Episodes

  • In the narrative we’re looking at, Naaman continually seeks to go to kings, but God insists on continually speaking to Naaman only and exclusively through slaves. Naaman is continually going to “somebodies,” and God insists on speaking to him through “nobodies.”

    What does that mean? What does that tell us about ourselves? What does that tell us about God?

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on March 10, 1996. Series "The Faces of Sin". Scripture: 2 Kings 5:5-17.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • What is the problem with the human race? Why do we have the problems we have? The Bible says the answer is a disorder of the human heart, a dislocation of the soul called sin.

    The account we’re looking at is one of the most wonderful illustrations in all of the Bible about what the Bible has to say about the nature of the problem and the cure for it. Let’s look at it under three headings. First, the text tells us what Naaman really needed the cure for, secondly, what the nature of his cure was, and thirdly, how we know he was indeed cured.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on March 3, 1996. Series "The Faces of Sin". Scripture: Kings 5:5-17.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

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  • The message of Jonah is about a moral, orthodox, religious man, who in the end is more a slave of sin than the debauched pagans to which he has gone. Unless you understand the essential spirit of sin, and that a very religious or moral person can be more bound by it than an irreligious or skeptical person, it’s going to defeat you.

    What does Jonah teach us about sin? First of all, it teaches us God goes to Jonah and shows him two symptoms that reveal there’s something morally disordered, something wrong with his heart. Then he gives him the diagnosis of his sin. And then finally, we’ll see God’s therapy for it.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on February 25, 1996. Series "The Faces of Sin". Scripture: Jonah 2:7-3:5;3:10-4:11.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • We’re going to take a look at a passage that tells us about sin, a picture of two trees. This text is about how to deal with your anxiety and worries. Jeremiah is claiming to have the secret.

    Jeremiah says, “I’ll tell you about worries and how to deal with worries, but first you have to let me tell you about the nature of sin.” Let’s see what this picture of two trees tells us about sin. It tells us about the root, the fruit, and the cure for sin.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on February 11, 1996. Series "The Faces of Sin". Scripture: Jeremiah 17:5-13.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • The biblical teaching about sin is one of the strongest arguments for the truth of Christianity that there is. There have been many thoughtful people who abandoned Christianity, abandoned religion, but were pushed back and embraced the faith because there was nothing else except the religious idea of sin that, when they actually saw human evil up close, could account for human history and human behavior.

    And yet, if there is a lack of joy in your life today, if the thought of Jesus dying for you does not revolutionize you, does not transfix you, does not transform you, do you know what the main reason for that is? You have not seen how deep he went to pay for you. You don’t know how far he has brought you. You don’t know the seriousness and the depth of your sin.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on February 4, 1996. Series "The Faces of Sin". Scripture: Mark 7:25-30; 8:11-17.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • What’s wrong with us, the human race? The answer of the Bible is all of our sociological and psychological problems are theological problems, and the only answer that possibly gets underneath all of these other semi-answers is the real problem of sin.

    We now look at what I’m going to call our capacity for self-deception. What is the capacity for self-deception? It’s the almost infinite ability of the human heart to hide the truth from itself when that truth is too unpleasant or uncomfortable. Self-deception is not the worst thing we do, but it’s the reason we can do the worst things.

    There’s no better example of the tragedy of self-deception and the dynamics of it than this tragic story of Saul, the first king of Israel. This text tells us about the fact of self-deception, the structure of self-deception, and a prescription for the healing of it.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 28, 1996. Series "The Faces of Sin". Scripture: 1 Samuel 15:12-23.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • What’s wrong with us? What’s wrong with the human race? If you don’t ask that question, if that question doesn’t burn in your heart, your head is in the sand. The answer the Bible gives us to this question is that it is, to a great degree, a problem of underestimation.

    God says, first of all, that sin hides itself. It crouches. Secondly, that sin is tremendously powerful. It will have you. Thirdly, we’re told about hope. You must master it. It tells us about the hiddenness of sin, about the power of sin, and that there’s a hope for the defeat of sin.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 21, 1996. Series "The Faces of Sin". Scripture: Genesis 4:3-15; Hebrews 12:24.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • [NOTE: This message was recorded on cassette tape in 1990, therefore the audio quality is subpar in some portions of the recording.]

    Paul says that if you want to understand the Bible, you need to realize that everything is about Jesus. He says it’s written not just for them, but it’s written for us, on whom the end of the ages has come.

    This passage teaches us three things. The world is a wilderness. God has opened a fountain for people in the wilderness. And this fountain is only available because God himself entered the wilderness and received our punishment.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on June 24, 1990. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 2". Scripture: Exodus 17:1-17; 1 Corinthians 10:2-4.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • There is a courtroom, and we all know it. You don’t even have to go to the Bible–your own experience tells you. It doesn’t matter if people are coming to you and saying, “You’re great. You’re really great.” That’s nice, and you cling to that like a life raft, but you really wonder, “What about the other people who seem to have rejected me in my life? Who am I really? What do I really look like? Am I acceptable?”

    The reason we’re so deeply insecure is because there is a courtroom. There is an accuser and there is a bar of justice and we are being accused there. We know it. Our conscience is a radio transmitter picking up the prosecution. How do we deal with the prosecutor? We look to the advocate.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on June 3, 1990. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 2". Scripture: Zechariah 3:1-7.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • Do you know how often Jesus Christ says, “You may be fake. You may be bogus. You may be counterfeit?” Paul likewise says, “Examine yourself to see if you’re in the faith. Jesus tells very clearly here in these two agricultural parables that there are counterfeits inside the body of Christ.

    There are three kinds of Christianity that are fake, that are counterfeit, where the message of the kingdom comes in, but there is no real true central root the truth actually takes. First, there is intellectual Christianity. Second, there is emotional Christianity. And third, there is volitional Christianity.

    I think emotional Christianity is mentioned as the second soil, intellectual Christianity, the third soil. And it’s probably volitional Christianity that is represented by those people in Matthew 7, who on the last day say, “Lord, Lord, didn’t we do all sorts of great things in your name?” and Jesus says, “I never knew you.” Let’s take a look.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 27, 1990. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 2". Scripture: Matthew 13:1-9; 18-30; 36-43.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • It’s clear we don’t see courage the way the Bible sees it. Courage and faith, in the Bible, aren’t really different. Courage is considered a moral trait, along with love, patience, honesty. It’s a moral character, and it’s something God expects from us.

    What we’re reading about here has to do with fear. The ultimate fear is a kind of mistrust in God. We cling to these other things because we all believe at the deepest level, that if we clung completely to God, he’d let us down. In fact, if you clung completely to God, if he was your only security, you would be a perfect person.

    The process of growth and grace and sanctification is to get to that place where you find out what those other things are that you are basing your security on, what you are really resting on instead of God. Do you know how you find where those things are, how you can find the trail to those security blankets? Follow your fears.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 20, 1990. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 2".

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • Commitment always makes you vulnerable, but Jesus Christ cannot be known apart from absolute commitment. He can’t be known any other way. Jesus Christ can’t be sampled; he can’t be known on a money-back guarantee trial. It can’t be done. He can only be known through absolute commitment, and to absolutely commit means the willingness to obey absolutely.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 13, 1990. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 2". Scripture: John 12:1-6, 23-26.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • Though there’s probably at least a hundred things the Spirit does, the main thing the Spirit does is he makes Jesus real to you. Everything else the Spirit does, all the fancy names we come up with–illumination, regeneration, sanctification–every other word you may hear me say and everything you hear anybody else say, it all boils down to that.

    When the Spirit of God made Jesus Christ not merely an intellectual concept or something on the periphery of your life, but rather when he made him glorious, the most important and significant thing in your life, that’s the day you moved from being a nominal Christian to being someone transformed by the power of the Spirit.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 6, 1990. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 2". Scripture: Romans 8:12-17.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • What does the Spirit do? The Spirit does a lot of things. It’s astonishing. If you really go back into the Old Testament you’ll see the Spirit was a creator. The Spirit is a teacher, and we’re going to see that the Spirit has three main ministries in the life of a Christian.

    Those three main categories are: The Spirit regenerates us (which means he is the agent of being reborn), the Spirit sanctifies us (which means he gradually turns us more and more into the likeness of Christ in our character), and thirdly, the Spirit anoints us with power. The Spirit of God makes God real. The Spirit of God mediates the presence of Jesus Christ. So you don’t just know about him, but you sense you’re in his presence.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 29, 1990. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 2". Scripture: Romans 8:15-11.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • Nobody grows without trouble. You can plan to obey this week, but you can’t plan to suffer. Suffering is one of the main ways in which Jesus Christ gives you what you really want, and that is becoming the person you want to be.

    How you respond to the troubles in your life will go a long way toward whether or not you ever develop courage, patience, compassion, or humility. How can you make sure you don’t waste your sorrows?

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 21, 1990. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 1". Scripture: 1 Peter 1:1-9.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • We’re now going to talk about, in some ways, the simplest of all of the disciplines: You have to obey. It’s the simplest and the hardest of all of the ways in which we grow, of all the tools for growth. We have to obey, and as we obey him, we change. We’re transformed.

    In Philippians 2:12, it says, “work out your salvation with fear and trembling.” It doesn’t mean to be saved, to go to heaven, is something you have to be good and work for. It doesn’t say, “Work for your salvation.” It says, “Work it out.” This passage lays out with three basic principles about obedience–the person of obedience, the method of obedience, and the results of obedience.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 14, 1990. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 1". Scripture: John 8:31-39.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • We are fascinated with the new. The reason we’re fascinated with the new is because every human being has a deep need for eternity. We all sense ourselves fading away. We see ourselves sagging and wrinkling. We see ourselves decaying, and that’s not natural. Nature is subject to futility, we’re told in Romans 8.

    Underneath the diets, underneath the need for vacations in new places, new clothes and new things that make you feel good for a little while, there is this need for eternity. We all need eternity. We need this newness God’s talking about.

    This passage tells us about the newness that is to come, a newness that is totally in the future. But there is also a newness that you can begin to experience now. Let’s just take a look at those two things. It’s exciting to look at it. The first aspect is the newness that is to come. The second aspect is the newness we receive now.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on December 31, 1989. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 1". Scripture: Revelation 21:1-8.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • In this series on Christian growth, we’re going to talk about the role of the Holy Spirit in the life of the believer. One of the main differences between Christianity and moral religion in general is that Christians believe only through the influence of the Holy Spirit are we able and enabled to do anything good. Only through the Holy Spirit can we grow. It’s through the Spirit’s work anything gets accomplished in our lives, not through our own effort.

    If we come to faith in Christ, come to God through Christ, then the Spirit of God comes in, and we can know God personally through the Spirit. Through the Spirit’s influence in our lives, we can actually experience God, not just know about him and not just know what he requires of us, but actually experience him.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on December 10, 1989. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 1". Scripture: Ephesians 5:18-21;3:14-21.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • We’re taking a look at Colossians 3:12–17 and pointing out some how-to’s. How do you work the gospel, the good news down into your life? Paul essentially says, “because your life is hid with Christ in God, live that way.”

    If Christ is your life, then when other people come and criticize you, you say, “Well, you know, it hurts to be criticized, but my reputation isn’t my life, and what they think of me isn’t my life. Christ is my life.” Paul is saying, “Be what you are. Take hold of what you really are and you really have, and live on the platform of it. Be what you are. Let the peace of Christ rule.”

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on November 12, 1989. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 1". Scripture: Colossians 3:12-17.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

  • The gospel tells you to stop trying to steal self-acceptance from other sources and to instead warm yourself at the fire of our standing in Jesus Christ. In Christ, God treats believers as if they have done all that Christ has done. It doesn’t matter what kind of day you’ve had. The gospel says that the determining factor is not your present or your past, but Christ’s present and past. That’s what the gospel is.

    This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on November 5, 1989. Series "Growth in Christ, Part 1". Scripture: Colossians 3:1-4.

    Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.