a state

  • Episode #255 – State Control

    · Marketing Secrets

    The key to getting people to have the same epiphany that you had. On today’s episode Russell talks about state control. Why being able to be a good storyteller to get people in the same state you were in to give you an epiphany, so that they too can have one is necessary to sell them. Here are some cool things you’ll hear in this episode: Hear the difference between stating how you felt and telling the story in a way that will put other people in the same state you were in. Find out why it’s important for people to have the same epiphany as you in order to sell them. And stick around to the end to hear one last little value bomb about the blue underlined link used in Clickbank. So listen below to find out how to get your customers to have the same epiphany you once had and why its so important. ---Transcript--- Hey everyone, good morning. This is Russell Brunson and welcome to, you know where we are, we are here today with Marketing In Your Car. Alright everyone, I hope you guys are doing good. I am on day number two of my routine. Not going to lie, I am feeling it. For some reason I couldn’t fall asleep last night, probably because we turned on bachelor in Paradise and that was dumb. As soon as that started, it was like, there’s 2 hours of my life that I’m not going to get back. It’s actually less than that because I can fast forward through the commercials, but it was still way too much time. So probably about 11 I passed out on the couch, wake up and I’m like, “Oh crap, I’m already an hour past bedtime, I gotta wake up at 5.” So I jumped into bed and then for some reason I couldn’t sleep until 12:30 and then I finally fell asleep until Norah woke up at like 2. Tough night. 5 the alarm clock goes off, I jumped in the float tank and floated, which was really nice. Then I had my call with Tara, my energy session, which was amazing and cool and weird and I don’t know. But it’s good, so I really enjoyed it. And now here we are, we’re driving to the office. So I wanted to tell you guys today, I don’t know about you guys, but I love just the art and science of what we do. This whole marketing game. So for me, it’s like here’s the scientific funnel structures that we know work, and within that framework then we have the art. How do we get it to break people’s patterns and cause emotion and get people to connect and bring them back to where they’re at? It’s interesting, one of the coolest things that I figured out as I have been writing the new Expert Secrets book, it’s just cool. If nothing else, writing a book is cool because it causes you to deep dive, immersion, all the stuff we’ve been talking about the last couple of weeks. All these cool things come out. And one of the things we were talking about in the book is the whole epiphany bridge concept. I showed you guys a bunch of times, and if you missed that go back to Marketinginyourcar.com and search for one of the episodes on epiphany bridges. But it’s coming back to rewinding and trying, not to sell people, but to get people to buy into what it is you’re selling. So that’s the difference between selling and getting people to buy into what you’re selling. It’s like, trying to get them into buying into something. So I have to cause an emotion for them to be able to buy into that. So for me, a lot of times it’s going back and telling the back story. So you figure out, you start this back story, and the back story is important because where you’re at today, is where your audience wants to be, that’s why they’re listening to you. So your back story brings it back to the spot where you’re starting in the same spot they’re at. So that’s the key, it’s coming off of your pinnacle or whatever you want to call it, the mountain on high, where people are looking at your success and coming back down the mountain and standing where they’re at and saying, “Hey, let me tell you about where I was in the same spot, because you want to get to the top of the mountain, that’s where am right now. Let me share with you how I got there.” So you step down off the mountain and you share this back story. You bring them through this process and then you’re telling them about the epiphany you had. Whatever that process or the thing you learned or read or discovered or whatever. Somewhere you had this epiphany that caused you to move and that was kind of the process. There’s a whole bunch in the other podcast about how the epiphany is getting people emotionally connected and things like that. But one of the interesting things, so we talked about in the book, a lot of people tell stories and just kind of tell the story. But if you want to become good at telling stories you have to move away from just the telling of the story. The facts and the details, like “Hey, I woke up this morning and I was really tired so I blah blah blah.” And just tell the story, a lot of people tell stories like that. And getting into the feeling side of it, if you read good books you’ll notice when you read the book the author doesn’t just say, “Hey I walked into the room and then I went to the bathroom and then I left.” The author walks in the room and he describes the room. “I walked in the room and on the side I could see the paintings that were kind of dusty and they were off center so you could tell they hadn’t been upkept, and the lights in here, one of them was kind of flickering and it gave this dim shimmer on the room. And there was kind of this music you could hear quietly in the background, almost like elevator music but even more quiet. I could smell this musty cigar smell that reminded me of my grandpa and reminded me about back in the day when he used to bounce me on his knees.” So I’m describing the scene to you, number one. Number two starts bringing you into the emotional things, like how you feel. “As I walked through that door, my hands started to sweat. And as I did that my mouth started getting dry and I had this weird feeling where I couldn’t swallow. I tried to swallow but it got stuck on the swallow. And then that thing that was stuck in my throat and started to swell and I felt like I was going to choke on it, because I couldn’t quite get it through. So I had to cough to get that pressure off my thing and all I could think about was how thirsty I was and I needed some water quick. So I looked over to the bartender and I saw…blah, blah, blah.” So that’s the story and it starts bringing you into the actual feelings. So he starts describing how you feel and the emotions and the senses and you start kind of describing those things. In the book, and in the event we did last week or two weeks ago, whenever that was, we talked a lot about me telling stories. How to tell them, how to get deep into the emotional side and painting a picture. And I was thinking about it and how to write this section of the book, I was like, “Why is that so important?” and all the sudden it hit me like a ton of bricks. If your job is to tell this epiphany story, this epiphany bridge and you’re trying to give somebody the same epiphany that you had, obviously you tell the story and you hope that the moral of the story is the same thing they get, they the same “Wow. I should have a funnel. Wow, I should definitely change my career. Wow, I should do this way to lose weight.” Or whatever that epiphany to have is. For them to get the same epiphany you had, you have to try to get them in the same state that you were in when you had that epiphany. That’s the key, that’s the big aha I had this week. It’s all about state control. I should do a whole course on this, it’s so cool when you start understanding it. I learned it originally from Tony Robbins. How to get in a state instantly. If you search Tony Robbins, search the Triad, it’s a concept he talks about where it’s basically there’s 3 things you need to do to get in state any time. Your physiology, what your body is doing. Then there’s pop quiz if I remember them. Physiology, focus and meaning. So what you’re focusing on and the meaning you’re attaching to things. And you can instantly get into any state as soon as you understand the pieces that go into state control. You can instantly go into a state. I want to be in a happy state. Boom, you can do it by changing your physiology, change what you think about, change your focus. Boom, boom, boom, really quickly you can get into a happy state, or a depressed state. State control is the key when you understand it. So when you understand it for yourself and how you can, not manipulate, but how you can control it and use it at certain times, the same things happening when you’re telling your stories. You were in a certain state when you had that epiphany, so because of that, the change happened. Have you had a friend that tells you a story and they’re like, “The most amazing thing happened ever! It changed my whole life.” They tell you the thing. “This was the thing.” And you’re like, “That’s it? Dude, that’s not a big deal.” And they’re like, “No, you don’t understand. When I heard it, it changed everything.” And you’re like, “It’s not …” and the reason it’s not a big deal to you is you’re in a different state when you heard it. So the state you’re in, it’s not that impressionable. You’re like, “Oh, yeah. Whatever.” The power behind the epiphany that they had when they share it with you, because you are in a different state, you miss it. There’s no emotion to it. So for one of our stories when we go back and tell our stories, when we’re telling this epiphany bridge, the goal of the story is to get them into the same state that you were in. Because if they’re in the same state you’re in, you control that state and get them to that same state, then they’re more likely to have the epiphany you are trying to get them to make. Does that make sense? I haven’t verbally talked about this, I’m kind of thinking through it live on this podca

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  • Income Not Received Should Not be Taxed – Ep. 274

    · 00:31:46 · The Peter Schiff Show Podcast

    Elimination of Deductions for State and Local Tax - "SALT"Tax reform is the one remaining 2018 Republican campaign issue, and the argument over "SALT", or the elimination of deductions for state and local taxes. In general that would be state income tax or state property tax. In some states that do not have income tax, you are allowed to deduct your sales tax, although that is a more complicated deduction. In the wealthier states on both coasts, tax payers rely on those deductions.The Mortgage Tax Deduction Restricts the Free MarketNo one wants to get rid of the home mortgage deduction, but that is a much better deduction to eliminate, as it does more damage to the economy. The politically popular mortgage interest deduction is aimed at altering behavior, rather than to let the free market work independently. The real beneficiary of the mortgage tax deduction is not the home buyer but the house seller. There are many predominately Democratic states with high taxes but I don't buy argument in favor of eliminating that deduction.Why Should the Federal Government Subsidize the State Government?The argument is, why should the Federal government subsidize state government?  If a state wants to have a high income tax, then, its citizens get to deduct that income tax from their Federal taxes and therefore, they don't feel the full burden of the tax, because some of it is absorbed by the Federal government. As a result of this, tax payers in high tax states are more receptive to those high taxes because they get a tax break on their Federal tax returns. If they could not deduct these taxes, there would be a bigger pushback on the state level.Federal Government Taxing Unearned IncomeIf we are going to have an income tax, we have to tax the actual income. For example, if you earn $100,000, and let's say you live in a state with a flat 10% income tax, then they pay $10,000 in taxes. Did they earn $100,000 for $90,000? I would say they earned $90,000. Now if the Federal government does not want to give a deduction on the state income tax, they should not tax you on income you never earned.  I don't think that's Constitutional. You can't be taxed on money that didn't come to you. The money paid to the state in taxes is not a voluntary donation. It is taken by force.No Double TaxIf you go back to the origins of the first Federal income taxes exempted tax paid to the states, it was because the Federal government respected the sovereignty of the states to tax the people first. If you allow the Federal government to ignore state taxes, theoretically they could place an income tax so high that you would have nothing left between the state and Federal tax burden. I would not allow the government to double tax anything, because it is diminishing the power of the state.Defer Income Tax to EmployersHere's another thing that no one in Congress is addressing: the states can get around this. Let's say they pass  a law that says you can't deduct your state income taxes from your Federal income tax.  In the previous example, the taxpayer pays taxes on $10,000 he never earned. What if the state then repeals the state income tax on wages and salaries and in its place, imposes a payroll tax on employers? So that, instead of an employee getting paid $100,000 and paying $10,000 in taxes, the payroll tax causes the employer to pay a state tax that would then reduce the salary of the employee by that much. That payroll tax would be deductible for the employer as an expense. So all the states would have to do is change the way they tax wages and salaries and the net effect would be no change for the individual worker.  This would deprive the Federal government of all the extra money they think they are going to get by removing the state income tax deduction.  

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  • Tribal Courts and Families: Native American Sovereignty and the Indian Child Welfare Act

    · The Center for Court Innovation - Podcasts

    Theresa Pouley of the Tulalip Tribal Court, Michael Petoskey of the Pokagan Band of Potawatomi Indians, and William A. Thorne Jr., a Pomo/Coast Miwok Indian appointed to the Utah Court of Appeals, discuss the  advantages of transferring child welfare cases from state to tribal jurisdiction. This is one of three podcasts produced in collaboration with the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.ROBERT V. WOLF: Hi, I'm Rob Wolf, director of communications at the Center for Court Innovation, and this is one of several special podcasts the Center's doing with the support and assistance of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, which is hosting its 74th conference in New York City this month, July 2011. Today I'm speaking with Judge William A. Thorne Jr., Judge Theresa Pouley, and Judge Michael Petoskey, all of whom are judges in tribal courts, and they're all involved with a lot of important issues like improving and strengthening tribal judicial systems, and the welfare of Indian children. So you all have long biographies so I just thought I'd give a very brief introduction for all of you. Judge Thorne is a Pomo/Coast Miwok Indian from Northern California, and he has served in the past as a tribal judge for numerous tribes. He's also served 14 years as a state trial judge in Utah and in 2000 was appointed a judge on the Utah Court of Appeals. Judge Pouley was appointed this year by President Obama to the Indian Law and Order Commission, and she's currently the chief judge of the Tulalip Tribal Court in Washington, and an associate justice of the Colville Tribal Court of appeals and a member of the Colville Confederated Tribes in Northeast Washington. And Judge Petoskey Is the Chief Judge of the Pokagan Band of Potawatomi Indians in Michigan. So I just want to welcome you all and thanks for taking the time out of the conference to chat with me. I thought we'd focus today on children and families and I thought we'd start off with the Indian Child Welfare Act, which is a pivotal piece of federal legislation. What are the problems that it’s intended to address?JUDGE THORNE: It's a piece of federal legislation that was intended to remedy the problem of Indian children being taken out of their homes way too often and unnecessarily. And it takes a couple different tacks to try and solve the problem of removing kids too often. It raises the standard of proof that's necessary. It gives an opportunity for extended family to become the first option for surrogate care, and you remember this was back in the '70s when most states didn't do that. And it provided a mechanism to transfer the decision point to tribal judges, who were more likely to understand the families in context, and therefore more likely to help them heal and be able to take care of their children. WOLF: Okay, so that was Judge Thorne. Thank you very much for that explanation. So it was enacted in '78 and its 2011 now, and I wonder If Judge Pouley or Judge Petoskey wants to talk about, a little bit about, if they feel state and tribal systems have a grasp of what the Indian Child Welfare Act Is and how to apply it. JUDGE POULEY: Well the Indian Child Welfare Act really is about making state courts engage in some particularly culturally relevant behavior when dealing with Indian children. It isn’t a restriction or a requirement on tribal court judges. Interestingly enough, most of the recent studies that have been done—and this is true in Washington State—indicate that the Indian Child Welfare Act, whose goal is to place Indian children in Indian families, to decrease the number of times and the length of time they're in foster care, to increase relative placements, that those policy goals are being profoundly met in state court systems. So that Indian children actually, in Washington State, for example, end up in foster care four times more often and four times longer than non-Indian children. That Indian children in Washington State, for example, are more likely to end up in detention more than children from any other race, even though their primary issue, of course, is being abused and neglected. So it’s actually a little alarming that given the length of time that the Indian Child Welfare Act has been in place, that we still have so many Indian children who are not placed within their families and within their communities. With that said, I think Washington State does a pretty good job of trying to transfer those cases to a local tribal court. Tribal courts always have a preference for placement of kids in relative families. So, for example, we have probably 150 dependency cases active in our tribal court and of those, about 80 percent of those kids are living either in their own homes or with relatives in their community. So that sort of consistency and ability to place kids with their family really strengthen when you get them back to their community. So I think as more judges, state court judges become educated about how tribal court judges can help facilitate placement of kids in the home, I think they'll see those statistics numbers change. WOLF: And Judge Petoskey, are you seeing something similar in Michigan as well, in terms of the number of Indian children who aren't in placement, and some of these challenges of educating state judges about the Indian Child Welfare Act? JUDGE PETOSKEY: Well I think the nature of the beast is that education is ongoing. It's not a one-time kind of thing. We, as Indian people, carry the burden of making sure that others understand who we are, so that we can alleviate any fears, any misconceptions they might have about what a cooperative kind of relationship looks like. I would agree with Judge Pouley. We have many advantages in tribal courts and as people become more aware of us being the village. You know, you hear, 'It takes a village'; well we are the village. You know, we're members of the community, we're members of those families, and so the stake that we have as tribal officials working in those tribal communities is as much like a family. WOLF: This Is Rob Wolf. I'm talking with Judge William A. Thorne Jr., Judge Theresa Pouley, and Judge Michael Petoskey here at the Annual Conference of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. We’re were talking about tribal courts, and we're talking about child welfare in particular, and maybe I thought we could take a step back. Judge Thorne, if you could explain, where does the legal authority come from for tribal court? JUDGE THORNE: Most kids are taught in school about the two different governments that impact their lives: the federal government and the state government. But what the instruction often leaves out is that there is a third leg of the stool in that family of governments, and that's the tribal governments. And the authority for the tribal government, the sovereignty, actually predates the U.S. Constitution. And while the Supreme Court has said that Congress has plenary authority, Congress has the ultimate say on whether tribal governmental existence continues or not, the policy of the Congress, the policy of the Supreme Court has been that tribes have a legitimate government, and particularly have an important tool, an important voice in taking care of their children. And that's what founded, or was the underlying cause of the Indian Child Welfare Act. It was a recognition by Congress that tribes had a vested interest in the outcome of their children's cases. And so now the federal law recognizes that parents have a role and have rights in any state court proceeding involving tribal children, and tribes do as well. They have a separate voice that's recognized as being valuable and legitimate about the health and welfare of their children. WOLF: Give me a sense of how many tribes, in fact, have their own court systems. JUDGE THORNE: There are roughly 565 Indian tribes in the country. There are a little over 300 tribal courts. WOLF: Tell me, with the existence of these 300 or so tribal courts, what can be done to improve the understanding between these various legs of the stool, as you've described? JUDGE POULEY: Education, education, education. It doesn't make any difference if you do it with a grade school child, a child in kindergarten, a high school student, or a judge who's been sitting on the bench for 20 years. They have to understand that tribal courts have been in existence. They are absolutely competent to adjudicate the matters in front of them. They just need to be considered as sort of the equal of state and federal court systems, which they absolutely, positively are. In terms of providing long-term solutions for persons in their community, they really are the experts. So just an ongoing recognition that they are a co-equal branch of the government, that they are someone who should be respected and maybe more important than that, solicited for input. Because the statistics for tribal court and the outcomes in tribal court are the exact same outcomes that federal and state court judges aspire to. We want healthy children. We want to reunify kids with their families. We want to stop substance abuse in families, and we have the tools and the resources in our communities, which can help not only our clients, our clients of the tribal court system, but clients of the state court system as well. So equality and communication is sort of the key. WOLF: Thank you, Judge Pouley. Judge Petoskey, there's been money from the federal government over the years at various times. Is it going to the right places in terms of helping the courts strengthen their capacity to handle child and family cases? JUDGE PETOSKEY: It seems to me that, you know, under the trust responsibility, tribes have always, sadly, just received a pittance of what they need to function and operate. Being a tribal member and having been a chief judge of my own tribal community for 16 years, I realized that I wasn't going to allow money to be a barrier, that we would put our heads together and collaborate and come around the table and do what we can for our own children, because if we didn't, nobody else was. I would like to go back to something Judge Pouley mentioned and it is in Michigan when the former chief justice and current Justice Michael Kavanaugh first brought tribal court and state court judges together over 20 years ago, so that they could first meet each other and develop strategies for avoiding jurisdictional conflict and strategies also for cooperation, one of the very first things he said to us, to us tribal judges was, “We will learn more from you, probably, than you will learn from us.” JUDGE THORNE: Historically, tribal welfare systems have not had access to the federal support systems available to the states. The biggest has been 4-E which is a $5 billion pot of money. Congress just recently authorized tribes to have access to that. There is also a separate fund that the federal government makes available to every state to improve their juvenile court systems. They're called Court Improvement Funds and tribes don't have access to those. And so tribal courts have historically been underfunded. In the last 20 years the training money for tribal courts has basically dried up. As Judge Petoskey said, they're doing a good job of doing a lot with very little. But just a little bit more resources would help them start innovative practices, find new approaches, find new ways of helping, because they're already masters of stretching the dollar. WOLF: I hope people who see this podcast can exert some Influence and help expand the resources for the incredible work that you guys are doing. Thanks so much for talking with me today. I've been talking about tribal justice and the Indian Child Welfare Act with Judges William A. Thorne Jr., Theresa Pouley, and Michael Petoskey. This podcast was jointly sponsored by the National Council of Juvenile Family Court Judges and the Center for Court Innovation. To find out more about the National Council, you can visit their website at www.ncjfcj.org or you can learn about the Center for Court Innovation at the Center's website at www.courtinnovation.org. I'm Rob Wolf, director of communications at the Center for Court Innovation. Thank you for listening. July 2011

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  • Episode 180 - Ancestry, FamilySearch, Google, Cloud Backup, Book Club Interview

    · 01:00:00 · The Genealogy Gems Podcast with Lisa Louise Cooke - Your Family History Show

      Genealogy Gems PodcastEpisode 180with Lisa Louise Cooke Welcome to episode 180 of the Genealogy Gems podcast! Today we’re talking about big names, like Ancestry and Google and FamilySearch. We’re talking about big numbers—the possible price tag for Ancestry at auction—and small numbers: a handheld computer for under $100. We’re also talking about road trip tips, an important online Civil War database, a leading Canadian digital archive and EXCLUSIVE tips for using FamilySearch’s free digitized book collection, which now tops 200,000 titles. And because I’ve gotten so much demand for it, I’m sharing tips for backing up your data at Ancestry—not just your tree but your sources and DNA, too. Mixed in with all this news and how-tos is an assorted cast of listeners-with-questions and an inspiring story about long-lost siblings reunited by radio. Let’s get started!NEWSCertainly some of the biggest news buzzing around the genealogy world is the possible sale of Ancestry. Reuters recently reported that the buyout firm that owns most of Ancestry has hired investment bankers to put the company up for auction. The price tag, they say? Between $2.5 billion and $3 billion. So what could this mean for customers? Of course, it’s far too soon to say. Ancestry currently delivers over 15 billion genealogy records to over 2 million subscribers. Their current trajectory includes acquiring even MORE records pretty aggressively, which we love. But as I'm sure we’ve all experienced at one time or another, though, when any type of company gets sold, things can change. Or we could continue to see business as usual at the shaky-leaf genealogy giant.Mybest advice to those of you whose master family trees are on Ancestry is to download and backup your data. I'm not being alarmist or saying the sky is falling here! This announcement is simply a good opportunity to do something we routinely recommend anyway. I'll have specific advice for downloading your tree, checking your source material and getting your raw DNA from Ancestry later in the podcast.In another piece of news, have you notice that Google is now answering the questions you google instead of just giving you search results with the keywords in your questions? Say you Google the question, “What county is Chicago in?” Google will respond at the top of your search results with a big, fat “Cook County” headline followed by some key facts about the county.Google’s also creating a bit of a stir with its new Chromebit; it's a Chrome OS full size computer about the size of your hand, and it plugs into an HDMI on our computer. This sounds like a great option for on-the-go genealogical computing! A lot of folks aren’t fully cloud-based and they really don't ever plan to be: they like to work from a hard drive or desktop of some kind. So this offers them a portable way to do that. You could plug in at a public terminal--say at a library--or at someone else’s home computer, or even a television so that you could share pictures on a big screen. And best of all the Chromebit is as affordable as it is portable! A write-up at ReadWrite.com  reports that Google says the Chromebit will be less than $100!MAILBOXRecently we heard from Jennifer, who is taking a little road trip, as many others of us in the northern hemisphere are contemplating in June. She asks a great question:“I’m tagging along on my husband’s thesis research trip to Columbus, Ohio. I have some ancestors from other parts of Ohio. I was wondering what exactly I could look for in a state’s capital city's collections and archives? I was thinking that the state capital may have a “gem” that I couldn’t find elsewhere, or even duplicated information [from local repositories].”Jennifer is definitely thinking along the right lines! Here’s our advice:At the state government level there are often two key resources: the state library and the state archives. These might be combined. One might be called the state historical society. You just have to look for each state. In Ohio, the Ohio History Connection serves as the state historical society and official state archives. But there is also a state library that serves as a repository for government documents and a resource for other libraries. Each has resources for genealogists, online and in-house. Look for some links to these in our show notes.In addition, public libraries of major cities often have excellent local history and genealogy collections. This is definitely true of the Columbus Metropolitan Library in Ohio’s state capital!We suggest you contact librarians before you go and ask what they have that can’t be found anywhere else, both on a state level and for locales you are researching. Often times that will include photograph collections, materials on old businesses, and newspapers on microfilm. If you can formulate specific genealogical questions that you want to try and answer and share those ahead of time with the librarian that will help her guide you toward the unique gems. Every state library and archive is unique, so consulting by phone with the reference librarian is the best way to go.Recently Tom wrote in with a question about a Civil War veterans database:“I’ve been a listener of your podcast for quite a long time. Great job. (Thanks, Tom!)“We have a grass-roots group trying to locate and document Civil War Veterans buried in Washington state. Is there a good website where I can enter a name and unit identification and get results of the person’s [Civil War] service?  I’m having a really hard time finding US Navy sailors.”It sounds like Tom is conducting a very worthwhile project! An excellent resource–but still in progress for sailors with only about 20% of them–is The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System (CWSS).The site describes its resources as a “database containing information about the men who served in the Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War. Other information on the site includes histories of Union and Confederate regiments, links to descriptions of significant battles, and selected lists of prisoner-of-war records and cemetery records.”This is an excellent resource for soldiers. As far as sailors go, the site says, “The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System currently contains [only] the records of approximately 18,000 African American sailors, though additional records will be added in the future. The information in the Sailors Database is derived from enlistment records and the quarterly muster rolls of Navy vessels." A Howard University research team is behind this stellar effort, using muster rolls to fill in missing data or correct apparent misinformation. Here’s a link to an article from the National Archives about African-American servicemen in the Navy during the Civil War.If a Navy ancestor isn’t among those already listed, my first instinct is always to turn to Google searches first. I ran a search in Google Books for free digitized books meeting the criteria “civil war” “sailors” and there are some resources there as well. I'll put a link to these results in the show notes. Just one example? Manchester Men, which appears to be a published list of those who served from Manchester, N.H. You can learn more about Google searching for “niche” topics like this in the fully-revised and updated 2nd edition of my book, The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox.Finally, we heard from Alexis with this energetic note about her ”genealogy podcast marathon:”“I just had to email you and say thank you for all you do!  I am 23 and finding that I am obsessed with family history.  No one around me seems to understand why but I love it.  And I was thrilled when I found your podcast!  Though still pretty young, I've been behind on some technologies like podcasts but now I'm addicted to those too.  It makes work so much better. Though I wish I didn't have to work at all so I could just research and apply what you teach us instead. Wouldn't that be great?!  I have been on genealogy podcast marathons. I'm still quite behind on genealogy gems since I just found you now in 2015 but I'm working through it!  And I started a blog of course. I just mentioned you in my last post as well. It's called Geneaholic Confessions at http://geneaholicconfessions.blogspot.com/. It's just getting started but I really want to be a part of the geneablogger community ‘cause it sounds like you guys have tons of fun! Thanks for all you do!        GEM: PROTECTING YOUR ANCESTRY DATAOkay, I promised you some tips for protecting your data on Ancestry, which you should do regularly whether the site is under threat of new management or not. First, download your current tree(s) to GEDCOM files onto your computer. Under the Trees tab, choose Create and Manage Trees. For each tree you have, choose Manage Tree, then Export Tree. At this point the green button should say “Download your GEDCOM file.” Just click on it and it will download. If you’re having difficulty, click “download tips” underneath the green button. I've heard that some of you have had difficulty downloading your trees to specific software, like Family Tree Maker or RootsMagic. For Family Tree Maker, read this article on syncing your updated online tree to your Family Tree Maker software. RootsMagic users should watch this YouTube video on importing your Ancestry tree into RootsMagic. Consult other online support options if you still need help.Next, check your sources! The Ancestry help section states, “Any pictures, charts, books, views, or similar items found in the original file will not be included in the [downloaded] GEDCOM. Vital information, notes, and sources are usually retained after conversion.” Check your GEDCOM to see whether your source notes are intact. Then make sure you have copies of documents, videos, photos and other items you may have attached to your tree. You don’t want them to disappear, should there be a hiccup (or worse) in service.Finally, if you have used AncestryDNA, download a copy of your raw DNA data. Here’s a link to show you how. We especially recommend this step! These tests are expensive. Tests for loved ones who are now deceased can’t be repeated. And Ancestry has disposed of DNA samples in the past when the company has switched directions. (Again, I'm not trying to be alarmist about this, just cautious.)If you have relied on Ancestry or any other cloud-based service to host your only or master family tree, I recommend you do some homework and consider keeping your master tree on your own computer, and a backup file with all your other backup files. We here at Genealogy Gems use Backblaze as our backup service and we love them (visit www.Backblaze.com/Lisa for more information).     GEM: TIPS FOR USING FAMILYSEARCH’S DIGITIZED BOOK COLLECTIONSo here's another tip for you. Google Books, which I mentioned before, isn't the only place to find digitized family history books online. Another free and growing resource is FamilySearch's Family History Books collection.  They've reached a milestone 200,000 titles! This collection began 8 years ago and includes "family histories, county and local histories, genealogy magazines and how-to books, gazetteers, and medieval histories and pedigrees,” according to the landing page.Digitally-archived volumes like these are so valuable because they are immediately accessible and because they are keyword-searchable. Here are three search strategies to use for these:·         Look for only a surname (in case the first name is written different ways or a different relative is mentioned).·         In addition to surnames, search for the name of a neighborhood, street, church, school, business, type of work or other keywords that pertain to your family.·         Use the Advanced Search feature to focus your search, like for a keyword in a title, or a type of publication like a periodical.Once you’re reading a book, you can click on the info icon (a circle with an “i” in it on the upper right) to see more information about the book, including source citation and copyright information.We were curious about how well FamilySearch's digital book Viewer interfaces with mobile devices. So we asked FamilySearch. Turns out, this is still a work in progress and in fact some browsers work better than others. Dennis Meldrum at FamilySearch told us that “Safari does not work well with the Viewer.” Neither do mobile devices like the iPhone or iPad. “The Viewer works best with IE or Firefox. It also works with Chrome, but the Adobe Tools do not work. We are aware of the limitations of the Viewer and are working to replace it by the end of the year."GEM: CANADIANA DIGITAL ARCHIVESpeaking of digital libraries and archives, I've got a great one to share with you. If you have Canadian roots, you should be searching Canadiana (www.Canadiana.ca) regularly for family history information.Recently Newswire.ca described Canadiana as “a digital initiative of extraordinary scale,…a joint effort of 25 leading research institutions, libraries and archives working together with the goal of creating Canada’s multi-million page, comprehensive online archive.” Its digital collections chronicle Canada’s past since the 1600s and most of its content is free.For example, the free Héritage Project “aims to digitize, preserve and make accessible Canada’s archival materials for Canadians and the world." Their large collection of genealogy materials so far includes immigration records, church records, land records, family histories, voters’ lists and more. Military history, government documents and aboriginal records are also well-represented. Check back often! More is coming, like local and regional newspaper digitization and records of the Canadian Expeditionary Forces.Another part of Canadiana is The Canadiana Discovery Portal. This gateway to digital collections from 40 repositories points to 65 million pages! Sample subjects include  Ontario genealogy and War of 1812 campaigns. This portal is also free to use.One part of the site that's awesome but NOT free? Early Canadiana Online, with 5 million images already and expected to grow to 16 million. A subscription will run you $10/month or a year for $100, says that site, I'm assuming in Canadian currency. This is “a full-text collection of published documentary material, including government documents and specialized or mass-market periodicals from the 16th to 20th centuries. Law, literature, religion, education, women’s history and aboriginal history are particular areas of strength.” The site describes itself as “the most complete set of full-text historical content about Canada, including books, magazines and government documents.” Tip: scroll down on the home page to click the Genealogy and Local History portal, but don’t ignore the rest of the site! GENEALOGY GEMS BOOK CLUBThis month we feature a meaty excerpt from our interview with Nathan Dylan Goodwin, author of The Lost Ancestor (The Forensic Genealogist).Genealogy Gems Premium subscribers can access the full interview in this month’s podcast episode. He tells us how he got started; we talk about the plot and characters and the challenges of creating genealogical mysteries with dangerous consequences for the present and more! DNA GEM: INTEGRATING GENETICS AND GENEALOGY TOOLSOur very own Diahan Southard, Your DNA Guide, joins us now. She talks about how the ideal genetic genealogy interface creates a seamless transition between genetics technology and genealogy research. AncestryDNA, she says, is really pioneering the integration with its newest product update. Read more about it here.PROFILE AMERICAHere's a this-month-in-history from Profile America. Ninety-one years ago this June, "Congress passed — and President Coolidge signed — the Indian Citizenship Act, which stated 'all noncitizen Indians born within the territorial limits of the United States be, and they are hereby declared to be, citizens of the United States: Provided that the granting of such citizenship shall not in any manner impair or otherwise affect the right of any Indian to tribal or other property.'"Prior to this act, about two-thirds of American Indians were already citizens by other provisions. Universal voting rights lagged until 1957, as various state laws were amended. Today, there are over 2 million single-race American Indians possessing this full citizenship and 566 federally recognized tribes." Wow, I had no idea there were so many federally recognized tribes!I close today with a story Contributing Editor Sunny Morton recently read about long-lost relatives who were reunited. We hear lots of stories like that now, relatives who rediscover each other online or through DNA tests. But this story happened in 1926!Sunny found the story in a newspaper article. The children of a man named Alonso Jones were sitting around one day listening to the radio. Then they heard the announcer say, "Alonso Jones, wherever you are, listen...Your sister wants to see you at Worthington, Ohio. She has not seen or heard from you in forty years. You were born at Antiquity, Meigs County, Ohio, at the time of the Civil War....""You were reared by Captain William Roberts, an Ohio River flat boat man. You went with him on a produce boat when you were a boy and ran away while the boat was lying at the bank in Arkansas." The article reports that the man telegraphed his sister and arranged to meet her. All because she'd had a dream that the radio could help her find her brother, and she tried it, and it worked.What an inspiration! It reminds me of the value of thinking outside the box, of using all available technologies, and of never giving up when we are looking for family. Forty years after she lost her brother, she still thought of him, and she finally figured out how to find him. Click below to visit our YouTube channel:

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  • #TMOS (The Morals Of State) --- SynTalk

    · 01:03:50 · SynTalk

    SynTalk thinks about the characteristics of the State, and explores its ontological claims, contradictions, & morals both normatively and positively? The link between bandit kings, violence, sovereign, private property, law, justice, hot water bath, modern production methods, corporations, religion, Darwinian evolution, and the general will. The concepts are derived off / from Kant, Locke, Hume, J.S. Mill, Hobbes, Burke, Wendell Holmes, Hannah Arendt, Nozick, Fukuyama, Chomsky, James C. Scott, Douglass North, & Snowden, among others. How have we reached a state where (for most parts) the citizen is the principal and the State is the agent? What is the rule of law, & does the State have an absolute or comparative advantage over violence? How does (sacred) constitutionalism emerge out of nowhere? What is the ideal tax/GDP ratio, and do different models of statehood just compete for greater populations and GDP? Have States formed more easily in fertile plains with surplus? Does a State have a need for legitimacy, and where does it derive its morality from? How the consciousness about the concept of a nation inform the development of the Modern State. How authoritarian States run out of people, and why civilizations can’t climb hills. What is the difference between ‘doing justice’ and ‘applying the law’. What is minority, and how minority is not a person but a position? How did UK rule the world, and is modern terrorism a counter to the violence of the State? What happens when a perfectly legitimate State commits immoral acts? Are all at war with all (a la Leviathan)? Is statelessness or a Minimal State possible or desirable? Who wins a democratic contest? Should / does a State create feedback loops and structures of accountability? Does an individual really think for the others, and what is general will and public good? Will the construct of the State change in the long term to have other agglomerations come between the State and its citizens? Does the State withdraw only to (often) reappear? What is the likely impact of globalization and technology. Is the future DIY? The SynTalkrs are: Dr. Saroj Giri (political science, Delhi University, Delhi), Prof. Ajay Shah (economics, National Institute of Public Finance And Policy, Delhi), & Dr. Harsh Vardhan (strategy consulting, Bain & Company, Mumbai)

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  • ADU 0643: What’s up with North Carolina’s drone laws? Do other states have special regulations as well?

    · 00:28:43 · Ask Drone U

    On today’s episode, we talk to Vic Zayas in North Carolina.  Vic recently discovered that drone pilots in North Carolina need much more than a Part 107 certificate to fly commercially in the state.  For those of you who are not familiar, commercial drone pilots in North Carolina are required to pass and NCDOT UAS Knowledge Test in order to fly their drone.  Additionally, they must obtain a state permit in order to operate a commercial drone business in the state.Unfortunately, these laws are a direct contradiction of the FAA’s standing regulations.  We discuss some of the problems with North Carolina’s drone laws and provide advice for pilots in NC.  We also talk about why North Carolina is the only state with drone laws like this.  We hope we answered your question, Vic.  Fly safe!Read more about FAA's Federal Preemption of State and Local Regulation of DronesGet your questions answered: http://askdroneu.com/.If you enjoy the show, the #1 thing you can do to help us out is subscribe to it on iTunes. Can we ask you to do that for us really quick? While you're there, leave us a 5-star review, if you're inclined to do so. Thanks! https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/ask-drone-u/id967352832.Follow us:Site - http://thedroneu.com/Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/droneuInstagram - https://instagram.com/thedroneu/Twitter - https://twitter.com/thedroneuYouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/droneuGet your copy of "Livin’ the Drone Life" - http://amzn.to/2nalUDHGet your copy of our Part 107 Study Guide - http://amzn.to/2omQatTTimestamps Today's topic revolves around North Carolina drone regulation Which is the only body that controls airspace in the United States? Is there a likelihood of North Carolina drone laws being struck down in court? Are you permitted to fly your drone in state parks in California or Colorado? Is it easy to gets a permit in these states? Considering that FAA is the central governing body and is in charge of issuing a federal license to fly a drone, does North Carolina have the authority to issue drone permits? What is the rationale behind North Carolina issuing state drone permits? Are there instances where the North Carolina state laws for flying drones are in direct violation of Part 107? Can a Part 107 license holder be arrested for flying a drone in North Carolina? What is the correct way of dealing with local authorities in this scenario? Can states control where you take off and land your drone? Does the North Carolina state government have the authority to blanket the entire state since they have control on where you take off and land your drone? Can the commerce clause provided in the Constitution preempt state laws? Why is the FAA letting North Carolina regulate state drone laws which are in violation of Part 107? Does Florida have state drone regulation similar to North Carolina? Check your TFR's and Notam's before flying your drone

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  • Growing Economic Success

    · Governor Asa Hutchinson's Weekly Address

    Earlier this week our state received some great financial news. The Arkansas Department of Finance submitted the year end revenue summary for 2016. I am pleased to report that Arkansas finished the year with a $177 million budget surplus. This is an excellent reflection of our growing economic success. Our budget surplus is a direct result of conservative principles in action. One of the first steps I took upon being elected Governor was to sign the largest middle class tax cut in Arkansas’ history. This tax cut affected what I like to call the “sweet spot” of the state’s economy by easing the burden on individuals making between $21,000 and $75,000 a year. Opponents of tax cuts often cite the opinion that cutting taxes will reduce the government revenue base and hinder its ability to fund services. After this week’s news, it is clear that the exact opposite has been the case. The tax cuts we passed in 2015 went into effect on January 1 of this year. Even with the impact from $100 million in tax cuts, net revenue from the state income tax grew by 4.4% over last year’s collections. Reducing the state income tax rate to a more competitive level is a key component of our economic development plan. When we pitch our state to companies who are exploring establishing or relocating in Arkansas, one of the first things they consider is the income tax rate of the target state. Companies want to make sure their employees are able to maximize their take home pay, so they tend to favor states with a lower tax burden. A competitive tax rate will help us recruit more companies like Big River Steel and Sun Paper to the state which in turn will expand our tax base and increase the total tax collections without the need to raise taxes. Relieving the financial burden on the middle class not only helps us bring more jobs to the state, it also drives economic growth by putting money back in the hands of wage-earners. After all, the more money hardworking Arkansans have in their pockets, the more likely they are to support local businesses, buy school clothes for their children and to spend in manner that creates growth for our state. It is important to note that economic growth is just part of what is necessary to build our $177 million surplus this year. It was also important to control spending. At my direction, our state agencies have continued to look for savings and efficiencies in their budgets. One of the ways we have kept costs down is the continuation of the hiring freeze for state agencies. Before the hiring freeze went into effect our agencies often filled vacant positions with no consideration as to whether the positions were still needed. Now our agency directors are taking a deeper look at ways they can streamline their agencies to be more efficient to ensure that we are making the best use of public funds. In fact, current estimates, as of the end of the 2016 fiscal year, show nearly $7 million in savings from the hiring freeze. Conservative budgeting also means that we need to be well prepared for the future. While we are doing well right now, it is important that we protect ourselves against the possibility of another economic slowdown. For that reason, I plan to direct as much of our $177 million surplus to our state’s rainy day fund as possible. Currently, we have $41 million in our fund and we’ll be adding another $13 million in monthly payments to the rainy day fund throughout the year. As Governor, I am working hard to lead our state in preserving funds and wisely allocating money to best grow our economy, ultimately putting money back into the pockets of hard-working Arkansans.

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  • CHP-158-The Rise and Fall of the Qin Part 2

    · 01:04:26 · The China History Podcast

    This time Laszlo finishes off the Qin in two parts as promised.  Apologies for the lopsidedness of it all.  In this extra long episode Laszlo takes the Qin to their height and examines their legacy.  The Qin Dynasty had a spectacular fall lasting only a few years after the early death of its founder Qin Shihuang. TERMS FROM THIS EPISODE Qin Shihuang  秦始皇  The First Qin Emperor, Ying Zheng Shang Yang  商鞅  Great Qin statesman, helped make the Qin. 390-338 BCE Qin  秦  The kingdom and later dynasty, led by the Ying Clan. Ying Zheng   嬴政  Qin Shihuang's name  Duke Xiao   秦孝公  Qin Xiao Gong He lived 381 to 338 BCE King Huiwen or King Hui  秦惠文王  King of Qin 338-311 BCE, son of Zhaoxiang Chengdu   成都  Largest city and capital of Sichuan, site of the ancient Shu Kingdom Qinling Mountains  秦岭Mountain range separating Shaanxi from Sichuan, also Qin Mountains (ling 岭means mountain range) Wei River   渭河  One of the major tributaries of the Yellow River Shaanxi  陕西 Province in China, capital is Xian Sichuan  四川  Province in southwest China Shu  蜀国  Shu State near Chengdu Shiniu Dao  石牛道 the Stone Cattle Road Ba State   巴国  Ba State near Chongqing Chongqing  重庆  Municipality formerly part of Sichuan Wu Lizhen   吴理真  Planted seven tea trees on Mengding Mountain, first known tea cultivation Mengding Shan  蒙顶山 Mountain near Chengdu site of the first known cultivation of tea Sanxingdui   三星堆  Archaeological discovery of an ancient non-Han civilization located halfway between Chengdu and Deyang. Jinsha   金沙  Another great archaeological discovery near Chengdu. Dujiangyan  都江堰  One of the most important irrigation projects in Chinese history. It tamed the Min River and  changed the face of agriculture in Sichuan. Li Bing   李冰  The Qin governor down in Sichuan, directed construction of Dujiangyan. Fan Sui  范睢  died 255 BCE, gave his king Zhaoxiang the winning strategy King Zhāoxiāng, Qin Zhao Wang  昭襄王   Qin leader, reined 306-251 BCE Bai Qi白起  Qin general served under Zhaoxiang.  Undefeated. Meixian陕西眉县 Mei County in Shaanxi, west of Xian. Ren Tu  人屠  The Butcher of Men, Bai Qi's nickname (well-earned I might add) Si Da Ming Jiang  四大名将  the four great generals of the day.  Bai Qi白起, Lian Po  廉颇, Li Mu李牧 and  Wang Jian 王翦 Battle of Changping   长平之战 The bloody battle where the Qin demolished the Zhao 262-260 BCE Chu State   楚国  Chu State  near Hubei Zuo Shu zhang 秦朝左庶长 left militia general Han  韩国  The Han Sate, sandwiched between Chu, Qin and Wei Wei  魏国  Kingdom of Wei, east of Qin, south of Zhao Yichuan County  伊川县is located in Henan just south of Luoyang near the famous Longmen Grottoes. The Longmen Grottoes  龙门石窟  UNESCO Heritage site containing thousands of statues of Buddha and paintings. Battle of Yique伊阙, near modern day Longmen, 293 BCE Qin defeated the combined armies of Wei and Han. Sima Cuo  司马错 Qin general. Advised Huiwen to annex Shu and Ba Huaxia  华夏  Ancient core China early name Zhao   赵国  Zhao State  in the Yellow River Valley Handan   City in Hebei Province, also the capital of Zhao Zhao Kuo   赵括 Son Zhao She, got beat bad at the Battle of Changping Zhao She赵奢 Zhao general who once gave the Qin a lickin' chengyu   成语 Chinese saying or proverb, usually but not always four characters zhishang tan bing 纸上谈兵  To discuss military strategy on paper King Xiaocheng趙孝成王 King of Zhao who pulled Lian Po from the roster and put in Zhao Kuo Huaihai Campaign   淮海战役One of the three final campaigns of the Chinese Civil War of 1948-49. Sima Qian  司马迁  China's Herodotus, writer of the Records of the Grand Historian Gaoping 高平  County level city in southeast Shanxi, site of the Battle of Changping Shanxi   山西 Province in China just east of Shaanxi Shennong   神农  The Divine Farmer, legendary discoverer of tea who gifted the Shen Nong Classic of Herbal Medicine. Yan Di    炎帝 The Flame Emperor, considered to be Shennong Zhou  周朝  The Zhou Dynasty Ji clan    姬家族  The Zhou Dynasty ruling family King Nǎn, Zhou Nan Wang周赧王 Last emperor of the Zhou Dynasty King Xiaowen 秦孝文王 Also known as Lord Anguo, Qin Shihuang's grandfather. Didn't reign too long. Shi Ji   史记  The Records of the Grand Historian by Sima Qian Han Dynasty  汉朝 One of China's greatest dynasties 206 BCE-220 CE Lü Buwei  吕不韦  The man who put Qin Shihuang's father on the throne. Regent for young Qin Shihuang. Zhao Ji 赵姬 Qin Shihuang's mother and a lover to many men (so says Sima Qian) Lao Ai  嫪毐 Introduced to Zhao Ji after she became the Queen Dowager, tried and failed to seize power Li Si   李斯 Took the philosophy of Legalism to great heights. Qin Shihuang's right hand man. Zhao Gao 赵高 Palace eunuch who conspired with Li Si against Qin Shihuang's wishes. Fu Su   扶苏 Qin Shihuang's heir, tricked into committing suicide Hu Hai  胡亥 Younger son of Qin Shihuang, allowed Lao Ai and Li Si to stack the deck and allow him to become the new emperor Meng Tian  蒙恬  Great Qin general who did most of his fighting in the north.  Key person in the construction of the Great Wall Wey State卫国 Different from Wei State 魏国.  Absorbed by Jin before it broken up。Lü Buwei was from Wey. Zichu 子楚 Other name of Qin Shihuang's father and later King Zhuangxiang. Lady Huayang  华阳夫人 Wife of Qin King Xiaowen Zhengguo Canal  郑国渠  joined together the Jing and Luo Rivers, both tributaries of the Wei. Named after the builder Zheng Guo Chelie 车裂  An ancient punishment where a person was tied to five chariots and pulled apart. Lin Biao  林彪  Great military man and one time heir to Chairman Mao. Jing Ke  荆轲  Assassin from Yan who wasn't able to bury his poison dagger into Ying Zheng Yan   燕国  Yan State near Beijing Chen Kaige 陈凯歌 Great Chinese film director. The Emperor and the Assassin Gong Li  巩俐  Famous and talented Chinese actress Zhang Yimou 张艺谋 One of the great film directors of China Xiang Yu   项羽  The hegemon of Chu State, fought Liu Bang and lost.  Featured in CHP episode 91 Qi   齐国  Qi State  near Shandong Zibo 淄博 Former capital of the Qi State Lu  鲁国  State to the south of Qi.  Confucius came from Lu. Qi Lu Liangguo 齐鲁两国  The two Shandong kingdoms of Qi and Lu Shandong   山东  Northeastern province of China Wang Ben  王贲 Son of one of the four great generals of the Warring States period Zhou Wu Wang 周武王 Co-founder of the Zhou, brother of the Duke of Zhou Shang Dynasty   商朝  The Shang Dynasty 1600 BCE - 1046 BCE King Zhou 商纣王  Last Shang King, and a wicked one at that. Also known as Di Xin Huangdi  皇帝  Emperor San Huang Wu Di   三皇五帝  The mythical Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors Shi'er Jinren  十二金人  Twelve Gold Men made from all the melted down weapons handed in from the defeated warring states Xianyang   咸阳 Near modern day Xian. Capital of Qin Lingnan   岭南the southern region of China comprising mostly Guangdong and Guangxi Guangdong 广东 southernmost province of continental China and a rich one at that Guangxi  广西 An autonomous region just west of Guangdong Fujian  福建  Province just north of Guangdong Baiyue百越 The Hundred Yue Nanyue  南越 the southern Yue Tu Sui  屠睢  Qin general who got schooled when he invaded the Lingnan region Han Wudi 汉武帝 Great conquering emperor of the Western Han Dynasty beifang caoyuan 北方草原  The grasslands of the north Xiongnu  匈奴  Also referred to sometimes as the Huns, a northern nomadic people Xiang Jiang  湘江 The Xiang River Dongting Lake  洞庭湖 the dividing marker between Hubei and Hunan. Guilin  桂林 Gorgeous city in Guangxi Li Jiang  漓江 the Li River (not to be confused with the other Li River 丽江 Min 岷江  Min River in Sichuan, tamed by the Dujiangyan irrigation project Lingqu Canal 灵渠 The Ling Canal...linked the Xiang with the Li Qinchao Sanda Shuiligongcheng秦朝三大水利工程  The three great irrigation project of the Qin Shi Lu史禄  Architect of the Ling Qu, the Ling Canal zhishi fenzi知识分子 intellectuals Huizong 宋徽宗  Song Dynasty emperor, featured in a CHP four-part series Siku Quanshu 四库全书  The Emperor's Four Treasures, commissioned by Qianlong. 36,381 Volumes divided up into 79,000 chapters, over two million pages and about 800 million characters. Dapingtai Village 大平台村  The village in Hebei where the Qin emperor died Qin Èrshì  秦二世  The Second Qin Emperor Dazexiang Uprising  大泽乡起义The first major uprising against the Qin - July to December in the year 209 BCE Chen Sheng陈胜also known as Chen She陈涉 One of the leaders of the Dazexiang Uprising Wu Guang  吴广 The other leader of the Dazexiang Uprising Liu Bang   刘邦  Han Dynasty founder Wu Xíng 五刑  The Five Pains.  Tattooing the face, nose cut off, foot cut off, private parts cut off and the fifth pain for Li Si was the old Yāozhǎn.  Cut in half at the waist Ziying  子婴  The third and final Qin emperor, reigned for 46 days Battle of Julu  钜鹿之战  fought near present day Xingtai in Hebei, Xiang Yu, leading the Chu army knocked the Qin army out clean in 207 BCE Luoyang   洛阳  Eastern capital of the Zhou Dynasty Sanmenxia 三门峡City in Henan in the cradle of Chinese civilization Nanhai Commandery南海郡 The Qin office that administered the two Guang's, based near Guangzhou Zhao Tuo  赵佗  Qin officer in charge of the Nanhai Commandery. Founded the Nanyue Kingdom Lüshi Chunqiu  吕氏春秋 Master Lü's Spring and Autumn Annals. banliangqian  半两钱 Qin standardized coin that weighed eight liang banliang  半两 half a liang. 16 liang equaled a jin One Jin was 0.604 kilos or 1.3 lbs banjin baliang  半斤八两 Our English version of six of one and a half dozen of the other.   Historic Teas of China available at Teasenz.com The Link is here:  HISTORIC TEAS OF CHINA The Teas you get:  1.     Dahongpao 大红袍 from Wuyi Mountain, Fujian 2.     Tieguanyin 铁观音 from Anxi, Fujian 3.     Huangshan Maofeng黄山毛峰from Huang Shan Anhui Province 4.     Longjing 西湖龙井 from West Lake, Hangzhou 5.     Two kinds of raw Pu-erh 普洱 tea in loose and brick form.   Two books I used prodigiously for this Qin Two-Part series:   Frances Wood, "The First Emperor of China"   Mark Edward Lewis: "The Early Chinese Empires: Qin and Han"

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  • CHP-157-The Rise and Fall of the Qin

    · 00:42:59 · The China History Podcast

    In this first of two episodes Laszlo gives Qin Shihuang, the subject of the first ever China History Podcast episode, a total makeover.   The Historic Teas of China: Check it out right here:  http://www.teasenz.com/historic-teas-china-gift-box   TERMS FROM THIS EPISODE Qin Shi Huang  秦始皇 The first emperor of China, Qin Dynasty founder Y.K. Pao  包玉刚  Featured in CHP-124, HK tycoon and philanthropist Zhongguo ren   中国人  A Chinese Zhao  赵国  Zhao State  in the Yellow River Valley Qi   齐国  Qi State  near Shandong Chu   楚国  Chu State  near Hubei Yue   越国  Yue State  near Zhejiang Ba   巴国  Ba State near Chongqing Shu  蜀国  Shu State near Chengdu Zhou   周朝  The Zhou Dynasty Yan   燕国  Yan State near Beijing Xia   夏朝  The Xia Dynasty, mythical they say it was... Shang   商朝  The Shang Dynasty Sima Qian   司马迁  China's Herodotus Shiji   史记  The Records of the Grand Historian by Sima Qian Song dynasty   宋朝  The Song Dynasty Lintong, Shaanxi   陕西临潼  Town outside Xian where the terra cotta warriors were found Puyi   溥仪  China's Last Emperor Ying   嬴  The surname of the Qin Kings and Dukes Ying Zheng   嬴政  Qin Shihuang's name Ying Zhuangxiang   秦庄襄王  Qin Shihuang's father Wei River  渭河  One of the major tributaries of the Yellow River Xian   西安  Capital of Shaanxi, one of China's most ancient cities. Gansu   甘肃  Western Province in China Tianshui   天水  Gansu's second largest city after Lanzhou Rong    戎  "Barbarian" people to the west and north of the core China Si Yi    四夷  The "Four Barbarians" Dongyi   东夷 One of the four "barbarians" Beidi   北狄  One of the four "barbarians" Nanman  南蛮  One of the four "barbarians" Duke Xiang   秦襄公Qin leader 777-766 BCE Ji Family   姬家族  The Zhou Dynasty ruling family Luoyang   洛阳  Eastern capital of the Zhou Dynasty Chengzhou   成周  Ancient name of Luoyang Zhou King Ping   周平王 Zhou King 770-720 Duke Wen   秦文公   Qin ruler 765-716 BCE Shaanxi and Shanxi   陕西/山西Neighboring provinces that almost sound the same Hubei  湖北  Central China province Henan   河南  Central China province Hebei   河北  North-central China province Shandong   山东  North eastern province of China Anhui   安徽  Central China province Yu the Great   大禹  Xia Dynasty Founder Huaxia  华夏  Ancient core China early name Qin Mu Gong   秦穆公  Qin Ruler 659-621 Bawang  霸王  A hegemon Wu State   吴国  State around Suzhou-Wuxi area King Helü   阖闾  King of Wu  514-496 BCE The Battle of Jìnyáng  金阳之战  Battle of Jinyang 455-453 BCE Taiyuan   太原  Capital of Shanxi Zhi state  智国  The Zhi state, annihilated at the Battle of Jinyang San Jia Fen Jìn   三家分晋   the Partition of Jin between 434 and 403 BCE. Qi Xiong   七雄  The final seven warring states Linzi  临淄   just east of modern day Zibo Shang Yang  商鞅  Great Qin statesman, helped make the Qin. 390-338 BCE Pi  錍  A kind of ancient weapon similar to a dagger on a long stick Ren duo hao ban shi  人多好办事  When you have a lot of people to do the job, it's much easier. Shi   士  knight, scholar Zaixiang  宰相  chancellor or chief minister Duke Xiao  秦孝公  Qin Xiao Gong He lived 381 to 338 BCE chelie   车裂  death by being pulled apart by 5 chariots zhulian jiuzu   株连九族 a.k.a. the zuzhu  族诛  That meant when Shang Yang went down, so did his whole family: parents, grandparents, children, grandchildren, siblings, uncles and uncle's spouses...they all had to go. Xiang Yu   项羽  The hegemon of Chu State, fought Liu Bang and lost.  Featured in CHP episode 91 Liu Bang   刘邦  Han Dynasty founder Shang Jun Shu商君书or just the Shangzi  商子  credited to Shang Yu, the blueprint fort Legalism and how to run the Qin State. Han Feizi   韩非子lived from 280 to 236 BCE The man who made Legalism famous Fan Sui  范睢  died 255 BCE, gave his king the strategy of yuanjiao jingong.   yuan jiao jin gong   远交近攻   Make allies of those far away in order to focus on defeating those who are nearby. King Zhaoxiang  昭襄王   Qin leader, reined 306-251 BCE Battle of Changping   长平之战The bloody battle where the Qin demolished the Zhao 262-260 BCE

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  • Show 1134 The Israeli Solution: A One-State Plan for Peace in the Middle East by Caroline Glick

    · American Conservative University Podcast

    Show 1134 The Israeli Solution: A One-State Plan for Peace in the Middle East by Caroline Glick Author Caroline Glick speaks at the Horowitz Freedom Center. For many shows from the Horowitz Freedom Center visit:  http://www.horowitzfreedomcenter.tv/category/wednesday-morning-club/ For a number of speeches and interviews from this author visit: http://carolineglick.com/category/latma/ The Israeli Solution: A One-State Plan for Peace in the Middle East by Caroline Glick Overview of the Book-   A  manifesto that exposes the flaws in the two-state policy of the United States toward Israel and the Palestinians and offers a direct and powerful call for Israeli sovereignty in the region.   The reigning consensus in elite and academic circles is that the United States must seek to resolve the Palestinians' conflict with Israel by implementing the so-called two-state solution. Establishing a Palestinian state, so the thinking goes, would be a panacea for all the region’s ills. It would end the Arab world’s conflict with Israel, because the reason the Arab world is anti-Israel is that there is no Palestinian state. It would also nearly erase the principal cause of the violent extremism in the rest of the Middle East.  In a time when American politics are marked by partisan gridlock, the two-state solution stands out for its ability to attract supporters from both sides of the ideological divide. But the great irony is that it is one of the most irrational and failed policies the United States has ever adopted. Between 1970 and 2013, the United States presented nine different peace plans for Israel and the Palestinians, and for the past twenty years, the two state solution has been the centerpiece of U.S. Middle East policy. But despite this laser focus, American efforts to implement a two-state peace deal have failed—and with each new attempt, the Middle East has become less stable, more violent, more radicalized, and more inimical to democratic values and interests.        In The Israeli Solution, Caroline Glick, senior contributing editor to the Jerusalem Post, examines the history and misconceptions behind the two-state policy, most notably: - The huge errors made in counting the actual numbers of Jews and Arabs in the region. The 1997 Palestinian Census, upon which most two-state policy is based, wildly exaggerated the numbers of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza. - Neglect of the long history of Palestinian anti-Semitism, refusal to negotiate in good faith, terrorism, and denial of Israel’s right to exist. - Disregard for Israel’s stronger claims to territorial sovereignty under international law, as well as the long history of Jewish presence in the region. - Indifference to polling data that shows the Palestinian people admire Israeli society and governance. Despite a half-century of domestic and international terrorism, anti-semitism, and military attacks from regional neighbors who reject its right to exist, Israel has thrived as the Middle East’s lone democracy.   After a century spent chasing a two-state policy that hasn’t brought the Israelis and Palestinians any closer to peace,The Israeli Solution offers an alternative path to stability in the Middle East based on Israeli sovereignty over Judea and Samaria.

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  • Guests: Hawaii activists Holly Huber and Mitch Kahle

    · 00:42:49 · Freethought Radio

    State/church whistleblowers We celebrate the 93rd anniversary of Women's Equality Day and the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech. We talk about FFRF's state/church activism, including this week's federal court victory upholding standing to proceed in our IRS electioneering lawsuit. Then we talk with Hawaii state/church activists Holly Huber and Mitch Kahle who, as whistleblowers on behalf of the state, are suing churches, alleging they have defrauded the government by underpaying millions of dollars for the use of public schools. We celebrate the 93rd anniversary of Women's Equality Day and the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech. We talk about FFRF's state/church activism, including this week's federal court victory upholding standing to proceed in our IRS electioneering lawsuit. Then we talk with Hawaii state/church activists Holly Huber and Mitch Kahle who, as whistleblowers on behalf of the state, are suing churches who are underpaying millions of dollars for the use of public schools. - See more at: http://direct.ffrf.org/news/radio#sthash.EIdNMJdF.dpuf We celebrate the 93rd anniversary of Women's Equality Day and the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech. We talk about FFRF's state/church activism, including this week's federal court victory upholding standing to proceed in our IRS electioneering lawsuit. Then we talk with Hawaii state/church activists Holly Huber and Mitch Kahle who, as whistleblowers on behalf of the state, are suing churches who are underpaying millions of dollars for the use of public schools. - See more at: http://direct.ffrf.org/news/radio#sthash.EIdNMJdF.dpuf We celebrate the 93rd anniversary of Women's Equality Day and the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech. We talk about FFRF's state/church activism, including this week's federal court victory upholding standing to proceed in our IRS electioneering lawsuit. Then we talk with Hawaii state/church activists Holly Huber and Mitch Kahle who, as whistleblowers on behalf of the state, are suing churches who are underpaying millions of dollars for the use of public schools. - See more at: http://direct.ffrf.org/news/radio#sthash.EIdNMJdF.dpuf

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  • TAS 257 : Sales Tax 101 + The Biggest Questions Answered with Mark Faggiano

    · 00:38:56 · The Amazing Seller Podcast

    One of the most unaddressed and confusing issues when it comes to selling any kind of products online is the collection of sales tax. One of the reasons it can be so confusing is because every State has its own set of regulations surrounding sales tax as well as its own process business owners need to go through in order to register and pay their taxes. That description alone should show you how difficult it is to remain in compliance. State sales tax issues are one of the most frequently asked questions Scott receives so he decided it was time to get someone on the show who could answer the basic questions about sales tax. That someone is Mark Faggiano of Taxjar. You can hear their conversation on this episode.I have to collect State sales tax? Really?Sometimes the fact that the internet is worldwide makes it seem like State and National jurisdictions don’t apply to what goes on, on the World Wide Web. But the fact is that when a product is purchased that transaction is taking place in a particular place. In other words, the purchaser is sitting at a computer or other device within a specific jurisdiction. It makes sense that States would want to collect sales tax when that happens. So yes, as a seller of products you really do need to be collecting sales tax with each product you sell. But how do you do it? That’s what this episode of The Amazing Seller is all about, so be sure you listen.As an Amazon seller, what States do you need to collect sales tax for?When it comes to knowing what States you should collect sales tax for it comes down to a couple of issues. First is the issue of “nexus.” Nexus refers to the place where you as a business are actually doing business. The most obvious qualification for where your business nexus is located, is the State in which you reside and do your work. But what if you have employees in a different state, or a warehouse in yet another State? And what if Amazon is warehousing your products in a number of States? As you can see, it gets very complicated. But Mark Faggiano from Taxjar is on the show to help us sort it all out. He’s Scott’s guest on this episode.Do I really need to register with a state to pay a very small amount of sales tax?What if you discover that you’ve sold enough products in a particular state - let’s say Maine - to owe $15 in tax to the State of Maine. Does that mean that you should register with the State of Maine so you can fork over that $15? Technically, probably so. But there’s another way to look at it that most people who do product sales for a living feel is safe and ethical. You can hear abou the varying approaches to the issue on this episode as well as hear all of them explained in detail. What are you waiting for? You should listen to this one.What if I had lots of sales in the past and never collected sales tax at all?It’s entirely possible that many people who sell products on Amazon - either private lable or retail arbitrage - are just now hearing about the possibility that they may owe sales tax to various States. If that’s you, here’s something important you should consider. What kind of sales volume have you done in various states in the past? That may impact whether you should be concerned about the issue or not. But at the very least it’s an issue you should look into because of the possibility that a given State may decide to audit you to come after their Sales tax money - and that could be even more costly than paying the tax of your own accord. Find out how you should think through the issues on this episode.OUTLINE OF THIS EPISODE OF THE AMAZING SELLER [0:03] Scott’s introduction to this episode and his guest, Mark Faggiano of TaxJar! [1:14] How Scott came to do this episode in the first place. [3:29] How Mark got into the business of dealing with sales taxes. [6:03] What is meant by “nexus?” [10:37] How do product sales impact the States I collect tax in? [12:44] Can you limit where Amazon moves your ...

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  • A Second Chance Society: A Conversation about Justice Reform in Connecticut

    · The Center for Court Innovation - Podcasts

    Mike Lawlor, Connecticut's under secretary for Criminal Justice Policy and Planning, discusses Governor Dannel P. Malloy's Second Chance Society, a series of justice reforms (including dramatic changes to bail and juvenile justice policies) that seek to reduce crime, lower spending on prisons, and help rebuild relationships between criminal justice professionals and the communities they serve. This New Thinking podcast was recorded in Chicago in April 2016 after Lawlor participated in a panel on "Jail Reduction and Public Safety" at Community Justice 2016.Mike Lawlor, second from left, who is Connecticut's under secretary for Criminal Justice Policy and Planning, participates in a panel on "Jail Reduction and Public Safety" at Community Justice 2016. MIKE LAWLOR: People gradually buy into the fact that, after all, the whole point of the criminal justice system is to reduce crime, and if that's what's happening, everybody's doing a good job. ROB WOLF: This is Rob Wolf, Director of Communications at the Center for Court Innovation in Chicago at Community Justice 2016 where there's a lot going on, a lot of panels talking about justice reform, people from all around the country and even around the world sharing ideas. One of those people with some interesting and cutting edge ideas is with me right now. His name is Mike Lawlor. He is the Chief Criminal Justice Advisor to Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy, and he just participated in a panel on jail reduction and public safety. A lot of interesting things are going on in Connecticut around justice reform, Mike, and I thought maybe you could explain a little bit about what the governor's agenda is. I understand it's something called the Second Chance Society. So what's it all about? LAWLOR: So yeah. My boss, Governor Malloy, talks extensively about his goals for what he refers to as a "Second Chance Society." And really that covers all of the ground of the criminal justice reform initiatives we're seeing around the country. He also articulates this with clear goals, and goal number one is to reduce crime. Goal number two is to reduce spending, and goal number three is to restore confidence in the criminal justice system, confidence among victims of crime who often come away thinking that they did not get justice, confidence among African Americans and Latinos who thinks the system is just not fair to them, and confidence among all citizens who see, every day, these examples of wrongful convictions or corruption or misconduct by police or prosecutors or probation officers or corrections officers or even judges sometimes even state legislators and governors, from time to time. All of this undermines confidence in the criminal justice system, so restoring people's confidence and at the same time reducing crime is our goal. And we think that by making a variety of changes across the board, we will continue to see a reduction in Connecticut's crime rate, which is at its lowest point in 48 years, and we'll see we won't have to spend as much money running prisons, because for the immediate past 20 years or so we've spent more money running prisons in Connecticut than we have running colleges, which is kind of crazy. Gradually we can rebuild these relationships, mainly between the criminal justice professionals and the community, and what you call community policing or something else. It's very important to build up that level of trust. WOLF: Well those are really ambitious goals. So what are the actual policies that are being proposed to achieve these goals to reduce crime, reduce spending on the criminal justice system, and build confidence in the justice system? LAWLOR: Okay, so let's start with what Governor Malloy has actually proposed this year, which is currently being considered by our state's legislature. It has two components. Number one is bail reform. Number two is raising the age of juvenile jurisdiction. On the bail reform initiative, a number of states, most recently New Jersey, New Mexico, the New York Supreme Court, have acknowledged that bail is a real problem. In other words, people sitting in jail because they can't afford to post what oftentimes are relatively low amounts of bail. The governor this year has proposed that we not have money bail for people charged only with a misdemeanor, with an exception for cases involving violence, for example family violence cases are often charged only as misdemeanors, but there is a very high risk that something bad is going to happen. He's asked our state sentencing commission to look at a comprehensive reform and report back next year so that potentially the legislature could enact comprehensive reform, as was the case in New Jersey and New Mexico, Connecticut has a state constitution that guarantees bail to all offenders. But many states, and the federal government have an option for what is know as preventive detention. So, if there is an evidentiary showing that someone actually is a danger to the community, they can be held without bail at all. In Connecticut, at the moment, the governor's concerned that the people who really should be locked up pre-trial are not. The high-risk, career criminal gang-banger types, bcause they have frequent flier points with the bail bondsmen and things like that, it's easy for them to get out if they get arrested, even if there's kind of a high bail. On the other hand of the spectrum are the people that don't need to be in jail, but they're sitting there for months on end, waiting for their cases to get resolved because they can't come up with, in some cases, a few hundred dollars to get out the door. So that's a big priority for us, and we think over time that will have a big impact on our jail population, but more importantly ... WOLF: What's the actual proposal? LAWLOR: So the proposal is no money bail for misdemeanors, and allowing all offenders who actually have a money bail that's been set for them, to have an option of posting 10% in cash that they would get back at the end of their case if they show up for all their court appearances and that is the case in many states. In Connecticut, it's actually an option that judges have pursuant to rules of court, but it's not in statute, and we think that by putting it into statute, it'll be used more extensively. Also, part of that proposal is that whatever money is accrued, because this cash will be sitting in a savings account while the court process plays out, all of that money that's earned through interest will go to our legal aid operations in the state. So it wouldn't be going to the state. It would be going to help fund legal assistance for the poor. And any money that is captured because people do not show up in court and we forfeit their money bail, that would also go to legal aid. So we're trying to create a system that has no incentive to have higher bail just to raise money, and at the same time, make it more of an option to actually get out, especially for people who are poor. WOLF: And you would presumably be saving money because fewer people would be held in jail unnecessarily pre-adjudication. LAWLOR: Right. We know about half the people in jail right now in Connecticut, because they can't post bail, are in there on relatively minor charges. So, now, obviously on a case-by-case basis, there may be very high risk factors involved, but, in general, there's way too many people being held just because they can't come up with enough money to post bail. And we'd like to get to the point where money bail is just not used at all. If you're really dangerous, prosecutors would have to put on an evidentiary showing, and you could potentially be held as a public safety measure, but the vast majority of cases that really don't meet those criteria would not sit in jail while their cases are pending. WOLF: What if someone repeatedly doesn't return to a court date? LAWLOR: Well, the proposal we have this year says that even if it's a misdemeanor where no money bail is allowed, if the new misdemeanor is in fact a failure to appear, that would allow for money bail to be set. But we know that, we've done a lot of deep dives into our data that we have and the rate at which people fail to appear is actually higher if a bail bondsman has posted bail for them. Connecticut is the only state in the country— Now, keep in mind we do not have any county courts, everything is run by the state. We have no county jails. We have no elected prosecutors. We have no elected judges, and all courts are state courts, so it's easier for us to make changes. But we have the only statewide accredited pre-trial services agency in the country. It's run in the judicial branch. It's very well staffed, and they are very good at sorting out offenders by risk and monitoring defendants in the community with non-financial conditions of release. So we have the infrastructure to really expand this a lot, and to the extent that we can save jail bed days, we can save a lot of money and at the same time get better outcomes, because all we know for sure is that putting somebody who's really a low-risk, high-needs person in jail, even for a short period of time, you're actually increasing the odds that they're going to recidivate once they get out. So we're trying to not do things that make it worse. WOLF: And it sounds like you have the infrastructure in place to do what bail supposedly does, which is to encourage someone to come back to court, but you have a non-bail, non-monetary means to monitor compliance with that. And so, what were some of the other ... LAWLOR: The juvenile ... so I think the more ambitious goal the governor has for this year is to raise the age of juvenile court jurisdiction from what it is now, 18, up to 21. So, if we do it, we'll be the first state in this country to do it. Other places do it. For example, Germany, which the governor visited last year, you might have seen it on 60 Minutes. They did the piece a couple weeks ago. In Germany, if you're under 21 and you get arrested and go to court, the judge makes an immediate decision whether the case will be handled pursuant to juvenile rules or adult rules and apparently 80% or 90% of the cases are dealt with as a juvenile case, in effect. So, the governor said, "Since we have gotten some very good outcomes with our juvenile justice reforms that date back about 10 years, we've seen a dramatically reduced number of young people getting arrested. We have historically low number of juveniles in juvenile detention or in our juvenile prison-like facility, that if we're getting these good outcomes by the earlier reforms, maybe we can get those similar outcomes for 18, 19, and 20 year olds going forward." We're beginning a process where we'll gradually phase this in. We're also going to make changes in the way we handle offenders under the age of 25. So, we want to have specialized parole and probation supervision for people under 25 so that the officers involved, that's their specialty, dealing with younger people. We're going to have a special correctional facility just for offenders under 25. We already have one for offenders under 21. We want to have another one for the next age cohort there. WOLF: And the rationale is because they have different needs and are more amenable to rehabilitation? LAWLOR: Exactly. And on top of that, mixing a 21 year old kid whose got all sorts of problems that have landed him in jail with some 40 year old career criminal guy's probably not a good idea, and I think any person with common sense would understand that that's probably the case. I don't think it's done by design that all these people are mixed together in our prison system, but why not change it? We don't have to build a new prison, we just allocate one for the next age cohort and put in staff that specializes with that. All of this ... the recent developments in brain science has really informed criminal justice policy planners like myself. I think people now, for the first time, are realizing that you need to have a special approach to younger offenders, meaning under 25. If we are successful in getting some of these young people off this trajectory towards career criminal status or lengthy terms of incarceration, we'll need a lot fewer prison beds in this country. So, earlier I referred to our juvenile justice reforms that have already taken place in Connecticut. First and foremost, Connecticut was one of three states in the country that used to treat 16 year olds as adults all the time. So it was Connecticut, New York, and North Carolina. Back in 2007, the legislature voted to increase the jurisdictional age up to 18, but to do it gradually, in increments, and establish a very robust planning process to get there. So we spent two years figuring out how to do this. Starting on January 1, 2010, we went from 16 to 17. Then on July 1, 2012, went from 17 to 18, and added all of that to the juvenile courts and subtracted all of that from the adult courts. It would be fair to say, "So how did that turn out?" And now we know. It's 2016, we have all the data. First of all, people had predicted, when we did this, the juvenile courts would be overwhelmed with new cases, and actually today there are fewer cases coming into the juvenile court than there were before because there's are a lot fewer young people getting into trouble that lead them to court in the first place. Second, we know that we have an all-time low number of kids in juvenile detention, and that has to do with a lot of different policy changes, not just raising the age. But don't forget, it used to be that on your 16th birthday you were automatically an adult. You never could be in juvenile detention. Now we've added all 16 and 17 year olds, and even with that we've got a historic low. We have three juvenile detention facilities in our state. One of the three has closed. The other two are about one-third full, and we're probably going to close one of those two shortly. We're closing 150 bed juvenile prison-like facility altogether. We're just gonna close it. It's down to 40 kids right now. So all of this has to do with fewer younger people getting into trouble and getting arrested and ending up in court and ultimately incarcerated. We see that this effect is playing out now for already 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 years. It's like a trough moving through the arrest statistics. And for example, 17 year-olds ... the last year we have complete data for is 2014, there was 60%, six zero, 60% fewer arrests of 17 year-olds statewide in 2014 than there were in 2008, and it's dropped in equal increments every single year. In the adult system, we measure the number of kids in jail 18 to 21 years old who are actually incarcerated on a particular day. That number has dropped from 2062 on January 1, 2008, down to 960 on January 1, 2016. WOLF: You know the numbers right off the top of your head, don't you? LAWLOR: These are important numbers. WOLF: ... recite them a lot. But lowering the age, it sounds like it's easier to do because the population is smaller, but it didn't create fewer arrests. There are other factors. LAWLOR: Right. Definitely. So, it's the raising age, actually ... we went up to 18, now we're proposing to go to 21. See, juvenile court works differently and has a different triage mechanism for new cases coming in. Not everybody ends up in front of a judge, and don't have all the formal proceedings with mandatory court dates, et cetera, which kind of sets up people for failure. You get charged with failure to appear if you don't show up on time, and go to your probation officers ... there's a lot of chutes and ladders that kind of get you into trouble. The juvenile system is much less formal. Much focused on needs-assessment and hooking people up with appropriate interventions without an overlay of let's say, court appearances, a guilty plea, a probation officer. We are convinced that approaching young people differently will get you better outcomes. The reason I'm citing these statistics is, 10 years ago, when we first started talking about this stuff people said, "If you make these changes, you'll get these outcomes." So here we are, fast forward ten years. We're getting those outcomes. Maybe it's a complete coincidence, but I don't think so. Other examples of changes have been in school systems themselves. We know now that there's a very high correlation between suspensions and expulsions, even in younger grades, and ending up in prison down the road. There's an extensive study in the state of Texas, which actually has very good data going back a long time, for every single kid in their public school system, and that's clearly shown that schools with the exact same type of kids and type of issues which tend to suspend and expel a lot of kids, versus schools which are very similar but suspend very few kids, it's the high suspension schools that end up with the high incarceration rate down the road. So, there's something about not ostracizing, jettisoning, younger people but trying to deal with their issues up front that means that they'll be much less likely to end up in the criminal justice system down the road. So it's this kind of thinking, which is really a complete re-thinking of schools, justice, service provision, everything else that gets us to where we are today and sustains the momentum we hope to continue for the next few years. The goal at the end of the day is reducing crime. If crime's going down, that's good. If crime is going up, something is wrong. WOLF: And you said this, you thought, was the bigger task. The more challenging component to implement of the Second Chance Society, the raising the age is this requiring how you have to persuade the legislature. Are they on board? LAWLOR: Well, it's a lot easier to talk to legislators and ordinary citizens, even journalists, editorial boards, about why we think this would be successful because we can cite the success of earlier, similar initiatives. And the process that the governor has recommended is gradual and incremental with a lot of planning built into the front end. It's really more about re-allocating resources, because everything you add to the juvenile system, you subtract from the adult system, so we think it's very workable. But people, appropriately, are apprehensive, skeptical, because it's new. It's a completely different approach to this. It's worth noting that we are making provisions to ... it wouldn't be 100% of the people under 21 go to juvenile court. Obviously, murders and very serious crimes, very high-risk kids of kids, there would be an option, with discretion, informed by specific standards or findings that need to be made, to deal with a case in adult court. So it's not one-size-fits-all, at all. It's very focused on risk assessment, needs assessment, with the stated goal up front of reducing crime, reducing recidivism among kids who are actually coming in to court. We think, based on our experience, that just talking about these things as the actual goals, talking about the fact that we now have the capability to measure all this data, make it very transparent so everybody can see what's going on, that affects behavior of everyone on the front lines: the cops, the prosecutors, probation parole, corrections, everybody. They know what the goal is, they know that you're able to figure this stuff out, and I think people gradually buy into the fact that, after all, the whole point of the criminal justice system, one would think, is to reduce crime. And if that's what's happening, everybody's doing a good job. WOLF: Well, thanks for explaining all that, and good luck with all your exciting stuff going on in Connecticut. LAWLOR: Thank you. WOLF: I've been speaking with Mike Lawlor, who is Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy's Chief of Criminal Justice, well, the Chief Advisor to the governor, right? LAWLOR: Policy stuff. WOLF: Your exact title is, Undersecretary, Criminal Justice Policy and Planning Division. LAWLOR: That's the job. I'm a bureaucrat. WOLF: Well, we need bureaucrats to get this done, right? LAWLOR: There you go. WOLF: I'm Rob Wolf, Director of Communications at the Center for Court Innovation, and Mike and I have been speaking outside of the rooms where Community Justice 2016 is occurring here at the Hilton in Chicago, where for two and a half days, people from around the country and even a few visitors internationally have been discussing justice reform. To find out more about the Center for Court Innovation and about justice reform, and about community justice, visit our website, www.courtinnovation.org. Thanks for listening.

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  • 7 Meditation – Relax Your Body

    · 00:20:40 · Affirmation Pod - Affirmations, Meditations, Visualizations | Happiness | Positivity | Guided Meditation | Confidence | Sleep

    Got 20 minutes?  This one aims to relax your body from head to toe. I take a deep breath in and out.  I am moving into a relaxed position. I place all the noise and all clutter of my life to the side.  I send a message to my entire body, it’s time to relax.  It’s time to rest, recharge and rejuvenate. I continue breathing in and out.  I continue to relax all parts of my body.  I scan my body, noticing any tension, and with each breath, release the tension. I am aware of my body in this relaxed position.  I notice how my body feels, right now.  I continue my deep cleansing breaths.  My body acknowledges any tension, and with each breath, the tension is gone. I notice peace inside my body.  I feel serenity inside my body.  I sense love throughout my body.  I can relax here.  I feel a deep, warm, pure love inside my heart.  I know that the more love I give, the more love my heart has to give. Right now this love in my heart is flowing to my chest, my stomach, my torso.  With each breath, I release any grief, sadness or pain.  My stomach, torso and chest are in a relaxed state and all of my internal organs are relaxed and comfortable. I continue my deep breaths and feel the flow of love travelling to my right shoulder, bringing peace, serenity and ease throughout my right shoulder.  This soft tender energy flows from my right shoulder, down the front of my arm, into my hands.  I experience warmth and relaxation flowing through each of my fingers.  One by one, they relax. The comfort of love now continues in my right palm and into my right wrist.  With each breath, I let things go.  I choose a state of relaxation.  The comfort of love now moves up my arm, filling it with love, peace and ease.  It now reaches my right shoulder and my entire right arm is deeply relaxed and comfortable. The flow of love now travels to my left shoulder, bringing peace, serenity and ease throughout my left shoulder.  This soft tender energy flows down my left arm, travelling to my hands.  I experience warmth and relaxation flowing through each of my left fingers.  One by one, they relax. The comfort of love now continues to my left palm and wrist.  With each breath, I feel all tension releasing.  This love now moves gently up my left arm, back to my left shoulder.  I continue to breathe deeply as I feel tension releasing throughout my left arm.  It feels great to simply let go. My left arm is now deeply relaxed and comfortable. I take deep breaths now as I experience this deep sense of relaxation.  The light of this love now moves from my heart to the back of my neck, slowing releasing tension in my neck.  It now travels up the right side of my head, relaxing my right ear, relaxing the back of my head.  And with each breath, becoming a deeper sense of ease and comfort.  It moves to the top of my head and slowly makes its way to the left side of my head, relaxing my left ear.  And with each deep breath, I feel this love cupping the back of my head.  My body knows it’s okay to let go, trusting in this love, trusting in this moment. The flow of love now moves from my heart to the front of my neck, relaxing all the muscles of my neck and slowly moving to my chin.  I feel its nurturing presence and I now relax my face.  With each breath, I feel tension releasing.  With each breath, I feel a comfortable state of relaxation. I sense the loving energy move along my right jaw, allowing for any tension to completely dissipate.  I feel the soothing nature of this love and my right jaw responds with a relaxed position. This love now moves up to my cheek in a circular motion, it erases any stress stored here. The love now travels to my lips and I feel my mouth and my tongue completely relax.  I continue my deep breaths, and I feel my upper lip release tension as well. I now sense the loving energy move along my left jaw, allowing for any tension to completely dissipate.  I feel the soothing nature of this love and my left jaw responds with a relaxed position. This love now moves up to my cheek in a circular motion, it erases any stress stored here. This love from my heart now travels to my nose and I can feel my nose deeply relax with each breath.  I continue my deep breaths, as I feel my face completely relax.  The muscles of my face, releasing all tension and tightness. I sense this love now flowing to my right eye, and it now moves in circles around my right eye.  With each breath, I feel a deeper state of relaxation. The flow of love now moves to my right temple, again creating small circles to release any tension stored here.  And each breath places me in a deeper state of relaxation. The light of love now travels to my forehead.  It gently and lovingly massages my forehead, removing any tightness, any worry.  I take deep breaths and allow the love erase any stress, anxiety or fear.  With each breath, I move to a deeper state of relaxation. Slowly, deeply, I am more relaxed.  The flow of love now moves to my left temple, creating circles to release any tension stored here. I sense this love now moving to my left eye, and now it moves in circles around my left eye.  With each breath, I am more and more relaxed.  Sinking into a deeper state of relaxation. Love from my heart now goes to the back of my neck, travelling down my back, creating relaxation across my shoulder blades.  I feel more relaxed and comfortable with each breath.  This love continues to every part of my upper back and I feel the abundance of love as I keep breathing deeply. The flow of love now moves to my lower back, sending a deep relaxation and ease to my lower back muscles.  I continue my deep breaths, and with each breath, I feel tension releasing and more and more relaxation. The warmth of this love is like the best massage experience ever.  I continue in my state of relaxation as I breathe deeply and smoothly. My entire back is in a relaxed state and all of my internal organs are relaxed and comfortable. This love from my heart now flows to my left hip.  It travels down my left leg and moves to my knee, creating a deeper state of relaxation.  It flows down to my left ankle, as I continue to relax. From my ankle, this love moves across my foot, to my toes.  This love spreads to each of my toes.  One by one, they relax.  The warmth of this love now moves across the bottom of my left foot, to my heel, and back to my ankle. On my left leg, I feel the love flowing up my calf to the back of my knee.  With each deep breath, my muscles relax.   This love now flows up the back of my leg to my left glute and back to my hip. My entire left leg is now deeply relaxed and comfortable. The light of love now flows from my heart to my right hip.  It now travels down the front of my leg, relaxing my muscles, moves to my knee and with each breath, takes me to a deeper relaxed state.  This light of love now flows down to my ankle, and I am deeply relaxed. From my ankle, this love moves across my foot, to my toes.  This love spreads to each of my toes.  One by one, they relax.  The warmth of this love now moves across the bottom of my right foot, to my heel.  I feel my entire right foot relax.  The flow of love now moves back to my ankle, and up my calf to the back of my knee.  I feel all the muscles of my right leg relax.  With each breath, the flow of love moves back up my leg, to my right glute, and back to my right hip My entire right leg is now deeply relaxed and comfortable. My body is now completely filled with love from my heart.  I breathe smoothly and comfortably.  I am aware of this source of love reaching to every part of my body.  I am connected to myself and in a relaxed state.  I am receiving this moment and all the love it has within it.  I continue in this relaxed pose for as long as I need.  I am thankful for love.  I am thankful for my body and the loving ways it serves me.  I am relaxed. Meditation by Josie Ong Ways to Support Affirmation Pod 1. Leave a Rating or a Rating and Review at AffirmationPod.com/ApplePodcasts 2. Purchase the Reflection Workbook at AffirmationPod.com/Workbook   For more from Josie: Website: http://AffirmationPod.com Digital Products: http://JosieOng.com For all the Podcast Episodes: http://AffirmationPod.com/Episodes Facebook: http://Facebook.com/AffirmationPod Twitter: http://Twitter.com/TheJosieOng Instagram: http://Instagram.com/TheJosieOng Podcast Network: http://CalmClearNow.com Facebook Group: http://AffirmationPod.com/Facebook Subscribe Apple Podcasts: http://AffirmationPod.com/ApplePodcasts Subscribe on Google Play: http://AffirmationPod.com/GooglePlay Subscribe on Spotify: http://AffirmationPod.com/Spotify Subscribe on YouTube: http://YouTube.com/AffirmationsForHealthyLiving For her free worksheet on The 6 Steps for Making Changes and Changing Habits, go to http://AffirmationPod.com/Habits

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  • Protocol Radio #140 - Volt & State Guestmix

    · Protocol Radio

    Tracklist #140 + Volt & State Guestmix 01 Eva Shaw - Moxie 02 Julian Jordan - Blinded By The Light 03 Bounce inc, Bassjackers ft Vassy - Bad Savior Up in the Air (G-Bæss edit) 04 Reunify feat. Yoshi Breen & Sanne Mus - Gold 05 Oliver Heldens - Bunny Dance 06 Paris & Simo, Rico & Miella - Get Back Volt & State Guestmix 07 Nicky Romero vs. Volt & State - Warriors (Volt & State Intro Edit) 08 Merk & Kremont - Volt & State - Black & White 09 Volt & State, Burgundy’s - Gajah 10 Nicky Romero & Vicetone - Let Me Feel  (Volt & State Remix) 11 Volt & State, Burgundy’s - Conspiracy 12 Orjan Nilsen - Apart (Volt & State Remix) 13 ID - ID 14 ID - ID 15 Jacquie Lee - Broken Ones (Volt & State Remix) 16 Volt & State - Rush

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  • Protocol Radio #140 - Volt & State Guestmix

    · Protocol Radio

    Tracklist #140 + Volt & State Guestmix 01 Eva Shaw - Moxie 02 Julian Jordan - Blinded By The Light 03 Bounce inc, Bassjackers ft Vassy - Bad Savior Up in the Air (G-Bæss edit) 04 Reunify feat. Yoshi Breen & Sanne Mus - Gold 05 Oliver Heldens - Bunny Dance 06 Paris & Simo, Rico & Miella - Get Back Volt & State Guestmix 07 Nicky Romero vs. Volt & State - Warriors (Volt & State Intro Edit) 08 Merk & Kremont - Volt & State - Black & White 09 Volt & State, Burgundy’s - Gajah 10 Nicky Romero & Vicetone - Let Me Feel  (Volt & State Remix) 11 Volt & State, Burgundy’s - Conspiracy 12 Orjan Nilsen - Apart (Volt & State Remix) 13 ID - ID 14 ID - ID 15 Jacquie Lee - Broken Ones (Volt & State Remix) 16 Volt & State - Rush

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  • UKF Music Podcast #64 - State Of Mind

    · UKF Music Podcast

    After their massive collaboration with Black Sun Empire we get State Of Mind in the mix for an hour full of D&B!TracklistState of Mind & Black Sun Empire - EgoState of Mind - BypassState of Mind & Black Sun Empire - Unconscious (Concept & Vision Remix)Kritix Feat. Coppa - TractionCurrent Value - DrivenUpbeats - Paranormal RollerState of Mind & Black Sun Empire - MoonboxMefjus - ContinuousSigns - VermineEastcolours - Things Inside (Hybris Remix)Mob Tactics - Wasted VIPMaztek & BTK - Yes Yes YoSigns - HeadboltState of Mind & Black Sun Empire - Jack NicholsonMob Tactics - IrreversibleEffector - The Destroyed Kingdom (Neonlight Remix)Gancher & Ruin - LieCurrent Value - LonerState of Mind & Black Sun Empire - BadEastcolours - Murderer (Audio & Meth Remix)State of Mind & Black Sun Empire Feat. PNC - Until the World Ends Minor Rain - DeformationState of Mind - Full ForceBro Safari, UFO, BeautyBrain - No Control (Diesalboy & Mark the Beast Remix)Six Blade & Insomniax - ContactTrei - MasqueradeState of Mind, Jade & Mindscape - In the PlaceState of Mind - No-Operative (Audio Remix)

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  • Episode #216 – Good Marketing Solves Everything

    · Marketing Secrets

    What area in life are you struggling with today?… Good marketing will solve EVERY problem. On this episode, Russell talks about good marketing, and why it can solve every problem in your life.  He also goes over why bad marketing is destroying the Boise State Wrestling Program and how good marketing could fix it. Here are 3 cool things you’ll learn in today’s episode: Why Russell isn’t currently donating time or money to the Boise State Wrestling Program. How good marketing has the potential to save the Boise State Wrestling Program. And  how applying good marketing into every aspect of your life (yes marriage, relationships, finances, business, etc…) will make it better. So listen in below to discover how to solve problems in all aspects of life with the power of good marketing. ---Transcript--- Hey everyone, right now I’m actually in the middle of a carwash and this is a first for Marketing In Your Car. Alright everyone, if you guys can hear me or not, we are in the middle of a carwash.  I hope you can hear this; it’s kind of loud outside. I got car washed a week ago and then I had it the other day and it rained, just drizzled a little bit, and then my cars been spotted for the last week and I’m like, you know what I’m going to go and get this washed so that it doesn’t look like I’m driving a car that’s been sitting out for the last 2 weeks or whatever. That’s where we are at, that’s the water going over us if you can hear that. Now we’re moving to the extreme polish section. Sweet, it’s dumping tons and tons of suds all over me and there’s all these crazy lines of red, green, I feel like I’m in a disco right now. This looks awesome from the inside. This is one of those carwashes you drive in and put your car in neutral and it pulls you through the whole thing while it’s washing everything. I think my wife might be behind me. There’s a car that’s just like my wife’s behind me, which would be really weird. Who knows? Maybe she’s getting her car washed today too. I’m driving the Corvette, so the guy was staring at me, looking at me he’s like, “Nice car.” I’m like, “Thanks.” Anyway, I have some serious stuff to talk about, but I want to wait til I can hear you and you can hear me. We’re about to pass through to the end. The final scrubbing and wax It says the element of protection is going through, now it’s rinsing off all the bubbles. And now we’re about to go through the part where they crank on the heat and the air, and it’s going to blow all this water away. And here it comes. This is my favorite part. Right now all the water is being blown up the windshield so it feels like, it’s awesome. And check that out you guys, I’ve got a car now that is clean. It’s not completely dry but it’s mostly dry. Oh here comes the last phase, oh, I see flames. Alright you guys, now we’ve experienced a carwash on Marketing In Your Car. It doesn’t get any better than that. What I’m doing right now, it’s getting loud again. So I’m going to actually pause it for a second, because I gotta go vacuum out the inside real quick, then I got something very important to talk to you about. So that’s the game plan, I will see you guys in a few minutes here. We will pick up where we left off. Alright, alright, we are back on the road, and ready for an amazing day. So what I want to talk about today is a very important subject, in fact it is the most important subject, arguably that you will have to learn about or think about in your life. And that is very broad, but it’s important and I’ll explain why here in a second. It’s marketing. Marketing matters. I was going to say that it’s the only thing that matters, but that’s not quite true, but it’s the only thing that matters if you want anything in life. So there you go. Now kind of to explain this; most of you guys know, if not you need to go back and listen to all the other 5000 episodes to catch up with who I am. But, I’m a wrestler. I grew up, was a wrestler in high school, was a state champ, took 2nd place in the country, was an all American. I went to Brigham Young University for a year, wrestled there. They dropped the wrestling program, transferred to Boise State, wrestled here, finished up my wrestling career here and then later went and tried to try out for the Olympics. We kind of built an Olympic training center here in Boise Idaho. I employed half the Olympic team to wrestle when our company was at a big peak, and then the company kind of collapsed, I had to cut the program and that really sucked. But, there’s my wrestling background in a nutshell. So I love it more than probably everyone on earth. I spent over $600,000 that year on the wrestling program and it didn’t go anywhere, which is a lot of money to throw away. But that’s how much I love wrestling. So yesterday morning I get an email from some of the wrestlers on the team and they’re talking about the Boise State coaches. I wrestled Boise State and we had two coaches. The head coach and assistant coach. The head coach, while he was a really nice guy, horrible marketer. Worst marketer on planet Earth. Can’t recruit, can’t train, can’t sell anybody in anything, somehow he got the head coach job. He’s kind of been there forever so when the old coach left they let him come in there. He’s kind of run the program into the ground, and instead of noticing that and being like, “Hey I should surround myself with great people.” He did the other thing, which is “Let me get rid of everyone around me who knows what they’re doing to make me look better.” And I had that same thing happen……. It’s something that’s common among wrestlers and among leaders who aren’t necessarily great leaders. So instead of trying to up their skills they fire and they cut the people around them and make them look better. Which by the way, horrible management idea. To anyone that’s followed my podcast, or what I believe. I’m the other way, I surround myself with A player geniuses that are smarter than me, because they make me look good. That’s kind of the opposite. But for him the idea was, “Hey, I’m gonna cut people around me who are doing good stuff because it’ll make me look better.” So yesterday he actually fired the assistant coach, which is insane because the assistant coach ran the whole program, did all the recruiting, did everything. But because of that, it made him look bad, so instead of being grateful and appreciative to that person like he should have been, he instead fired him, so that it would make him feel more secure in his role. Now there is a huge uproar in the wrestling community here. So I got on this email chain that went on back and forth and back and forth all day long with people who want to get our coach fired. Trying to talk to the administrator and all sorts of things. Reinstate the assistant coach in place of the head coach and all sorts of crazy things. I just mentioned really quickly, “Okay, I agree there needs to be a change. I don’t invest money in the Boise State wrestling program anymore, because of some issues. And I would love to invest money back in the program. I love wrestling, I love Boise State, but I haven’t because a lot of the issues that everyone is talking about right now.” So one of the guys messages me and he’s like, “Well as a potential investor, what things would you like to see that would make it so you would be willing to give money.” They said, “Please be brutally honest.” So that should be an entrance way to give me the ability to say what I really believe, and then should listen, they should shut their mouths, listen because you asked me to be brutally honest. So I went through and I was brutally honest. “These are the reasons I would not give money to the Boise State Wrestling program today.” And I gave the reasons, boom, boom, boom, boom. A marketer would have looked at that and said wow, if you guys came to the funnel hacking event, it talked a lot about how, “Here’s the 3 step process to build the business. Step 1 find a market, step 2 ask them what they want, step 3 give it to them.” So you’re trying to figure out how to get money from me, so I say here are the reasons I’m not giving you money. The smart thing a marketer would say, “Wow, he told me exactly how to sell him.” And you come back and say, “Russell, sweet. You want this, I will do this.” And you would give me what I asked you for, and I will give you money. It’s so simple. All you need to do is just listen to what I said, and then give it to me and you get free money for doing nothing. That was what should have happened. Instead, this guy, bless him he’s a wrestling coach….I don’t know. I love wrestlers, but…….anyway, he came back on every one of the reasons why I said I don’t currently invest and instead of saying “wow, let me fix that so you will give me money for free. Came back and fought me on every single one, and insulted me on multiple of them. I was just like, “Are you freaking kidding me.” I am telling you what it will take for me to give you money and instead of saying, wow let’s do that so you will give me money. He came back and fought me on every single point, insulted me on multiple ones and basically told me I wasn’t a true wrestling fan. I was like, “Are you freaking kidding me. Four years ago I spent 600,00 on wrestling here in Boise to make Boise wrestling better. In the last 12 months I’ve spent I probably won’t say, but insane amounts of money. More than the entire budget of the Boise State wrestling team for the next five years on my own wrestling room. I love wrestling more than anyone. Period. The end. For you to come in and attack me and insult me like that, now I sure as heck don’t want to give you money first off, second off, your problems are all business issues you’re struggling with. And you’ll have a bunch of wrestlers that don’t know anything about business trying to solve these busi

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  • Episode #173 – What Do You Expect From Yourself?

    · Marketing Secrets

    How to become more by increasing what you expect from yourself each day. On today’s episode Russell tells a story about a guy from some Tony Robbins’ events and why he expected more from himself and how that made his story is so inspiring. He also talks about how wresting helped Russell expect more form himself. Here are 3 cool things to listen for in this episode: People expect a lot of you, but what do you expect from yourself? Why the more you expect out of yourself, the more successful you will be. Why letting yourself off the hook is not always a good idea. So listen below to find out why you should expect more out of yourself in order to be successful. ---Transcript--- Hey everyone, this is Russell Brunson and welcome to a snowy marketing in your car. All right, all right, so we've got snow out here in Boise Idaho and it's beautiful. It's supposed to snow for the next three days, so I'm hoping we just get dumped on because it would be really fun to take a day or two off with the kids and just do snowball fights, and snow forts, and all of that fun stuff. Cross your fingers that we get dumped on for a little bit here. I just wanted to jump in real quick because I just listened to a podcast and someone said something and it sparked something and I wanted to jump in here. It has to do with what you expect from yourself. We have all sorts of people in our lives that have expectations on us, right? Our wives expect us to do things, our kids, our co-workers, our employees, our parents, our friends, our brothers and sisters, everyone expects things out of us, right? That's one thing. I'm curious, what do you expect out of yourself? We were at a Tony Robins event and if you've ever been to UPW there's this little, not little. There's this guy, he's a little shorter, but like a stocky, bald dude, who's always on Toby Robins security, and at every UPW. If you ever go you'll see him, he's usually one of front guys in the front. He's always standing there flexing, making sure nobody gets to Tony. Anyway, the last day when Tony sells Business Mastery, usually this guy will get up and tell the story, and how basically when he was growing up ... I can't remember how bad his life was but he went to a Tony Robins event, it changed him. He started just going to every Tony Robins event and just trying to just be there all the time, and be around it, and talked about how it changed his life from being this homeless kid to being a multi millionaire, and all of these things, it was just a really inspiring story. Afterwards we pulled him aside and we were just talking to him, me and four or five of our friends, we were just talking to him and the dude was like oh, so motivational, I just wanted to hire him just to come yell at me once a week. He was talking, and one thing he said that was interesting is we asked like, "What made the difference. Why do you come and work for Tony for free five times a year, and why do you do all of this stuff?" He said, "Where I grew up from nobody expected much from me, so I didn't do much. When I came here," he's like, "Everybody expected a lot out of me." He's like, "The reason why I'm so successful now, I expect more out of myself than anyone can imagine." I remember thinking about that like, that's the driving force. What do you expect out of yourself? You think about why we get depressed in life, or why we have issues, or whatever it might be, I think it's usually because we expect something out of ourselves and we don't do it. I look at the things in my life that I really struggle with and that cause me pain, and almost all of them are associated with this is what I expect from myself, and this is what I'm doing. It's like when you were a kid and your dad is ... you do something really, really bad and you're expecting him to beat you and you're preparing for a whooping, and then he comes in and he just looks at you and shakes his head and says, "I expected a lot more out of you," and walks away. You're like, "Oh, daggers in the heart. That was way worse, why didn't you just beat me? I could have handled that." I think that's a big thing, and I'm curious for you right now, and everyone listening is in different parts of their life, different times, different seasons, and different parts of their business as well. I'm curious, what do you expect out of yourself? People always ask, "Russell how do you get so much stuff done? How do you blah, blah, blah," all of these things. I don't feel like I do that much but I feel like I expect a lot out of myself, because of that I don't sleep in, in the morning, I don't go to bed early at night, when I'm at the office I don't goof off, I'm not surfing Facebook and if it's not making me money, if I'm not helping someone, I expect so much out of myself that I don't, I just keep working, I keep moving forward because I expect it out of myself. I look at one of my favorite coaching clients from the last year and a half is Liz Benny, you guys have heard me talk a lot about her. People ask me, "What was different about Liz? How come she was able to grow so fast?" The reality, if you listen to the Voxer messages she sends me, I don't know anyone that expects more out of themselves than her. She is always on herself, which is part ... I'm like man, you're doing awesome, lighten up on yourself. That's why she's so successful, she expects so much out of herself. She always says, "The Liz Benny that I am is not this, I am here, I need to be here, I need to get there. I expect so much out of myself." I think that sometimes we just let ourselves off the hook. If you're struggling, it might be because you're letting yourself off the hook. I don't know, it might not be, there's life circumstances, there's things. Even when I expect a lot of myself we still had issues and headaches, things that come up so I get that, that's a real thing. If you're not progressing, and not progressing your own life, your clients lives in the way that you want, I wonder if that's the issue. I wonder if you're not expecting as much, enough out of yourself. I'm just going to put it out there, and I may be wrong, I don't know. If someone was to ask me now thinking back on it like, "Russell why are you having so much success?" There's a million external forces that have made it, there's so many. My partners, my employees, and my friends, people that have made this happen, right? Internally for me it's because I expect so much out of myself, that's it. I woke up this morning excited to get to work because I expect so much, and I want to do so much, I want to help, and serve, and change, and I can't do that without it. Anyway I just kind of wanted to throw that out there today, again I was listening to a podcast and that just popped into my head, and thought I would share it and hopefully you get some value out of it. Yeah, it's interesting, I think the same thing was true when I was a wrestler. My Junior year I was the state champ, and the next year there was a national tournament, you had to be a Senior and a state champ to go to so I was like, "Okay, I'm going to go," and I expected that I would be an all American. That was what I expected out of myself. My Senior year the state tournament I lost to this punk kid who's not very good in just a really bad match. I ended up taking third place in state that year, my Senior year. I won it my Junior year and third my Senior year and I was destroyed, it ruined my self image. Everything that I was disappeared that day and I was so mad, but I expected so much out of myself and I was like, "No, I'm an all American. I know that already, that's not something that's up for debate just because I lost this match." I was so mad and I remember we had two months before the national tournament and as like Russell right now is not an all American but I am one, I know that, that's what I expect from myself, and that's what I need to get. For the next two months we went crazy, I was working out on average ... I remember one time when Dan Gable, when he's training for the Olympics was working out for seven hours a day, that was the standard I set for myself. I need to work out at least seven hours a day, so I'd lift, I'd go to my high school workout, then I'd try to find another high school close to me that had guys that were also training for the national tournament. I'd travel there, so I had to do two to three wrestling practices a day. During that time, that two month period of time, I went from being a good wrestler to being a great wrestler, I went to national tournament and because I had won the state tournament my Junior year I qualified, but I was probably one of the only dudes in the room who didn't win the state tournament that year. Came in, and because I expected so much out of myself over that two month period of time I came in and in a tournament that I think prior I would have done alright in, I don't think I would have placed in it, you walk in and the bracket has eighty six state champs in it. I came in and I beat almost everyone, I beat a two time state champ, I beat a three time state champ, I beat all of these people and I actually made it to the finals. The finals I lost by two points from a kid from New York. I made the national finals, I took second place in the country, I became an all American, and it wasn't something I was surprised about, I expected that out of myself, but I wasn't there at the state tournament. It took that loss and that setback, which we all have in life, it took that kick in the nuts, whatever you want to call it, that took me back, for me to really step up and say, "Look, this is what I expect from myself and I need to achieve it all costs." I did in that situation, anyway, I hope that helps. I know that again everyone's in different times in life, you may have just lost your state tournament, figurativel

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  • Show 978 Worshipping the State: How Liberalism Became Our State Religion

    · American Conservative University Podcast

    Show 978 Worshipping the State: How Liberalism Became Our State Religion Benjamin Wiker, "Worshipping the State: How Liberalism Became Our State Religion," argues that people on the political left are seeking to establish secularism as the official religion for the U.S. He discusses his theory with Washington Post writer Krissah Thompson. (56 min. 44 sec. - April 20, 2013) Overview of book- Many Christians feel that they are being opposed at every turn by what seems to be a well-orchestrated political and cultural campaign to de-Christianize every aspect of Western culture. They are right, and it goes even further back than the Obama Administration. In Worshipping the State: How Government is Replacing Religion, Benjamin Wiker argues that it is liberals who seek to establish an official state religion: one of unbelief. Wiker reveals that it was never the intention of the Founders to drive religion out of the public square with the First Amendment, but centuries of secularists and liberals have deliberately misinterpreted the establishment clause to serve their own ends: the de-Christianization of Western civilization. The result, they hope, is government as the new oracle. Personal faith in a deity is replaced with collective dependence on government, and the diversity of religious practices and dogmas is reduced to a uniform ideological agenda. The strategy is two-pronged: drive religion out of the public square through law and by encouraging popular derision of the faithful; then, in religion’s place, erect the Church of the State to fill the human need for a higher power to look up to. But what was done can be undone. Outlining a simple, step-by-step strategy for disestablishing the state church of secularism, Worshiping the State shows the full historical sweep of the war to those on the Christian side of the cultural battle—and as a consequence of this far more complete vantage, how to win it. http://www.booktv.org/Podcasts.aspx

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