thoughts on comedy in art from Tate's collection.


    To find out more about the artists and artworks discussed visit tate.org.uk.


    This episode was a Stance Media production for Tate, produced by Phil Brown, researched by Deborah Shorinde and executive produced Chrystal Genesis.


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • What role does a persona play in the lives we lead and the art we make? We speak to artists, performers and DJs who use a form of persona in their work. Experimenting with our persona can be a way to learn about ourselves and the world. But do we always know where the performance starts and when it stops?


    The podcast is presented by Sandra Jean Pierre. Featuring artist Rosa Johan Uddoh, performer and activist Lewis G Burton, Scary Things hosts DJ Bempah & JK, choreographer and performer Holly Beasley Garrigan and magazine editor Bob Colacello.


    The Art of Persona is a Falling Tree production for Tate, produced by Hannah Dean and Sandra Jean Pierre. With additional music by Sleep Eaters, Keel Her and Black Manila. Special thanks for Snaketown Records.


    To explore the role of persona in Andy Warhol’s work visit the exhibition at Tate Modern from the 12 March – 6 September 2020.


    This exhibition is in partnership with Bank of America, with additional support from the Andy Warhol Exhibition Supporters Circle, Tate America’s Foundation, Tate International Council, Tate patrons and Tate members.


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • What is love? is one of the most searched questions online. In this episode, author, journalist and ‘the funniest guy on Instagram’, Raven Smith explores how the various experiences of love have been expressed through art. Art that shows romance is loved by many and comes in all forms. From sculpture and photography, to paintings and films – the art of love is a language that speaks to us all.


    To discover more artworks which have been inspired by romantic love, take a look at our recent book Love, written by Alex Pilcher. From passion and dating, to heartbreak and loss, the book explores 500 years of love in art.


    This episode was a Stance Media production for Tate, produced by Catrin Manel, researched by Deborah Shorinde and executive produced Chrystal Genesis.


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • Why are some stories easier to forget than others? We speak to artists who are using their work to uncover the people who have been hidden from view. Led by artists, poets and activists, we explore how art can be used to address the erasure of important events that has led to a history of ‘misremembering.’


    The podcast is presented by poet Bridget Minamore. Featuring artists Kara Walker, Hannah Catherine Jones and Rene Matić, Bristol's city poet, Vanessa Kisuule and Tate Collective Producers Libertee, Sai and Haris.


    Visit the free Hyundai Commission: Kara Walker at Tate Modern from the 2 October 2019 – 5 April 2020. In partnership with Hyundai Motor. Supported by Sikkema Jenkins & Co. with additional support from Tate Americas Foundation. The exhibition is curated by Clara Kim and Priyesh Mistry.


    The Art of Remembering is a Falling Tree production for Tate, produced by Zakia Sewell, executive produced by Hannah Geddes.


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • This episode explores how the culture of hip hop has collided with art forms such as painting, installation art, photography and film. We follow its beginnings as an artistic and socio-political movement in the Bronx in the early 70s to its many manifestations throughout culture today. Listen as we talk with curators, musicians and fine artists about the influence of this art form and how hip-hop’s ability to bring together multiple mediums in one space has revolutionized the creative industry.


    The podcast is presented by poet and writer Bridget Minamore. Featuring broadcaster and DJ Zezi Ifore, Tate Curator’s Darren Pih and Andrea Lissoni, Musician Little Simz and artist King Saladeen.


    The Art of Hip-Hop is a Boomshakalaka production, produced by Tolani Shoneye.


    Keith Haring is at Tate Liverpool until 10 November 2019.


    Use the code ‘241HARING’ for 2 for the price of one tickets, available online only from the 1st to 31st of October 2019.


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • Discover what it takes to make it in the arts. Inspired by generations of artists who have taken on commercial work to fund their passion projects, we take a practical look at the realities of earning a living as a young creative today. We explore the rise of slasher culture and ask how artists balance priorities; from personal branding, to self-care. 


    The podcast is presented by DJ and producer Martha Pazienti Caidan. Featuring Jide Adetunji and Ibrahim Kamara founders of GUAP video magazine, DJ and mentor Gavin D, artists Georgina Johnson and Ellie Pennick, poet Teige Maddison and illustrator Sinead McGeechan.


    The Art of the Hustle is a Falling Tree production for Tate, produced by Hannah Dean and Alia Cassam, executive produced by Sam McGuire.


    Find out more about one of the pioneers of slasher culture, painter/engraver/poet William Blake.

    Visit the William Blake exhibition at Tate Britain, 11 September 2019 to 2 February 2020

     

    Buy the exhibition book and receive a free Blake print. Quote promo code BLAKE at the point of sale or in the basket when checking out online. Offer available in the Blake exhibition shop and at shop.tate.org.uk. This offer is subject to availability, while stocks last. Valid from 9 September 2019 to 2 February 2020.


    Want to listen to more of our podcasts? Subscribe on Apple Podcasts or download this episode.


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • In this episode we explore the role of chance and accident in the creative process. Hear artists, musicians and choreographers discuss what it means to 'go with the flow'.


    The podcast features Frank Bowling, an artist who has spent 60 years improvising with paint. With contributions from dancer Alethia Antonia, artist Albert E. Dean, musicians Greta Eacott, Deji Ijishakin and Axel Lidstrom, and Bowling’s assistant Spencer A. Richards.  The podcast is presented by DJ and broadcaster Zakia Sewell.


    The Art of Improvisation is a Falling Tree production for Tate, produced by Hannah Dean. It features music by Cykada, G.Bop Orchestra and The Evil Usses.


    Explore 60 years of experiments and improvisation with paint.

    Visit Frank Bowling at Tate Britain, 31 May – 26 August 2019


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    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • How long do you usually spend looking at art?


    In this episode we explore what happens when we allow ourselves time to really get to know an artwork.


    Hear a psychologist and former monk discuss how the act of looking slowly at objects affects the way we understand them. Tate volunteers and visitors also share their own slow looking experiences and offer some tips and techniques that you can try out on your next gallery visit.


    This podcast features Bumi Thomas, Nicole Mollett, Rebecca Chamberlain, Aidan Hart and Enrica Franca.


    The Art of Slow Looking is a Boom Shakalaka production for Tate, produced by Eliza Lomas.


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • Is there a link between mental health and creativity? Do artists have to ‘suffer for their art’?


    In this episode, we challenge the myth of the 'tortured artist'. Hear artists, curators and health professionals discuss the role creativity can play in promoting well-being.


    The podcast features Shadi Al-Atallah, Alistair Gentry, Carol Jacobi, Benji Jeffrey and Victoria Tischler. It is presented by Billy Childish.


    The Art of Creativity is a Boom Shakalaka production for Tate, produced by Arlie Adlington.


    Discover how Van Gogh’s mental illness has affected the way people view his art. Visit The EY Exhibition: Van Gogh and Britain at Tate Britain, 27 March – 11 August 2019.​


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • How can our past inspire us to create? We explore the role of memory in art.


    Pierre Bonnard relied on memory to create his paintings. This podcast asks how can our senses provoke memories and how can our past inspire us? We hear from contemporary artists, a stroke survivor, a neurologist and an author and poet.  


    Featuring Kayo Chingonyi, Constanza Dessain, Stuart Donaldson, Matthew Gale, Rosanna McLaughlin, Sylvia Rimat, Nick Turner and Rachel Williams.


    A Boom Shakalaka Production for Tate, Produced by Eliza Lomas.


    To discover how Bonnard used memory in his work, visit The C C Land Exhibition: Pierre Bonnard: The Colour of Memory at Tate Modern, 23 January – 6 May 2019.​


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • What does it mean to belong? Artists, writers and poets explore the human stories behind art and belonging.


    In this episode, we explore what it means to belong. How can art make us feel part of something, how can it help us to connect with ourselves and others? Hear artists, an author and a poet reflect on their experiences of art and belonging.


    Featuring Tracey Chevalier, Lubaina Himid, Andrew Mashigo, Anahita Razvani-Rad, John Hegley, and Corey Samuel.


    For more information about the artists and artworks in our collection, visit www.tate.org.uk


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • What does it mean to fail, and how can it lead to success? We hear the human stories behind art and failure.

     

    In this episode we ask what it means to fail and explore how the risk of failure can inspire us. Artist Lubaina Himid says ‘you can’t succeed at a work of art unless you dance with failure’. Hear artists, a poet, a novelist and a dancer reflect on their experience of art and failure.


    Featuring Lubaina Himid, Akram Khan, Scottee, Tracey Chevalier, and Michael Symmons-Robert.


    For more information about the artists and artworks in our collection, visit www.tate.org.uk


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • How do art and protest meet? We explore acts of defiance with artists, poets and activists.


    In this episode we look at how art can be an act of protest. How can art be used to question ideas relating to recognition, representation and equality? Hear artists, activists and a poet discuss their experiences of using their work to bring about change.


    Featuring Scottee, Jeremy Deller, Anahita Rezvani-Rad, Sarah Carne, Hilary Powell, Daniel Edelstyn and Alistair Gentry (Bank Job) and Raju Rage.


    For more information about the artists and artworks in our collection, visit www.tate.org.uk


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • What can happen when we allow ourselves to dream? We explore the link between art and dreaming.


    In this episode we look at how art can encourage us to dream, and ask what is possible when we do. Hear artists, thinkers and a dancer and choreographer consider how art and dreaming meet. We float from balloons, have moments of contemplation in the gallery and wonder what it might be like to bounce on a giant Turkish delight.


    Featuring Noëmi Lakmaier, Michelle Williams Gamaker, Akram Khan Sarah Wynne and Debora Wich.


    For more information about the artists and artworks in our collection, visit www.tate.org.uk


    Photo: ​​© Rikard Österlund


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  • What does time mean to different people? How do we experience the passing seconds?


    Hear some of the team behind artist Christian Marclay's The Clock discuss the making of the 24-hour film piece. Plus poet Rachel Long, a new mother, a night owl, an oil rig worker and an 8 year old each unravel their own perceptions of time.


    See The Clock at Tate Modern from 14 September 2018 – 20 January 2019


    For more information about the artists and artworks in our collection, visit www.tate.org.uk


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  • In 1932 Pablo Picasso experienced a remarkable burst of creativity. But where does such inspiration come from? Artists, musicians and writers unravel some of the myths around creativity, and show how we can unlock our own powers of invention and overcome creative drought.

    Be inspired by Picasso’s year of wonders at The EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern, 8 March – 9 September 2018.

    For more information about the artists and artworks in our collection, visit www.tate.org.uk


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  • Discover the confidence and creativity needed to undress in the name of art.


    From artist’s muse to school art class, professional life models explore their role in the creative process. Freyia Lilian, Valentina Rock, Sue Tilley and Morimda Tassembedo discuss the qualities they need to do their job and how they connect emotionally with artists, with particular reference to Modigliani and the women he painted nude.


    To see Modigliani’s paintings of nudes visit Modigliani at Tate Modern, on until 2 April 2018.


    For more information about the artists and artworks in our collection, visit www.tate.org.uk


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  • St Ives is a place known for its pottery, boats, beaches and beatniks. For over a century it has attracted artists who have new ways of looking at the world. Even David Bowie was a fan. Join Emma Gannon to find out what brought these like-minded people to the far-flung coastal town.  


    For more information about the artists and artworks in our collection, visit www.tate.org.uk


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