Radio play

  • 148: REDRUM!!!!

    · 01:46:31 · The Walking Dead ‘Cast

    All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy. All work and no play makes Jason a dull boy.

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  • #6 - Reid Speed Dubstep Mix

    · Panda Dubstep Mix Show: The Best Dubstep Tracks Mixed Weekly // Dubstep Podcast with Dubstep Mixes by a Dubstep DJ

    The Panda Dubstep Mix Show presents Reid Speed. This American dubstep, drum and bass and electro producer and DJ is the founder of Play Me Records, one of the labels making splashes in the dubstep genre right now. Reid started out years ago in the New York City underground working behind the counter at the legendary Breakbeat Science store while in college at the School of Visual Arts. Drum and bass at the start, she was soon seduced by the sounds of 2-step and speed garage and began DJing full time, producing tracks and throwing her own events. Recently garnering new acclaim as the founder of chart-topping Play Me Records. In just over 2 years, Play Me Records and Play Me Too have taken the Beatport charts by storm, with 6 #1s, more than half the releases charting in the top 10, and nearly every release charting in the top 100. They have broken more new artists and launched the careers of artists like Cyberoptics, J. Rabbit, Tremourz and Bare. 2010 saw Play Me Records voted Dubstep Label of the Year by Beatport, and Beatport has now signed on to sponsor the Play Me Bass Monster Tour for 2011. Play Me's self-described mission is to bring the joy of bass to everyone. With Reid Speed on the lead, they're sure doing that. In this mix, Reid Speed bring us 18 of her label's best and latest tracks, remixes and exclusives in a 40-minute mix. Leave your appreciation for her in the comments! ★BIOGRAPHY★ Reid Speed has been a dancefloor destroyer for over a decade and is best known for skillfully throwing down all genres of bass music. She has recently garnered new acclaim as the Bass Boss of her top-charting labels Play Me Records and Play Me Too. Respected the world over as one of America's best DJs, with a host of mix compilations and a slew of original and group productions under her belt, she now devotes most of her time to running the Play Me brand. In just over 2 years, Play Me Records and Play Me Too have taken the Beatport charts by storm, with 6 #1s, more than half the releases charting in the top 10, and nearly every release charting in the top 100. They have broken more new artists and launched the careers of artists like Cyberoptics, J. Rabbit, Tremourz and Bare. 2010 saw Play Me Records voted Dubstep Label of the Year by Beatport, and Beatport has now signed on to sponsor the Play Me Bass Monster Tour for 2011. Play Me is known for its ear-to-the-ground breaking of new artists such as Bare, Figure, Dillon Francis, J. Rabbit & Tremourz, Cyberoptics, and raising the bar for musicality amongst bass music labels. They continually push the sound forward and seek new talent in ways others choose not to, with clearly positive results. Their "New Blood of Dubstep" Compilation was an instant hit for bringing to light a young and hungry crop of talented producers from around the world, and is now in production of Volume 2. Their DJs are booked all around the world every week, the crew host an online radio show on Filth.FM each Sunday with worldwide guests and tons of dubs, and their music is now an integral part of a global Bass community. Play Me's mission is to continue to reach further out and higher up to bring the joy of bass to everyone. TRACKLISTING1 - The Unik - Gimme Some (PLAY ME) 2 - Cyberoptics - Geisha (Total Recall Remix) (Unreleased) 3 - Bassex - Sex Drive (Tremourz Remix) (PLAY ME) 4 - Trowa - Body Scan (PLAY ME TOO) 5 - Trampa & Dark Elixer - Bag Of Weed (PLAY ME) 6 - Dirt Monkey - Peanut Butter (Unreleased) 7 - Blaqcix & Gein - Bang (PLAY ME TOO) 8 - KPC- 22 Inch Swag (PLAY ME TOO) 9 - MRK-1 - Arabian Bass (PLAY ME) 10 - The Unik - Bad Funk (PLAY ME) 11 - AaA - Bang Bang (PLAY ME TOO) 12 - Ishe & Dirt Monkey - Flaunt It (PLAY ME) 13 - Cyberoptics - Tie Fighter (PLAY ME) 14 - KPC - In Love Again (PLAY ME TOO) 15 - Nostalgia - Synthesizer (Unreleased) 16 - FS & Reid Speed - Bass Monster (Calvertron Remix) (PLAY ME TOO) 17 - FS & Reid Speed - Bass Monster (PLAY ME TOO) 18 - Negativland - The Way of It (SST)

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  • Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio with Glen Popiel, KW5GP - ETH072

    · 01:33:41 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk with Glen Popiel, KW5GP, about all kinds of projects that you can do with an Arduino and about his two books dealing with the Arduino, Arduino for Ham Radio and More Arduino for Ham Radio. Facebook Question of the Week: Have you ever used an Arduino to build something? If so, what did you build? Tech Corner - Arduino Projects Glen Popiel, KW5GP author of Arduino for Ham Radio, More Arduino for Ham Radio and High Speed Multimedia for Amateur Radio Hamvention interview on 40m qrp transceiver video https://www.facebook.com/ARRL.org/videos/10154849135407408/   I had a great conversation with Glen in this episode. Glen is a great guy and is funny as it gets. Glen has been a ham for a long time and has a lot of experience in electronics and Ham Radio. He combines the love of electronics and the love of amateur radio in a way that everyone can understand. Some of the stuff that we talked about that are in his books, and realizing that you can get an arduino for SOOOO cheap, I cant wait to get his More Arduino for Ham Radio book and try out some of the stuff in there. I might even have to buy both of the books and see if my oldest daughter wants to build some of the projects with me as well. It would be some great father-daughter time if she did. Below is a list of each of Glen's books and the description of them as well as links to both Amazon using my affiliate link and a direct link to the ARRL if you want to buy directly from them. Arduino for Ham Radio Arduino Microcontroller Projects You Can Build Today!The Arduino has become widely popular among hobbyists and ham radio operators. Hams are exploring these powerful, inexpensive microcontrollers, creating new projects and amateur station gear. With its Open Source model, the Arduino community freely shares software and hardware designs, making projects easier to build and modify. Arduino for Ham Radio introduces you to the exciting world of microcontrollers and Open Source hardware and software. It starts by building a solid foundation through descriptions of various Arduino boards and add-on components, followed by a collection of ham radio-related practical projects. Beginning with simple designs and concepts and gradually increasing in complexity and functionality, there is something here for everyone. Projects can be built quickly and used as-is, or they can be expanded and enhanced with your own personal touches. Projects Random Code Practice Generator CW Beacon and Foxhunt Keyer Fan Speed Controller Digital Compass Weather Station RF Probe with LED Bar Graph Solar Battery Charge Monitor On-Air Indicator Talking SWR Meter Talking GPS/UTC Time/Grid Square Indicator Iambic Keyer Waveform Generator PS/2 CW Keyboard Field Day Satellite Tracker Azimuth/Elevation Rotator Controller CW Decoder Lightning Detector CDE/Hy-Gain Rotator Controllers Purchase from Amazon(Affiliate Link)  or directly from the ARRL More Arduino Projects for Ham Radio More Arduino Microcontroller Projects for Your Ham Radio Station!Building on the success of Arduino for Ham Radio, this book — More Arduino Projects for Ham Radio — includes 15 completely new practical and functional Arduino projects for the ham shack. This time, we branch out to use some of the newer Arduino variants and devices. Each project is complete and functional as-is, but room has been left for you to add personal touches and enhancements. That’s part of the fun of the Arduino and Open Source communities — building on the work of others, and then sharing your designs and innovations for others to learn, modify, and improve. More Arduino Projects for Ham Radio starts by building a solid foundation through descriptions of the many new Arduino boards and add-on components, followed by a collection of practical ham radio-related projects that showcase a wide variety of applications. There is something here for everyone. Projects Auto On/Off Mobile Power Control Station Power Monitor AC Current Monitor Load Tester Voice Memory Keyer Wireless Remote Coax Switch Wireless Remote Telemetry GPS-Based Ethernet Network Time Protocol Server Yaesu FT-series Transceiver Rotator Controller Interface Yaesu G-450A/G-800SA Rotator Controller Rebuild Yaesu Rotator Controller Modification 1 to 30 MHz DDS VFO Antenna SWR Analyzer 40 Meter QRP CW Transceiver 40 Meter QRP JT65 Transceiver Purchase from Amazon(Affiliate Link)  or directly from the ARRL High Speed Multimedia for Amateur Radio Build a High Speed Amateur Radio Microwave NetworkUsing commercial off-the-shelf equipment and developing their own software, groups of hams have created high speed wireless Amateur Radio digital networks with wide area coverage. The possible uses for these high speed data networks in the Amateur Radio community are endless. Virtually any service that works on the regular Internet can be adapted to an Amateur Radio high speed multimedia (HSMM) network, including video conferencing, instant messaging, voice over Internet protocol (VoIP), network sensors and cameras, remote station control, and many other services. With the capability to send real-time video and data files, the public service and disaster support aspects of Amateur Radio are expanded tremendously. This book introduces HSMM networking, explains the basics of how it works, and describes the various technologies in use today. Later chapters explain in detail how to deploy your own HSMM network, along with various applications to put it to work. Well illustrated step-by-step instructions will guide you through the process of installing and configuring software needed to get your HSMM network up and running. Includes: Introduction to High Speed Multimedia High Speed Multimedia Technologies HSMM Equipment for Amateur Radio TCP/IP for HSMM HSMM Applications Security and Filtering Backup and Redundancy Deploying HSMM Networks The Future of HSMM Purchase from Amazon(Affiliate Link)  or directly from the ARRL If you have any questions regarding the Arduino, or would like to collaborate on a project, Contact Glen and He will be happy to help any way that he can. Click here to send him an email. Links that we talked about in this episode: Amateur Radio Round Table - A live amateur radio show with Tom and the gang. Tom has one of the longest running amateur radio programs on today. His Tuesday night live webcasts are even retransmitted on a Shortwave radio station. Hamradio 360 - This podcast is one of my favorite podcasts. Cale, George and Jeremy do an awesome job with being ambassadors to the hobby of ham radio. George and Jeremy are the hosts of the Hamradio 360 Workbench podcast that does a more of a deep dive into the  technical side of the hobby. Do You Need Some QSL Cards? Check out KB3IHF QSL Cards. When you place your order make sure you mention that you heard about him on the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. If you do I will get a small commission on your purchase. West Mountain Radio Are you tired of lousy propagation conditions and wondering how to work some real DX for a change? Maybe you spin the dial and wonder what's going on below the voice segment of the HF bands? The answer is ... You're missing out! You're missing out on digital modes! A rapidly growing and exciting part of ham radio! Work real DX with the incredible JT-65 and JT-9 modes! It's no exaggeration when I tell you, you WILL work stations you never thought possible, even using low power and compromise antennas. Have fun making new contacts in modes such as PSK31, Olivia, Radio-Teletype, SSTV and many more! The RIGblaster Advantage is everything you need to operate these exciting digital modes. Made in the US, the RIGblaster interfaces have set the standard for nearly 20 years. Thousands of satisfied operators have learned their RIGblaster Advantage will provide solid digital communication, easy operating and reliability. The RIGblaster Advantage has: A high quality built in sound card A single USB cable to your computer - say goodbye to the rats nest of audio and serial cables.  Tidy up your station! Built in rig control that works with most radios Flexible transmit/receive switching -  Choose between VOX or computer PTT Volume controls on the interface - no more hunting through Windows just to alter your transmit level! Real Morse Code keying that actually uses the CW mode on your radio Operate RTTY FSK for radios which support it An easy to understand manual covers beginners and seasoned operators alike Comes with a universal mic cable which fits most radios - optional cables may be available for your particular radio. Don't miss out on the fun and excitement any longer! The RIGblaster Advantage is available right now for 199.95 with free ground shipping to the US 48.    For more information on the RIGblaster Advantage and to learn how to get your free USB Port Monitor with you purchase, click here. Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH047 - Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Servies

    · 01:11:16 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service(RACES), we talk about the Cleveland Amateur Radio Club from Cleveland, TN in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!     Tech Corner - Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Services(RACES) What is RACES?   Founded in 1952, the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) is a public service provided by a reserve (volunteer) communications group within government agencies in times of extraordinary need. During periods of RACES activation, certified unpaid personnel are called upon to perform many tasks for the government agencies they serve. Although the exact nature of each activation will be different, the common thread is communications.   ACS, in its RACES and other reserve emergency communications functions, provides a pool of emergency communications personnel that can be called upon in time of need. ACS/RACES units across the country prepare themselves for the inevitable day when they will be called upon. When a local, county, or state government agency activates its ACS unit, that unit will use its communications resources (RACES, if necessary) to meet whatever need that agency has.   Traditional RACES operations involve emergency message handling on Amateur Radio Service frequencies. These operations typically involve messages between critical locations such as hospitals, emergency services, emergency shelters, and any other locations where communication is needed. These communications are handled in any mode available, with 2 meters FM being the most prevalent. During time of war, when the President exercises his War Emergency Powers, RACES might become the only communications allowed via amateur radio. Activating under the FCC's restrictive RACES Rules is not always necessary when using Amateur Radio Service frequencies for emergency communications. For example, ACS communicators may need to communicate with ARES or other radio amateurs who are not government-certified to operate in a RACES net. ACS personnel also might become involved in non-amateur public-safety or other government communications, Emergency Operations Center (EOC) staffing, and emergency equipment repair. Who Does RACES Operate Under?   The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provides planning guidance and technical assistance for establishing a RACES organization at the state and local government level.   The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is responsible for the regulation of RACES operations. RACES is administrated by a local, county, or state civil defense agency responsible for disaster services. This civil defense agency is typically an emergency services or emergency management organization, sometimes within another agency such as police or fire. RACES is a function of the agency's Auxiliary Communications Service (ACS), sometimes known as DCS (Disaster Communications Service), ECS (Emergency Communications Service), ARPSC (Amateur Radio Public Service Corps), etc. Many ACS units identify themselves solely as RACES organizations, even though their communications functions and activities typically go beyond the restrictions of RACES operations. Other ACS units combine government RACES and non-government ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Service) activities and identify themselves as ARES/RACES organizations. Yet other ACS units who use amateur radio for emergency government communications identify themselves solely as ARES organizations, whether or not they activate under FCC RACES Rules.   The Amateur Radio Regulations, Part 97, Subpart E, §97.407, were created by the FCC to describe RACES operations in detail. Although no longer issued or renewable, RACES station licenses were issued in the past by the FCC to government agencies for RACES operations. The agencies may continue to conduct RACES operations without these licenses, using primary or club call signs. Training While each RACES organization may not require the same thing, there are a few “classes” that are required by the NIMS for all entry level first responders. These are the NIMS courses, IS-100b and IS-700b.While these two are the only ones that are required by the NIMS system for first responders, several RACES groups that I have looked at also require the IS-200 and/or IS-800.b.   Even though RACES and Skywarn are two separate entities on paper, because of the way that both of them work, sometimes Skywarn is run under the RACES flag so to speak. Since they are pushed together so often, some RACES groups require Skywarn training as well.   Other types of training should also be done within the RACES organization. Things like Net training, search and rescue operations, how to send a radiogram, and so much more. While most training is done in person there also should be on the air training. With RACES however, you are limited to one hour of on the air training a week. You can extend the one hour per week to up to 72 in length with the permission but you can only do this twice a year. This type of training is typically a large scale training event involving multiple agencies. Standardization   One of the things that we have learned over the years, since 9/11/2001 especially, is that things should be more standardized across different organizations or agencies. One of the things that a lot of RACES organizations have done all across the US is to standardize their power connections. When I first got my license 20+ years ago, there were several different types of power connections and each manufacture had a different style.   Things have gotten better over the years and now most radios have the same type of connections. I have not personally see any new radios in a while so I'm not sure if they are the same type of connects as they use to be, however, many RACES organizations have adopted a standardized power connection called the Anderson Powerpole Connectors.   One of the many reasons that I can think of to goto this type of power plug is because of the awesome power distribution system that West Mountain Radio has developed called the Rig Runner.These power distribution systems are an awesome piece of equipment and are very versatile! Liability Issues?   One of the things that I hear a lot when it comes to people volunteering is that they don't want to put themselves in a position where they can be sued. While this question doesn't come up a lot in the amateur radio community because a lot of people that are hams got into it to help people, this is still a valid concern. Thankfully, those that volunteer to be a RACES, ARES and Skywarn volunteer are protected under the Volunteer Protection Act of 1997.   While this act is not a get out of jail free card or total protection from a lawsuit, it does protect you from prosecution if you if you are doing what you are suppose to be doing. By that I'm saying that if you:   Work within the scope of your responsibilities,    The harm was not caused by willful or criminal misconduct, gross negligence, reckless misconduct, or a conscious, flagrant indifference to the rights or safety of the individual harmed by the volunteer If appropriate or required, the volunteer was properly licensed, certified, or authorized by the appropriate authorities for the activities or practice in the State in which the harm occurred, where the activities were or practice was undertaken within the scope of the volunteer's responsibilities in the nonprofit organization or governmental entity The harm was not caused by the volunteer operating a motor vehicle, vessel, aircraft, or other vehicle for which the State requires the operator or the owner of the vehicle, craft, or vessel to-- possess an operator's license; or maintain insurance.   RACES Organizations Around the Country Arlington County RACES Resource Library   Flashback: Comment by NA4IT on QRZ about Ep 46 ETH026 - Youth In Amateur Radio ETH035 - Elmers, Are You Doing Your Part?     Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Cleveland Amateur Radio Club   Website: https://www.carc.cc/ Twitter: @carc_tn Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/carcradioclub/ Club Callsign: W4GZX   The CARC is one of the few amateur radio clubs that owns its own building which is a huge blessing.  This allows for club member to congregate anytime they want.  Every Saturday our clubhouse is open from 8 AM to noon for members to come and work on radio projects, get on the air, or have a cup of coffee with fellow hams.  The CARC clubhouse is located centrally in Cleveland, TN on a high ridge and serves Cleveland and Bradley Co as an emergency communications staging area.  Testing has proved that this location is ideal allowing for VHF simplex coverage throughout the county and beyond.   History Larry G. Ledford KA4J prepared “The Beginning of the Cleveland Amateur Radio Club” for the club’s 50th anniversary in 2012. It is an excellant insight into the people who pioneered amateur radio in Bradley County and were able to share their interest in wireless communications with the founders of the club. The article can be viewed by clicking here.   Meetings General Club Meeting - 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of each month except December at 7pm Tutoring Meeting - Most Saturdays 8a-11a CW Classes - Tuesday Evenings 6:30p - 7:30p   Repeaters 146.925 - PL 114.8 System Fusion (Listen Live) 444.275 + System Susion   Nets Southeast Tennessee Amateur Radio(STAR) net - 1st, 2nd and 4th Tuesdays at 8:30pm on the 147.180 Repeater (Listen Live) The Bradley County Emergency Services Net is held every Monday night at 8:00 PM on the 146.925 repeater, Cleveland Amateur Radio Club Slow Speed CW Net (CARC SSCW). - 1st, 2nd and 4th Thursday nights of every month at 7PM EST/EDT (2300 / 0000 UTC), on a frequency of 7.070 MHz +/- QRM. Activities Field Day ARRL Sweepstakes CQ World Wide TN QSO Party ARRL VHF Contests Community Service   Upcoming Events     NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Dec 9 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 9 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 9 ARRL 10-Meter Contest 0000Z, Dec 10 to 2400Z, Dec 11 SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 1200Z, Dec 10 to 2400Z, Dec 11 International Naval Contest 1600Z, Dec 10 to 1559Z, Dec 11 AWA Bruce Kelley 1929 QSO Party 2300Z, Dec 10 to 2300Z, Dec 11 and  2300Z, Dec 17 to 2300Z, Dec 18 CQC Great Colorado Snowshoe Run 2100Z-2259Z, Dec 11 NAQCC CW Sprint 0130Z-0330Z, Dec 14 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 14 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 14 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Dec 14 and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 14 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 15 NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Dec 16 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 16 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 16 Russian 160-Meter Contest 2000Z, Dec 16 to 2400Z, Dec 17 AGB-Party Contest 2100Z-2400Z, Dec 16 OK DX RTTY Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 17 RAC Winter Contest 0000Z-2359Z, Dec 17 Feld Hell Sprint 0000Z-2359Z, Dec 17 Croatian CW Contest 1400Z, Dec 17 to 1400Z, Dec 18 Stew Perry Topband Challenge 1500Z, Dec 17 to 1500Z, Dec 18 ARRL Rookie Roundup, CW 1800Z-2359Z, Dec 18 Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0200Z-0400Z, Dec 19 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 21 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 21 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Dec 21 and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 21 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 22   *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar   Hamfests 12/09/2016 West Central Florida Section Convention (Tampa Bay Hamfest) - Plant City, FL   12/10/2016 Pearl River County ARC Hamfest - Poplarville, MS SantaFest - Cheltenham, MD   12/17/2016 MARA Annual Christmas Hamfest - Minden, LA   *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar     News ARRL Expands Initiative to Fire Up Collegiate Amateur Radio Clubs 11/30/2016 A growing number of campus radio clubs and student radio amateurs have begun to share ideas and suggestions on the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative (CARI) Facebook page, which is aimed at sparking renewed participation, activity, and idea-sharing among this special sector of the Amateur Radio community. The now-expanded initiative stemmed from two well-attended ARRL New England Division Convention forums for radio amateurs attending college, one hosted by the Amateur Radio clubs at Harvard (W1AF) and Yale (W1YU). As the forum explained, the activity level at campus Amateur Radio club stations can vary wildly from one year to the next, as students graduate and newcomers arrive. “The most common difficulty stems from uneven interest over time,” said ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, in his “Second Century” editorial, “Cheers for College Amateur Radio: Sis-boom-bah!” in December 2016 QST. “Even the strongest leaders in college Amateur Radio graduate every 4 years, sometimes leaving their clubs without adequate continuity or leadership succession.” Gallagher pointed out that “recognized” student activities require students in order to maintain that status. However, even officially recognized college club stations may find themselves at the mercy of administrations in terms of space for a station and antennas, and some clubs have had to move more than once to accommodate their schools’ space requirements. Issues involving safety and security can also affect college radio clubs. In a recent post, Kenny Hite, KE8CTL, a graduate teaching assistant at West Virginia University, said the university’s Amateur Radio club, W8CUL, has been unable to participate in recent on-the-air events “due to lack of working equipment and questionable antenna setups,” as he put it. “We are working to identify working equipment/coax lines.” Another poster, Dennis Silage, K3DS, who’s associated with the Temple University Amateur Radio Club (K3TU), said, “A key to a successful and long-running college club seems to be faculty involvement for stability and recognition.” He invited other CARI participants to check out the club’s website to see what members have been doing. “It occurred to us that, if college Amateur Radio could galvanize [mutual interests], then colleges might just provide the ideal bridge between youthful interest in the subject and lifelong participation in our community,” Gallagher wrote. Some ideas are already being suggested, and the Facebook page has spurred communication among an ever-widening network of those involved or interested in Amateur Radio on campus, from students, faculty members, and administrators to college radio club alums. One suggestion has been to harness the competitive nature of colleges to organize operating events — perhaps with “conferences” resembling those for sports — to keep interest alive. ARRL received permission to rebrand the Collegiate Amateur Radio Operators Facebook group, initially organized by Sam Rose, KC2LRC, as the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative. All collegiate radio amateurs, clubs, and alumni are invited to participate and to get involved in activities that advance the art and enjoyment of Amateur Radio. All suggestions are welcome. December Youngsters on the Air Event Set 11/29/2016 The annual Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event takes place during the entire month of December, with YOTA stations attempting to contact many other young radio amateurs around the world. The event offers an excellent opportunity for get radio amateurs in their teens and early 20s to get together on the air. “The idea of this is to show the Amateur Radio hobby to youth and to encourage youngsters to be active within the hobby,” said International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 (IARU-R1) Youth Working Group Chair Lisa Leenders, PA2LS. “Consider giving a demonstration at a school or local club, gather together with your friends, grab a pizza, and make some QSOs, or enjoy a great pile-up. Let’s show this great hobby to the world!” This is not a formal contest but a way to get young people on the air with their peers. Numerous participating stations, primarily in Region 1, will be sporting YOTA call sign suffixes.     Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • 5: Renaults nya bil

    · 01:42:23 · En podd om teknik

    Veckans avsnitt bjuder på tankar kring annonsblockering på webben, pollen gör ett gästspel och därtill ger vi er en herrans massa apptips för både Android och iOS. Allt detta och mer från herrarna Söderlund, Larsson och Jonasson. Rakt in i hörselgångarna, så bara!! Flera av länkarna i veckans show notes är affiliate-länkar, med vilkas hjälp ni kan stödja En podd om teknik. Så funderar på du på att köpa någon app vi pratar om, använd gärna våra länkar här nedan. Då blir vi glada och kan göra mer kul saker för dig som lyssnar! Veckans ämnen Spotify kör inte P2P längre Marco om popups och content blocking Ghostery An hour with Safari Content Blocker The Verge: The Mobile Web Sucks Google släpper router: OnHub Apptips Podcast-appar Overcast (iOS) Castro (iOS) Pocket Casts (Android) Pocket Casts (iOS) Pocket Casts (Windows Phone) Twitterklienter Fenix (Android) Twitterific (iOS) TweetBot (iOS) GTD-appar Todoist (iOS) Tidiest (Android) Things (iOS) Due (iOS) Clear (iOS) Wunderlist (Android) Wunderlist (iOS) Foto-appar Instagram (Android) Instagram (iOS) VSCO Cam (Android) VSCO Cam (iOS) EyeFi (SD-kort med WiFi) Darkroom (iOS) Snapseed (Android) Snapseed (iOS) Skitch (Android) Skitch (iOS) Genius Scan (Android) Genius Scan (iOS) Produktivitetsappar Outlook (Android) Outlook (iOS) Mailbox (Android) Mailbox (iOS) Fantastical (iOS) Inbox (Android) Inbox (iOS) Inte ett tips om Gmail-appen (Android) Gmail (iOS) Drafts (iOS) RSS-läsare / Läsare Feedly (Android) Feedly (iOS) Reeder (iOS) Instapaper (Android) Instapaper (iOS) Pocket (Android) Pocket (iOS) Appar i hemmet / Övrigt Day One (iOS) Jamie Olivers recept (Android) Jamie Olivers recept (iOS) Paprika (Android) Paprika (iOS) Philips Hue (Lampor som går att styra med mobilen) RoomScan (iOS) Promillekoll (Android) Promillekoll (iOS) Waze (Android) Waze (iOS) Musikproduktion Figure (iOS) Traktor DJ (iPhone) Traktor DJ (iPad) djay 2 (Android) djay 2 (iPhone) djay 2 (iPad) En podd om teknik Hemsida Skicka feedback En chatt om teknik Donera Om oss Social media En podd om teknik på Twitter En podd om teknik på Facebook Jezper på Twitter Johan på Twitter Magnus på Twitter Tommie på Twitter  

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  • ETH037 - We Have The Power!

    · 01:21:55 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Power Tech Corner - Power Cords Where to Connect Power on a Mobile Setup You should always connect the positive side to either the hot terminal of the battery or the input leg of the fuse bose as close to the battery as possible. The negative side should be connected to the chassis where your your battery is connected. The reasoning behind this is because vehicle come standard now with a battery monitoring system that monitors the battery voltage as well as power consumption needs of the vehicle(i.e. When the A/C is turned on, more power is needed). The monitor is typically connected between the batteries negative terminal and the chassis ground. You need to bypass this monitor when connecting radio equipment so alway connect your negative side to the same location as the negative battery lead is connected to. Because you are more than likely going to be killing the power to the entire vehicle, you could potentially activate the anti-theft device on your car radio and have to enter a security code to get it to work again. In some cases this could affect the starting of the vehicle as well, which could potentially have to be fixed at a dealership. Selecting the Correct Size Wire Make sure that you a big enough gauge wire to handle the amperage you need to power your equipment. There are several things to consider when selecting the size wiring you need. First off, you need to know what you Peak Current draw will be, not the average. A typical 100 watt radio draws about 22 peak amps while a 50 watt radio is about half that at about 11 amps. If you throw an amp in the mix that is even more. High Power Installations In high powered setups, like those that will include an amplifier, you should also install a second battery in your vehicle. This is typically done in the truck of the vehicle, if it has one. If you are going to install a second battery, you should use at least a 4 AWG wire or 2 AWG wire if the length of the wire is over 20 feet. You also need to make sure that you fuse the hot wire at both ends with about a 60 amp fuse to protect the wire. Also, make sure that you connect the negative side of that battery to the same chassis ground as your other battery, again bypassing the battery monitoring system. Multiple Devices Needing Power Whether you have a high powered setup or just multiple radios(which could technically be the same thing), one way to get power to all them the easiest is to use some kind of distribution power block, like a Rig Runner from West Mountain Radio. Like any other installation you need to know what you peak amperage is going to be when installing something like this. The higher gauge wire is only needed from the battery to the distribution block(Rig Runner). From there, you can use smaller gauge wire to each piece of equipment.   Can I Just Use the Existing Wiring? You never want to use the existing wiring in your vehicle to power you radios. Things like Accessory plugs(Cigarette lighter plugs), or tapping into the fuse panel inside your vehicle. While this may seem like the easiest way to do it, and I have been guilty of it myself, this can cause problems down the road. The high power consumption needs of your radio equipment can cause the wiring to overheat and cause RFI in your system. You would think that it would be ok to tap into your fuse panel because an open fuse spot on the fuse block can “kill two birds with one stone”. One it could fuse your power cord and two you don't have to go through the fire wall. While you could do it for the short term and it probably be ok, I highly recommend that you take to time to install your equipment properly. Boing through the fuse panel doesn't allow you bypass the battery monitoring system and could potentially cause problems.   If you use the accessory plug to power your radio, you can get RFI because of the circuitry that is built into the plug. Another possible cause of potential RFI is arcing can occur between the spring loaded tip of the plug and the socket. Both of these potential problems could cause errors to show up in your vehicle’s computer and causing your check engine light to come on or other warning lights or error messages to show up. Fuses We have talked already about how you should fuse you wiring, but let's dive a little deeper into it shall we. First off, what is a fuse? A fuse is a short piece of enclosed wire that is designed to melt if it is subjected to to high of a current. When the wire melts it will open the circuit and power will stop being supplied to your equipment. However, if you use a fuse that is rated for a higher amperage than what is required for whatever you are powering, it may not open or it may open but with a long delay. You want your fuse to do it’s job before the wire itself acts as a fuse and opens the circuit by potentially starting a fire. The above picture is a perfect example of using the wrong size fuse. The wire used in the picture above is a 6 AWG wire which is rated for a maximum of 100 amps, however, the fuse that the wire is connected to is 200 amps. There are several types of fuse holders out there for different types of fuses, but which should you use? Barrel Fuses The most common type of fuse that you see is a barrel type fuse. While there are several types of fuse holders for these type fuses, the most common that you will see are the inline ones. These are not the best kind to use, and here is why. With a barrel type in line fuse, you have two butt connections that you have make which are hard to solder and the wire that is supplied with the fuse holder is often two small of wire. If you are going to use this type of fuse, I recommend using a fuse block or something along those lines with proper end connectors. I recommend using the round end connectors over the split ones so that they maintain good connection and not slip out. Also, you should use insulated connector whenever possible so that they don't inadvertently come in contact with something else. Blade Fuses Another type of fuse that you see quite often is a blade fuse. You really see these in the automotive industry, however, the fuses that you use in your car are not the same type of fuses that you should use in your radio installation. The fuses that you use in your car are called ATO fuses. These fuses are not sealed and if moisture winds up getting inside of them, it can cause corrosion. You should use ATO style blade fuses because they are sealed. These are the type of fuses that you will see used in a Rig Runner or other type of commercially available power distribution system. There are also inline fuses that use these type of fuses, however you still run into the problem of have to use butt connectors to put them inline and the gauge wire issues are the same. Circuit Breakers Another option that sometimes is used is a circuit breaker. While you may think that this is a better option, because then all you have to do is reset the breaker if something happens, this is not really the case. Both fuses and circuit breakers have a time delay on when they open the circuit. With circuit breakers, that time is longer than with fuses. So your equipment will be subjected to a high amount of amperage for a longer period of time before the circuit breaker trips, potentially causing more damage to your equipment. How to Run the Wires First off, let's talk about the firewall. This is probably one of the most dreaded things for most people to do. It is right up there with drilling holes in your roof or truck to install an antenna. Car manufacturers don't typically design their firewalls with amateur radio in mind. That being said, there is, sometimes, a extra hole that is not used that is in the firewall for installation of high end radio installations that you can use. If your vehicle has one, great! Use it! If not, rather than trying to squeeze a wire through one that already has wires going through it, is often not a very good idea to try. Most of the time, these holes are already pretty much full and you won't be able to get another wire through it, especially if you are using a higher gauge wire. So, as a dentist says, we have to drill! Crap, I Have to Drill! If you have to drill, there are a few things that you need to remember when you are planning out where you are going to drill. Most modern vehicles have a fresh air inlet just behind the hood. Sometimes this area will also have the windshield washer assembly or the cabin air filter. For this reason, the upper area of the firewall should be avoided. Another thing to pay attention to, is in diesels and most high end vehicles, there is a second firewall that is in place to reduce engine noise in the cabin. The second firewall should also be avoided. Thirdly, often times, the brake lines are attached to the engine side of the firewall directly behind the brakes. Wherever you decide to drill, always make sure that you know what is on the other side of the firewall, so you don't damage anything that could potentially cost you a lot of money to get fixed. Once you have the hole drilled, make sure that you put the appropriate size grommet in the hole. This is to protect whatever wires you have coming through from rubbing on the side of the hole and causing them to fray or get cut. The last thing that you need to consider when choosing the location to drill, is make sure that the wires that you will be putting through the hole are not in a place where they will be stepped on or pinched. The closer to the outside of the vehicle on the driver side the better. Probably one of the best bits to use to drill through your firewall is a Rotacut drill bit. They are pricey but they do an outstanding job according to their website and reviews. We Are Going Under! There is another way that you can get to the battery from inside your vehicle, especially if it is a truck. Sometimes there is a hole that can be punched out under the driver or passenger seat. Sometimes, if you are lucky there is already a grommet there, sometimes not. On my 2008 Ram, there was, but on my 2012 Ram, there wasn't. If you decide to go this route, just remember to route your wires in a way where they won't be pinched and you will need to make sure and put some extra insulation on the outside of wiring to protect from moisture and heat. Make sure that you stay away from the exhaust system, suspension members, factory wiring and fuel lines. On some vehicles, you can follow the brake lines and use the hard points to secure your wiring. On my 2012 Ram, I was able to run my wires through my frame most of the way. In doing this, I was able to protect the wire from road debris, and to an extent, moisture. I'm Through the Firewall, Now What? Now that the hard part is done and we are through the firewall, the next thing that you need to think about is how you are going to run your wires inside the cab of your vehicle to make it look nice. I know of some people that it doesn't really matter to them if wires are going everywhere, but if this is not you, then keep reading. There are channels along the door that you can run your wires through. All you have to do is pull up the door kick plate and you will see it. These door trim pieces, just snap in and out. They generally pop out fairly easy and are just as easy to reinstall. See the picture below for an example of what I'm talking about. This picture is not of my installation although I did the exact same thing. This picture was taken from Alan Applegates, K0BG, website. I'm not sure if it is a picture of his installation or someone elses. You can also route you wires under the carpet of your vehicle, but sometimes this can be a real pain the butt, however, it can be done. The major thing that you need to remember when doing this, is to pay attention where you wires are lying. If they are lying in a place where they can get cut, or a screw be screwed through it, it is a recipe for disaster and you can see in the picture below. What About Base/Home Setups? So we have pretty much just been talking about mobile installations here, however, a lot of what we have talked about transfers over to a home or base station as well. The major differences is that you don't have to worry so much about external temperature, extra installation on your wiring, and going through the firewall…:) You will still need to make sure you have proper wiring size, fusing your connections and to a certain degree, a neat installation. Guys you know what I'm talking about, I'm sure your wife is probably like mine and don’t want a bunch of wires running all over the place making the desk look nasty! Further Reading: K0BG - Wiring and Grounding Ham Radio Mobile Installation - Going Mobile - Ham Radio School.com   -----------------------------------------------------  Are you looking for some new radio gear? Maybe you need a new computer for your shack? Did you lose a piece off you tower and you just can't find it without a metal detector? You can find all this and more at GigaParts.com. While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome! Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now! GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of... EHR10 ...at checkout to receive 10% off the price of the case!   Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Hall of Science Amateur Radio Club Website: http://www.hosarc.org/   Meetings Meetings which are held at the NY Hall of Science cafeteria (47-01 111th Street, Queens, NY) are open to the public and are held on the second Tuesday of the month at 7:30 PM. No meetings in July, August and December.   Repeaters WB2ZZO 444.200 (+5mhz offset), PL 136.5 Located in Alpine NJ KC2PXT 145.270 (-600 khz offset), PL 136.5 Will be up soon Activities Hamfest - Oct 9, 2016 starting at 9am - Flyer   Upcoming Events NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 30 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 30 YLRL DX/NA YL Anniversary Contest - 1400Z, Sep 30 to 0200Z, Oct 2 TARA PSK Rumble Contest - 0000Z-2400Z, Oct 1 15-Meter SSTV Dash Contest - 0000Z, Oct 1 to 2359Z, Oct 2 Oceania DX Contest, Phone -  0800Z, Oct 1 to 0800Z, Oct 2 WAB HF Phone - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 TRC DX Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 GTC CW Cup - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 Russian WW Digital Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1159Z, Oct 2 International HELL-Contest - 1600Z-1800Z, Oct 1 (80m) and 0900Z-1100Z, Oct 2 (40m) California QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 1 to 2200Z, Oct 2 FISTS Fall Slow Speed Sprint - 1700Z-2100Z, Oct 1 UBA ON Contest, SSB - 0600Z-1000Z, Oct 2 RSGB International DX Contest - 0700Z-1900Z, Oct 2 German Telegraphy Contest - 0700Z-1000Z, Oct 3 ARS Spartan Sprint - 0100Z-0300Z, Oct 4 Phone Fray - 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 5 CWops Mini-CWT Test - 1300Z-1400Z, Oct 5 and 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 5 and 0300Z-0400Z, Oct 6 432 MHz Fall Sprint - 1900 local - 2300 local, Oct 5 UKEICC 80m Contest - 2000Z-2100Z, Oct 5 NRAU 10m Activity Contest - 1700Z-1800Z, Oct 6 (CW) and 1800Z-1900Z, Oct 6 (SSB) and 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 6 (FM) and 2000Z-2100Z, Oct 6 (Dig) SARL 80m QSO Party - 1700Z-2000Z, Oct 6 NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Oct 7 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 7 Makrothen RTTY Contest - 0000Z-0759Z, Oct 8 and 1600Z-2359Z, Oct 8 and 0800Z-1559Z, Oct 9 Oceania DX Contest, CW - 0800Z, Oct 8 to 0800Z, Oct 9 Microwave Fall Sprint - 0800 local - 1400 local, Oct 8 SKCC Weekend Sprintathon - 1200Z, Oct 8 to 2400Z, Oct 9 Scandinavian Activity Contest, SSB - 1200Z, Oct 8 to 1200Z, Oct 9 QRP ARCI Fall QSO Party - 1200Z, Oct 8 to 2359Z, Oct 9 Pennsylvania QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 8 to 0500Z, Oct 9 and 1300Z-2200Z, Oct 9 Arizona QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 8 to 0600Z, Oct 9 and 1400Z-2359Z, Oct 9 FISTS Fall Unlimited Sprint - 1700Z-2100Z, Oct 8 PODXS 070 Club 160m Great Pumpkin Sprint - 2000Z, Oct 8 to 2000Z, Oct 9 North American SSB Sprint Contest - 0000Z-0400Z, Oct 9 UBA ON Contest, CW - 0600Z-0900Z, Oct 9   *Information taken from the ARRL and WA7BNM Contest Calendar Hamfests 10/01/2016 2016 Wichita Area Hamfest - Wichita, KS ARCOS SWAPMEET & COOKOUT - Shreveport, LA HamEXPO - Belton, TX Last Chance Tailgate - Plymouth, MN MBARC Fall Fest - Fishkill, NY Red Rose Repeater Association Hamfest - Brownstown, PA Rock Hill Hamfest - Rock Hill, SC San Diego Ham Fest - Lakeside, CA Valley Disaster Preparedness Fair - Granada Hills, CA VETTE CITY HAMFEST - Bowling Green, KY   10/02/2016 BARCfest - Longmont, CO Southeast Iowa Hamfest - West Liberty, IA   10/07/2016 Florida State Convention (Melbourne Hamfest) - Melbourne, FL Pacific Northwest VHF Society Conference - Bend, OR   10/08/2016 Alpena Swap - Alpena, MI BARA Fall Hamfest - Township of Washington, NJ Helena Hamfest - Helena, AL Kitsap County ARC Hamfest 2016 - Bremerton, WA LaGrange Hamfest -  LaGrange, GA Parkersburg/Wood County Hamfest - Mineral Wells, WV Randy Griffin Memorial Ham Fest - Morrilton, AR SwaptoberFest 2016 - Logan, UT WCLARC's 39th Annual Hamfest - Leesville, LA   10/09/2016 CARAFest 2016 - West Friendship, MD HOSARC Hamfest - Queens, NY Maysville Hamfest - Maysville, NC SEWFARS Swapfest - Hubertus, WI   News Amateur Radio Credited with Helping Injured Cyclist 09/23/2016 Members of the Huntsville Amateur Radio Club (HARC) in Alabama had a role in getting help for a Louisiana cyclist injured in a September 17 group ride in Madison County, Alabama. A representative of the sponsoring Spring City Cycling Club told WHNT-19 News that a number of riders, including Brian Guerrero, fell as a motor vehicle was passing in the opposite direction. The club spokesperson said it was unlikely that the motorist caused or contributed to the accident, and an investigation continues. The club praised the action of first responders and first aid from fellow cyclists — a trauma surgeon and a nurse. “Their actions in first aid and in directly calling for MedFlight likely saved his life. Huntsville Amateur Radio Club volunteers were instrumental in coordinating the communications amongst event organizers and volunteers, emergency personnel, and law enforcement. We extend our gratitude to law enforcement, first responders and HARC for their able and quick response to this terrible incident,” the club said. Guerrero remains hospitalized in Huntsville. — Thanks to WHNT-19 News Momentum Building to Urge Senate Passage of the Amateur Radio Parity Act 09/22/2016 The response to ARRL’s call to action urging the support of US Senators for the Amateur Radio Parity Act, H.R. 1301, has been gratifying — although the campaign continues. More than 50,000 e-mails have been sent to Capitol Hill viaRally Congress, and all 100 US Senate members have been contacted. The League continues to encourage members of the Amateur Radio community who have not yet done so to reach out to their two US Senators seeking their support. Just where things stand with respect to the bill’s future in the US Senate is not yet entirely clear. “As of this moment, we have no date set for action by the Senate,” said ARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, who has been deeply involved in promoting passage of the legislation. “The Senate will adjourn the September work period soon and members will return home to campaign. If we do not achieve consideration before they go into hiatus, we will have to wait until they return after Election Day.” On September 12, the US House of Representatives approved H.R. 1301 on a voice vote under a suspension of the rules, culminating many years of effort on ARRL’s part to gain legislation that would enable radio amateurs living in deed-restricted communities to erect antennas that support Amateur Radio communication. The bill calls on the FCC to amend its Part 97 rules “to prohibit the application to amateur stations of certain private land-use restrictions, and for other purposes.” Shepherded by ARRL, the overwhelming grassroots support for H.R. 1301 from the Amateur Radio community was credited for getting the bill through the US House, but it faces significant obstacles to passage in the US Senate. The earlier U.S. Senate version of the bill, S. 1685, no longer is in play, and the Senate is expected to vote on the version of H.R. 1301 that the House adopted this month. The vote came after ARRL worked with the Community Association Institute — which represents homeowners associations — to develop language that both organizations could support. Rally Congress makes it easy to generate letters to Senators in support of The Amateur Radio Parity Act. The entire process takes just a couple of minutes. “So it is critical that ARRL members continue to write their Senators,” Lisenco urged. “To those who have already written, thank you! If you haven’t done so already, please do so today. We can only do so much. After that, it becomes the responsibility of the membership to participate.” According to the amended bill provides, “Community associations should fairly administer private land-use regulations in the interest of their communities, while nevertheless permitting the installation and maintenance of effective outdoor Amateur Radio antennas. There exist antenna designs and installations that can be consistent with the aesthetics and physical characteristics of land and structures in community associations while accommodating communications in the Amateur Radio services.” More information on The Amateur Radio Parity Act is on the ARRL website.   ARRL Outgoing QSL Service to Raise Rates 09/22/2016 Although ARRL believes it’s important to maintain the long-standing tradition of the ARRL Outgoing QSL Service as a membership benefit, increased administration costs will require an increase in rates, in order to keep the Service available and viable. “The Service has been a member benefit for decades,” an ARRL statement said. “Since its official formation in November 1976, tens of millions of QSL cards have been shipped from ARRL Headquarters to Amateur Radio QSL bureaus of other national societies worldwide. At one time, this benefit offered a safe, reliable, and inexpensive way to exchange QSL cards for a fraction of the cost of the postal service. What Amateurs saved in financial cost, however, was made up for in time; it could take months, or even years, to send and receive a QSL through the bureau.” Effective November 1, the rate for 1 ounce of outgoing QSLs via the Service will increase to match the 1 ounce USPS international postage rate. As of September 2016, this rate is $1.15 per ounce — about 10 cards. An additional service fee of $7 will be charged per individual transaction, to cover administrative costs. ARRL said QSLing is very different now, and, while postal services are generally more reliable than in years past, international shipping costs have risen significantly. “With the advent of the Internet and online QSL confirmation services such as ARRL’s Logbook of The World, fewer and fewer paper cards are being exchanged,” the ARRL statement observed. Calling the Outgoing QSL Service “a significant tradition in the world of Amateur Radio,” the League said it’s committed to keeping that tradition and service alive for members who enjoy using it. “We are committed to ensuring our members will be able to send their QSL cards through the Service for decades to come,” the ARRL statement concluded.   Amateur Radio Volunteers on Call during Major Puerto Rico Power Outage 09/23/2016 Amateur Radio volunteers went on alert following an afternoon explosion on September 21 at the Aguirre Central Power Generator in Salinas that left some 1.5 million residents of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico without power. ARRL Public Information Coordinator Angel Santana, WP3GW, said that as Wednesday evening wore on, the most sought-after item was ice, followed by potable water — which depends on electricity to power the pumps that deliver it. The outage also resulted in traffic jams from non-functioning signal lights. The governor of Puerto Rico has declared a State of Emergency. “On the Amateur Radio side, the VHF/UHF linked repeater system of the Federación de Radio Aficionados de Puerto Rico (FRA), an ARRL-affiliated club, was the main source of information,” Santana told ARRL. “As soon as the situation began, lots of mobile and portable stations got on the air from east to west to report on the power loss, and ham radio was among the first to report the explosion, as smoke was observed soaring toward the sky.” According to FEMA, the fire at the Salinas switching station caused the island-wide power generation plant to shut down as a safety precaution. FEMA reported on September 23 that power had been restored to nearly 950,000 customers, with complete power restoration expected late in the day. FEMA said 305,000 customers were left without drinking water due to the loss of power to pumping stations. FEMA said that all critical facilities were operating on back-up generators, and airports, police stations, and water plants were “expected to receive first priority as power is restored.” The agency said telecommunications were operating normally. Santana said the eastern side of the island was covered by the 145.110 MHz repeater in Cayey, the western by a machine on 145.290 MHz, and in the center by the 146.830 MHz from the FRA. Repeaters on 70 centimeters became the main network for any emergency or health care traffic, Santana said. A routine Wednesday VHF net made it on the air as scheduled, and most comments and messages involved local situations as well as information about an October 9 FRA event. “Other repeater systems were on the air as part of a regular monitoring schedule, and some were active with normal conversations,” Santana said. On HF, Antonio Santiago, KP4IA, in Toa Alta was on the air from his energy-efficient home. Santana said KP4IA was “the main source of what was happening even before the situation got to the mainland news services,” checking into nets on 20, 40, and 75 meters and relaying information about the situation to other amateur stations on the mainland. Santana said local schools remained closed on September 23 and public services were to resume at 10 AM, as power and water service is returning gradually. “There are still Autoridad de Energía Eléctrica (AEE) customers who are without electricity,” Santana said. “Two cellular companies had problems. There was at least one death because of generator emissions and a few vehicle accidents. Kudos to the police personnel directing traffic.” FEMA said untreated wastewater and sewage were being discharged into spillways, hospitals were running on back-up generators and cisterns, and buses are being used to move passengers as the light-rail system is down. NASA provided a view from space, showing how Puerto Rico appears at night with full power as well as how it looked during the outage. Source: ARRL News   Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM  

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  • I am the music man (教学版)

    · 英文儿歌亲子童谣韵文

    I am the music man我是个音乐人I come from down your way我来自你的家乡And I can play我会演奏乐器What can you play你会演奏什么I play piano我会弹钢琴Pia-pia-pia-noPia-no pia-noPia-pia-pia-noPia-pia-noI am the Music Man,I come from down your way,And I can play!What can you play?I play the saxophone!Saxo,saxo,saxophone,saxophone,saxophone,Saxo,saxo,saxophone,Saxo,saxophone!Pi-a,Pi-a,Pi-a-no etc.I am the Music Man,I come from down your way,And I can play!What can you play?I play the bass drum!Big bass,big bass,big bass drum,Big bass,big bass drum,Big bass,big bass,big bass drum,Big bass,big bass drum!Saxo,saxo,saxophone etc.Pi-a,pi-a,pi-a-no etc.I am the Music Man,I come from down your way,And I can play!What can you play?I play the xylophone!Xylo,xylo,xylophone,Xylophone,xylophone,Xylo,xylo,xylophone,Xylo,xylophone!Big bass,big bass,big bass drum etc.Saxo,saxo,saxophone etc.Pi-a,pi-a,pi-a-no etc.I am the Music Man,I come from down your way,And I can play!What can you play?I play the violin!Vi-o,vi-o,vi-o-lin,Vi-o-lin,vi-o-lin,Vi-o,vi-o,vi-o-lin,Vi-o,vi-o-lin!Xylo,xylo,xylophone etc.Big bass,big bass,big bass drum etc.Saxo,saxo,saxophone etc.Pi-a,pi-a,pi-a-no etc.I am the Music Man,I come from down your way,And I can play!What can you play?I play the trombone!Trom-bo,Trom-bo,Tro-om-bone,Tro-om-bone,tro-om-bone,Trom-bo,Trom-bo,Tro-om-bone,Trom-bo,tro-om-bone!Vi-o,vi-o,vi-o-lin etc.Xylo,xylo,xylophone etc.Big bass,big bass,big bass drum etc.Saxo,saxo,saxophone etc.Pi-a,pi-a,pi-a-no etc.piano [pɪ&`&ænəʊ] 钢琴saxophone [&`&sæksəfəʊn] 萨克斯bass drum [beis drʌm] 大鼓xylophone [&`&zaɪləfəʊn] 木琴violin [vaɪə&`&lɪn] 小提琴trombone [trɒm&`&bəʊn] 长号词汇讲解:I come from down your way我从你家附近来down 沿着;其中 [ow]发【au】要发的饱满;your way你家附近piano [pɪ&`&ænəʊ] 钢琴;后面是音节的拆分。saxophone [&`&sæksəfəʊn] 萨克斯;重音在最前。x后面加o发【sə】bass drum [beis drʌm] 低音鼓;xylophone [&`&zaɪləfəʊn] 木琴;violin [vaɪə&`&lɪn] 小提琴;重音在最后;trombone [trɒm&`&bəʊn] 长号;更多精彩内容请添加毛妈微信:maobahelper

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  • ETH045 - Being A Net Control

    · 01:06:07 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Net Control , we talk about the Columbia Amateur Radio Club from Columbia, SC  in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!   Tech Corner - How To Be A Net Control   Characteristics of a Good Net Control   Good Listener Ear to Hand Multitasking Speaking Clearly Good Handwriting or computer skills Good under pressure Decision making skills   Member Accountability   Always know where you net members are located, and always make sure that everyone is accounted for. There is nothing worse than someone not answering a roll call, or ending a net and someone not checking secure and you have to go and look for them. If you don’t know where they were, you don't even know where to look. Just like my role as a 911 dispatcher, it is your responsibility to do everything in your power to make sure that those that you are “working” with” go home safely.   Know your radio   During an emergency is not the time to find out that you don't know how to do something on your radio. Make sure that you know how to do all the functions with your radio before you are put in a position where you HAVE to know how to do something and you can't figure it out. It is also a good idea to make sure that you have your radio manual with you as well. That way in case you don't know how to do something or you have forgotten to do something you can always look it up.   Whether the radio that you will be using during a net is your own personal radio or if you go to a location like an Emergency Operations Center to run the net, you need to train using whatever radio you will be using. If you will be using a radio that is not yours, you should always try and use it as much as possible before you have to use it in an emergency situation.   Know your logging program(if you use one)   Short of using a pen/pencil and paper, make sure that you understand how to use whatever you will use to do your logging with. If you are just going to use a pen/pencil and paper, make sure that you write neat enough to where others can read your handwriting, especially if someone will be taking over from you.   If you will be using a computer program, make sure that you know how to use the program well before you need to use it during an emergency. Make sure you understand all the functionality of it and how to start the program in case it crashes on you or if you are the first one to use it during a net.   Mistakes Happen   If you make a mistake, acknowledge it, correct it and move on! Everyone is human and everyone makes a mistake. The difference is if you make a mistake, you need to acknowledge it and correct it. This will not only make sure that everyone that is listening to you has the correct information, but it will also help earn their respect for you as a net control operator.   Think before you key up   There are two things that are my biggest pet peaves when it comes to taking on the radio. One is when you don't listen to whats going on and I have to say something twice or more. The second is when people key up to give a weather report or something and they  say something then they will say like ahhh or ummm and then something else and then umm again and it just take forever to get done saying whatever it is that they are trying to say.   When you have something that you need to say on the radio, think about what you are going to say, get all your thoughts together and then key up, say it and unkey. Not only does this make whoever is talking look like they don't know what they are doing, but it also reflects on the organization for not training them enough and it ties up the frequency for other people to use that have something to report as well.   Use Standard Phonetic Alphabet   When you are operating on a net, make sure that you use the official International Phonetic Alphabet. If you use something other than that, the receiving person will have to think about it more than if you use the standard alphabet. I talked with one person on the radio one day that had a suffix of CFS and he identified himself as Chicken Fried Steak. While it may be “cute”, it still took me a extra second or two to realize what his callsign was. Partly because it wasn't the standard Charlie Foxtrot Sierra and partly because I was laughing when I heard it.   Have a Backup   There are two backups that you need to have planned for on a net, a backup net control and a backup frequency. Both should be announced at the beginning and during the net. You should have a backup net control in case something happens to you station during the net or if you need to take a bathroom break or a phone call or something. I have been on several nets where something has happened to the net control stations equipment and they just all the sudden when silent. One person I know that was running a net and his house got hit by lightning and everything got fried. There wasn't a backup in place and the net was in limbo until someone took over for him.   The other thing that you need to make sure that you have in place is a backup frequency. Just like that something could happen to your own station, something could happen to the repeater that you are using as well. If lightning were to strike the repeater and knock it out, the whole net would come to a halt. If you have a backup repeater or frequency in place and everyone knows it, if no one responds to you, you could automatically change to the backup frequency and continue with the net.   Be Respectful   No matter what happens either before, during or after a net, ALWAYS be respectful to who you are working with. If you don’t have the respect of those you are working with, things could be very stressful for both you and those you are working with.   If something happens during a net or event that was done against what you asked the person to do, don't talk to that person about it during the net or in front of others. Handle what needs to be handled during the event and afterwards, pull that person aside and talk to them about what happened. Don't jump down their throat or chew them out, talk to them civilly and with respect. The way that you talk to them could have all the difference in the world in later interactions.   Pace Yourself   Being net control can be very demanding on you. There is so much going on, multiple frequencies and radios to monitor, phones, other people and so much more. It is very easy to get overwhelmed. No matter how good of a net control that you are you need to pace yourself. Never stay as net control for more than two hours at a time. If you have the personnel, change every hour or thirty minutes depending on how busy you area in the net.   If at all possible, stagger your helper shift and your net control shifts. Have the first hour of your shift as a helper with someone else as net control. After an hour take over as net control and a new helper will take over for you. An hour later, you rotate out, your helper rotates to net control and a new helper takes over as helper.   Tactical Call Signs   Tactical call signs are probably one of the most useful things that I use as a net control. A tactical call sign is a word used to describe a location where a station is located at. For example, if you are running a net and you have two shelters, a Red Cross building, and an EOC. If each location has two operators at them, you may never know who is at the radio as net control. So if you call a location by call sign, you might have to call a couple times because you don't know exactly who to call.   Instead use a tactical call sign like Shelter 1, Shelter 2, Red Cross, and EOC. By doing this, no matter who is at the radio at that location, they will know who you are calling.         Amateur Radio Club Spotlight The Columbia Amateur Radio Club   Website: http://w4cae.com/   The Carolina Amateur Radio Club is a service-oriented club and has been in existence for more than 40 years. Originally known as the Carolina Repeater Society, it was an offshoot of the Palmetto Amateur Radio Club (which is the oldest South Carolina amateur radio club, having been founded in 1928 on “the Horseshoe” at the University of South Carolina). Around 1976 the club name was changed to the Columbia Amateur Radio Club to include a broader range of interests, not just repeaters. From the beginning the club was active in promoting amateur radio, giving classes for new hams, and maintaining a testing team.   Meetings First Monday of the month at 7:30pm at the SCETV Telecommunications Center, 1041 George Rogers Blvd, Columbia, SC 29201   Repeaters 146.775 - PL 156.7 Ft. Jackson 147.330 + PL 156.7 Columbia   Nets Every Sunday and Wednesday Evenings at 8:30pm on the 147.330 Repeater   Activities Annual Picnic Field Day Workshops License Classes Testing Sessions Bike Races Walk-a-thons Hamfest - in 2016 it was on the first Saturday of April.       Upcoming Events     NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 25 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 25 CQ Worldwide DX Contest, CW 0000Z, Nov 26 to 2400Z, Nov 27 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Nov 30 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 30 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 30 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 30 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 1 UKEICC 80m Contest 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 30 NRAU 10m Activity Contest 1800Z-1900Z, Dec 1 (CW) and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 1 (SSB) and  2000Z-2100Z, Dec 1 (FM) and  2100Z-2200Z, Dec 1 (Dig) NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Dec 2 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 2 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 2 ARRL 160-Meter Contest 2200Z, Dec 2 to 1600Z, Dec 4 TARA RTTY Melee 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 3 Wake-Up! QRP Sprint 0600Z-0629Z, Dec 3 and  0630Z-0659Z, Dec 3 and  0700Z-0729Z, Dec 3 and  0730Z-0800Z, Dec 3 TOPS Activity Contest 1600Z, Dec 3 to 1559Z, Dec 4 Ten-Meter RTTY Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 4 SARL Digital Contest 1300Z-1600Z, Dec 4 ARS Spartan Sprint 0200Z-0400Z, Dec 6 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 7 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 7 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Dec 7 and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 7 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 8     *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar     Hamfests     11/25/2016 Fair Lawn ARC Ham Radio Auction - Fair Lawn, NJ   11/26/2016 OARC Hamfest in the Woods - Okeechobee, FL   12/03/2016 Fulton County Winter Fest - Delta, OH SSRC 2016 HAMFEST - Ocala, FL Superstition SuperFest 2016 - Mesa, AZ   12/04/2016 LCARC Amateur Radio Swap/Hamfest - Madison Heights, MI     *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar       News Rocky Mountain Division Director Dwayne Allen, WY7FD, Overcomes Challenge to Win Election   11/18/2016ARRL Rocky Mountain Division Director Dwayne Allen, WY7FD, has won election to a 3-year term. As Vice Director, Allen assumed the Director’s seat last January, after the Board of Directors elected former Director Brian Mileshosky, N5ZGT, as Second Vice President. Allen outpolled challenger Garth Crowe, WY7GC (ex-N7XKT) 1112 to 528 votes, to win the seat in his own right.Ballots were counted November 18 at ARRL Headquarters. The Rocky Mountain Division Director’s seat was the only contested election for the 2017-2019 cycle.Allen served previously as Wyoming Section Manager, from 2005 until 2007. New terms of office begin on January 1, 2017, at 12 Noon Eastern Time. Work Continues to Strengthen Relationship between Amateur Auxiliary, FCC   11/17/2016 Work continues to promote the visibility of Amateur Radio enforcement within the FCC, the ARRL Executive Committee was told recently. The EC met on October 22 in Rosemont, Illinois. ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, chaired the session. ARRL General Counsel Chris Imlay, W3KD, reported that meetings have been held with the FCC concerning more effective FCC use of the volunteer resources of the Amateur Auxiliary (Official Observers) program, the current FCC-ARRL Amateur Auxiliary Agreement, and the development of a new Memorandum of Understanding that better incorporates the Amateur Auxiliary program — especially in light of the FCC’s recent closing of field offices and reduction of Spectrum Enforcement Division staff. The EC directed Second Vice President Brian Mileshosky, N5ZGT, to continue work on the review and revitalization of the Amateur Auxiliary, in cooperation with the FCC, to ensure active use of the Amateur Auxiliary program. In other FCC-related issues. The EC provided guidance in the domestic implementation of the worldwide Amateur Radio allocation at 5 MHz, agreed upon at World Radiocommunication Conference 2015 (WRC-15) last fall. Delegates to WRC-15 reached consensus on 15 kilohertz-wide band, 5351.5-5366.5 kHz, with stations limited to an effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) of 15 W.   Imlay, in conjunction with ARRL International Affairs Vice President Jay Bellows, K0QB, and Midwest Division Director Rod Blocksome, K0DAS, will review of the National Broadband Plan, with an eye toward determining any impact it might have on Amateur Radio allocations.   In addition, Imlay and West Gulf Division Director Dr David Woolweaver, K5RAV, will meet with officials of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and congressional offices to address the effect on Amateur Radio antenna systems between 50 and 200 feet tall of new painting and lighting requirements required under the FAA Reauthorization Act (H.R. 636).   ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, told the panel that several new educational initiatives under way, and, as those pilot programs are assessed and refined, the programs will be made available to the Amateur Radio community.   In his report, Bellows told the EC that the IARU Administrative Council has begun preparations to represent Amateur Radio at various meetings to be held in advance of World Radiocommunication Conference 2019. Minutes of the October 22 meeting are available on the ARRL website.     New ARRL Repeater Directory Will Leverage Crowdsourcing Technology   11/14/2016ARRL partner RFinder, the creator of a web and app-based directory of Amateur Radio repeaters worldwide, will supply all data for the 2017-2018 ARRL Repeater Directory®. RFinder will employ its crowdsourcing technology to aggregate timely and accurate information for the Directory, marking the first time crowdsourcing has been put to use in the production of an ARRL publication. “Crowdsourcing” is a means of using data gathered from public resources — in this case, repeater owners and frequency coordinators — via the Internet to obtain the necessary listing information more quickly and flexibly. Including RFinder’s data in The Repeater Directory will help users seeking the most complete listing of on-air repeaters. The Repeater Directory will continue to publish repeater listings according to state, city, frequency and mode.Although RFinder’s data is primarily user supplied, ARRL has invited volunteer frequency coordinators to contribute their coordination data to RFinder. RFinder has setup an online portal to accept uploaded data from coordinators. Every coordinator that supplies repeater data to RFinder will have its listings credited as coordinated repeaters both in the RFinder smartphone apps and web listings, and in the hard-copy Repeater Directory.As part of this program, RFinder will make the RFinder database available to all frequency coordinators free of charge, with the exception of the Apple iOS version app, which requires a $9.99 license. The Android-compatible database is a free download.“We believe this will help you in your coordination activities, as it will provide you with a complete map of machines, both coordinated or not,” RFinder said. “It will also assist coordinators to bring uncoordinated machines into coordination.”ARRL earlier this year established an agreement with RFinder to be the membership association’s preferred online resource of repeater frequencies. RFinder’s steadily growing worldwide repeater database now includes more than 60,000 repeaters in some 170 countries around the globe. RFinder listings are dynamic, regularly reflecting new, updated, revised, and deleted information.RFinder is integrated directly with EchoLink on both Android and iPhone and provides the ability to share repeater check-ins on Facebook, Twitter, and APRS. RFinder is integrated with RT Systems and CHIRP radio programming applications and has a routing feature that lets users find repeaters worldwide over a given route. Video demos of RFinder features are available on YouTube.ARRL had previously discontinued its own products that supported digital listings of repeater data including the TravelPlus for Repeaters™ software and its own apps.RFinder is $9.99 per year. Subscribe to RFinder by visiting http://subscribe.rfinder.net/ from your iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, or from your Android smartphone or tablet.RFinder also includes the ability to report radio jamming anywhere. Those without a device or subscription can file reports online. Individuals or entities responsible for coordinating anti-jamming activities also can request access to view jamming reports for their area. Southern Florida Assistant Section Manager Ray Kassis, N4LEM, SK   11/17/2016ARRL Southern Florida Assistant Section Manager Ray Kassis, N4LEM, of Cocoa, Florida, died unexpectedly on November 9. He was 69. Licensed as WB4CTZ in 1966, he served the ARRL Southern Florida Section for many years in various capacities, most recently as Space Coast District Emergency Coordinator (DEC) and Assistant Section Manager (ASM).Kassis had been the Brevard County Emergency Coordinator (EC) since 1991, and he was instrumental in constructing several mobile communications units in the area. He was the owner of, and air personality on, WWBC radio, where he maintained a second ham station.p“We have suffered a great loss in our Section family with Ray’s passing,” said Southern Florida Section Manager Jeff Beals, WA4AW. “Ray was a dear friend and a valued member of my section staff.”     Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH041 - Morse Code

    · 00:59:22 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about CW or Morse Code, the South Canadian Amateur Radio Society in Norman, OK, some upcoming events/contests and Hamfest a for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!   Tech Corner - Morse Code - CW What is Morse Code and It’s History?   Morse code is a method of transmitting text information as a series of on-off tones, Lights, of clicks. Morse code started way back in 1836! It was originally developed by an Amateur artist by the name of Samuel F.B. Morse, an American physicist Joseph Henry, and Alfred Vail. Their system sent electric pulses through wiring to a receiving station that used an electromagnet to make a mark on a piece of “paper”. Once the message was completed, the operator would translate the message visually. The original morse codep was only numbers that corresponded with words in a codebook. This didn't last to long because Alfred Vail soon expanded the code to include the letters of the alphabet as a few special characters. It was soon discovered by the operators of the telegraph stations that they could translate the clicks that the mechanical armature made when receiving a current. It was soon realized that operators could translate a message faster by listening to the clicks over let the machine do that work, then translating it from the “paper”. When Morse Code was adapted for radio communications, the characters we sent using a tone. In the 1890s, Morse code began to be used extensively for early radio communication, before it was possible to transmit voice. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, most high-speed international communication used Morse code on telegraph lines, undersea cables and radio circuits. In aviation, Morse code in radio systems started to be used on a regular basis in the 1920s. By the 1930’s all civilian and military pilots were required to learn morse code, both for use in early communications methods and for identification of navigational beacons which continually transmitted a two or three letter identifier in morse code. Morse code was used as an international standard for maritime distress until 1999, when it was replaced by the Global Maritime Distress Safety System. Before 1999, the standard phrase for distress was SOS ( … --- … ), who can tell me what it was before it was changed to SOS? When the French Navy ceased using Morse code on January 31, 1997, the final message transmitted was "Calling all. This is our last cry before our eternal silence.” In the United States the final commercial Morse code transmission was on July 12, 1999, signing off with Samuel Morse's original 1844 message, "What hath God wrought", and the prosign "SK". As of 2015 the United States Air Force still trains ten people a year in Morse. The United States Coast Guard has ceased all use of Morse code on the radio, and no longer monitors any radio frequencies for Morse code transmissions,p including the international medium frequency (MF) distress frequency of 500 kHz. User Proficiency Morse code speed is measured in Words-Per-Minute(WPM) or Characters-Per-Minute(CPM). Being that characters have different lengths, therefore words will have different lengths to them as well. The WPM is therefore measured by using a standard word, such as PARIS or CODEX. This allows the standardization of WPM speeds. Operators proficient at morse code can receive(copy) morse code transmissions at 40+ wpms in their heads. International contests in code copying are still occasionally held.  In July 1939 at a contest in Asheville, North Carolina in the United States Ted R. McElroy set a still-standing record for Morse copying, 75.2 wpm. However it is believed that there are some operators out there that can copy morse code in their heads at over 100 WPMs. Today among amateur operators there are several organizations that recognize high speed code ability, one group consisting of those who can copy Morse at 60 wpm. Also, Certificates of Code Proficiency are issued by several amateur radio societies, including the American Radio Relay League. Their basic award starts at 10 wpm with endorsements as high as 40 wpm, and are available to anyone who can copy the transmitted text. Members of the Boy Scouts of America may put a Morse interpreter's strip on their uniforms if they meet the standards for translating code at 5 wpm. International Morse Code Morse code has been in use for more than 160 years—longer than any other electrical coding system. What is called Morse code today is actually somewhat different from what was originally developed by Vail and Morse. The Modern International Morse code, or continental code, was created by Friedrich Clemens Gerke in 1848 and initially used for telegraphy between Hamburg and Cuxhaven in Germany. Gerke changed nearly half of the alphabet and all of the numerals, providing the foundation for the modern form of the code. After some minor changes, International Morse Code was standardized at the International Telegraphy Congress in 1865 in Paris, and was later made the standard by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Morse's original code specification, largely limited to use in the United States and Canada, became known as American Morse codeor railroad code. American Morse code is now seldom used except in historical re-enactments.   Amateur Radio The original amateur radio operators used Morse code exclusively, since voice-capable radio transmitters did not become commonly available until around 1920. Until 2003 the International Telecommunication Union mandated Morse code proficiency as part of the amateur radio licensing procedure worldwide. However, the World Radiocommunication Conference of 2003 made the Morse code requirement for amateur radio licensing optional. Many countries subsequently removed the Morse requirement from their licence requirements Until 1991 a demonstration of the ability to send and receive Morse code at a minimum of five words per minute (wpm) was required to receive an amateur radio license for use in the United States from the Federal Communications Commission. Demonstration of this ability was still required for the privilege to use the HF bands. Until 2000 proficiency at the 20 wpm level was required to receive the highest level of amateur license (Amateur Extra Class); effective April 15, 2000, the FCC reduced the Extra Class requirement to five wpm. Finally, effective on February 23, 2007 the FCC eliminated the Morse code proficiency requirements from all amateur radio licenses. Since Morse Code is not a requirement any long to obtain you amateur radio licence or to upgrade to a higher class, there has been an influx of people getting and upgrading their license. There has also been a rift forming with some operators who obtained their license before the code requirement was dropped. It is sad, but true. Some ofp those operators have not been very friendly to operators that got their license after the code was dropped. What are your feeling about the code requirement being dropped? Learning Morse Code There are three major methods on learning amateur radio, Mnemonics, the Farnsworth Method and the Koch Method. The Farnsworth method is probably the best way to learn according to a lot of people that I have talked to and/or read articles from. Mnemonics When I first upgraded to the Tech + class, I had to get 5 wpm code. I didn't have any plans on going any higher than that really. I just wanted a little sliver of 10 meter voice that I could possibly use to talk home on while I was in college. That didn't happen though, because my father didn't get his upgrade until after I had graduated college. While I did learn morse code and I got my tech + license, the way that I learned morse code was definitely not the best way that I could have. I learned using the Mnemonics method. What this means in that every letter has a sound-a-like that followed the pattern of the morse code dits and dahs. For example, let letter A has a sound alike of “Say Aww” and the letter B has a sound alike of “Band rat it tat”. While this method is OK for use at slow speeds, it really hampers ypou when or if you want to increase your speed. When you learn morse code with this method, you brain will automatically translate the morse code character into the sound alike and then into the letter. This adds an extra step when trying to receive a morse code message and limits how fast you can receive. Koch Method The Koch Method is named after a German Psychologist Ludwig Koch. This method is probably the second most popular method of learning morse code. The way that this method works is that you learn all the characters at full speed from the start. However, you start with only two letters and build from there once you can copy those two at 90% accuracy. Farnsworth Method The Farnsworth Method is probably the most popular method on learning morse code. It was developed by Donald R. Farnsworth, W6TTB, This method is similar to the Koch Method, however there is one real difference. With the Farnsworth method, all the characters are sent at your target speed, typically 13 or 20 wpms, but the spaces between the letters and words are exaggerated to make the overall speed of only about 5 wpm. This exaggerated space between the characters are so that you have extra time to think of the character. Bother the Koch and the Farnsworth Methods allow you to easily increase your speed of sending and receiving because you learning the sound of the actual character rather than the sound alike of the character. Keyers Straight Key The straight key is probably the first keyer that anyone uses. It is a mechanical key so it doesn't have any electrical parts and can be used with pretty much any kind of radio. This style of keyer has an up-down motion to it and contacts on the bottom of the arm. When the arm and the base meet it causes a tone to be sent out on the radio. The longer you hold the key down the longer the tone will be. I'm sure that most of yall have used or at least played with one of these types of keys at some point in your life. These keys are the easiest to use, since they are so simple, however, it is hard to achieve a speed of more that 20 wpm with them and that is probably pushing it. The other negative thing about these types of keys it the up and down movement of them can cause wrist issues like carpal-tunnel. Sideswiper A sideswiper keyer is similar to a straight key in that the longer you hold the contacts together the longer the tone that is transmitted will be. The other similarity is that they are totally mechanical. The major difference is that instead of an up-down motion, the key arm goes left and right with contacts on both side. The two advantages of having the key arm moving left and right instead of up and down, is that a higher rate of speed can be achieved and you don't have the carpal-tunnel issues that a straight key has.   Vibroflex “Bug” A Vibroflex “bug” expands on a Sideswiper style keyer in that is goes left and right, however the biggest difference is that the Vibroflex is a semi automatic keyer. When you push the key one way it will make a dit sound that will repeat at a set speed and the dah will be made when you press it the other. The dahs however, do not repeater so the tone will be transmitted for as long as you hold the key down. The Vibroflex was the most common form of speed keyer used before electronic keyers. Electronic Keyers The the advent of electronic keyers, the speed at which you can send morse code that increased dramatically. With electronic keyers, you can set the speed you want to send at and then like the Vibroflex, when you hold down one side it will send dits but when you hold down the other side it will send dahs. Unlike the Vibroflex though, when you hold down the dah side it will repeatedly send dahs instead of just one single tone. Electronic keyers are typically referred to as paddles because of their shape. There is also two kinds of electronic keyers, one with a single paddle, the other with two. With the single paddle it is much like the sideswiper in that there are contacts on both sides. However, unlike the sideswiper, one side is for dits and the other for dahs and both sides repeater. The other type of electronic keyer is double paddle style. This type uses a squeeze type methodology. One side is for dits the other for dahs. The biggest difference with this type of keyer is that you can hold down one side and squeeze the other side together and they keyer will alternate whether a dit or a dah is sent out. This comes in handy when you are doing like a “R” or a “K”. With the electronic keyer, you can press one side down the squeeze the other and it will do a dit dah did or a dah dit dah depending on which side is pressed down first. Do you use morse code? How fast can you send and receive? From My Listeners   Back in August I received an email from Fred Wilson:   Curtis     Just found your podcast last week, and I have been lessening to all I can find. I am new to Ham and looking to take my technical class license next month. I have got three guys from work going to take it with me. My dad was a ham back in the 70s and I can't believe I've waited this long to get started. And thanks to you I think I got a jump on it. Thanks for all the info. Even though a lot of it is over my head. LOL   Fred Wilson   At the time, he was not licensed as you can see. We talked back and forth a few times, talked about radios, how his studying was going, if he had taken the test yet, etc. Last Monday, Oct 17, 2016, I got this email:   Curtis   Well I did it, I couldn’t wait for my friends to take the test with me. I passed the technician class test this weekend. Didn’t know you got to take the general for free. I didn't study for it and was only two questions short of getting my general ticket. So now I’m studying for the general and extra. I’ll let you know when I get my call sign for technician . Thanks for the encouragement, I’ve learned a lot from your show. Fred Wilson73   He emailed me on Wednesday when he got his call sign, KG5PWA. My original call sign was KC5PWP. He almost ended up with the same suffix as I had and I told him so. His reply was:   Wow that is close. Well I'm already studying for my general an extra class hopefully by the end of next month I should be sending you a new call sign. I think the reason why I almost passed my general class without studying was because I listen to you every week. I've learned a lot from your show. THX 73Fred Wilson, KG5PWA   It is so awesome when I get emails like these. Once again, congratulations Fred on joining the ranks of amateur radio. Maybe one day we can talk on the air or in person!   Amateur Radio Club Spotlight   South Canadian Amateur Radio Society   Website: http://www.w5nor.org Facebook: http://www.w5nor.org/Facebook   SCARS is not a Canadian Club, we're just located in the South Canadian River area. The founding fathers didn't want to limit the scope of the club to a certain town, or village, so this name was chosen. 40 years later, we've expanded to have members from across the state, and country. With the Internet experience, we've even attracted regulars from around the globe. For more information on the South Canadian River area, please see the South Canadian River Facebook Group.   Meetings 2nd Saturday of each month (3rd Saturday in June) at Fire Station #7 near Westheimer Airport / Field. Coffee and donuts start at 9am, meeting starts at 9:30am. Informal Meetings - McDonalds at 1720 W. Lindsey St. Every day but Sunday, a cast of about a dozen meet for coffee and breakfast between about 9:00 am and 11:00 am   Repeaters 147.060 + PL 141.3 Norman, OK 443.700 + PL141.3 Norman, OK 144.399 APRS Digipeater Norman, OK   Nets SCARS hosts the N5HZX Memorial Net (In memory of N5HZX Fred Goodwin) every Wednesday evening at 8:00 PM (central time zone) on 28.445 MHz USB Each Tuesday, at 8:00 pm Central Time, SCARS hosts the Cleveland County ARES traffic net on 147.060 MHz +600 kHz offset, 141.3 Hz CTCSS tone, repeater Each Tuesday, at 8:30 pm Central Time, SCARS hosts the Weekly Gossip net on 147.060 MHz +600 kHz offset, 141.3 Hz CTCSS tone, repeater SCARS hosts the KD5JSD Memorial Net (In memory of KD5JSD John Sauer) every Monday evening at 8:00 PM (central time zone) on 50.200 MHz USB   Activities Field Day Technician and General Classes Central Oklahoma Radio Amateurs Ham Holiday Storm spotter Training OKC Memorial Marathon NPOTA Bike MS Event Jamboree On The Air National Weather Festival Christmas Party Training at every meeting Community Service   Upcoming Events   RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 27 NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Oct 28 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 28 CQ Worldwide DX Contest, SSB 0000Z, Oct 29 to 2400Z, Oct 30 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 2 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 2 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 2 and  0300Z-0400Z, Nov 3 UKEICC 80m Contest 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 2 NRAU 10m Activity Contest 1800Z-1900Z, Nov 3 (CW) and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 3 (SSB) and  2000Z-2100Z, Nov 3 (FM) and  2100Z-2200Z, Nov 3 (Dig) NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 4 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 4 IPARC Contest, CW 0600Z-1000Z, Nov 5 and  1400Z-1800Z, Nov 5 Ukrainian DX Contest 1200Z, Nov 5 to 1200Z, Nov 6 RSGB International Sprint Contest, SSB 1700Z-2100Z, Nov 5 ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, CW 2100Z, Nov 5 to 0300Z, Nov 7 IPARC Contest, SSB 0600Z-1000Z, Nov 6 and  1400Z-1800Z, Nov 6 EANET Sprint 0800Z-1200Z, Nov 6 High Speed Club CW Contest 0900Z-1100Z, Nov 6 and  1500Z-1700Z, Nov 6 DARC 10-Meter Digital Contest 1100Z-1700Z, Nov 6 ARS Spartan Sprint 0200Z-0400Z, Nov 8 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 9 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 9 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 9 and  0300Z-0400Z, Nov 10 RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 9   *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar   Hamfests   10/29/2016 Halloween Hamfest - Kirkwood, MO Hazard Hamfest - Hazard, KY Jacksonville FREE Hamfest - Jacksonville, FL Tri-City ARC Auction - Gales Ferry, CT   10/30/2016 Long Island Hamfest and Electronics Fair - Hicksville, NY USECA Swap & Shop Hamfest - Madison Heights, MI   11/05/2016 Enid ARC Hamfest - Enid, OK FARAFest - Bourne, MA GARC Hamfest - Georgetown, OH Georgia State Convention (Stone Mountain Hamfest) - Lawrenceville, GA HARKFEST - Congress, AZ LARA Tailgate - Tavares, FL Link McGarity WV4I Memorial Free Flea - West Palm Beach, FL MRC91 Radio Fest - Milwaukee, WI NARCfest 2016 - Nixa, MO TechFest - Lakewood, CO   11/06/2016 Davenport RAC Hamfest & Computer Show - Davenport, IA FCARC Swapfest - Appleton, WI WACOM HAMFEST 2016 - Washington, PA   *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar   News Time to File Your JOTA Station Report 10/19/2016 Now that Jamboree On The Air (JOTA) 2016 is history, the Boy Scouts are urging participants to file a JOTA Station Report, in order to determine how things went. “It's your perfect opportunity to share your stories, photos, and some numbers,” JOTA Coordinator Jim Wilson, K5ND, said. “The reports I've seen so far show some good turnout, particularly from Cub Scouts. We feel this is due to the new requirement for the Arrow of Light Award that asks Scouts to participate in JOTA-JOTI. This is also no doubt responsible for the big increase in JOTI registrations in the US, from roughly 100 last year to what looks like close to 500 this year.” Reports are due by November 1. Every station that files a report will be entered into a drawing for an Icom ID-51A Plus dualband handheld transceiver and will receive a 2016 Jamboree on the Air Certificate. Five runners up will receive an Icom America Ham Crew T shirt. Only Boy Scouts of America stations are eligible. “Worldwide we had 11,534 register for the event,” Wilson said, adding that a rough estimate indicated 800 US registrations and nearly 300 of those indicating Amateur Radio call signs. If that number holds, he said, it would indicate a dip in JOTA participation from 2015, when 346 turned out. “Some of that could have been due to the complexity of the registration system,” he allowed. “I assure you that the reporting system now is much simpler. Wilson said the US JOTA 2016 Report should be out in early December. “Thanks again for all your support to Radio Scouting and Jamboree on the Air,” he said. It’s estimated that more than 1 million Scouts in 150+ countries took part in JOTA 2016, engaging with other Scouts to talk about Amateur Radio and their Scouting experiences. Source: ARRL News Apparent ARISS Radio Failure Prompts Shift to Russian Service Module Ham Gear 10/20/2016The VHF handheld transceiver that the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program has used to connect students worldwide with astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) for more than 16 years has begun to display an error message and is unusable at this time.While the ARISS technical team evaluates the best path to restore operation from the ISS Columbus module, ARISS contacts will be supported using the Kenwood radio in the Russian Service Module.During this period, the packet digipeater will be unavailable. Switching to the 70 centimeter capability on board the Columbus module for some operations is being coordinated. ARISS said to expect further updates as it works to resolve the problem. A reminder: The deadline is November 1 for formal and informal education institutions and organizations to submit proposals to host an Amateur Radio contact with an ISS crew member. ARISS anticipates that contacts will take place between July 1 and December 31, 2017. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits determine contact dates.To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the ham radio contact into a well-developed education plan. — ARISS Bulletin Source: ARRL News Georgia Section Manager Changing on November 1   10/20/2016Georgia Section Manager Gene Clark, W4AYK, of Albany, has announced that he’s stepping down at the end of October, after serving since October 2009. David Benoist, AG4ZR, of Senoia, has been appointed as Georgia Section Manager, effective November 1, to complete the current term of office, which extends until September 30, 2017.When a Section Manager vacancy occurs between elections, the position is filled by appointment. Clark recommended to Field Services and Radiosport Manager Dave Patton, NN1N, that Benoist succeed him. Patton then consulted with Southeastern Division Director Doug Rehman, K4AC, before making the appointment.Benoist has served as Georgia Section Emergency Coordinator and as an Emergency Coordinator. Source: ARRL News Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • Mansion Ingles Podcast June 2013 - Aprende gramatica y vocabulario ingles

    · 00:43:05 · Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free

    Aprender ingles gratis con La Mansion del Ingles. Un podcast para mejorar la gramatica, el vocabulario y la pronunciacion del ingles. Una leccion del ingles con ejemplos y ejercicios. Learn English free with podcasts from La Mansion del Ingles. Improve your grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. This English lesson contains examples and exercises. Hello once again and welcome to another Mansion Ingles podcast. This is podcast number 62 recorded for June 2013. Este mes, en el nivel básico practicamos el afirmativo y el negativo del pasado simple y las preposiciones. En el nivel intermedio enfocamos en la diferencia entre any, some, either and neither y el vocabulario de la personalidad - character and personality. In the advanced section, we practise vocabulary with some  advanced collocations, and there's business vocabulary as usual, and a translation exercise all to help you improve your English and take it to the next level.  En los podcasts mensuales hablamos de los temas, vocabulario y ejercicios que salen en nuestro cuaderno mensual. Así podáis practicar la pronunciación y repasar el material del cuaderno. Si quieres recibir gratis el cuaderno cada mes, ver la trascripción de este podcast o leer los anteriores, vete a mansioningles.com y sigue los enlaces en la página principal.  Ok, let's start then with el nivel básico. Voy a decir algunas frases en el afirmativo, y tú tienes que cambiarlas al negativo. Por ejemplo, yo digo "She is a teacher." Tú dices: "She isn't a teacher." OK? Luego repitas la frase negativa para practicar la pronunciación. Ok. 1. I like classical music - I don't like classical music. Repite: I don't like classical music. 2. He plays tennis - He doesn't play tennis. Repite: He doesn't play tennis. 3. She is divorced - She isn't divorced. Repite: She isn't divorced. 4. They are students - they aren't students. Repite: They aren't students. También puedes decir they're not students. Depende como se hace la contración del They are not. Puede ser they're not o they aren't. Repite: they're not students - they aren't students - They're not Spanish. They aren't Spanish. 5. She likes photography - She doesn't like photography. Repite: She doesn't like photography. Very good! Now, también hemos practicado algunas preposiciónes. Las preposiciones son difíciles en inglés por que muchas veces son diferentes al traducir las al español. Pero no te preocupes demasiado porque si haces una falta con una preposicion la gente van a entender lo que quieres decir. No es una falta grave. Pero, hay que intentar aprender las poco a poco - little by little - poco a poco. Escucha: They sometimes go snowboarding in December. In december. Cuando hablamos de los meses en inglés, decimos la preposición in. Repite: in December. We go in December. In June - I never go in June. - In March - My birthday's in March. Escucha: The Tourist Information Office closes at five o’clock. Cuando hablamos de la hora en inglés, empleamos la preposición at. Repite: at five o'clock. It closes at five o'clock. At 8.30 - I finish work at 8.30. - at 7 - I have breakfast at 7. Escucha: She was born on May 12th. - Ella nació el 12 de mayo. Cuando hablamos de los días, utilizamos la preposición on. Repite: on May 12th - born on May 12th. She was born on May 12th. - On Monday. I work on Monday. - On Saturday. I don't work on Saturday. On Thursday. See you on Thursday! Escucha: My keys are in my coat pocket. Muchas veces la preposición in se traduce como 'en'. Escucha: In my pocket. - en mi bolsillo. My keys are in my coat pocket. - Mis llaves están en el bolsillo de mi abrigo. Repite: In my pocket. In my car. It's in my car. In the house. It's in the house. In the office. They're in the office. Escucha: Where can I try on this shirt? - ¿Dónde puedo probar esta camisa? to try on es un phrasal verb (un verbo compuesto) Los phrasal verbs llevan un verbo y una preposición o un adverbio o a veces ambos. To try on significa probar ropa. Repite: try on - try on clothes - try on a shirt - try on shoes - Please try on the jacket. Do you want to try on the dress? Ok, moving on to the intermediate section, we practised the difference between any, some, either and neither. Let's look at either and neither first. There are two possible pronunciations. Listen: either/either - neither/neither. Repeat: either/either - neither/neither. either se puede traducir como: cualquiera de los dos y neither como ninguno (de dos) Either student can take the test. - (Uno de los estudiantes puede tomar el examen.) Neither student can take the test. - (Ninguno de los estudiantes puede tomar el examen.) A veces el neither va con el nor y sirve para unir dos oraciones. En este caso significa: “ni” Por ejemplo: “Ni cafe ni té”. “Neither coffee nor tea”. Neither puede también significar “tampoco”. Por ejemplo: “I don't want to go. Neither do I.” - Yo no quiero ir. Yo tampoco (ni yo). Escucha y repite algunos ejemplos: I don't like Lady Gaga. Neither do I. Neither the Tower of London nor Buckingham Palace were included in the tour. I neither sing nor dance. I can't swim. Neither can I. Either (o either) puede significar: ni, o, cualquiera, ninguno/a, alguno/a, tampoco, ni siquiera. Listen and repeat: You can have either tea or coffee. Which would you prefer? Either, I don't mind. We'd like to buy either the blue one or the red one. We don't mind. Either of them. Who are those two women? I don't know either of them. I can't speak French. I can't either. I don't like Alejendro Sanz. I don't either. (También puedeo decir "Neither do I:" I don't like tennis. - I don't either/neither do I. OK, let's talk about some and any. Usually, we use some in positive sentences and any in negative and question sentences. Listen: afirmativo - I've got some biscuits. Do you want one? negativo - Sorry, I haven't got any money. pregunta - Have you got any brothers or sisters? Repeat: I've got some biscuits. Do you want one? Sorry, I haven't got any money. Have you got any brothers or sisters? Listen and repeat some more examples with some and any: I don't need any help. Repeat: I don't need any help. You've got some coffee on your shirt. Repeat: - You've got some coffee on your shirt. Did you buy any wine? Repeat: Did you buy any wine? There somebody at the door. Repeat: There somebody at the door. Are you doing anything this weekend? Repeat: Are you doing anything this weekend? This project will take some time. Repeat: This project will take some time. I don't want anything to drink. Repeat: I don't want anything to drink. Has anyone seen the dog? Repeat: Has anyone seen the dog? Would you like some beer? Repeat: Would you like some beer? Are you going anywhere this summer? Repeat: Are you going anywhere this summer? We also use any in positive sentences when we mean "It doesn't matter which" - no importa que You can visit us any time. Which direction should I take? - Any one. It's up to you. I like any jazz music. Repeat: You can visit us any time. Which direction should I take? - Any one. It's up to you. I like any jazz music.   Also in the intermediate section this month we studied some adjectives of character and personality. Vamos a ver si recuerdas. What do you call a person who doesn’t like sharing or giving things. The opposite of generous. - mean Someone who likes giving orders and telling other people what to do. - bossy What's the adjective for a lively person who likes to be doing something all the time. - active Do you know the opposite of active? - inactive. People, usually children, who get everything they want even when they shouldn’t. - spoiled A person who isn’t interested in anybody but herself/himself. He/she thinks he/she is the only person who exists. - selfish A person who is aware of the feelings of others and is considerate. - thoughtful Somebody who thinks money and possessions are more important than anything else. - materialistic Someone whose feelings are very easily hurt. - sensitive. Be careful of the false friend sensible. Remember sensato - sensible and sensible - sensitive. What's the name for children behaving badly and not doing what they are told. - naughty And finally, a person who is in good physical condition, who does a lot of exercise and doesn’t tire easily after hard physical work.                 - fit - We also say to get fit. to get fit or to be fit. I'm fit = estoy en forma. I'm trying to get fit - I go to the gym to get fit. Are you fit? OK, listen to the adjectives again and repeat them after me to practise pronunciation. mean bossy active - inactive spoiled selfish thoughtful materialistic sensitive sensible naughty fit If you like these podcasts, remember that you can buy complete lessons for only 1 euro and 40 centimos (the price of a cup of coffee) from our online shop - nuestra tienda online. Tenemos un curso entero de nivel principiante y básico. Puedes encontrarlas en mansioninglesdescargas.wazala.com that's: mansioninglesdescargas - todo junto - punto . wazala.com. Cada leccion vale solo 1.40 euros y dura approx. 1 hora y cada leccion está en el formato mp3 y lleva su trascripcion en formato PDF. Así puedes aprender inglés haciendo ejercicio, limpiando la casa, en el coche, caminando con el perro y en todo el tiempo muerto que tienes. Mejorar tú ingles con las descargas de la mansión del inglés. Bueno, también puedes encontrar la dirección de la tienda en la trascripción de este podcast. In the advanced section, we looked at some collocations. For example to play truant. That's when you don't go to school and you go shopping or you play football in the park. Have you ever played truant from school? I don't remember ever playing truant. I liked going to school most of the time. In American English you can say to play hooky or to skip a class. The next expression was to put your foot in it. If you put your foot in it or put your foot in your mouth, you do something by accident which embarrasses or upsets someone. For example, I really put my foot in it when I asked her if she was pregnant. to hold a meeting is to have a meeting about something but the verb to hold is a strong collocation with meeting. You can also hold a reunion of old school friends, hold a business meeting and hold an online meeting on the Internet. If you put two and two together, you understand something by using the information you have. For example, I didn't know his wife had left him, but when I saw that all her clothes and her things and her car were gone, I put two and two together. To put your foot down means to assert something strongly. For example, Pepito's boss put her foot down and refused to accept any more bad behaviour. She put her foot down. To play a trick on someone or play a prank on someone es hacer una broma - to do a trick that affects someone. For example, Somebody played a trick on me by hiding my shoes. Did you ever play any tricks on your teacher at school. We used to play tricks regularly, but not with all the teachers, only some of them. To hold down a job means to keep it possibly in the face of difficult circumstances, as in "He held down the job for a year before handing in his notice". To hold a record for something means to have the record for an event or an achievement. For example, She holds the world indoor 800 metres record. To play havoc with something means to cause someone to have trouble doing something. Listen: Strong winds played havoc with her golf game. It can also mean to damage something. For example,  Stormy conditions played havoc with the fishing. Put your feet up means to relax, especially by sitting with your feet supported above the ground. For example: You go home and put your feet up, love. I can't wait to finish work and put my feet up. to hold your breath means to stop breathing for a short period, on purpose. Do you hold your breath when you dive into the water? I can't hold my breath for very long. But it can also mean to wait or delay until something special happens and it's often used in the negative. For example, I expect to get paid for last month's work this week, but I'm not holding my breath. It's often late. Or another example, do you think there'll have free drinks and sandwiches at the meeting? Don't hold your breath! o sea, "no te hagas ilusión". Don't hold your breath! Finally, to play a part in something or play a role in something means to participate in something in a specific way. For example, I hope to play a part in the development of the new product. He played a big part in the success of the company. Listen to the collocations and expressions again and repeat them: play truant put your foot in it hold a meeting put two and two together put your foot down play a trick (on someone) hold down a job hold a record play havoc with (something) put your feet up. hold your breath play a part in (something)   In the Business English section we looked at some more business English vocabulary, and the first word was merger. A merger is the combination of two or more companies, either by the creation of a new organization or by absorption by one of the others. I think in Spanish it's fusión. Repeat: merger - mergers and acquisitions. In order to save the business, they merged with another company. The phrasal verb to set aside means dejar a un lado. We set aside some money for a holiday. It's good to set aside money for emergencies. Have you set aside any money for anything recently? I haven't got any money to set aside! Another phrasal verb was to bring in which means to include. The example was "I would like to bring my partner in on this discussion." To bring someone in on something. Shall we bring her in on the secret? I don't think it's necessary to bring them in on this deal. Notice that this phrasal verb must be separated. You put the object between the verb and the particle. You say bring her in on it but not Xbring in her on it.X If you make sound decisions you make good decisions. He makes sound business decisions. Repeat: He makes sound business decisions. We can trust him. He makes sound decisions. Feasible means possible, doable. In Spanish viable, o realizable. It's not a feasible project. We can't do it. Repeat: It's not feasible. I'm sorry, but it's not feasible. It's not economically feasible. The word demographic is similar in Spanish, demografía. Listen and repeat the pronunciation: demographic. The demographics show that income went down. We have to examine the demographics. To rule out means to eliminate. Listen: We can't rule out the possibility that we'll need another round of investment capital before the end of the year. Repeat: rule out - We should rule out the possibility of a merger. Don't rule out the competition. You may hear or read companies speaking about their mission statement. Especially of it's a North American company. According to the dictionary, a mission statement is "A summary of the aims and values of a company, organization, or individual." For example a mission statement for La Mansión del Inglés could be "To help Spanish speakers learn and improve their use of the English language." or something similar. Does your company have a mission statement? If not, what do you think it should be? You could write it in Spanish and then try to translate it into English. If you need help to check your mission statement, ask us on Facebook. We also gave you some more sentences to translate in this month's cuaderno. First, you had to translate from English to Spanish. So,  I'll say the English sentences and you can say the Spanish translation. Then, repeat the English sentence after me to practise pronunciation. Ready? 1.I only believe what you tell me. - Sólo creo lo que tú me dices. - I only believe what you tell me. 2.Could/Can you call a doctor? A German Shepherd has bitten my left leg. - ¿Puedes llamar a un doctor? Un pastor alemán me mordío en la pierna izquierda. - Could/Can you call a doctor? A German Shepherd has bitten my left leg. 3.I was hoping that you remembered how I got this tattoo. - Estaba esperando que tú recordaras como conseguí este tatuaje. - I was hoping that you remembered how I got this tattoo. 4.If the shoe fits, you can call me Cinderella. - Si me queda la zapatilla, me puedes llamar Cenicienta. If the shoe fits, you can call me Cinderella. 5.I don't own that penguin, it's a rental. - No soy el dueño de este pinguino, lo alquilo. - I don't own that penguin, it's a rental. Good, now I'll read some Spanish sentences and you translate to English. Then repeat the sentences after me to practise your pronunciation. OK? 1.¿Sabes cuanto él gana? - Do you know how much he earns? - Do you know how much he earns? 2.Él llevaba unas gafas oscuras. - He was wearing dark glasses. - He was wearing dark glasses. 3.Mi nivel está por encima del de ellos. - My level is above theirs. - My level is above theirs. 4.Tienen que llegar antes de la fecha tope. - They have to arrive before the deadline. - They have to arrive before the deadline. 5.Siempre le encantaba bailar. - He always loved to dance. - He always loved to dance. Well, that's all we have time for on this podcast, but we'll be back with you next month as usual with another podcast based on our monthly newsletter, our cuaderno de inglés mensual. Remember, you can listen to all our previous podcasts at mansioningles.com and on iTunes. Si te gusta este podcast, puedes hacernos un gran favor y escribe por favor una corta reseña en iTunes. Si escibes una reseña en iTunes más personas pueden escucharnos porque subimos en el 'ranking' de iTunes. y también puedes darnos algunas estrellas, si te gusta nuestros podcasts. Thank you very much for listening to this podcast, and for being part of the community of La Mansión del Inglés. Remember, If you want to contact us you can find us on Facebook. Just search Facebook for La Mansión del Inglés and join our growing community of fans. Or send me an email to: mansionteachers@yahoo.es. You can also follow us on Twitter. Our Twitter name is MansionTwit. Puedes ver el cuaderno mensual de este mes, y todos los cuadernos anteriores en www.cuadernodeingles.com/ Until next month then, keep practising and taking your English to the next level! Take care and bye for now! The music in this month’s podcast is by Revolution Void, the album is The Politics of Desire and the track is called Outer Orbit.                                            

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  • ETH043 - CTCSS & DTMF, What is That?

    · 00:59:19 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Tones, we talk about the Mid-Atlantic Amateur Radio Club in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!     Tech Corner - Tones   http://www.everythinghamradio.com/2015/08/ctcss-do-you-hear-what-i-hear/   http://www.everythinghamradio.com/2015/08/dtmf-dual-tone-multi-frequency-tones/           Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Mid-Atlantic Amateur Radio Club   Website: http://www.marc-radio.org   Meetings Fourth Tuesday at 7p at the Newtown Public Library - Community Room, 201 Bishop Hollow Rd, Newtown Square, PA   Repeaters 145.130 - PL 131.8 Paoli Hospital - Linked to the 147.060 & 445.675 Repeaters 147.060 +PL 131.8 Newtown Square - Linked to the 145.130 & 445.675 Repeater 147.360 + PL 131.8 Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby - Linked to the 224.500 & 444.050 Repeaters 224.420 - PL 131.8 Bryn Mawr Hospital 224.500 - PL 131.8 Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby - Linked to the 147.360 & 444.050 Repeaters 444.050 + PL 131.8 Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby - Linked to the 147.360 & 224.500 Repeaters 445.675 - PL 131.8 Paoli Hospital - Linked to the 145.130 & 147.060 Repeaters   Nets MARC Club Net - Wednesdays at 8:30PM on the 145.130, 147.060, & 445.675 Repeaters(Linked).   Activities Field Day MARC Ham Fest - July 8, 2017 Boy Scouts Christmas Party Elmer Program License Testing Breakfast Eyeball QSO - Second Saturday at 0900 - Country Squire, 2560 W. Chester Pike, Broomall, PA Penn Wynne 5k Run 5 Mile Radnor Run Vietnam Veterans Run     Upcoming Events   NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 11 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 11 WAE DX Contest, RTTY 0000Z, Nov 12 to 2359Z, Nov 13 10-10 Int. Fall Contest, Digital 0001Z, Nov 12 to 2359Z, Nov 13 JIDX Phone Contest 0700Z, Nov 12 to 1300Z, Nov 13 SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 1200Z, Nov 12 to 2400Z, Nov 13 OK/OM DX Contest, CW 1200Z, Nov 12 to 1200Z, Nov 13 Kentucky QSO Party 1400Z, Nov 12 to 0200Z, Nov 13 CQ-WE Contest 1900Z-2300Z, Nov 12 (CW/Digital) and  0100Z-0500Z, Nov 13 (Phone) and  1900Z-2300Z, Nov 13 (Phone) and  0100Z-0500Z, Nov 14 (CW/Digital) Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 16 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 16 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 16 and  0300Z-0400Z, Nov 17 NAQCC CW Sprint 0130Z-0330Z, Nov 17 NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 18 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 18 YO International PSK31 Contest 1600Z-2200Z, Nov 18 ARRL EME Contest 0000Z, Nov 19 to 2359Z, Nov 20 SARL Field Day Contest 1000Z, Nov 19 to 1000Z, Nov 20 LZ DX Contest 1200Z, Nov 19 to 1200Z, Nov 20 All Austrian 160-Meter Contest 1600Z, Nov 19 to 0700Z, Nov 20 Feld Hell Sprint 1700Z-1859Z, Nov 19 RSGB 2nd 1.8 MHz Contest, CW 1900Z-2300Z, Nov 19 ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, SSB 2100Z, Nov 19 to 0300Z, Nov 21 Homebrew and Oldtime Equipment Party 1300-1500Z, Nov 20 (40m) and  1500-1700Z, Nov 20 (80m) Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0200Z-0400Z, Nov 21 SKCC Sprint 0000Z-0200Z, Nov 23 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 23 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 23 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 23 and  0300Z-0400Z, Nov 24       *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar     Hamfests   11/11/2016 Jackson County ARA Hamfest - Ocean Springs, MS   11/12/2016 Big Island of Hawaii International Swap Meet/HamFest - Kamuela, HI Flamingo Net / University of Miami ARC Free Flea - Coral Gables, FL GSARC "BEACHFEST 2016" - Conway, SC Indiana State Convention (Fort Wayne Hamfest & Computer Expo) - Fort Wayne, IN New Orleans Ham Radio & Computer Flea Marlet - Harahan, LA Oro Valley ARC Hamfest -  Marana, AZ Raytown ARC Hamfest - Kansas City, MO SPARCFest 2016 - Pinellas Park, FL   11/19/2016 Alabama State Convention (MARC Hamfest 2016) - Montgomery, AL Cy Harris Memorial Free Flea - Oakland Park, FL Upper Pinellas ARC Ham Fest - Palm Harbor, FL   11/20/2016 JARSFest 2016 - Benson, NC     *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar       News ARRL President Emeritus Jim Haynie, W5JBP, SK 11/02/2016 ARRL President Emeritus Jim Haynie, W5JBP, of Dallas, Texas, died on November 1. He was 73. His death followed a period of ill health. Haynie was elected as the 13th President of ARRL on January 21, 2000, succeeding Rod Stafford, W6ROD (ex-KB6ZV). “Jim was a remarkable individual who made a huge personal commitment to Amateur Radio and the ARRL,” said ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR. “He had a great sense of humor that was often quite helpful as we addressed some serious matters when Jim was President. His vision guided us to try new things that are still helping Amateur Radio and the League to this day.” A radio amateur for more than 40 years, Haynie was twice re-elected by the ARRL Board to the ARRL’s top volunteer office, serving until January 2006, when Joel Harrison, W5ZN, succeeded him. Prior to assuming the ARRL presidency, Haynie was ARRL West Gulf Division Director during two different periods — from 1987 until 1990 and from 1997 until 2000, and an ARRL Vice President from 1990 until 1992. During his 6 years as president, Haynie focused on promoting Amateur Radio in the classroom, and his ARRL Amateur Radio Education Project — which he dubbed the “Big Project” — was an initiative to offer a turnkey Amateur Radio curriculum as well as radio equipment to schools. His project eventually grew into the ARRL Education & Technology Program (ETP). A gregarious and accessible individual, Haynie was also skilled at promoting Amateur Radio as often as he could, frequently on the road to attend as many ham radio gatherings as he could squeeze into his schedule, including Dayton Hamvention each spring. Once, he was also a guest of Art Bell, W6OBB, on his Coast to Coast AM overnight radio talk show. On several occasions, Haynie traveled to Washington, DC, to meet with FCC and other government officials and with lawmakers on Capitol Hill to promote Amateur Radio issues and to communicate concerns. Those included the League’s position on deed restrictions or CC&Rs. During his tenure, the Amateur Radio Spectrum Protection Act and the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Consistency Act — an early bill to address the CC&R issue — were introduced in Congress. In 2003, Haynie testified on Capitol Hill on behalf of the Spectrum Protection Act. Not long after he became president, Haynie arranged for the gravely injured 13-year-old Willem van Tuijl — shot by pirates while cruising in the South Pacific with his parents Jacco, KH2TD, Jannie, KH2TE, van Tuijl — get medical treatment in the US. After the 9/11 terror attacks, Haynie rallied radio amateurs to assist, and he praised the actions of Amateur Radio volunteers who turned out in New York City and Washington, DC. “Radio amateurs in New York City and elsewhere around the country are doing everything they can to support the authorities in locating and assisting victims,” he said in the immediate aftermath of the attacks. A few years later, Haynie provided written testimony on Amateur Radio’s response in the Hurricane Katrina disaster to the US House Government Reform Committee. In 2007, after he had left the presidency, Dayton Hamvention® named Haynie as its Amateur of the Year. Hamvention said Haynie’s League leadership “helped define Amateur Radio’s role in emergency communication.” Among other highlights of Haynie’s tenure as the League’s president was the signing of a Statement of Affiliation between the Department of Homeland Security in 2003, which made ARRL a Citizen Corps affiliate. The following year, he headed an ARRL delegation to the White House to discuss concerns about broadband over power line technology, meeting with an official of the Office of Science and Technology Policy. In 2013, the ARRL West Gulf Division honored Haynie with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Service details have not yet been announced. RSGB Criticizes TV Broadcast Portraying Radio Amateur as “Nightmare Neighbour” 11/01/2016 The Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) has weighed in following the airing of a Channel 5 TV Nightmare Neighbour Next Door episode [the program may have been removed from the website — Ed.] that featured an Amateur Radio operator. In the program, neighbors of 75-year-old Armando Martins, M0PAM, of Kent, made unsubstantiated claims that RF radiating from his 30-foot vertical antenna was detrimental to their health. “Unfortunately, the RSGB was not invited to be part of Channel 5’s Nightmare Neighbour Next Door programme or to verify any facts,” the RSGB said. “We have, of course, contacted Channel 5 about our concerns and have highlighted the positive aspects of Amateur Radio. We have also offered our expertise and input for future programmes where Amateur Radio is mentioned.” Channel 5 broadcast the offending episode on October 27, and it drew criticism from radio amateurs across the UK, some of whom may have used a program complaint service form provided by telecommunications regulator Ofcom. Critics complained that the program was replete with false claims and note that Ofcom has never found any problems with Martins’ station. Martins, a veteran radio amateur, was put off the air in 2010 by the Canterbury City Council after moving into a council house — a form of public housing — and was not allowed to install his antenna in the back garden, although that was more of a zoning issue. He subsequently moved to Kent, where the health claims began. A radio amateur for more than 60 years, Martins was first licensed as CR6IL in Portuguese West Africa (Angola). “Our volunteers spend a lot of time helping radio amateurs with planning applications,” the RSGB said. “It is by putting forward facts during those processes that we can help to dispel myths about Amateur Radio and any impact on the public or environment.” The RSGB said it would let its members know if it receives a response from Channel 5.   National Parks on the Air Update With just 2 months left in the ARRL National Parks on the Air (NPOTA) program, the push for 1 million contacts from eligible NPS units remains strong. November 1 saw the 800,000th contact uploaded to Logbook of the World, breaking 25,000 contacts for the second straight week.   ARRL Media and Public Relations Manager Sean Kutzko, KX9X, and QST Managing Editor Becky Schoenfeld, W1BXY, were interviewed by NPS Ranger Bill Urbin during their September NPOTA activation of Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site (NS14). Video of that interview is available on the ARRL Facebook page.   Thirty-two activations are on tap for November 3-9, including Big Bend National Park in Texas, and Everglades National Park in Florida.   Details about these and other upcoming activations can be found on the NPOTA Activations calendar.   Keep up with the latest NPOTA news on Facebook. Follow NPOTA on Twitter (@ARRL_NPOTA).         Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH036 - Don't Skimp on the Coax

    · 01:06:00 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about     Tech Corner - Coax Coax is probably one of the main components of your station that you should NOT skimp on the cost of. You should always get the best coax that you can afford! You can have the best radio and the best antenna but have crappy coax and your neighbor could have a crappy radio and antenna but awesome coax, and your neighbor will nine times out of ten have a better signal than you do.   Let's do some math…   For easy math, let's say that your coax has a line loss of 3 dB per 100 feet and you have a 100 foot run, your radio has a transmitter power of 100 watts and your antenna has a 3 dB gain.   100(w) - 3 dB(coax loss) = 50(w) 50(w) + 3 dB(Antenna Gain) = 100(w)   In this example, you didn't gain anything but you also didn't loose anything. Let’s take it one step more now and say that you have 200 foot run now.   100(w) - 6 dB(200 ft coax loss) = 25(w)   *every 3 dB, your sign either doubles or halves; so at 3 dB you have 50 watts and for the next 3dB you are down to 25 watts   25(w) + 3 dB(antenna gain) = 50(w)   By doubling your coax length, you cut your radiated power in half.   In this example, we are also assuming that you have perfect 1:1 SWR on your antenna. If it is more than that, you have even less being radiated. You also have to take into account what frequency you are talking on. A coax that has a loss of 3 dB around 100 MHz or the 2 meter band, might have a 6 dB loss around 400 MHz or or the 70 cm bands.   Coax dB Loss per 100 Feet using common coax types: dB Loss / 100 feet Frequency Mhz Cable Type 1.0 10 50 100 200 400 900 1000 3000 5000 6A, 212 .26 .83 1.9 2.7 4.1 5.9 6.5 9.8 23.0 32.0 8 MINI, 8X   1.1 2.5 3.8 5.4 7.9 8.8 13.0 26.0   LMR -240 .24 .76 1.7 2.4 3.4 4.9 7.5 7.9 14.2 18.7 8, 8A, 10A, 213 (RG8/8A hard to find ) .15 .55 1.3 1.9 2.7 4.1 7.5 8.0 16.0 27.0 9913, 9086, 9096     0.9 1.4 1.8 2.6 4.2 4.5   13.0 4XL8IIA, FLEXI 4XL     0.9 1.4 1.8 2.6 4.2 4.5   13.0 LMR-400     .9 1.2   2.5 4.1 4.3     LMR-500     .7 1.0   2.0 3.2 3.4     LMR-600     .6 .8   1.4 2.5 2.7     8214   .60 1.2 1.7 2.7 4.2   7.8 14.2 22.0 9095     1.0 1.8 2.6 3.8 6.0 7.5     9, 9A, 9B, 214 .21 .66 1.5 2.3 3.3 5.0 7.8 8.8 18.0 27.0 11,11A,12,12A,13,13A, 216 .19 .66 1.6 2.3 3.3 4.8   7.8 16.5 26.5 14, 14A, 217 .12 .41 1.0 1.4 2.0 3.1   5.5 12.4 19.0 17,17A,18,18A, 218, 219 .06 .24 .62 .95 1.5 2.4   4.4 9.5 15.3 55B, 223 .30 1.2 3.2 4.8 7.0 10.0 14.3 16.5 30.5 46.0 58 .33 1.2 3.1 4.6 6.9 10.5 14.5 17.5 37.5 60.0 58A, 58C .44 1.4 3.3 4.9 7.4 12.0 20.0 24.0 54.0 83.0 59, 59B .33 1.1 2.4 3.4 4.9 7.0 11.0 12.0 26.5 42.0 62, 62A, 71A, 71B .25 .85 1.9 2.7 3.8 5.3 8.3 8.7 18.5 30.0 62B .31 .90 2.0 2.9 4.2 6.2   11.0 24.0 38.0 141,141A, 400, 142, 142A .30 .90 2.1 3.3 4.7 6.9   13.0 26.0 40.0 174 2.3 3.9 6.6 8.9 12.0 17.5 28.2 30.0 64.0 99.0 178B,196A 2.6 5.6 10.5 14.0 19.0 28.0   46.0 85.0 100 188A, 316 3.1 6.0 9.6 11.4 14.2 16.7   31.0 60.0 82.0 179B 3.0 5.3 8.5 10.0 12.5 16.0   24.0 44.0 64.0 393, 235   .6 1.4 2.1 3.1 4.5   7.5 14.0 21.0 402   1.2 2.7 3.9 5.5 8.0   13.0 26.0 26.0 405               22.0     LDF4-50A .06 .21 .47 .68 .98 1.4 2.2 2.3 4.3 5.9 LDF5-50A .03 .11 .25 .36 .53 .78 1.2 1.4 2.5 3.5 Note: These tables are typical specifications for comparison only. Values may not be exactly as quoted by a specific mfg. *http://www.hamuniverse.com/coaxdata.html Connectors   The other aspect of coax that you need to pay attention to is the end connectors that you use. While it is tempting to use the cheap $0.25 to $0.50 a piece PL-259 connectors that you can get at most hamfests, it is better to use a more high quality version of them. The cheap ones that you find are often very cheaply made and can be damaged easily while you are trying to solder it onto the coax. Often while you are soldering these ends on you can very easily get to much heat in the center point and melt the insulation before you are able to solder the shielding to the sides of the connector.   Check out this page,  K0BG.com - Coax and PL259 for more information about coax and connectors. It is a very nice article written by Alan Applegate, K0BG. He was the guest on episode 28, where we talked about mobile installations.     Are you looking for some new radio gear? Maybe you need a new computer for your shack? Did you loose a piece off you tower and you just cant find it without a metal detector? You can find all this and more at GigaParts.com. While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome! Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now! GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of... EHR10 ...at check out to receive 10% off the price of the case!     Amateur Radio Club Spotlight   Socorro Amateur Radio Association   Website: http://www.socorroara.org/ About SARA Amateur radio has been part of the landscape in Socorro since the 1930's. By the mid-1970's, informal meetings of members and their families were occurring and SARA made the transition to a formal association on May 1, 1976.  Although participation in the association has ebbed and flowed since, SARA has remained a vital element of both the amateur radio and Socorro communities since its formation.  Although a smaller southwest community, Socorro is very high tech.  The ARRL featured Socorro and SARA in the QST article, "Socorro, New Mexico -- Ham City, USA? (QST, December 1996, pp. 43-45)," an article by Dave Finley (N1IRZ) that highlighted the area's high per capita interest in amateur radio.   New Mexico Tech is a high quality, Socorro-based university offering bachelors degrees through doctorates in science, mathematics and engineering disciplines.  The NSF-funded National Radio Astronomy Observatory is located on the NMT campus and coordinates activities of the Very Large Array and Very Large Baseline Array.  Employees from diverse research endeavors ranging from the geophysics to defense make Socorro and SARA home.   Repeaters 146.680 - 100 or 123 input tone, 123 output tone - Socorro Peak 444.500 + D-Star Repeater   Netsp Weekly Socorro ARES Net - Wed 1930 - 146.680 Repeater Weekly Tri-County ARES Net - Thur 1930 - URFMSI System via the 146.680 Repeater New Mexico D-Star Net - Thur 2000 on DStar REF055A   Meetings SARA Club Meeting - Second Wed @ 1930(Except December) - Socorro County Annex, 198 Neel Ave. Burger King: Coffee every Saturday ~8:00 to 9:30 hrs at Burger King.   Capitol Bar on the Plaza - Weenie Wednesdays (on the patio in good weather) beginning in late afternoon. Twisted Chili - Friday Happy Hour beginning at 5:30 PM (on the patio in good weather).   Activities DX QRP Digital Modes Community Service Hamfests - Oct 15 8a-2p Field Day   Upcoming Events Contests EME Contest Objective: To work as many amateur stations as possible via the earth-moon-earth path on any authorized amateur frequency above 50 MHz. Dates - Three full weekend 48-hour periods (0000 UTC on Saturday through 2359 UTC Sunday). Dates for 2016 are: 2.3 GHz & Up - September 24-25, 50 to 1296 MHz - October 22-23 and November 19-20 Log Submission Deadline - All entries must be emailed or postmarked no later than 2359z Wednesday, December 21, 2016. NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 23 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 23 CQ Worldwide DX Contest, RTTY - 0000Z, Sep 24 to 2400Z, Sep 25 Maine QSO Party - 1200Z, Sep 24 to 1200Z, Sep 25 Texas QSO Party - 1400Z, Sep 24 to 0200Z, Sep 25 and 1400Z-2000Z, Sep 25 AGCW VHF/UHF Contest - 1400Z-1700Z, Sep 24 (144) and 1700Z-1800Z, Sep 24 (432) RSGB International Sprint Contest, CW - 1700Z-2100Z, Sep 24 UBA ON Contest, 6m - 0700Z-1000Z, Sep 25 Classic Exchange, Phone - 1300Z, Sep 25 to 0800Z, Sep 26 and 1300Z, Sep 27 to 0800Z, Sep 28 Peanut Power QRP Sprint - 2000Z-2200Z, Sep 25 220 MHz Fall Sprint - 1900 local - 2300 local, Sep 27 SKCC Sprint - 0000Z-0200Z, Sep 28 Phone Fray - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 28 CWops Mini-CWT Test - 1300Z-1400Z, Sep 28 and 1900Z-2000Z, Sep 28 and  0300Z-0400Z, Sep 29 UKEICC 80m Contest - 2000Z-2100Z, Sep 28 RSGB 80m Club Sprint, CW - 1900Z-2000Z, Sep 29 NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 30 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 30 YLRL DX/NA YL Anniversary Contest - 1400Z, Sep 30 to 0200Z, Oct 2 TARA PSK Rumble Contest - 0000Z-2400Z, Oct 1 15-Meter SSTV Dash Contest - 0000Z, Oct 1 to 2359Z, Oct 2 Oceania DX Contest, Phone -  0800Z, Oct 1 to 0800Z, Oct 2 WAB HF Phone - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 TRC DX Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 GTC CW Cup - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 Russian WW Digital Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1159Z, Oct 2 International HELL-Contest - 1600Z-1800Z, Oct 1 (80m) and 0900Z-1100Z, Oct 2 (40m) California QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 1 to 2200Z, Oct 2 FISTS Fall Slow Speed Sprint - 1700Z-2100Z, Oct 1 UBA ON Contest, SSB - 0600Z-1000Z, Oct 2 RSGB International DX Contest - 0700Z-1900Z, Oct 2   *Information taken from the ARRL and WA7BNM Contest Calendar Hamfests   09/23/2016 W4DXCC DX and Contest Convention - Pigeon Forge, TN   09/24/2016 41st Annual Elmira International HamFest - Horseheads, NY Bloomington ARC Hamfest  - Bloomington, IN CLARC ANNUAL HAMFEST - Alexandria, LA Covington Hamfest - Covington, GA DVRA 2016 Hamfest - West Windsor, NJ FreeGate 2016 - Greensboro, NC North Dakota State Convention (RRRA Hamfest) - West Fargo, ND ORC Regional Fall Swapfest - Cedarburg, WI Pasco County HamFest - Odessa, FL Pensacola Hamfest - Pensacola, FL RADIO EXPO 2016 - Belvidere, IL Reno Ham Swap - Verdi, NV Richmond KY Hamfest - Richmond, KY San Joaquin Valley Section Convention (Rally in the Valley) - Modesto, CA SMARTSFEST 2016 - Henderson, MN Washington State Convention (Spokane Hamfest) - Spokane Valley, WA   09/25/2016 Cleveland Hamfest and Computer Show - Berea, OH Ocean Monmouth County ARC Tailgate and Hamfest - Wall Township, NJ   10/01/2016 2016 Wichita Area Hamfest - Wichita, KS ARCOS SWAPMEET & COOKOUT - Shreveport, LA HamEXPO - Belton, TX Last Chance Tailgate - Plymouth, MN MBARC Fall Fest - Fishkill, NY Red Rose Repeater Association Hamfest - Brownstown, PA Rock Hill Hamfest - Rock Hill, SC San Diego Ham Fest - Lakeside, CA Valley Disaster Preparedness Fair - Granada Hills, CA VETTE CITY HAMFEST - Bowling Green, KY   10/02/2016 BARCfest - Longmont, CO Southeast Iowa Hamfest - West Liberty, IA     News   Amateur Radio Parity Act Passes in the US House of Representatives! 09/14/2016“The bill is passed without objection.” With those words, Amateur Radio history was made on September 12, when the US House of Representatives approved the Amateur Radio Parity Act, H.R. 1301 on a voice vote under a suspension of the rules. The focus of the campaign to enact the legislation into law now shifts to the US Senate. The House victory culminated many years of effort on ARRL’s part to gain legislation that would enable radio amateurs living in deed-restricted communities to erect antennas that support Amateur Radio communication. The measure calls on the FCC to amend its Part 97 rules “to prohibit the application to amateur stations of certain private land-use restrictions, and for other purposes.” While similar bills in past years gained some traction on Capitol Hill, it was not until the overwhelming grassroots support from the Amateur Radio community for H.R. 1301 shepherded by ARRL that a bill made it this far. The legislation faces significant obstacles to passage in the US Senate, however.“This is huge step in our effort to enact legislation that will allow radio amateurs who live in deed-restricted communities the ability to construct an effective outdoor antenna,” ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, said. “Thanks to everyone for their help in this effort thus far. Now we must turn our full attention to getting the bill passed in the Senate.”RARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, who chairs the ARRL Board’s Legislative Advocacy Committee, has been heavily involved in efforts to move H.R. 1301 forward. “This has been a multiyear effort that is finally seeing some light,” he said. “The passage of the bill in the House is a major accomplishment, due to the hard work of so many — from the rank-and-file member to the officers and directors.”Lisenco said it’s not a time to rest on our laurels. “We are only halfway there. The focus now shifts to our effort in the Senate,” he said. “We are beginning a massive e-mail campaign in which we need every member to write their two Senators using our simplified process. You will be hearing from President Roderick and from your Directors, asking you to go to our ‘Rally Congress’ page. Using your ZIP code, e-mails will be generated much like our recent letter campaign. You’ll fill in your name and address and press Enter. The e-mails will be sent directly to your Senators without you having to search through their websites.”Lisenco said getting these e-mails to members’ Senators is a critical part of the process. “Those numbers matter! Please help us help you by participating in this effort,” he said.As the amended bill provides, “Community associations should fairly administer private land-use regulations in the interest of their communities, while nevertheless permitting the installation and maintenance of effective outdoor Amateur Radio antennas. There exist antenna designs and installations that can be consistent with the aesthetics and physical characteristics of land and structures in community associations while accommodating communications in the Amateur Radio services.”During this week’s limited debate, the House bill’s sponsor, Rep Adam Kinzinger (R-IL), thanked ARRL and the Community Associations Institute (CAI) for reaching an agreement to move the bill forward “in a bipartisan and very positive manner.” He pointed out to his colleagues that Amateur Radio antennas are prohibited outright in some areas.“For some this is merely a nuisance,” Kinzinger said, “but for others — those that use their Amateur Radio license for life-saving emergency communications — a dangerous situation can be created by limiting their ability to establish effective communication for those in need.”Kinzinger said that in emergencies, hams can provide “a vital and life-saving function” when conventional communication systems are down. He also praised the Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS), a US Department of Defense-sponsored program, comprised largely of Amateur Radio volunteers, that also supports communication during emergencies and disasters.Cosponsor US Rep Joe Courtney (D-CT) also urged the bill’s passage. “This is not just a feel-good bill,” Courtney said, recounting how Hurricane Sandy brought down the power grid, and “we saw all the advanced communications we take for granted…completely fall by the wayside.” Ham radio volunteers provided real-time communication in the storm’s wake, he said, saying the legislation was a way “to rebalance things” for radio amateurs who choose to live in deed-restricted neighborhoods by enabling them to install “non-intrusive antennas.”Courtney noted that he spoke recently with FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, and said that Wheeler “strongly supports this legislation.”Leading up to the vote, Rep Paul Tonko (D-NY) also spoke in support of the legislation, calling it a commonsense approach that would build “fairness into the equation for Amateur Radio operators” in dealing with homeowners associations.The earlier U.S. Senate version of the Amateur Radio Parity Act, S. 1685, no longer is in play, and the Senate is expected to vote by unanimous consent on the version of H.R. 1301 that was adopted by the House on September 12.   New Section Manager Appointed in Northern New Jersey   09/16/2016 Steve Ostrove, K2SO, of Elizabeth, New Jersey, has been appointed as ARRL Northern New Jersey Section Manager, effective September 16. He takes the reins of the Northern New Jersey Field Organization after Richard Krohn, N2SMV, announced that he was stepping down. Krohn, of Manalapan, has served as the Northern New Jersey Section Manager since July 2008. ARRL Field Services and Radiosport Manager Dave Patton, NN1N, received Krohn’s resignation and recommendation for his replacement. He then consulted with ARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, before making the appointment. Ostrove will complete the current term of office that extends until June 30, 2017. Ostrove has served as Assistant Section Manager in Northern New Jersey since 2009, and was the Section Emergency Coordinator from 2001 through 2008. He is currently a District Emergency Coordinator, Official Emergency Station, and Official Relay Station.   SKYWARN Youth on the Air Net Debuts   09/14/2016 The SKYWARN Youth on the Air Net is on the air, encouraging young radio amateurs to get on the air and learn about the SKYWARN weather-spotting network and basic weather facts. The SKYWARN Youth Net meets on most Southwest Missouri SKYWARN repeaters Sunday evenings at 7:30 PM CT and is open to all hams via EchoLink. The net will first take check-ins from young hams aged 25 and younger. The net also will offer an opportunity for participation by unlicensed young people in ham radio households who may be interested in obtaining a ham ticket. “As this net grows and evolves, we hope to create and present brief educational segments,” said George Sfair, KJ6TQ. “We invite all young hams, their families, and the Amateur Radio community in general to check into this net. Young hams are the future of this hobby, and we encourage them to get involved, to get out on the air and talk, and to invite their friends to become hams as well.” The SKYWARN Youth Net is held on Missouri linked repeaters in Fordland/Springfield, 145.49 MHz (136.5 Hz tone); Joplin, 145.35 MHz (91.5 Hz tone); Walnut Grove, 147.33 MHz (162.2 Hz tone); Buffalo, 147.18 MHz (136.5 Hz tone), and Branson, 147.15 MHz (162.2 Hz tone), as well as on EchoLink node 291849 or NNWS-R. — Thanks to George Sfair, KJ6TQ   Source: ARRL News   Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM  

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  • 172: Charlie Hoehn - Play Your Anxiety Away • Find Work That Doesn't Feel Like Work • Intentional Acts Of Kindness

    · 00:45:59 · The Ultimate Health Podcast: Wellness, Nutrition, Fitness, & Exercise

    Charlie is the author of Play It Away and Recession-Proof Graduate. He's spoken at the Pentagon, TEDx, and universities around the world. Charlie is the Head of Podcast & Video for Book in a Box. He lives in Austin, Texas with his wife and two dogs. Today we’re talking about Charlie's experience with extreme anxiety and how he cured it primarily through play and switching to a play mindset. In this episode, we discuss: How he coordinated a huge event for Tim Ferriss The 1:3 sleep to wake ratio Charlie's slow and steady build to debilitating anxiety The various modalities Charlie tried to help relieve his anxiety eg. meditation, supplements, psychedelics, & fasting The book that was the tipping point during Charlie’s anxiety recovery How play completely cured Charlie of anxiety and depression within a few weeks How improv allowed Charlie to embrace what was going on in the moment Adopting a play mindset Children generally fall into one of 3 categories: secure, avoidant, or anxious We can all choose to view the world as a playground and the world tends to respond accordingly How to figure out what types of play best suits you Start by scheduling in as little as 30 minutes of play a week Outdoor sports are one of the best ways to reduce anxiety, especially in men Pay to play Fitting play into the workday It's ideal to find work that doesn't feel like work Finland has up to 2 hours of recess a day Are tracking devices such as Fitbit’s and social media taking away from the play experience? The less screen time you get, the happier you're going to be It's liberating to get rid of stuff - minimalism Finding an environment/location that supports your wellbeing Start smiling and saying hello to strangers on the street Intentional vs. random acts of kindness The more sleep you get, the better your work is The ultimate cheat in life... a 15-20 minute nap Show sponsors: Perfect Keto

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  • 069: The Play Everywhere Challenge

    · 00:13:08 · Infinite Earth Radio – weekly conversations with leaders building smarter, more sustainable, and equitable communities

    Topic: The Importance of Play in Our Society In This Episode: 01:50 Aisha Alexander is introduced. 02:02 Aisha shares what KaBOOM! is. 02:40 Aisha provides why play opportunities are so important. 04:06 Aisha explains why access to play is an issue. 06:02 Aisha describes the Play Everywhere Challenge. 09:08 Aisha states how people can learn more about KaBOOM! and the Play Everywhere Challenge. 09:38 Mike comments how playspaces have dual benefits. 10:16 Aisha expresses how kids are indicator species for cities. Guest/Organization: Aisha Alexander is a Director of External Affairs for KaBOOM!, where she leads efforts promote the creation of kid-friendly cities. She attended Hampton University, where she earned her BA in English and Early Childhood Education; and Temple University, earning a Master of Social Work, concentrating in Community and Policy Practice. Before joining KaBOOM!, she worked in municipal government, most recently for the City of Charlotte, where she managed the city’s neighborhood improvement programs. Aisha is an expert in community engagement, neighborhood quality of life and social sector innovation. Take Away Quotes: “KaBOOM! is a national nonprofit organization that’s committed to making sure that all kids have the access to the play opportunities they need to thrive.” “There’s lots of reasons that play is really important. Number one, we believe that play is a fundamental right of childhood; it is the work of children.” “We realized through our community-built playgrounds that we could not address the problem at scale, and so we worked with Ideas42, a behavioral research firm, to figure out what are the barriers to play, and when we looked at those barriers, we found out that what needs to happen to be able to give access to all kids is to really make play everywhere.” “We really wanted to have this Play Everywhere Challenge to help spur these types of ideas of how you can infuse play into everyday spaces where kids and families are already spending time.” Resources: Play Everywhere Challenge The Play Everywhere Playbook KaBOOM

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  • Criteria-based return to play. Psychological readiness. How? Whose call? Dr Clare Ardern explains

    · 00:15:32 · BJSM

    A recent keynote speaker at the Return to Play conference in Bern, the Arsenal FC Sport and Exercise Medicine Conference and the Isokinetic Football Medicine Strategies Return to Play conference in London, Clare Ardern is an emerging voice in sports medicine research. She currently occupies a postdoctoral position in the research department at Aspetar Sports Medicine Hospital, after doing the bulk of her research at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia. Her work focuses on the factors influencing return to play, particularly psychological readiness after ACL injury, as well as shared decision making and evidence based medicine. Follow Clare on Twitter @clare_ardern Timeline: 1:35 When can Sarah play again? Should she be playing again? 2:30 Need criteria-based progession through the rehab process , so that the focus shifts from “when” I can play again to “what” I need to achieve for successful return to play. 3:00 Education is key – both the patient and the coach. Motivation is important and can be positive or negative. Young athletes even more important 4:40 Are we moving back to biopsychosocial models, or have we moved on? 5:30 Understand the inherent risks that Sarah is facing, and make sure she understands them! 6:20 Psychological readiness for return to play – the ACL-Return to Sport after Injury (ACL-RSI) scale developed by Dr. Kate Webster and Dr. Julian Feller . It considers: confidence, risk appraisal and the athletes emotions. 12 questions completed in a few minutes. Also available as an Iphone app. It’s sport specific AND IT’S FREE!! 7:45 We should be thinking different for all time-loss injuries. 8:15 Criteria-based rehabilitation – but beware – early return to sport for young athletes increase the risk of re-injury. 9:00 We need to become more systematic to address the psychological/emotional aspects of return to play during our clinical management of these athletes. 12:00 Should we get “informed consent” from the athlete before return to play? 12:50 SUMMARY – When can I play again? 1. Reshape the question – Will I play again? Not all athletes get back, and that doesn’t mean fail. What is the right thing for Sarah? 2. Consider the psychological aspect more systematically! CONSENSUS PAPER on return to sport coming soon! Check out some recent papers from Dr. Ardern: Br J Sports Med 2014;48:1613-1619 doi:10.1136/bjsports-2014-093842The impact of psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activities after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/48/22/1613.full Br J Sports Med 2014;48:1543-1552 doi:10.1136/bjsports-2013-093398 Fifty-five per cent return to competitive sport following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis including aspects of physical functioning and contextual factors http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/48/21/1543.full Br J Sports Med 2016;50:506-508 doi:10.1136/bjsports-2015-095475 It is time for consensus on return to play after injury: five key questions http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/50/9/506.full Further listening: Podcast from Adam Gledhill which discusses a case study of ACL return to play considerations and different examples of strategies used to aid return to play experiences - https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/i-cant-return-to-play-when-fear-of-reinjury-dominates-after-acl-reconstruction-adam-gledhill

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  • MN 0033 Gaming Goals 2015

    · 00:35:37 · Meeple Nation Board Game Podcast

    In this episode we review Brent's 2014 gaming goals: 1. Play 40 games 10 times 2. Play Twilight Imperium with Brian 3. Play Monopoly 4. Play More Games with my Kids   We then discuss the benefits of playing a game multiple times.   Then we dive into our 2015 gaming goals   Brent 1. Play Dominion at least 43 times. 2. Play Games at least 25 times with my kids. 3. Attend 3 game conventions/trade shows. 4. Make 12 videos - likely games played at least 10 times. 5. Play 10 games 10 times. 6. Significantly organize at least five games with better inserts and getting started sheets.   Nathan 1. Play Starfarers of Catan at least once. 2. Play at least 40 games with my kids. 3. Play 10 new games with my family. 4. Play 10 games 10 times. 5. Play 20 new games this year. 6. Play 20 games within my collection that I haven't played for at least a year.   Ryan 1. Play Hanabi and get a perfect score. 2. Find Accessible Games I can play with my blind daughter and my other kids. 3. Thrift 10 gems (games I want to add to my collection). 4. Travel 10 times this year to my friends house to play games.

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  • Johnny Dollar Podcast 1956-08-13 to 08-17 Howard McNear and Richard Crenna - The Crystal Lake Cabin Matter

    · Jack Benny Show - OTR Podcast!

    More great Johnny Dollar with actors Howard McNear and Richard Crenna! Do you want OTR Rob to keep doing characters? He can do whatever he wants Keep them to just a few minutes I prefer to just hear the intro about the show most times Maybe they should just be for a few times a year Occasionally they are great online surveys What OTR Genres do you like best Comedy - Jack Benny Show Drama - Mecury Theater Suspense - The Whistler, Suspense Sci-Fi - X Minus One Detective - Johnny Dollar Mystery - I love a Mystery Serial - Superman Adventure - Escape, Tarzan Soap Opera - One Man's Family, Guiding Light Variety - Command Performance Musical - Bing Crosby Adult Western - Gunsmoke Musical Western - Gene Autry Western - Wild Bill Hickok, Lone Ranger Stars from Film - Lux Radio Theater, Screen Guild Theater Other Please Specify: survey Maker How should I bring Suspense in the fall? Buck chooses what he thinks is the best Suspense episode of the week Play all episodes from, 75,70,65,60, and 55 years ago each week Play Suspense, The Whistler, and Escape from 70 years ago Play whatever you want Other Please Specify: Poll Maker

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  • Jack Benny Podcast 1955-02-27 (912) Television Wrestling (Transcribed and Rehearsal Rec 1954-12-01)

    · Jack Benny Show - OTR Podcast!

    A fun rehearsal where Mel Blanc cracks up the whole cast! Here is Jack's first special of 1968. Do you want OTR Rob to keep doing characters? He can do whatever he wants Keep them to just a few minutes I prefer to just hear the intro about the show most times Maybe they should just be for a few times a year Occasionally they are great online surveys What OTR Genres do you like best Comedy - Jack Benny Show Drama - Mecury Theater Suspense - The Whistler, Suspense Sci-Fi - X Minus One Detective - Johnny Dollar Mystery - I love a Mystery Serial - Superman Adventure - Escape, Tarzan Soap Opera - One Man's Family, Guiding Light Variety - Command Performance Musical - Bing Crosby Adult Western - Gunsmoke Musical Western - Gene Autry Western - Wild Bill Hickok, Lone Ranger Stars from Film - Lux Radio Theater, Screen Guild Theater Other Please Specify: survey Maker How should I bring Suspense in the fall? Buck chooses what he thinks is the best Suspense episode of the week Play all episodes from, 75,70,65,60, and 55 years ago each week Play Suspense, The Whistler, and Escape from 70 years ago Play whatever you want Other Please Specify: Poll Maker

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  • ETH039 - Jamboree On The Air(JOTA)

    · 00:42:49 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the Jamboree On The Air, the Red River Radio Amateurs Amateur Radio Club, Upcoming events and hamfests for the next two weeks and Hurricane Matthew and other news. Tech Corner - Jamboree On The Air Jamboree-on-the-Air(http://www.scouting.org/jota.aspx), or JOTA, is the largest Scouting event in the world. It is held annually the third full weekend in October. JOTA uses amateur radio to link Scouts and hams around the world, around the nation, and in your own community. This jamboree requires no travel, other than to a nearby amateur radio operator's ham shack. Many times you can find the hams will come to you by setting up a station at your Scout camporee, at the park down the block, or perhaps at a ham shack already set up at your council’s camp.   Tell Me More Scouts of any age can participate, from Cub Scouts to Boy Scouts and Venturers, including girls. Once at the ham radio station, the communication typically involves talking on a microphone and listening on the station speakers. However, many forms of specialized communication may also be taking place, such as video communication, digital communication (much like sending a message on your smartphone but transmitted by radio), or communication through a satellite relay or an earth-based relay (called a repeater). The exchanges include such information as name, location (called QTH in ham speak), Scout rank, age, and hobbies. The stations you’ll be communicating with can be across town, across the country, or even around the world! The World Scout Bureau reported that nearly 1 million Scouts and almost 20,000 amateur radio operators participated in the 2015 JOTA, from more than 17,776 stations in 151 countries.   When Is It? Jamboree-on-the-Air is held the third weekend in October. There are no official hours, so you have the whole weekend to make JOTA contacts. The event officially starts Friday evening during the JOTA Jump Start and runs through Sunday evening.   Frequencies To Use HF SSB Voice Band WOSM Calling Frequencies Suggested Band Segment for US Stations Notes 80 m 3.940 & 3.690(1) 3.920 – 3.940 3.670 – 3.690 (1) (1) Extra segment 40 m 7.190 & 7.090 (2) 7.180 – 7.200 7.270 – 7.290 (2) 7.090 not available in Region 2 20 m 14.290 14.270 – 14.290 14.320 – 14.340   17 m 18.140 18.140 – 18.150   15 m 21.360 21.360 – 21.400   12 m 24.960 24.960 – 24.980   10 m 28.390 (3) 28.350 – 28.400 (3) (3) Includes Novices & Techs 6 m 50.160 50.160 – 50.200   HF CW Band WOSM Calling Frequencies Suggested Band Segment for US Stations Notes 80 m 3.570 (3) 3.560 – 3.570 (3) (3) Includes Novices & Techs 40 m 7.030 (3) 7.030 – 7.040 (3) (3) Includes Novices & Techs 20 m 14.060 14.050 – 14.060   17 m 18.080 18.070 – 18.080   15 m 21.140 (3) 21.130 – 21.140 (3) (3) Includes Novices & Techs 12 m 24.910 24.900 – 24.910   10 m 28.180 (3) 28.170 – 28.180 (3) (3) Includes Novices & Techs 6 m 50.160 50.150 – 50.160   HF PSK-31 http://bpsk31.com Call CQ JOTA. The chart below shows the commonly used frequencies for PSK-31. Band Frequency Notes 80 m 3.580   40 m 7.080 (4) (4) Region 2 (USA). 7.040 to 7.060 for Regions 1 & 3 30 m 10.142   20 m 14.070 (5) (5) Most activity for JOTA will be on 20 m 17 m 18.100   15 m 21.080 (6) (6) Most activity can be found at 21.070 12 m 24.920   10 m 28.120   2 Meter FM Simplex 147.450, 147.480, 147.510, 147.540* * Use 147.540 as Calling Channel. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO or auxiliary or control link. Avoid 146.520, the National FM Simplex Calling Frequency, as well as 146.550, which is commonly used by mobiles and RVers. 70 CM FM Simplex 446.000*, 445.950, 446.050, 446.100, 446.150 * Use 446.000 as Calling Channel. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO or auxiliary or control link. D-STAR http://www.dstarinfo.com REF033A has been allocated as a full-time JOTA/Radio Scouting D-STAR Reflector. After contact is established, stations should disconnect from REF033A and connect to one or other repeater or migrate to an unused Reflector. SIMPLEX Channels: 145.670*, 145.640, 145.610, 438.010. * 145.670  and 438.010 are commonly used as the National D-STAR Simplex Channels and should be used only as Calling Channels for JOTA. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO. DMR http://www.dmr-marc.net All wide area talkgroups are permitted for use for JOTA for establishing contacts. After contact is established, stations should utilize as few resources as possible. For international, national, and regional QSO's, stations should move their transmissions to one of the DMR-MARC UA talkgroups or to the DCI TAC-310 talkgroup.   For intrastate contacts, stations may use their area's statewide talkgroup (if applicable). The use of your repeater's local talkgroup (if applicable) is always permitted. A full list of repeaters and their available talkgroups can be found at http://www.dmr-marc.net/repeaters.html .   SIMPLEX Channels: 441.0000*, 446.5000, 446.0750, 433.4500, 145.7900*, 145.5100. All simplex frequencies operate on time-slot 1 and use color code 1. (*are commonly used as the National DMR Simplex Channels and should be used only as Calling Channels for JOTA. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO.) IRLP http://irlp.net http://www.irlptopics.net Use Topic Channel Node 9091 as a Common Meeting Place or Calling Channel. After contact, disconnect from 9091 and one station should connect to another's local node. EchoLink http://www.echolink.org Software or apps available for Windows, Mac, iPhone/iPad, and Android. Dedicated Conference Node *JOTA-365* (node 480809). When contact is made on a Conference Node, it is recommended the two parties establish direct contact with each other to free up the Conference Node. APRS 144.39 http://aprs.org http://aprs.org/cqsrvr.html http://www.aprs-is.net/CQSrvr.aspx CQSRVR: CQ JOTA CQSRVR: CQ SCOUTS (other times of the year)   General Guidelines Jamboree-on-the Air is about getting young people to talk to each other using amateur radio. Arrange for the use of a club call sign, or apply for a special-event call sign in plenty of time. Prepare some simple diagrams and explanations showing how radio works and how signals can be transmitted around the world as well as to the nearest repeater. Arrange with the Scout leaders regarding venue, QSL cards, patches, participation certificates, other activities, physical arrangements, publicity, and details required for the JOTA report form on this website. Notify the national JOTA organizer of your event using the details on the registration form on this site. Go to Scout meetings beforehand to introduce the subject. Organize activities such as kit building, soldering practice, SSTV, FSTV, packet radio, and weather satellite reception. The simplest of things, such as a closed-circuit RTTY station, can generate a great deal of excitement. Offer to train Scouts for the Radio merit badge. Offer a Technician license preparation course for those interested in learning and doing more with ham radio. Ensure that no more than three Scouts are watching one Scout on the air. Keep Scouts involved and active or they will quickly grow bored. Ensure that the station is safe for young visitors. Observe your license conditions, especially regarding third-party traffic. Involve the Scouts in the contact. The goal is to involve as many Scouts as possible in making a contact. It is not to maximize the number of contacts or the distance of the contacts; it's about the experience for the Scouts. Try to use plain, understandable English where possible. When you do use Q-signals and other ham radio terms, take time to explain them to the Scouts. Don't try to work weak stations from remote locations. Go for stronger, more local stations that unpracticed ears can hear easily and understand. Local FM repeaters can be just as exciting for Scouts. Don't feel you have to keep the station on the air with no Scouts present.   Useful Internet Sites K2BSA Amateur Radio Association http://www.k2bsa.net BSA JOTA Information http://www.scouting.org/jota.aspx World Organization of the Scout Movement JOTA Information http://www.scout.org/jotajoti/ ARRL JOTA Information http://www.arrl.org/jamboree-on-the-air-jota Ultimate resources site for everything ham radio http://www.ac6v.com/   Discussion Groups Best all-around Radio Scouting discussion group http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ScoutRadio/ Worldwide coverage; however, be certain to post identical information at ScoutRadio at Yahoo http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JOTAskedbook Emphasis on discussion, announcements, and promoting getting "Scout Camps on the Air (SCOTA)" http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scoutcamps_ota/     Are you looking for some new radio gear? Maybe you need a new computer for your shack? Did you lose a piece off you tower and you just can't find it without a metal detector? You can find all this and more at GigaParts.com. While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome! Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now! GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of... EHR10 ...at checkout to receive 10% off the price of the case!     Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Red River Radio Amateurs   Website: http://rrra.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/W0ILO   Meetings Third Tuesday of each month at 7PM in the basement of the Cass County Annex, 1010 2nd Ave South, Fargo, ND 58103 . Please enter through the north doors adjacent to the 2nd Ave S parking lot.   Repeaters 145.350 - PL 123 Moorhead, MN 146.760 - PL 123 Grandin, ND 147.255 + PM 123 Wheatland, ND 444.875 + PM 123 Moorhead, MN   Nets Sundays at 9p - RRRA Repeater System Sundays at 8p - 146.520 Simplex   Activities Skywarn Class Hamfest Hospital Exercise Fargo Marathon Headwaters Rally ADA Tour de Cure Field Day MS TRAM Ride Ojibwe Forests Rally FM Rotary Ride 2016 Simulated Emergency Test Jingle Bell Run License Testing   Upcoming Events   + Classic Exchange, CW 1300Z, Sep 11 to 0800Z, Sep 12 and  1300Z, Sep 13 to 0800Z, Sep 14 + Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 14 + CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Sep 14 and  1900Z-2000Z, Sep 14 and  0300Z-0400Z, Sep 15 + RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 1900Z-2000Z, Sep 14 + NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 16 + NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 16 + AGB NEMIGA Contest 2100Z-2400Z, Sep 16 + ARRL 10 GHz and Up Contest 0600 local, Sep 17 to 2400 local, Sep 18 + SARL VHF/UHF Analogue/Digital Contest 1000Z, Sep 17 to 1000Z, Sep 18 + Scandinavian Activity Contest, CW 1200Z, Sep 17 to 1200Z, Sep 18 + All Africa International DX Contest 1200Z, Sep 17 to 1200Z, Sep 18 + SRT HF Contest SSB 1300Z, Sep 17 to 1300Z, Sep 18 + QRP Afield 1600Z-2200Z, Sep 17 + New Jersey QSO Party 1600Z, Sep 17 to 0359Z, Sep 18 and  1400Z-2000Z, Sep 18 + New Hampshire QSO Party 1600Z, Sep 17 to 0400Z, Sep 18 and  1600Z-2200Z, Sep 18 + Washington State Salmon Run 1600Z, Sep 17 to 0700Z, Sep 18 and  1600Z-2400Z, Sep 18 + Feld Hell Sprint 1800Z-1959Z, Sep 17 + North American Sprint, RTTY 0000Z-0400Z, Sep 18 + BARTG Sprint 75 1700Z-2100Z, Sep 18 + Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0100Z-0300Z, Sep 19 + 144 MHz Fall Sprint 1900 local - 2300 local, Sep 19 + Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 21 + CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Sep 21 and  1900Z-2000Z, Sep 21 and  0300Z-0400Z, Sep 22 + NAQCC CW Sprint 0030Z-0230Z, Sep 22 + NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 23 + NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 23 + ARRL EME Contest 0000Z, Sep 24 to 2359Z, Sep 25 + CQ Worldwide DX Contest, RTTY 0000Z, Sep 24 to 2400Z, Sep 25 + Maine QSO Party 1200Z, Sep 24 to 1200Z, Sep 25 + Texas QSO Party 1400Z, Sep 24 to 0200Z, Sep 25 and  1400Z-2000Z, Sep 25 + AGCW VHF/UHF Contest 1400Z-1700Z, Sep 24 (144) and  1700Z-1800Z, Sep 24 (432) + RSGB International Sprint Contest, CW 1700Z-2100Z, Sep 24 + UBA ON Contest, 6m 0700Z-1000Z, Sep 25 + Classic Exchange, Phone 1300Z, Sep 25 to 0800Z, Sep 26 and  1300Z, Sep 27 to 0800Z, Sep 28 + Peanut Power QRP Sprint 2000Z-2200Z, Sep 25 *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar Hamfests   10/13/2016 Microwave Update 2016 Conference - St. Louis, MO   10/14/2016   Pacific Division Convention (PACIFICON) - San Ramon, CA   10/15/2016 Al Brock Memorial Hamfest/Tailgate - Rome, GA Anderson RC's 38th Annual Hamfest - Anderson, SC ARRL Day in the Park - Columbia, MS Coastal ARS Savannah Swapmeet - Savannah, GA Greeneville Hamfest - Greeneville, Tn Kingman Ham Fest - Kingman, AZ Muskegon Color Tour Hamfest - Muskegon, MI Socorro Hamfest -  Socorro, NM SouthSide ARC Hamfest - Belton, MO Swaptoberfest - Rickreall, OR   10/16/2016 2016 Kalamazoo HamFest and Amateur Radio Swap & Shop - Kalamazoo, MI Conneaut ARC Hamfest - Conneaut, OH Connecticut State Convention (Nutmeg Hamfest) - Meriden, CT FLEA at MIT - Cambridge, MA RF Hill ARC Hamfest - Sellersville, PA   10/21/2016 Arizona State Convention (CopaFest 2016) - Maricopa, AZ Florida State Convention (Melbourne Hamfest) - Melbourne, FL Texoma Hamarama - Ardmore, OK   10/22/2016 4th Annual TailgateFest - Hollywood, MD Hamfest Chattanooga 2016 - East Ridge, TN Shelbyville Tailgate 2016 - Shelbyville, IN Wiregrass ARC Fall Tailgate - Headland, AL Wisconsin ARES/RACES Conference - Wisconsin Rapids, WI   10/23/2016 Mason-Dixon Hamfest - Upperco, MD Massillon ARC Hamfest - Massillon, OH *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar   News “Overview of Army and Air Force MARS” Webinar Set for October 25 10/04/2016 Registration is open for the webinar “Overview of Army and Air Force MARS,” October 25 at 8 PM ET (0000 UTC on October 26). US Air Force MARS Chief Dave Stapchuk, KD9DXM, will discuss the history of the Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS) program and membership requirements for Amateur Radio operators. He also will highlight the Joint MARS Phone Patch network, which provides daily support to US armed forces. The phone patch network facilitates not only morale/welfare phone patches but routinely handles mission-related radio calls and occasionally assists US air crews with in-flight emergency phone patches when air traffic control cannot be reached. US Army MARS Program Manager Paul English, WD8DBY, will discuss the quarterly US Department of Defense (DOD) contingency communication exercises, which promote interoperability between the Amateur Radio community and the DOD. English will also discuss initiatives for promoting the use of 60 meters between Amateur Radio and the federal government as well as the types of information MARS operators will request from the Amateur Radio community during the upcoming quarterly DOD communications exercise (COMEX), October 30-November 1. Webinar registrants will receive a confirming e-mail that contains information about joining the webinar. Hurricane Watch Net Stands Down Following Record Activation for Hurricane Matthew 10/09/2016 After the longest activation in its history, the Hurricane Watch Net (HWN) secured operations for Hurricane Matthew on October 9 at 0400 UTC. HWN Manager Bobby Graves, KB5HAV, reports the net was in continuous operation for 6 days, 7 hours, gathering real-time ground-truth weather data and passing it along to the National Hurricane Center (NHC) via the Center’s WX4NHC. Various Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) nets also activated along the Eastern Seaboard over the past week. The first major hurricane of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season and, at one point, a Category 5 storm, Matthew has been downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone, as it’s poised to head out into the Atlantic. As of 0900 UTC, Matthew was still generating strong winds over eastern North Carolina, as it moves to the east-northeast just off the Outer Banks. The NHC reported that record-breaking flooding continues over portions of eastern North Carolina. The storm was some 30 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, with maximum sustained winds of 75 MPH, moving east at 14 MPH. The Hurricane Warning from Little River Inlet to south of Cape Fear has been discontinued, and the Hurricane Warning from Cape Fear to Surf City has been replaced with a Tropical Storm Warning, the NHC said. “Many have perished in Haiti and Cuba as a result of Matthew, and the death-toll rises still,” Graves noted. “Many residents in the Bahamas and the US East Coast states of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina have felt the impact of Matthew as well.” Graves was appreciative of the Amateur Radio volunteers who took part in the HWN activation as well as of those who accommodated the net's lengthy operation on 20 and 40 meters. “As always, having a clear frequency benefits our net control stations and [lets us copy] those in the affected areas,” he said. “It’s unfortunate we had to occupy these frequencies for an extended time, but, no two emergencies are alike. And Matthew was certainly unlike any storm anyone has ever seen before.” As Hurricane Matthew pulls away from the US East Coast, the Voice over Internet Protocol SKYWARN/Hurricane Net (VoIPWX) attracted a number of visitors, according to net managers. “On board Saturday afternoon, in addition to WX4NHC at the National Hurricane Center, stations representing a number of Federal Emergency Management Agency regional offices and the National Response Coordination Center monitored the net for actionable intelligence to be used to plan recovery operations,” said net Public Affairs Officer Lloyd Colston, KC5FM. The net also activated on October 3 for Hurricane Matthew. The net said its Georgia Reflector was linked to the WX-Talk conference, so net managers could help to relay relaying reports to local National Weather Service offices on NWSchat and the NHC. According to Chief of Operations Dennis Dura, K2DCD, the net established a link up the East Coast into North Carolina and continued to monitor for damage assessment in areas the hurricane had already passed. The net supported the NHC on the WX-Talk Conference, Node #7203 onEchoLink. IRLP Reflector 9219. IRLP Reflector 9553 was the backup. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Network (SATERN) on 14.265 MHz also was active for Matthew, handling outbound emergency, priority, or health-and-welfare traffic from hurricane-affected areas. Matthew was the first Category 5 Hurricane to form in the Atlantic Basin since Hurricane Felix in 2007.   Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • 157: Bilingual Play Date Activities

    · 00:12:09 · Bilingual Avenue with Marianna Du Bosq

    On this episode of Bilingual Avenue, I share activities that you can carry out at a bilingual play date. Let’s talk a bit about how children of different ages play. This will help you with your planning and to make sure that you are meeting the needs of your participants. Play date activity tips by age group 0-2 year olds Kids at this age learn by exploring with their hands and mouth. They absolutely love to bang, throw, drop, shake and put things in their mouth. Now I understand you don’t necessarily want a bunch of toddlers throwing and banging things around your house. But you can include things like sensory bins for them to play. Add some toys that can help you work on target words in the bin to make sure you incorporate some language. Keep in mind that toddlers will generally not play with another child but instead play in parallel.   3 – 5 year olds Children this age love imaginary play which is great because there is so much you can do here to work on language skills. Create activities that tap into children’s fantasy play and imagination. The best part about this age group is that they are much more likely to interact with other kids. My kids have both loved to interact with play little kitchens which is great because you can incorporate lots of vocabulary around pretend food and pretend cooking. You can also adapt this activity for different ages. 6 – 9 year olds Little ones at this age are able to create deeper connections with friends. However, with deeper connections also comes conflict. Be aware that while hosting a play date this age there could be some arguing. This is generally because children in this age group are much more competitive and can get very disappointed if they lose. Therefore, avoid activities that involved winners and losers. In fact, for this stage I recommend having one friend over for a play date. Keep it even smaller than before to reduce the likelihood of arguments. Dress up for example is fun for this age group and there is no competition. It also allows for some very natural ways to introduce vocabulary through articles of clothing.   10 -14 year olds Older kids can enjoy play dates too. There will likely be a lot less parent guidance for this group and much more free play. Keep in mind that peer pressure has a big influence with kids this age. Silliness comes in super handy with this group so consider that when planning your activities. So what do you think? Are you up for the challenge? Don’t overthink it and host one. They will only get better with time and you learn what works and what doesn’t.

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