Episodes

  • “If you can’t be vulnerable, then how can you expect your patient to be vulnerable?” asks Sherry Sami, DDS. The integrative pediatric orthodontist and cofounder of Be Hive of Healing sits down with GP to help us gain a deeper understanding of holistic dentistry and the different elements that can promote healing. Sami is devoted to looking at the whole picture. She believes that “disharmony in the mouth” could even be linked to a detail from a child’s birth or the emotional traumas of their parents. Today, she shares fascinating (and sometimes heartbreaking) stories about patients she’s worked with. And she offers sage advice for parents: “Be very committed to your own healing, because that’s the best thing that you can do for your child.” (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • Functional medicine psychiatrist Jeffrey Becker, MD, takes an uncommon approach to depression, anxiety, and mental health. Becker, who is also a cofounder of Bexson Biomedical, examines the genome, the gut, and micronutrient levels before prescribing drugs to a patient. He was an early advocate of ketamine-assisted psychotherapy for treating depression. “We are absolutely the nexus of body, mind, and spirit,” says Becker. Today, he talks about the chemical, biological, emotional, and spiritual components of mental health. And he gets into a deeper conversation with host Elise Loehnen about consciousness. “There’s a lot of programming that has reduced our consciousness to a level that allows us to survive,” Becker says. When we honor the layers of our existence, he believes we can remove some of the limits we often struggle with in everyday life. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • Missing episodes?

    Click here to refresh the feed.

  • “The cause of all suffering is what we’re thinking and believing,” says Byron Katie. Katie is a legendary spiritual teacher, the author of Loving What Is, and the creator of a self-inquiry method that she calls “the Work.” Today, Katie guides Elise Loehnen through the Work in her life. The process involves asking four basic questions that can turn a negative belief on its head. Katie reminds us that emotions are emotions—not enemies. She invites us to do deeper within and ask ourselves this question: Who would we be without our stories? (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “It’s not really science,” says David Michaels, PhD. “It’s public relations disguised as science.” Today, the epidemiologist and author of The Triumph of Doubt explains how frequently science is manipulated across industries—from tobacco to personal-care products to football. During his tenure as the assistant secretary of labor at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Michaels uncovered shocking truths about the way major industries distort scientific studies and withhold information at the expense of consumer safety. To resolve this, Michaels believes we need to restructure the way research is conducted and how we consume it. He offers a few key solutions for creating change at the consumer level and beyond (like voting, banning attorney-funded studies, and consulting unbiased scientists to analyze data). Ultimately, this is work that will protect the integrity of science and keep us all safe. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “Our votes with our fork, our votes with our wallet, make a difference,” says Mark Hyman, MD. He sat down with GP to talk about his latest book, Food Fix, and what led him on his own personal path into functional medicine. As a physician, Hyman looks for the root causes of chronic health issues—and the factors that contribute to optimal health. He says a lot of it boils down to food and our agriculture system. Hyman explains that disease is correlated with the way food is produced in our country (and around the world). The future, as he outlines it, is more hopeful than you might think, though: Big food companies are realizing they need to make changes. Farmers are being supported to increase regenerative agriculture and increase water conservation. And there’s a lot we can do now, today, on a personal level—and some of it is simple. “Just eat real food,” says Hyman. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “We think about loneliness as a stereotype of the person sitting alone in a corner at a party,” says former surgeon general of the United States Vivek Murthy, MD. “But loneliness doesn’t usually look like that.” The author of Together joins host Elise Loehnen to explain the downward spiral of loneliness: When we don’t feel comfortable showing up as who we are, we tend to try to be somebody we’re not. And when we become focused on seeking validation from others, we feel even more isolated. Today, Murthy shares strategies for easing loneliness, building connection, embracing our vulnerability, and moving toward a people-centered life (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “We are all meant to feel alive and to feel powerful,” says Peter A. Levine, PhD. “That’s what being a human is.” The psychologist and author of Trauma and Memory joins Elise Loehnen to talk about how trauma lives in the body and how it can work its way out. We learn some of Levine’s favorite strategies for energetic movement, like skipping and chanting. He says the key to moving trauma out of the body is “bringing the energy up and then letting the energy settle.” He teaches us a sound exercise that helps move energy through the body and ease stress. Levine explains the difference between memory and traumatic memory, and how recovering—and processing—traumatic memories might help us heal. “All trauma shuts down our vital force,” says Levine. But when we begin to understand how to process our pain, we can free ourselves from shame and disembodiment—and find our way back to empowerment. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “We’ve attached importance and status to busyness,” says Brigid Schulte. The director of the Better Life Lab at New America and the New York Times–bestselling author of Overwhelmed joins Elise Loehnen to dispel the busyness myth. She also breaks down the varied ways our home and work systems make it particularly difficult for women to just get to the end of the day. She suggests solutions for changing this structure and easing the enormous pressures many women feel around balancing career, childcare, and running a household. They also talk about gender roles at the office and in parenting (and how we can encourage men to take on different roles as fathers). And Schulte shares some of her strategies for building a better work-life balance. One of her tips: Start asking yourself what one thing you need to get done each day to feel less overwhelmed and still accomplished. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • Today, Daniel Pink teaches us how crack the code of “perfect timing.” The New York Times–bestselling author of When and Drive explains that much of our lives is episodic: We tend to think of projects, days, and life events in reference to beginning, middle, and end. And Pink explains that our brain and our mood function differently over the course of the day. Becoming aware of these patterns allows us to hack productivity. Pink shares fascinating studies about the best time of day to make a critical decision and when not to have a medical procedure—and also why the “nappuccino” (drinking a coffee before a fifteen-minute nap) might be the best secret he knows. We also learn about why kids benefit from slightly later school start times and why taking breaks is essential for higher performance for everyone. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “You’re desperate to find causality even where there is none,” says Kate Bowler. She’s a historian at Duke Divinity School and the author of a memoir called Everything Happens for a Reason: And Other Lies I’ve Loved. And she makes us laugh, even when she’s talking about death, dying, and grief. In this episode, Bowler tells Elise Loehnen about what happened after she was diagnosed with stage four colon cancer in her mid-thirties. She shares the moments she stopped feeling like a person, the pressure she felt to be “the best” cancer patient, to find explanations, to treat everything as a lesson that she needed to learn. She talks about how her beliefs eventually shifted. And how, perhaps the biggest lesson is that it’s not always on us to figure it all out. “I was never a problem to be solved,” says Bowler. “I was just a person to be loved.” (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • GP got on a video call with Peter Attia, MD, data-focused physician, longevity specialist, and host of The Peter Attia Drive podcast. She asked Attia about the research and science evolving around the COVID-19 pandemic and what’s known (and not) about how viruses function—and how our bodies respond to them. Attia provides helpful updates on antibody testing, along with his thoughts on what might come next. He also speaks more broadly about health span and the factors that support our immune function; sleep, unsurprisingly, is perhaps the most important, he says. And Attia shares the toolbox he uses to manage stress: mindfulness meditation, journaling, and steady-state aerobic exercise. Attia believes that the more information you have, the better—and we felt a little more peace of mind after listening to his perspective. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “I try to create the illusion of simplicity because life’s too complicated,” says Eileen Fisher. Today, the founder and clothing designer joins Elise Loehnen to talk about her appreciation for simplicity (which Loehnen shares). Fisher reveals that her own discomfort inspired her career—she could never understand why women were so willing to suffer to look good. Beyond creating a simplified system for style, Fisher shows us a different way to define and run a company: She doesn’t see herself as the sole leader. She thinks of her brand as more of a big collective, and the company is partially owned by its employees. But Fisher is probably most proud that her company is in the process of becoming fully sustainable—and it’s a fascinating, hopeful process for all of us to get a glimpse into. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “The best way to get respect from people is through honesty and authenticity,” says Bob Iger, executive chairman of Disney (and one of GP’s idols). In this conversation, Iger and GP go back and forth about what makes a great leader. (After serving as the CEO of Disney for the past fifteen years and writing a memoir, The Ride of a Lifetime, Iger had some interesting insights.) Iger outlines the strategies that have driven his success and the principles and questions he always comes back to. For him, leadership is about being in a constant state of learning—and not being afraid to admit what you don’t know. It also involves speaking straight—listen in to hear how Iger and GP navigate the challenges of doing so. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “Pay attention to your vulnerable feelings and lead with those,” says therapist Terry Real, who comes back on The goop Podcast to help us navigate sheltering in place with significant others. Real guides us on how to step up for our partners (and ourselves) in crisis. He dissuades us from falling back on losing strategies that make us feel disconnected and instead outlines a path toward a healthier, more pleasurable dynamic. (While reassuring us that a little “marital hatred” is still normal.) Real believes in what he calls “fierce intimacy.” It’s not always pretty but it allows us to repair our relationships and build trust—and it brings us closer together. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “It’s the fuel of fear that keeps these patterns going,” says Craig Malkin, PhD. The Harvard Medical School psychologist joins Elise Loehnen to redefine narcissism. As he outlines in his book Rethinking Narcissism, Malkin believes that being a little narcissistic may help us—there’s a spectrum: “When we have that little bit of self-enhancement, that’s what gives us the protection against adversity in the world, and even loss,” says Malkin. In his work, he’s found that survival mechanisms and even genetics can be at the root of narcissistic behavior. He explains the differences between pride, self-esteem, and arrogance—and how not to conflate their meaning. He also guides Loehnen through a small but powerful breakthrough with her own fear-driven mechanisms. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • Host Elise Loehnen sits down with Pulitzer Prize–winning authors Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn to talk about their new book, Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope. It’s a story about our country that begins in rural Yamhill, Oregon—where Kristof grew up—and moves to the Dakotas and Oklahoma and New York and Virginia and everywhere in between. Through vivid personal reporting and the lives of real Americans, Kristof and WuDunn explore working-class America and the all ways our system has neglected and damaged these communities. They expose the mythology of personal responsibility, the tightrope that families have been forced to walk, and the devastating effect of one small slip when you have no safety net. They remind us that no community is “other,” and they show us that even issues as large and complex as addiction, homelessness, and incarceration are not unsolvable. We have the toolboxes; now we need the will. “There’s obviously no silver bullet,” says Kristof. “But we know how to make a big difference.” (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “This is not outside us,” says Terry Tempest Williams. “This is alongside us.” Today, the conservationist, activist, and award-winning author offers a spiritual perspective on this planetary change, as she calls it. She shares moving stories from her newest book, Erosions, that show how our undoing may be our becoming. She urges us to redefine what we deem essential. To ask ourselves if we could accept that this is a part of us—not just happening to us. Could we allow ourselves to find refuge in change? And: How will we live when we come out the other side? We are being asked to walk bravely into the unknown—and Tempest Williams assures us that we can refuse to live in fear. “We have no idea of the collective power that we hold together,” she says. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “Healing is always a surprise,” says Bill Bengston, PhD. Bengston, a sociology professor and researcher, sat down with host Elise Loehnen to talk about his wild, fascinating, unconventional research. A reformed skeptic, Bengston set out to disprove the effect of hands-on healing, only to be proven wrong himself. (“Don’t spend all your time defending beliefs,” says Bengston. “The world is more interesting than that.”) Throughout his career, Bengston has studied healing techniques on mice with cancer—and tried to make sense of what his findings could mean for the future of healing more broadly. In this conversation, Bengston also shares his rapid image cycling technique. For reasons he doesn’t completely understand—Bengston is hilariously clear about just how much he doesn’t know—he says this technique seems to enhance healing. It involves making a list of twenty things we want, and very quickly cycling through them in our minds. Another suggestion from Bengston: When we put our ego aside, we may find that the answers we are looking for are more simple than we think. (P.S. As always, check with your doctor before beginning any healing process.) (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “There’s no secret sauce to parenting that parents need to know that kids shouldn’t be let in on,” says pediatrician Cara Natterson, MD. After GP read Natterson’s newest book, Decoding Boys, they sat down to talk about different ways to approach difficult and awkward conversations with our children—about, say, puberty. Natterson explains why puberty is occurring earlier and earlier in boys and girls and why it’s generally more common and easier for girls to talk about what they experience during puberty. She breaks down the chemistry of the limbic system to help us understand boys’ decision-making processes. She suggests ways that we can all address body image insecurities and social pressure. And: what to do if your son might be a late bloomer, how to talk about porn, how to empower our boys with healthy definitions of masculinity. These conversations are always going to feel uncomfortable for everyone, especially at first. But the most helpful thing we can do, says Natterson, is communicate directly, clearly—and repeatedly. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)

  • “What I know is that we’ve always recovered,” says Sallie Krawcheck, CEO and cofounder of Ellevest. The Wall Street legend and personal finance expert returns to The goop Podcast to demystify what’s happening right now in the fluctuating market and explain why she foresees it rebounding and what we can do in the meantime for our financial health. She suggests different ways to think about money during this crisis, whether you’re considering making an investment or trying to navigate some of the economic relief policies being set by the government. “We’ve been socialized as women that we’re not good with money,” says Krawcheck. But today, she’s helping us move away from this stigma, unlearn our scarcity mentality, and make empowered choices around the way we invest. (For more, see The goop Podcast hub.)