Episodes

  • Ep 203: California Fires / Rapel Valley, Chile

    · Wine for Normal People

    We discuss the wildfires raging in the North Coast of California and give ideas on what that could mean for the industry. Then we talk about one of the best (maybe unknown) value regions for wine in the world, Rapel Valley in Chile and its sub regions!

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  • Ep 202: Our Favorite Fall Wines

    · Wine for Normal People

    Our 2017 list of top 10 wines for fall (or early spring if you're in the southern hemisphere!)! The smell of falling leaves is here & it's time for a change from crisp, refreshing sippers to something heavier, earthier, and better with warm, hearty food.   Here's the list:  1. Malbec from Cahors (France) 2. Cabernet Franc from: Long Island, New York (US) Virginia (US) Chinon or Bourgueil from Loire Valley (France) 3. Red Bordeaux (France) 4. Fiano di Avellino, a white from Campania (Italy) 5. Aglianico, a red from Campania (Italy) especially Taurusi 6. Nebbiolo-based wines from Piedmont (Italy) especially Barolo, Barbaresco, Langhe 7. Sangiovese-based wines from Tuscany, Umbria or other parts of Italy especially Chianti, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Brunello or Rosso di Montalcino 8. Côtes-du-Rhône Blanc or the WHITE grapes that go into it: Grenache Blanc, Viognier, Roussanne, and Marsanne from Paso Robles, California (US) 9. Syrah from the northern Rhône or from Paso Robles, California 10. Rioja (Spain) -- Tempranillo only for M.C. Ice, the traditional Rioja blend for Elizabeth   Enjoy! And a great thanks to our sponsor: The Great Courses Plus Go to: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/wine for a free month! 

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  • Ep 201: How to Develop Your Wine Palate

    · Wine for Normal People

    We received two very similar listener questions so it was time to make a podcast of it! They were.... Caryn R: I am trying to learn more about aroma and taste. How does one discern that a wine has notes of pineapple and honeysuckle, for example? Is all of that really true or just marketing? Can i learn to smell and taste with more nuance? Ted A: I'd like you to discuss palate. Can it be enhanced? How do you improve your palate? Do some people like me just not have a great palate, and it can't be improved?   We address all the questions above: First we discuss the biology and building blocks of aroma We talk about a number of categories of aromas from a chemical perspective (which, actually, as I look at them, remind me of names from Game of Thrones!): Esters, Pyrazines, Terpenes, and Thiols. Lots of great info on http://winefolly.com/review/where-wine-flavors-come-from/  We discuss some other broader smell categories and what they manifest as in wine: oak, botrytis, and the yeast brettanomyces too! Then we give you some action items:  How to separate broad categories: fruit v herb v earth v other stuff  How to become a student of smell and flavor by paying attention The importance of slowing down to experience wine and food more fully How to learn what certain structure terms mean by tasting certain things   And finally, non-conventional advice like: don't buy aroma kits and stop with the blind tasting, already!   Enjoy!    Special thanks to our sponsors: www.hellofresh.com - use the code Wine30 to get $30 your first week of meals!  www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/wine -- don't forget to check out: The Everyday Gourmet: Rediscovering the Lost Art of Cooking for the tasting class we discuss!  

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  • Ep 200: A Re-Intro to WFNP & How To Begin in Wine

    · Wine for Normal People

    After a few listener questions on what WFNP was, is, and will be, we hit restart. We talk about: What if you or a friend were new to wine? How should they approach the subject? Where should they start? We answer & then add a few words from our 1st listener, Douglas Trapasso.   Here are the show notes:  1. We answer:  What is Wine for Normal People? Who are our listeners? How did WFNP get started and where is it going? The climate of wine now v. when we started   2. We then shift gears and address the topic of introducing wine novices to wine appreciation. Phase one of the intro involves:  Do a little research before you drink. Mainly on yourself - figure out what kinds of foods you like to eat. NOT For pairing – for finding wines that fit your profile. Go by fruit groups, start with wines that taste like fruit, Don't start sweet Buy the best version you feel comfortable buying (a tier or two above normal) Have them with cheese or food Take note of what you like. Explore that grape from different places. Then find things that are similar  3. Phase 2 involves: Listen to the podcast on topics you like. Read or listen in digestible bits. Do you like history? Do you like food? Do you like travel? Architecture? Science? What do you like to read about or know about? Wine has it all. Start with whatever topic is fascinating vis a vis wine. Read Wine Folly or Vine Pair to get digestible bits of info Remember: what grows together, goes together Be an explorer – keep pushing yourself into new wines, don’t get hung up on 1 wine type because you like it. If you don’t like a wine or a region, keep at it. Try at least 1 a year from various classic regions – BTG or buy a bottle. Just to check in on your palate evolution. Keep reading, keep listening, take WFNP classes, which will soon be online   Contest!! If you bring two friends who want to know more about wine, and have them like the page and listen to the podcast. I'll pick one of these groups and reward them with a free online live chat on any wine topics they wish. Post on Social Media with their names and I'll select a winning group!   

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  • Ep 199: Cava -- Spain's Bubbly Wine

    · Wine for Normal People

    Named from the stone cellars (cavas) in which the wine is matured, Cava is Spain's premier sparkling wine but it has a lot of quirks and variations, all of which we discuss in the podcast. From unique grapes to diverse sourcing areas to a new top tier classification, we cover it all. Hopefully the show will give you insight into why this wine is so special and why it holds so much potential for becoming even better!  Here are the show notes: Overview of regions and grapes: Cava is from Catalonia and other regions – 95% in Penedes, Sant Sadurni d’Anoia – home of the largest producers like Codorníu and Freixenet, Seguras Viudas Other areas – Rioja, Navarra, Valencia, Aragon, Basque Country, Castilla y Leon, and a few more Most have Mediterranean climate, moderate rain and vienyards are at altitude The wine is made as white or rosado White grapes: Macabeo (most used, also called Viura), Parellada, Xarel-lo, Chardonnay Red grapes: Garnacha, Monastrell, Pinot Noir Because the grapes are mainly native ones, you can’t compare the flavors to Champagne except in production methods Made like Champagne Same sweetness levels of Champagne in order of driest to sweetest: Brut Nature, Extra Brut, Brut, Extra Seco, Seco, Semiseco, Dulce  History: First made in 1851 Josep Raventos traveled through Europe in 1860s – shilling Cordorniu’s wines (married into the family) but thought Spain could make its own Champagne.Made his own in 1872.   For the first century of their existence, the wines were called Champaña. 1970s -- international laws,enforced and the wine became Cava. Top brands: Raventós i Blanc Gramona (organic) Recaredo (biodynamic) Mestres Bohigas Castellroig New top classification for the category, the Cava de Paraje Calificado. Only vintage dated, only single vineyard – like a burgundy climat Other specifications around acidification, aging levels The first 12 Cava de Parade sites and their owners: Vinyes de Can Martí – Torelló Turó d’en Mota – Recaredo Serral del Vell – Recaredo Vallcirera – Alta Alella La Capella – Juvé i Camps Can Sala – Freixenet La Pleta – Codorníu El Tros Nou – Codorníu La Fideuera – Codorníu Can Prats – Vins el Cep Font de Jui – Gramona Terroja – Castellroig  

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  • Ep 198: Roero, Italy - Secret Values, Awesome Wines

    · Wine for Normal People

    In a small area of Piedmont is a hidden gem that makes some of the best value Nebbiolo and most unique whites of Italy, Arneis. If you love Italy and want to add to the list of gems, this podcast is a MUST listen!   Show Notes: 1. We give an overview of Piedmont, Italy and where Roero fits in to the mix -- it makes Nebbiolo and a unique white called Arneis   2. We discuss the small size of Roero 1100 ha/2700 acres of which most of it is Arneis with some limited growing of Nebbiolo. We chat about the advantages of Roero and how its polyculture will serve it well in years to come!    3. We do the requisite history dork out (you know I can't help myself!): discussing the long heritage, the Roero family, and how Roero started its rise in the wine pantheon   4. Dorking out further, we cover the geology of Roero: How it was part of the Golfo Padano, a sea that receded The relevance of sand soils to the wine The importance of the Tanaro River and its changing course       5. We talk wine styles: Nebbiolo Softer, earlier maturing than those wines but can be bold and aromatic that can be bottled under simple Nebbiolo d’Alba or under Roero DOCG GREAT VALUE Various levels to explore: Romero DOCG, Roero Reserve DOCG, NEW: After 8 years – subzone classification map of top vineyard sites in Roero – “Grand Cru” Arneis   Roero Arneis is minerally and expressive, mild in acidity, but the soils add complexity and minerality. Arenas was planted to get birds and bugs away from Nebbiolo b/c it’s more aromatic Various levels to explore: Roero Arneis DOCG, Roero Arneis Riserva DOCG, Roero Arneis Spumante DOCG Some producers mentioned:  Vietti Bruno Giacosa  Luciano Sandrone  Matteo Correggia Thanks to https://winesofroero.com AND... Special thanks to our sponsor this week:  The Great Courses Plus Go to www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/wine for a month free trial of over 8,000 lectures!!! 

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  • Ep 197: A lesson on Mosel with Dr Dirk Richter of Max Ferd Richter

    · Wine for Normal People

    In March 2017, I went to Mosel & spoke with Dr. Dirk Richter, 9th generation owner/operator of Max Ferd. Richter. The wines are stunning and Dr. Richter's explanation of Mosel wine, history, and culture will be the best you'll ever hear.    http://en.maxferdrichter.de/en/   The distinguished Dr. Dirk Richter:     Wines we discussed: "Zeppelin Label" Mulheimer Sonnenlay Riesling ($14):    Richter Estate Riesling (we discuss '15 and '16), $17      2015 Graacher Himmelreich Riesling Kabinett, $20 2015 Graacher Himmelreich Riesling Spätlese, $20   Veldenzer Elisenberg Riesling Spätlese ($25) and Auslese ($50)

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  • Ep 196: Tejo, Portugal with Ian Renwick

    · Wine for Normal People

    Ian Renwick, owner of Jaded Palates wine in the UK and occasional co-host returns to talk about a recent trip to Tejo, Portugal. It's a fascinating region experiencing a renaissance and we give you the inside line on the best wines to seek out!       Special thanks to this week's sponsor, The Great Courses Plus! Check out my special URL to get a free month of access to amazing video lectures: thegreatcoursesplus.com/wine

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  • Ep 195: Oded Shakked, Dynamic Winemaker & Owner of Longboard in Sonoma

    · Wine for Normal People

    This time, an outstanding interview with Oded Shakked of the small Russian River Valley producer, Longboard Vineyards. Although he's been making wine for most of his life in California, Oded is originally from Israel and has a global perspective on wine, winemaking, and wine business that's refreshing and fascinating. He's fantastic and all his wines are delicious, well-balanced, and all are made to accompany food.    Here are the show notes:  Oded shares his amazing story, from being a kid in Israel to discovering surfing, traveling the world, and then winding up at UC Davis in Sonoma to study winemaking. We talk about what things used to be like in Napa and Sonoma, and what a winemaking degree from UC Davis gave to Oded that was so valuable. Oded discusses his love of Sonoma and why it's so special to him.  We discuss the changes that have occurred over the years in Sonoma and what Oded has seen in the food and wine scene -- for good and bad.  Oded is a deep thinker. We tap into some of that brain power when he discusses his philosophy on food and wine, and how it helps him makes wines of balance Since he is one of the few winemakers in California that does a full line of still wine and also makes a Methode Champenoise sparkling wine, he uses this unique experience to tell us the differences in mentality you need to make each type of wine (a very cool discussion).  We chat about Syrah (Oded's is stunning!) and why it isn't as popular as it should be. All in all a fascinating conversation with a great winemaker, a guy with great perspective on the last 30 years in Sonoma, and an all around nice person! Go visit Longboard when you're in Healdsburg: https://www.longboardvineyards.com   

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  • Ep 194: The Flavors of Rosé Explained

    · Wine for Normal People

    Rosé is so popular now that the market is flooded. So the question now is not just do you want rosé, but what kind? How do you figure it out? There are some ways to choose the kind of pink for you! This podcast gives you heuristics to get a perfect bottle! Here are the show notes:    The four ways to make rosé: LIMITED SKIN MACERATION Crush the grapes Leave them in contact with the skins like a red wine   Soak them for a little while – like 2 hours to 2 days or so (red wines are weeks or months) Longer maceration, the darker the wine, the more tannin, the more red wine character   DIRECT PRESSING Similar to limited skin maceration, direct pressing -- contact with the skins for an extremely short period of time. No maceration, press and get skins away, make it like a white wine Some color in the juice, lightest rose of all   SAIGNÉE METHOD The saignée, or “bleeding,” method makes rosé AND red wine Started as a way to concentrate reds. Early in the maceration process, remove or “bleed” some of the juice from the tank. Vinified separately as a rosé   BLENDING White + red = rosé Prohibited for quality wines in Europe except Champagne Style varies from light to heavy depending on the amount and type of red wine used in the blend   Grapes/areas and flavors: French styles: Provence – salmon colored, Grenache lead with Syrah, Cinsault, Mourvedre: fruity, berry, cherry, with orange, saline, hay/dried grass or meadow, stony, floral, berry notes, bone dry, acidic, strawberry, fresh-cut watermelon, and rose petal, finishing with a distinctive, salty minerality on the palate Rhone: Tavel: only 100% rose appellation. Lots of structure and character – Grenache and Cinsault, 9 grapes authorized, ages well Sancerre, Burgundy, Alsace, Germany Pinot Noir: acidity and soft, subtle aromas of watermelon, raspberries, cherry, strawberries, and stream. Earthy, elegant, Bone dry Bandog from Provence: Mourvedre. Full bodied, richer, darker Loire: Cab Franc/Cab Sauv/Grolleau/Gamay Rose –  can be dark red, bone dry, floral, herbal   Spain: Tempranillo lead: Savory, heavy color – herbal, peppery, watermelon, strawberry, heavier, earthy, floral Basque Txakolina Rosado: berries, spritzy, salinity, low alcohol   Italy:   Red fruit, flowers/roses, citrus, savory AKA – Rosato, Cerasuolo, Ramato     New World: Syrah lead: bolder, more like a light red – strawberry, pepper, cherry, peach Cab Sauv: deep ruby red color with typical Cab notes: green bell pepper, cherry, black currant and black pepper White Zin: 85% of Zin production. Off-dry, sticky sweet. Carignan lead – common in CA: red berries, citrus Malbec: In Argentina Any combo possible, as well as sugar and blending white and red   Remember, it's ok to drink rosé once fall begins!    Thanks to our sponsor The Great Courses! www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/wine   

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  • Ep 193: Lambrusco! An Awesome Italian Gem

    · Wine for Normal People

    Lambrusco is a family of grapes & a wine made from those grapes that's usually red, fizzy & refreshing! Made in Emilia-Romagna, east of Tuscany, this ancient gem got a bad rep in the 1980s but is making a comeback! We'll tell you how to get the good stuff!  

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  • Ep 192: Hawke's Bay, NZ with Correspondent Simone Madden-Grey

    · Wine for Normal People

    You know Marlborough and its tasty Sauvignon Blanc and you may know New Zealand makes Pinot Noir too, but Bordeaux blends and Syrah? YES! Hawke's Bay is New Zealand's second largest wine district and it rocks. Simone, our Australia and New Zealand correspondent, tells us all about it in this fabulous podcast!   First we give a Hawke's Bay Overview It's the 2nd largest industry after Marlborough with about 10% of NZ total production It's New Zealand's leading producer of full-bodied reds: 88% of New Zealand's red production of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah grapes in 2016.  The area makes rich, complex Chardonnays too Started in 1851, Hawke's Bay is one of New Zealand's oldest wine regions   Then we talk location and climate: The area is on the east coast of the North Island in and around the cities of Napier and Hastings  The climate is maritime climate at coast and more continental as you move inland Hawke's Bay is one of the most versatile wine-producing regions in New Zealand -- with multiple mesoclimates, solis, slopes, etc. Sub-regions -- Coast, hillsides, alluvial plains (Gimblett Gravels),  river valleys, and continental areas The grapes of the area: Reds: Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Pinot Noir Whites: Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris and other aromatic whites     And finally, the wineries Simone shared in the podcast: 1. Clearview Estate* 2. Greywacke*  3. Elephant Hill* 4. Craggy Range* 5. Stonecroft** 6. Vidal 7. Villa Maria* 8. Bilancia** 9. Trinity Hill**   *= available in the United States **=limited in the United States   Get on these wines! They are spectacular!     

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  • Ep 191: Proving Terroir is Real with John Dimos of Biome Makers

    · Wine for Normal People

    Is terroir a concept concocted by the French to hide flaws, as some suggest? Or is it a real thing that can be tasted and measured? John Dimos from Biome Makers and Wine Seq has a tool that resolves the question. In this nerdy, fascinating podcast we dig into the details and provide solid answers to the questions below! I never thought we'd see this in our lifetimes, but here we are!    1. What is it?! John tells us the premise of Biome Makers and how it's an affordable and viable premise now vs 5 years ago   2.  He answers terroir questions around... Why people have denied the presence of "terroir" in wine  How Biome Makers changed the game on the notion of terroir  How soil variation impacts on grapes The effect of the biomes v chemicals from winemaking in the final wine?    3.  We discuss the WIM (What it Means) and the impact of the tool on wineries... Who is this tool for and how will they use it? Given that terroir is a real thing and that it CAN be detected in many wines, why isn't expressed in all wine (or food for that matter)? How is this new tool going to change wine growing going forward?  Will it empower people to take more "risks" on farming organically?  Does this steal the "art" from grape growing/winemaking? I encourage you to check out the site and to follow them on Facebook and Twitter. A company that surely will change the way winemaking happens!  http://www.biomemakers.com   A thanks to our sponsor: the Great Courses Plus! Sign up for a free trial!

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  • Ep 190: The Birthplace of wine - The Republic of Georgia

    · Wine for Normal People

    Where did vitis vinifera originate? Where do we think winemaking started? We think it's from the area that is now the Republic of Georgia. Once part of the USSR, this small, beautiful nation is reemerging as a wine power so it's time for an overview!   Here are the show notes: Top level stuff...   Georgia is where Eastern Europe meets Asia. Between the Caucasus Mountains and the Black Sea As big as Scotland or Ireland 111,000 acres of vines ranging from the coast of the Black Sea to Kakheti, on the other side of the Caucasus mountains Outside Tbilisi, they only speak Georgian so when you go, you've gotta hire a guide   Location: Russia to the north and Turkey and Armenia to the south Primary wine region of Kakheti—according to Georgians, the birthplace of wine itself The main wine regions, from Kakheti in the east and Imereti, Racha and Samegrelo in the west, are within a few hours’ drive from Tbilisi, the capital Climate: a diverse climatic landscape that varies from temperate to subtropical An Historical Relic: Qveri (Kwhere-vree) Traditional Georgian fermentation: a clay vessel used for centuries to produce wine in Georgia. Qvervi: 1,000-liter beeswax-coated terra-cotta jar buried in the earth A qvevri is a thick-walled vessel buried deep in the ground in a marani, or Georgian wine cellar. naturally maintains wine at optimal temperature during fermentation and allows it to age for many years without spoilage. Once fermentation is complete, the wine can be racked into another qvevri, leaving the heavy sediment behind. Qvevri white wine is sharp, strong, amber. or in the case of reds, so dark it’s known as shavi gvino: black wine    Grapes: 500+ indigenous grape varietals found in Georgia, Red: Saperavi, Tavkveri and Chkhaveri plus Tavkveri, Shavkapito,  Chkhaveri and Ojaleshi. White: Rkatsiteli (r-kat-see-telly), Chinuri and Mtsvane (mits-vane) méthode Champenoise in Georgia since the late 1800s, with native grape Orange wine:  Friuli winemaker Josko Gravner makes his sought-after “orange” wines using ancient Georgian techniques/qvervri   History: Grapes and traces of wine residue have been found in archaelogical digs from 8,000 years ago. Vitis vinifera originated from the Caucasus mountains in GA Ottoman rule in west, Christianity in the east made east side of the country the wine powerhouse Georgia came under Soviet control a few decades later. Small vineyards merged into huge co-ops =CRAP Georgia declared independence in 1991 Russia's 2006 embargo on Georgian wine imports, lifted only in June 2013. Forced diversification into other, stronger markets   The wines of Georgia have a little ways to go, but they are a fascinating slice of vinous history and worth seeking out or trying if they are ever right in front of you!   

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  • Ep 189: Navarra, Spain

    · Wine for Normal People

    Navarra is in northern Spain and although a prolific, historic region, it's not well-known. Traditionally it's been associated with making fruit-driven rosé, but its reds are starting to come on strong and it's emerging as an excellent, high quality, high value region. Fast facts on Navarra: Capital: Pamplona, home of the running of the bulls (Fiesta de San Fermin)! DO is south of the city Vineyards are around the foothills of the Pyrenees to the Ebro River in Northern Spain Navarra is part of the historic Basque country – but the Ebro River has the most impact on winemaking here (river valleys are essential to vine growing) We review the storied history of Navarra: From Romans to Moors to Catholics, we discuss the winemaking legacy We talk about the importance of El Camino a Santiago de Compostela -- a 400 mile walk to visit the remains of St. James (Santiago) in Galicia on the western coast 12th c – wine recommended in a guide book to pilgrims Reputation for wine formed through El Camino We discuss the French influence from the 14th century through the 19th c – (1892) when Navarra wines were in high demand post-phylloxera We talk about the modern efforts of the DO, and EVENA, the Estación de Viticulture y Enología de Navarra (Navarra Viticulture and Oenological Research Station), in the Ribera Alta sub-region and how that added legitimacy AND created some issues for Navarra.    We talk geography and terroir: Navarra is large and the climate includes areas with Atlantic-influenced, continental, and Mediterranean climates In the south-east is the Bardenas Reales National Park The Pyrenees mountains in the northeast w/other mtns in north, just below France Atlantic is an hour northwest, Ebro Valley in Southern Part Near Bay of Biscayne in Northwest/Atlantic Ocean   We discuss grapes and wines: Navarra was known only for Garnacha-based rosados EVENA allowed and encouraged French varieties in the 1980s to compete with Rioja (add diversity and it's own identity) — Chardonnay, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon 90% red varieties, 10% white grape varieties 70% of the grapes are native varietals Tempranillo – 33% Garnacha – 24% Graciano – 1.5% Mazuelo/Cariñena .5% (WHITE) Viura – 2.25% 30% of vineyards are planted to international varieties Cabernet Sauvignon – 15% Merlot – 14% Chardonnay – 5.4%   The Sub regions  Tierra Estella: Northwest, borders Basque Country and La Rioja. Highest average altitude and notable Atlantic influence. Tempranillo, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay. Valdizarbe:  Northern area with continental and Atlantic climate. Tempranillo, Garnacha, Cabernet and Merlot all occupy similar surface areas, with Chardonnay and Malvasía. Baja Montaña: In the foothills of the Pyrenees Mountains. Continental climate. Garnacha, Tempranillo, with little else grown. Known for rosados. Ribera Alta: Continental climate transitioning from Atlantic to Mediterranean climate.Cereal plantings here (fertile soils!). Tempranillo, Graciano, Chardonnay, Moscatel de Grano Menudo   Ribera Baja: Mediterranean climate. Tempranillo, Garnacha, Viura, Moscatel.    Finally we hit on identity issues: Too much diversity We decide that Garnacha expresses place and should be the horse they bet on in Navarra! We mention the DO de Pago producers: Señorio de Arínzano and Prado Irache in Tierra Estella and Bodegas Otazu in Valdizarbe.   Go get some Navarra! It rocks!!         

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  • Ep 188: Kieran Robinson, Where Sonoma Meets the Rhône

    · Wine for Normal People

    Kieran Robinson is a small producer of Rhone style wines in Sonoma --and his stuff rocks. A Philadelphia native, after working in the Northern Rhône he moved to Napa & worked for cult wineries going it alone. A great story from a truly talented winemaker!   Here are the show notes:  Kieran tells us about his early life in Philadelphia, at Ithaca college, and getting his start in wineries in the Finger Lakes. He takes us on his journey from Northern Rhône to Napa to Sonoma and details what it was like to work with everyone from Michel Rolland, Aaron Potts, and Paul Hobbs before going out on his own. We address Kieran's real passion: making Viognier and Syrah. We talk about the current situation in Sonoma with grapes and more people looking at Rhône varietals as a viable and awesome option. Kieran takes us through the differences between his wines, the wines' nod to Philly, and why they are so darn great!    To learn more about Kieran, go to http://www.kieranrobinsonwines.com   And thanks to our sponsor, The Great Courses: https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/wine   

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  • Ep 187: Paso Robles (with some Sonoma)

    · Wine for Normal People

    After a trip out to Sonoma and Paso Robles, we have much new information to share! In this podcast we chat quickly about the glammed up version of Sonoma we encountered and then take a detailed look at Paso -- its history, terroir, the 11  appellations, and the wine!          

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  • Ep 186: My Trip to Mosel, Germany, A Wine World Wonder

    · Wine for Normal People

    My recent trip to German wine regions included Mosel, which has one enormous advantage over any other place that makes Riesling: terroir. We talk about the geography, the slopes, the land, and the people, and why Mosel is really a wonder of the wine world.

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  • Ep 185: Laura Maniec, Master Sommelier and Owner of CorkBuzz

    · Wine for Normal People

    Laura Maniec, Master Sommelier and owner of CorkBuzz Wine Studio shares insights on being an MS, a restaurateur, and a hospitality guru. After she shares her fascinating story, we talk about our venture, weeklytasting.com and how we love wine shopping for you and treasure hunting for great values that hit the price point for an average of $70 for 4 bottles (a steal!).    Here are the topics we cover on the show:  First, Laura tells us about her childhood and how her grandmother shaped her mentality regarding hospitality.  We learn about how a Master Sommelier gets made! Laura talks about her path from cocktail waitress in Queens to MS and owner of CorkBuzz Wine Studio in Manhattan and Charlotte, NC.  We get Laura's take on the MS program and how much she loves it! We talk about who it's for and who it's not for.  We discuss Laura's awesome wine philosophy and how she wants to help normal people love wine! Laura shares with us the latest wine trends she's seeing in NYC We chat about the new project we're on together, Weekly Tasting and how it's an opportunity for us to shop for wines for you that you may not know about, have heard of or even knew you wanted (you do want these!) Laura is @lauramaniec on Twitter and Instagram and you can find her on Facebook @CorkbuzzRestaurant&Winebar    

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  • Ep 184: My Field Trip to Rheingau, Germany (will make you WANT these wines)

    · Wine for Normal People

    This podcast is based directly off a blog post on my site! So instead of trying to recreate the formatting and pictures, I'll just link to it here since there are no better show notes than this:   https://winefornormalpeople.com/the-9-things-you-need-to-know-about-the-rheingau-region-of-germany/

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