Episodes

  • This episode brings Chantelle Lewis, editorial manager for The Sociological Review, into conversation with Ronda Daniels and Steph Lacey. They talk about their experiences of being young working class women in Higher Education, of becoming aware of their class backgrounds in these spaces. Reflecting on their initial unease in entering and navigating these spaces, they discuss how these institutional spaces are made in the image of young middle-class students and how this disadvantages those from backgrounds where they have not been brought up to know the rules of the game. As they describe their own trajectories in and through the university, they draw out the strategies that they have developed in order to cope in these spaces, and talk about what needs to change in order to support working class students continued engagements with Higher Education.

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    The Undisciplining Sessions were recorded at Undisciplining, a conference organised by The Sociological Review Foundation Limited in June 2018. Find out more about The Sociological Review, Britain’s longest-standing sociology journal at https://thesociologicalreview.com.

    They are produced and edited by Emma Houlton at Art of Podcast http://www.artofpodcast.com.

  • This episode brings our Managing Editor Michaela Benson into conversation with Maggie O’Neill (University of York) and Holly Argent (Artist, Northern Charter), the instigators the Feminist Walk of Newcastle that took place at the Undisciplining conference. This was a feminist intervention in a city, which, like many others, has obfuscated the role of women in the public and civic live. Maggie and Holly describe how, in bringing together women’s art, history and politics, they strive to put women back into the city and make feminist role models more visible. They also speak to the feminist politics of co-production at the heart of the development of this walk as well as the broader ambition to put the Women Artists of the Northeast Library (initiated by Holly Argent and Rene McBrearty) on the global map of Women’s libraries.

    If you are interested in finding out more a map of the Feminist Walk of Newcastle designed by Petra Szemán (http://www.petraszeman.com) is available to consult at https://www.thesociologicalreview.com/blog/the-feminist-walk-at-undisciplining.html; Maggie and Holly have also produced a short video about coproducing the walk https://vimeo.com/217149109.

    To find out more about the Women Artists of the Northeast Library visit https://northerncharter.hotglue.me/?2017wanelibrary.

    *****

    The Undisciplining Sessions were recorded at Undisciplining, a conference organised by The Sociological Review Foundation Limited in June 2018. Find out more about The Sociological Review, Britain’s longest-standing sociology journal at https://thesociologicalreview.com.

    They are produced and edited by Emma Houlton at Art of Podcast http://www.artofpodcast.com.

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  • In this episode, Imogen Tyler, editor of The Sociology of Stigma, talks with Jenna Loyd (University of Wisconsin, Madison) about the neglect of grounded histories of racial segregation, displacement in the conceptual framework of territorial stigmatisation. Thinking with her empirical research in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Jenna argues that race, racism and racialisation need to take centerstage to ask questions about how racism and racial capitalism occur in particular places, produced through histories of urban planning and development, local and national political contexts.

    To find out more about these ideas discussed in this episode, read Jenna Loyd and Anne Bonds’ paper ‘Where do Black lives matter? Race, stigma, and place in Milwaukee, Wisconsin’ (http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0038026118778175), one contribution to the recent Sociological Review Monograph The Sociology of Stigma edited by Imogen Tyler and Tom Slater and available for purchase at https://store.thesociologicalreview.com/collections/books/products/the-sociology-of-stigma.

    *****

    The Undisciplining Sessions were recorded at Undisciplining, a conference organised by The Sociological Review Foundation Limited in June 2018. Find out more about The Sociological Review, Britain’s longest-standing sociology journal at https://thesociologicalreview.com.

    They are produced and edited by Emma Houlton at Art of Podcast http://www.artofpodcast.com.

  • In this episode, our managing editor Michaela Benson talks with Imogen Tyler (Lancaster University) about her recent work on the sociology of stigma. In keeping with the theme of the conference, Imogen advocates an approach that recognises that sociological knowledge might be produced from outside rigid disciplinary boundaries; as she describes the political urgency of a renewed genealogy of stigma that takes seriously its relationship to racism, she traces how this knowledge and understanding was excluded from the curriculum of US sociology. Retelling the history of stigma from penal tattooing in the Greek and Roman Empire to critical black scholarship about the production of racialised subjects, she presents her critical reconceptualisation of stigma and anti-stigma as sites of active political struggles.

    To find out more about these ideas discussed in this episode, read the recent Sociological Review Monograph edited by Imogen Tyler and Tom Slater, including their agenda-setting introduction ‘Rethinking the Sociology of Stigma’ (http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0038026118777425). The full volume is available for purchase at https://store.thesociologicalreview.com/collections/books/products/the-sociology-of-stigma.

    *****

    The Undisciplining Sessions were recorded at Undisciplining, a conference organised by The Sociological Review Foundation Limited in June 2018. Find out more about The Sociological Review, Britain’s longest-standing sociology journal at https://thesociologicalreview.com.

    They are produced and edited by Emma Houlton at Art of Podcast http://www.artofpodcast.com.

  • What should anti-racist solidarity within and beyond the university look like? In this episode,Chantelle Lewis, editorial manager at the Sociological Review, Adam Elliott-Cooper (Kings College London) and Remi Joseph-Salisbury (University of Manchester) discuss the challenges of doing anti-racist work within and beyond the university. They talk about how to build solidarities that weave together understandings of inter-personal and institutional racisms, while also attending to the anti-racist struggles ongoing internationally. And within this, they call for understandings of racism centred on the relationship of capitalism and imperialism.

    *****

    The Undisciplining Sessions were recorded at Undisciplining, a conference organised by The Sociological Review Foundation Limited in June 2018. Find out more about The Sociological Review, Britain’s longest-standing sociology journal at https://thesociologicalreview.com.

    They are produced and edited by Emma Houlton at Art of Podcast http://www.artofpodcast.com.

  • In this episode, our managing editor Dr Michaela Benson interviews Anna Bull (University of Portsmouth) and Tiffany Page (University of Cambridge) about their work with the 1752

    group to end sexual misconduct in higher education. They talk frankly about staff to student sexual misconduct, highlighting how power is enacted in and through this, and stress that the development of support structures and reporting procedures within Higher Education institutions is long overdue. Describing the paired strategy of the 1752 group in both working at a national level to lobby for change and conducting research in this area, they highlight their success in getting this issue onto the political agenda and working with institutions to develop codes for best practice.

    You can find out more about the 1752 Group on their website: https://1752group.com

    *****

    The Undisciplining Sessions were recorded at Undisciplining, a conference organised by The Sociological Review Foundation Limited in June 2018. Find out more about The Sociological Review, Britain’s longest-standing sociology journal at https://thesociologicalreview.com.

  • In this episode our Managing Editor, Michaela Benson talks to Jenny Reardon (University of California. Santa Cruz) about her ongoing research which has involved riding through the wide, open grasslands and cow towns of Kansas. As she explains, this is a project that was designed to develop embodied knowledge of the land and to find out more about attitudes towards contemporary US politics from the denizens of the prairies. By talking about how to know and care for the land with her interlocutors, she uncovers, layer by layer the interlocking effects of globalisation, financialisation and environmental change on how they live their lives.

    *****

    The Undisciplining Sessions were recorded at Undisciplining, a conference organised by The Sociological Review Foundation Limited in June 2018. Find out more about The Sociological Review, Britain’s longest-standing sociology journal at https://thesociologicalreview.com.

    They are produced and edited by Emma Houlton at Art of Podcast http://www.artofpodcast.com