Эпизоды

  • Literacy experts Sharon and Phil Callen believe classroom libraries are incredibly important for literacy development in children.

    Why?

    Classroom libraries represent for many children the experiences that they will have with books - literature and informational - across a year of their school life. We should want to make it rich, be a collection that is enticing and accessible, and an entry point for every child into a rich and glorious world of reading, thinking, experiences and discussions. It should represent a collection of some of the best picture books to read aloud because they have features that entice children to want the books to be read over and over again - rich language with rhythm, rhyme and repetition and interesting illustrations.

    The books must also be entertaining to read or to listen to. They must introduce students to some of the best children’s authors and illustrators from Australia and overseas, and be read over and over again because they become favourites.

    Children will eventually join in while being read to. This is the beginning of their independent reading.

    Children should have opportunities every day to request favourites, have them read multiple times, so that children will soon be reading them independently.

    What kind of reading materials?

    Lots of nursery rhymes Texts that support children's functioning and allow them to be successful are those which not only fulfil expectations and allow them to confirm their understanding about reading, but also provide the kind of challenges that stretch the boundaries of children's current competence

    Children’s expectations

    That the text makes sense because it connects logically and has 'unity of meaning'That the text uses natural language which retains the richness and variety of cues with which the children are familiar in speechThat the text layout and print styles and size are reasonably consistent within the textThat the topic, subject matter, concepts on which the text is based are related to the child's experiences

    Therefore classroom libraries are developed over the course of a year, based on the children we are working with.

    Most useful books for the library

    How do we know which are the most useful to have in our classroom collections?

    Share the categories you can look for in your own classroom library, and talk with students about how the structure of the story helps them as a reader.

    Once you think of these as categories, you will soon find books that fit within these categories. These can be:

    RepetitiveCumulativeFamiliar culturalChronologicalProblem-centred - good, ripping yarns!Rhyme-rhythm scheme Nursery rhymes and songsBig BooksChapter Books - for those ready to move on and for read aloud. Information booksPlaysFairy TalesBooks for 2 voicesYounger NovelsInformation books connected to discovery, inquiry, units of inquiryChildren’s own publicationsFamily Stories, Animal stories, Author study: Julia Donaldson, Pamela Allen, Lynley Dodd, Mem Fox, Pat Hutchins, Janet and Allan Allburg, Eric Carle,.Children’s own collections of poems added to throughout the year, coming from read alouds, copies of class made stories, etc. Year 1 example. Everything created as a class, became a copy for children.

    Maximising the power of the classroom library

    How do we get them going in the classroom? How do we develop our 3 selves as a reader? (Self directed, self motivated, self regulated)

    This is an essential, and integrated part of the literacy toolkit for teachers and students. We teach through texts in the classroom library, and kids have daily access to choosing and using. Each child should also begin their own collection of texts with which they can do the work. Teachers should record the books children practice and read.

    Teachers, as enabling adults, can create conditions that impact on the successful development of readers who learn to self-regulate and self-improve, develop their understanding about reading and how to use the information available to them through the cueing systems.

    Listening to Stories, as many of these as you can - 2 to 3 a day. Shared Book Experience - a store of these used daily, returned to often, available for free choice activity time, including books made by the class.Children dictating their own stories - building a collection of books children can read for themselves - into the book box/bag.Children writing their own stories and making their own books - alphabet books, pattern books - into the book box/bag.Frequent reading practice - with the books in their book box/bag, and books they have been matched to.

    Responding to stories

    Asking self questions, doing the thinking and the noticing.

    Make personal evaluations by asking themselves questions such as:

    What I liked about this story ...What I didn't like about this story ...What puzzled me, what I am wondering ...Why did ... happen?What would happen if ...?

    Important questions to help children figure out how texts work.

    What patterns I noticed in this story ...What ideas I noticed ...New discoveries I made ...What other stories have a pattern like this story?

    Make class big books.

    Same story, illustrated by classInnovations on the story, written collectively by the classInnovations on the text, each child/pair contributing a sentence, verse, etc.

    Write themselves.

    Retelling the storyUsing the same characters or setting or patterns or problem or concept or sentence patterns, innovations

    Perform or retell in a different medium.

    Dramatising part or the whole story - puppets, acting, playsDrawing, painting, sculpting, story freeze

    Show reactions as they read/listen

    Laughing, crying, arguing, deciding not to read on

    Connect with us!

    Got any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.au

    The Teacher’s Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning.

    Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.

    At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves.

    To find out about upcoming webinars, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/.

    And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.

    To make sure you don’t miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player.

    Produced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com

  • In his 30+ years in the industry, Greg Holfeld has supplied storyboards and animation for television series such as 2 Stupid Dogs, Ren and Stimpy, Pearlie, Figaro Pho, Monster Beach and Kitty Is Not a Cat, directed award-winning commercials, created short films that have screened and pulled awards in numerous international festivals, and made hundreds of pages of comics for everyone including kids.

    Greg began illustrating children's books in 2001 and is now credited with over 35 titles. His work also appears regularly in The School Magazine. He currently lectures in 2D animation at CDW (Flinders University).

    For Greg it always has been, and still is, all about telling stories with pictures.

    In this insightful interview, Greg talks about:

    His fascinating story His illustrative and creative processConnecting and creating meaning in storiesThe power of illustration for reading and writingTricks, tools and techniques for teachers and studentsAnd much more!

    Connect with us!

    Got any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.au

    The Teacher’s Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning.

    Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.

    At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves.

    To find out about upcoming webinars, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/.

    And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.

    To make sure you don’t miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player.

    Produced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com

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  • In this podcast, Sharon and Phil Callen explain:

    What habits and behaviours of readers areWhy are they important?How do we know which are the most useful habits and behaviours?How do we get them going in the classroom?How we develop the ‘three selves’ as a reader - self-directed, self-motivated, self-regulated

    Learning about what good readers do makes reading accessible to every child, every day.

    GOOD READERS READ A LOT OF JUST RIGHT BOOKS:

    Lots of practice, lots of access, lots of success. Classroom practice to develop the habit of daily reading includes creating a culture of reading and helping to build the daily habit of reading, such as:Classroom library for easy access to booksTime for reading carved out everydayEvery child every day should have the opportunity to read something they choose, that they can understand and that they can read with accuracy. This is a habit of good readersEvery child has an entry point with ‘just right’ booksRead aloud is an entry point for young readersEncourage voluntary reading - choosing to read, reading at school, outside of school, seeing it as part of what they doWe build up accuracy, understanding, fluencyForming the habits and behaviours is the first phase - with the help of an enabling adult - every child, every day

    GOOD READERS ARE MOTIVATED TO READ AND TO GROW AS A READER (GROWTH MINDSET):

    Interest, confidence and dedication.

    Classroom practices:

    Read aloud, introduce students to many books, authors, genres, information, vocabulary that is beyond their independent level of reading but which extends them into a rich world of habits and behaviours they can take into their own reading. Good teachers use Read and Shared Text to demonstrate to students what good readers do, whilst engaging in an authentic reading process. Meanwhile readers are practising many of the strategies of good readers with the teacher as they listen to/view the text, giving them an opportunity to begin practicing these behaviours.Anchoring these reading behaviours on a Good Reader Anchor chart enables students to see the importance of these behaviours and to be reminded of what they can practice/give a go as they read independently.Book tasting and book blessings given by students/ teachers also opens the world into more books, building interest and confidence to make informed selections. With every child experiencing an entry point, this develops a growth mindset about what it is to be a good reader. Good readers are active: thinkers, questioners, picture makers.

    GOOD READERS USE PROBLEM SOLVING, WITH A RANGE OF STRATEGIES:

    Good readers are active readers - they have an extensive range of strategies they draw on as they are reading.

    Classroom practices that establish these behaviours:

    Show students what good readers do as they read extended and continuous text (If we teach strategies outside of extended, continuous text, we fail to enable readers to grow the skills and strategies they need to read extended/continuous text, which is the very goal of reading).

    Modelling good reader strategies includes:

    Word solvingMonitoring and correcting/fixing up their reading when it doesn’t make senseAdjusting fluency Comprehending the text (visualising, predicting, questioning, summarising, inferring, setting a purpose for reading)Vocabulary learning and its influence on comprehensionFluency developmentResponding to reading - personal thoughts to discuss with others, recording some in a readers journal/notebookMetacognition, being aware of what they are doing as a reader and therefore developing self-regulation and self-directionBackground knowledge - bringing what they have developed and what they know, their experience of other texts, knowing when to use particular strategies and processes.

    GOOD READERS RESPOND TO FEEDBACK

    Good authentic teaching means good teachers will learn a lot about the needs of their readers by listening to them read and providing next steps to developing reading behaviours whilst they are reading continuous texts.

    This further develops the behaviours of good readers, as readers learn to apply an ever increasing range of strategies. Good teachers also notice when a group of students are ready to be taught a new reading behaviour or are close to consolidating one, or simply need more practice. Close eyes on the habits and behaviours that readers are developing is what builds success, confidence, interest, motivation and dedication to continuing on a thriving path to the joys and insights that reading bring to us.Actions are anchored in child language on charts in the classroom.Conferring with children is powerful teaching.Children need to be able to name the action.

    GOOD READERS TALK ABOUT THEIR READING

    Good readers love to talk about and share what they are reading. Reading is a very social experience - afterall books are published so that more than one person can access the story! So our experiences with story and books are meant to be shared.

    Classroom practices that give readers opportunities to talk about their reading include:

    Turn and Tell after reading - 60 seconds (What I liked, what I didn't like (emotions), what puzzled me, what patterns I am noticing)Book recommendationsMost underutilised comprehension strategy

    In summary – the themes today have been:

    Enabling all students to develop the habits and behaviours of good readers.Allowing all children to be problem solvers in their reading – using a range of strategies.How to define the habits and behaviours and how to let students in on what these are and how to use them effectively.NOTE: Watch how good reader strategies also play out for your students as writers.

    Key questions:

    What is a good tool that Sharon has used with teachers in classrooms? Mt Barker South Teachers have turned their learning intentions into Good Reader statements - ensuring that they are teaching good reader actions, teaching good reader behaviours, building a growth mindset, motivation, reading habits, practice and interest.What’s a tantalising text that Sharon has used recently in a classroom? Going to the Volcano by Andy Stanton and illustrated by Miguel Ordenez (Pronounced OR DAWN EZ). It's a fun rhyming picture book text for two voices or more. Fun to read with your class, for readers to read in pairs and a great model for writing your own ‘GOING TO’ story. We’ll demonstrate, Sharon as the voice of Jane, whilst Phil is the voice of Dwayne.

    SH: Going to the Volcano by Andy Stanton and Miguel Ordonez

    PH: Going off with Jane-o to look at the volcano!

    SH: Going off with Jane-o to look at the volcano!

    PH: Walking down the lane-o to look at the volcano!

    SH: Walking down the lane-o to look at the volcano!

    PH: Riding the Great Dane-o to look at the volcano!

    SH: Riding the Great Dane-o to look at the volcano!

    PH: Sitting on the train-o to look at the volcano!

    SH: Sitting on the train-o to look at the volcano!

    PH: Jumping on the plane-o to look at the volcano!

    SH: Jumping on the plane-o to look at the volcano!

    PH: Flying off to Spain-o to look at the volcano!

    SH: Flying off to Spain-o to look at the volcano!

    PH: Splashing through the rain-o to look at the volcano!

    SH: Splashing through the rain-o to look at the volcano!

    PH: Going up the crane-o to look at the volcano!

    SH: Climbing down the chain-o to look at the volcano!

    PAUSE 3, 2,1

    PH and SH: BOOM!

    PH: In a lot of pain-o because of the volcano!

    SH: In a lot of pain-o because of the volcano!

    PH: NEVER do it again-o. STAY OFF THE VOLCANO!

    SH: NEVER do it again-o. STAY OFF THE VOLCANO!

    Connect with us!

    Got any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.au

    The Teacher’s Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning.

    Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.

    At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves.

    To find out about upcoming webinars, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/.

    And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.

    To make sure you don’t miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player.

    Produced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com

  • Sharon and Phil cover a range of literacy learning insights and strategies, including:

    "How do I engage every child in literacy learning?"

    With literacy learning, what do teachers want? They want their kids to be engaged. They want to cater for all abilities and motivations.

    Our approaches to literacy learning

    It's not about a blanket program that works for all. Not every child is the same. Some approaches are better than others - Sharon and Phil have discovered this over years of teaching.

    In the Cue toolkit, revealed to you on this podcast, there are some great tools and techniques that will enhance these approaches.

    How do we know which approaches work best?

    Over the years, Sharon and Phil have seen first hand the increase in engagement of the kids in their classes and those they work with. When students own their own learning, they are more engaged.

    Sharon and Phil talk about the three selves – self-motivated, self-regulated, self-directed.

    This is just a broad start!

    Getting started with 7 Timeless T’s of Literacy Instruction

    In this episode, Sharon and Phil go through each of these as an overview and give ways they have worked in my classrooms and give techniques/tools that has been useful.

    TOGETHER: All the children on the same task, together. This builds a community of learners. Learning together means that as the teacher we need to know our students well enough to provide an entry point for every child and no ceiling, allowing everyone a chance to grow.

    TIME: Allow plenty of time for students to read or write what they choose to read or write. Without this time they don’t have an opportunity to really demonstrate what they can do.

    TANTALISING TEXTS: In the previous episode Sharon and Phil talked about the central role literature takes in the Australian Curriculum and other curriculums. Building a tantalising library of books the students can choose from is key. It is this choice that research tells us is the most critical aspect to engaging readers. Tools: Easy to find and appealing books in attractive baskets is the first step in creating a great classroom library. Teachers find out what is wanted by students.

    THINKER’S TALKING: Always make a time in literacy sessions – in the beginning, middle or end - for identified students to share to the whole group. This will be students who have gained a particular insights or discoveries that will benefit the rest of the group. Keep a roster of who is sharing so that over time all students are contributing.

    TRANSFORMATIVE TEACHING: Picking up on what you noticing in observations and conferring and then aligning the next steps in your teaching with the curriculum, you're honing in on where the needs of the students are – as individuals, in groups or as a whole class, you're looking for opportunities to take a group or individuals aside and teach them a new skill, as they need it, in that moment.

    TRUE TASKS: If tasks are meaningful they are more likely to engage the students. How do you make them more meaningful? This occurs when connections can be made across reading and writing.

    TRANSFORMATIVE TRACKING: When you track the learning closely it’s more powerful than a standardised test in showing the teacher and the student where they are in their learning.

    Summarising the key themes:

    ● Allowing all children an entry point

    ● Empowering students through choice vs blanket scripts that they follow/top down approaches

    ● Learning together with Timeless T’s vs grouping students into ability groups

    End of episode questions:

    ● A tantalising text - The Beetle Alphabet Book by Jerry Pallotta

    ● A tool - Phil has mentioned a few including Reading Calendar A3 blank calendar grid

    Connect with us!

    Got any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.au

    The Teacher’s Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning.

    Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.

    At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves.

    To find out about upcoming webinars, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/.

    And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.

    To make sure you don’t miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player.

    Produced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com

  • In this introductory episode, Phil and Sharon Callen introduce themselves and give you a taste of what the show is all about - giving tools and techniques to really help teachers in their classrooms (and they work for all students).

    Phil and Sharon also touch some key questions that teachers are asking, including:

    How do we get all students to be engaged in literacy? How do we know the tools we choose are working? How do we create an entry point for each and every student? How do we become a thinker, rather than a deliverer of programs? How do I maintain an engaging and rigorous literacy classroom?

    Phil and Sharon also talk about building trusted mentors or professional associations, developing timeless principles, and becoming a professional - an authentic teacher who owns their own teaching.

    And, some practical points to finish -

    1. Sharon's recommended book

    2. A great tool you can use in the literacy classroom

    3. Something exciting Phil and Sharon have seen in a classroom this week

    Connect with us!

    Got any questions? Feedback? Thoughts? Email Phil: phil@cuelearning.com.au

    The Teacher’s Tool Kit For Literacy is the free podcast for motivated teachers and school leaders who want the latest tips, tricks and tools to inspire their students and school community in literacy learning.

    Hear from literacy experts and founders of Cue Learning, Sharon and Phil Callen, and special guests.

    At Cue Learning, our literacy specialists draw on over 30 years of teaching and international consulting experience to deliver world-class learning solutions. We equip, empower and support teachers to become their authentic selves, using the fullness of the Australian curriculum.

    To find out about upcoming webinars, and about how Cue can help you and your school, visit the Cue Learning website http://www.cuelearning.com.au/.

    And you can get even more amazing teaching resources, right now, at Teachific https://www.teachific.com.au/.

    To make sure you don’t miss any literacy learning tips and insights, please subscribe to our show on your favourite podcast player.

    Produced by Apiro Media https://apiropodcasts.com