english

  • 3 Reasons Why You’re Not Fluent in English and How to Improve NOW

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_3CNHlyFLo     Episode transcript below: Hello! How’s it going, Awesome Go Natural English Learner? How are you? Do you speak English as fluently as you would like to? If your answer is, “No!” then this episode is for you! Do you wonder what you’re doing wrong? Do you wonder why, after so much time and effort and money studying English in classes that don’t work, why you’re not fluent in English yet? If your answer is, “Yes!” then this episode is for you. At Go Natural English, we have a unique way of learning English and improving your fluency. So, I want to invite you to join our free training, “The 7 Steps to English Fluency”, which is a short video training at gonaturalenglish.com/7steps and I want to share that training with you for free. And you can find out about more courses and materials at gonaturalenglish.com that can help you with your English fluency. Now, there are three reasons why your English is not where you want it to be. Number one: If you are relying on your English teacher to give you English, to fill your brain with English, without you really taking action, without you doing anything, that is a huge mistake! That is a big reason why you’re not fluent in English yet. If you’re expecting your teacher to simply give you the gift of English, then I’m sorry, but it doesn’t really work like that. If you have an English teacher, then that person, that teacher, is like your guide. But you have to walk with your guide. You have to put some effort into learning English. Okay. Next: Is your English study a habit? Do you study and practice English when you feel like it? Whenever? Maybe if you have some free time? That doesn’t work. In order to become fluent in English, to develop a skill, any skill – whether it’s English fluency or swimming or something else – you have to put yourself on a study schedule, on a practice schedule, on a training schedule. There will be days when you just don’t feel like studying English. I don’t care! You must force yourself to study English, even if you don’t have much time, even if it’s only fifteen minutes a day. That is better than nothing. Fifteen minutes a day of English study every day will improve your fluency much more than nothing, than zero minutes of study a day. Okay? So, make sure your English study is a part of your daily life. Third: Your mindset is extremely important. You must believe in yourself like I believe in you and your ability to become fluent in English. If you do not believe that it’s possible, then it won’t be possible. If you believe that you cannot speak English, then you will not speak English. So starting right now – Yes! Now! – I want you to develop a can-do mindset. That means that you believe you can do the things that you desire to do, the things that you dream to do. For example, to become fluent in English, you have to believe that you can do it. So, right now I would like you to repeat after me: I can become fluent in English. I can speak English. Awesome! So, again, three reasons why you may not be as fluent you want to be in English. One: You’re relying on someone else to give you the power of English when you actually have to work for it yourself with the help of others, such as an English teacher. Two: You’re not making English a part of your daily life. So, you can’t just do it when you feel like it; you have to study English a little bit ever day. And Third: Your mindset. You must believe in yourself. You must have faith and you must think positively. So, I would like to invite you again to come back to gonaturalenglish.com/7steps to join me in more English fluency training. So, I’ll see you over there. I hope you have a great day! And yeah! Believe in yourself! You can do it! Bye for now!

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  • Is your English class hurting your fluency?

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHYK07EUzvs   Episode text below:   Hey, Go Natural English learner! How are you doing? I’m so happy you’re here today. We’re going to talk about classroom English versus real life English and how they’re not the same. Maybe you’ve thought about this before. Of course, classroom English is different from real life English, but how are they different and how could you actually be hurting your English fluency by learning in the classroom? It seems so counterintuitive: you want to study English, you sign up for English class, you go to your class every day, you learn from a good teacher, why are you still not fluent in English? These are the thought that you might be having in your own head. So, let’s talk about it a little bit. I taught English as a second language in a classroom for over ten years. That’s right, ten years. So, I know what it’s like. And I did my best to help my English learners to become fluent in English. But the fact is inside the classroom is not the real world. We can do role plays, we can pretend, we can act, we can do theatre, and that’s really fun, and they are all great ways to learn, especially at the beginning levels of English, but when you are ready to become and advanced, fluent English language speaker, you need to get out in the real world, you need to get out of the classroom. Here’s why. The classroom is rigid, the classroom is its own real world, its own bubble. In the classroom, you’re going to learn more classroom English, such as ‘Turn to page twenty,’ such as ‘Please, raise your hand,’ such as ‘Any questions?’ These are phrases that you don’t always hear on daily basis in the real world. Sure you might hear them, but it’s going to be more likely that you hear something different, like ‘Hey, what’re you doing? Where’re you going? What’re you up to?’ And these are phrases that… They’re a little bit casual for most English teachers to be teaching. Now, maybe you have a really great English teacher, and yes, I was a pretty good English teacher, but the thing is we often have to use textbooks, and textbooks can be quite rigid. And the time we have in the classroom is limited. So, as teachers we can’t always cover natural, conversational, casual English in the classroom. When you learn English in a classroom with an English teacher, that English teacher might be an amazing English teacher, but they might only have experience as an English teacher, not in the specific area that you want to learn English for. For example, if you want to become a doctor, you want to learn medical English. Or if you want to have conversational English, maybe out in the world, like in a bar or a restaurants, well, sure your English teacher might have experience in bars and restaurants, but in the classroom, they’re probably not focusing on English for the bar. Anyway, other specific examples. If you want to be a pilot, a flight attendant, these are English for specific purposes. So, you may want to find a course or a teacher that helps you in those areas. If you’re preparing for a test, find a teacher who can help you with those areas. So perhaps, you have a course or a tutor that can help you, but just be aware of what you want to learn, what are your goals and can your teacher, can your class, can your textbook help you with those. Another thing is inside the classroom, conversations can seem a bit forced, scripted. You might be reading examples from a textbook, and then, your teacher calls on you, and you know you have to answer. But in real life, how do you know when to join the conversation? I find this is a big issue for a lot of English learners.

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  • 10 English Learning Myths

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cc5s2jK2JfU   Episode transcript below: Hello, how are you doing? In this episode we're going to take a look at some interesting, surprising myths about learning English. The top ten myths in fact. I'm really excited to share them with you, I think you're going to like them. They might make you think about your English fluency in a new way. Let's challenge some of those thoughts that you have about English fluency. I've heard from a lot of learners that they say, "Oh you know I really need to learn in a Native speaking country. I can't learn English until I can move to the United States." Seriously? It's not true. If you're planning on moving to the United States for example, you should probably start learning English before you move there. You don't need to live or even to travel to a native speaking country to become fluent in English. There's so many resources, especially online with so many interesting websites, news sources, video clips that you can watch, movies that you can stream, music sites that you can listen to music on, there's so many ways that you can get immersed in English in your living room, or wherever is convenient for you. You don't have to be in an English speaking country, you just need to bring English to you wherever you are. In fact I know a lot of people who live in the U.S. and they've lived there for years, maybe ten years, and they still don't speak English. Why? They spend their whole day everyday with people from their own country speaking their native language. Simply living in the United States is not the secret to fluency. It's a great place to be don't get me wrong, but fluency has to come from you and your effort, and knowing how to become fluent. That's why I'm here to help you. Stop making excuses, this excuse is not valid, you do not need to live in an English speaking country to become fluent. The next myth that I'd like to bust is that you have to major in English in University in order to be fluent. Now this is wrong on so many different levels, of course majoring in English can help you with your English but in a University you're typically going to study literature, and writing, and maybe how to become an English teacher. Sure, maybe it's a good idea if you want to be working with those fields but, in fact if you want to be able to speak English fluently I would suggest that you don't focus on it at your University. I would suggest, if you're taking English classes at University or a private language school that's great, but you have to do so much more outside of the class to develop your fluency, and make sure that you're not relying on your textbook, your teacher, or your course work to make you fluent. You really have to use English outside of the classroom to become fluent. Okay, next number three is really fun. I get a lot of requests from Go Natural English viewers, if they could become fluent by marrying an English speaker. Well, you do not need to marry an English speaker in fact to become fluent in English. It's great if you can have connection, or friendship, or even more with an English speaker, but you do not have to marry an English speaker to become fluent in English. I would suggest to reach out to people with similar interests and discuss those interests with them in English. Maybe you're really into sports, you could find a sports community using social media, or maybe a forum online. That's a great way to connect with people. I would suggest you put your effort into finding people with similar interest who also speak English. Number four, English is the most difficult language to learn. This is simply not true for most English language learners. English can be more difficult for some people and easier for some people depending on your native language, and depending upon your experience learning languages. If you've already learned another language it can become easier an...

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  • The First Thing You Need for Fluency in English

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5hdCi9cZK0   Episode transcript below:   Hey! How are you doing? In this episode of Go Natural English, I’m going to share a number one thing that you need for English fluency. The first thing that you need first and foremost is not a textbook. It’s not even a lesson. What you need to know is why you are learning English. I help you to understand what you need to say in English, how you should say it, how you can learn English, but what I can’t tell you is why you are learning English. That has to come from inside you. And I want to know what is your reason why you want English fluency. This is so important for you to think about and to know, because it will keep you motivated, it will keep you going when English becomes challenging. And let’s face it, English can be really challenging. So, we have to ask ourselves why do we want to be fluent in English. I receive thousands of e-mails from people asking me, ‘Gabby, how do I become fluent in English?’ And I’m happy to help you. That’s why I’m here. But you can help me by thinking about and telling me in the comments right here why do you want to be fluent in English. Why? Really, ask yourself why, and then ask yourself why again. I ask myself this with Go Natural English, ‘Why do I want to help people become fluent in English?’ Well, I think it’s great to be able to communicate and connect with people, I think it will help you in your professional life, maybe to get a better job, to work overseas, to travel. You can make more friends if you speak English. It will even give you confidence and help you with your personal development in life. It will bring you knowledge. You can learn about the world through English. There’s lots of reasons why I love teaching English to you through Go Natural English. But really the number one reason why is freedom. I created Go Natural English so that I could have more freedom as a teacher. But I also created it to give you more freedom  as an English learner, because you can learn with Go Natural English anywhere anytime. That’s freedom. You can self-study, and you can interact and ask questions, and you can practice together with our on-line community. You can join a paid Premium Class, and you can learn more and have the freedom to do that anywhere anytime. And it gives you the freedom and opportunity to do more and achieve your goals through English. That’s my ‘why’. I want to know your ‘why’. So please, take two minutes, think about why you’re learning English and tell me. Tell me please, I really want to know. Now, moving forward. Things are changing a little bit here on the Go Natural English YouTube channel. I’ve thought about why I’m helping people learn English at Go Natural English, and I think that moving forward, we can improve by going deeper with each English tip episode. So, from October, moving forward October 2015, we’re going to have one longer episode every week where I go deeper into answering one of your questions. So, next week, we’re going to go deep learning several points (I can’t even count them all, there’s so many) on how to become fluent in English. So, I hope you come back, I hope you check out the episode, and I hope you love it so much that you watch it, you share it with your friends and that you comment on it too. So now, you know my ‘why’, you know what’s going on moving forward with Go Natural English. I hope that you enjoy it, and I hope to hear from you to learn your ‘why’. Please, share it with us. We want to know. Alright. So, I look forward to seeing your comment real soon. Bye for now. The post

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  • 【2016毕业特辑】英语的魅力 · 主播严喆 NO.146

    · 为你读英语美文

    主播:严喆-2016年应届毕业生录制地点:上海外国语大学2014年的毕业特辑来自潇雨,如今,潇雨成为了国家电网的一名会计人员。 2015年的毕业特辑来自Sally, 如今,Sally成为了一名高中语文老师。 2016年毕业特辑来自严喆,今天,严喆参加了毕业典礼。今后,严喆将到德国攻读博士学位,继续学术之路。毕业,是一个结束,也是一个新的开始,而毕业照就是最难忘的纪念。欢迎把你的毕业照发到为你读英语美文的微信公众平台,也可以在微博上@为你读英语美文,发照片的同时,也说一说你是哪所学校毕业的,可以关于毕业的感受,记忆,也可以关于对未来的憧憬…我们会把你的毕业照整理成册,7月1日在微信公众平台发布。作为英语专业的毕业生,严喆要为你带来是一篇毕业演讲,来自一位美国英语专业的毕业生John Borwick English Department Graduation SpeechJohn BorwickHello. My name is John Borwick. I am graduating with a B.A. in English and a B.S. in Computer Science. Today I would like to speak to you to illustrate how useful our English majors are, how they have already helped someone like me in a technical field, and how our English majors have prepared us for the post-college world. Though I entered NC State with only a declared B.S. in Computer Science, studying English has in many ways proven to be more valuable for me than com¬puter science, and I expect that English will continue to be more valuable. I’d like to outline how an English major has helped me through three major points. My first point is perhaps the most obvious point for the use of an English major: English has taught me to value and enjoy life. I’ll talk about the more career-oriented reasons for having an English major in a few minutes, but for me this point resounds the most. We have been encouraged to consider the key ideas of hundreds of amazing, thought-provoking writers who all write very well or we wouldn’t be reading them. Our degree has demanded that we read the best and most beautiful works of the English language. With English, we have been encouraged to read, ponder, and come to class ready to discuss what we think. It is a rewarding pleasure in itself to feel that it is right and acceptable to sit outside under an oak tree and read poems by Walt Whitman. Without English, I would feel almost guilty for taking time out of my day to read. English has taught me that work can be fun and worthwhile. An English major has also improved my quality of life by teaching me to apply what I’ve learned directly to my own life. When I took American Romanticism, Professor West didn’t teach us Emerson and Thoreau as abstract, academic models for prose and rhetoric. Rather, he asked us to reflect on their thoughts and question our daily routines. We talked about how “Walden” can shape our views of the world. We learned the theories, and then applied them to ourselves. English has improved my quality of life by helping me understand and ex¬press nuanced emotions. The books and poems we have read give us a better understanding of how concepts like love, religion, and hope have developed. My idea of love has been refined by John Donne’s flea and Hawthorne’s mechanical butterfly. Professor Hunt taught me that the word “enthusiasm” didn’t even exist in the English language before Spencer. By knowing how elegant, intelligent writ¬ers have been able to label and define their feelings, we can better comprehend, embrace, and magnify our future experiences and emotions. Our ability to understand complex ideas leads me to the second, more practical point demonstrating the value of an English major: we have been prepared to understand and analyze never-before-seen thought, so we can adapt and learn. Our required course on literary theory demands that we become familiar with interpretive strategies and apply them to texts. After being introduced to a new set of tools, like “narratology” or “deconstructionism,” we are asked to think from that new perspective and analyze a piece of literature. That class teaches English majors how to listen, understand, change our perspective to suit the task at hand. With that sort of adaptability, we are ready for a variety of fields. English courses help us adapt to new interpretive strategies, but also incorpo¬rate other disciplines like psychology, sociology, and political science. Our course on “American Linguistics” could not go far without considering sociology. That same course on literary theory draws on psychoanalysis—from psychology—and Marxism—from political science. English has encouraged us to embrace a multi-disciplinary approach to our work. The students in our English classes have also helped us understand and ana¬lyze thoughts from other disciplines, and teach us new, invigorating approaches. NC State’s diverse student body has afforded us the opportunity to sit alongside engineers, biologists, and architects. Our classmates from other fields of study approach problems from fresh perspectives we would not necessarily consider if only English majors took our English courses. Engineers can produce some spectacular science fiction writing! And biologists can help us understand the im¬plications of an author’s reference to a particular flower or natural compound. Our fellow students have added to our knowledge and helped us become comfortable communicating to people in other fields. Those students sit in our English classes for a reason. Computer scientists are told that we, as engineers, will only spend ten percent of our time at work doing engineering. The other ninety percent will be spent communicating with others. My third and final point is that we, as English majors, will excel because we have honed the most critical skill in the business world: the art of expressing oneself. We all know how to write. Literature and writing classes alike have required us to express ourselves on paper. I had to write a three page paper about a single word for Dr. Holley’s course on Chaucer. When we’re asked to deliver a paper that concisely covers a topic, we can deliver a powerful, well-constructed argument with a rhetorical effect that you can’t get just by using a grammar checker. We can communicate back to those students from other disciplines who take our classes. After we’ve understood other students’ perspectives, we next must hone our skills of explanation to communicate our viewpoint to people without a background in rhetoric, literature, or creative writing. We have been able to contextualize references to Milton in a poetry writing course in such a way that students without that background can still understand us. We have been trained in the classroom to teach, and more impressively to teach to people with little back¬ground in the subject material. When we work as business leaders, professors, or poets, we will know how to share what we’ve learned with others; we will be experts in the most important component of our jobs: communication. With that, let me express my congratulations and thanks to all of you today. The long nights spent reading, the hours struggling to finish an essay, the week¬ends spent on group work, and 120 some-odd credit hours have all paid off in a very tangible form today, for all of us. Thank you, professors, for your dedication to us. Thank you, family and friends, for your support and confidence in us. Thank you, fellow graduates, for your perseverance, friendship, and for representing NC State’s best. Well done! 垫乐张惠妹 - 永远的画面送别 - 口琴伴奏版姜小鹏,杨佳音,李军 - 昨日再现 Yesterday Once More班得瑞 - Right Here Waiting录制:严喆;制作|编辑: 永清文字及垫乐归作者或版权方所有图片源于网络微信公众号:为你读英语美文官方新浪微博:@为你读英语美文

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  • Why You Can’t Understand Some Native English Speakers

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYM92pioYyQ   Episode transcript below:   Hey! How’s it going? ‘Why is it that I can understand some native English speakers and not others?’ This is a really common question that I’ve been getting over and over from you, members of the Go Natural English community. And I think it’s a really good question to discuss in this episode. Don’t you think so? So, why is it that you can understand some native English speakers, like me. I know that a lot of you while I’ve received many, many, many emails saying, ‘Oh my Gosh, this is so exciting! Gabby, I can understand every single word you’re saying.’ Or ‘Wow, I can’t believe I understand 70% of what you’re saying. This is amazing. I’ve never felt this way before. I feel so good when I listen to your English, Gabby. But why when I listen to other native English speakers, can’t I understand them?’ So, let’s talk about that. Today, we’re going to solve this problem, and I’m going to share resources, suggestions with you on how to fix this problem. This is some big deal, because you don’t want to feel left out of native English conversatione. It feels horrible. It feels really horrible when you cannot understand some native speakers, but you can understand others, because it makes you wonder is this your problem, is that the native speakers’ problem, is there something wrong with them or is there something wrong with you. It’s embarrassing when you’re in a group of native speakers, and maybe you can understand some of them, but not others. Or maybe in the morning, you’re watching a Go Natural English video or listening to the podcast, and then in the afternoon, you go to talk with your native English speaker friend or your colleges, and you can’t understand some of them. So, in this episode, we’re going to solve that. So first of all, natives talk funny. Native English speakers have different ways of talking. I’m a native English speaker. I was born and raised in United States of America, and I speak a very standard kind of American English. I was born in Minneapolis, so some people who are really, really good at English know that sometimes, there’s a tiny, tiny, incy-wincy hint of that kind of regional accent in my English. But not so much. I tend to speak standard English, because as I was growing up, I actually moved to different states. I lived in Minnesota until I was ten, and then Hawaii until I was thirteen, and then Indiana, until I was fifteen, and then Maine until I was twenty, Massachusetts until recently. So anyway, I’m a very good kind of even English. So anyway, my English is really clear, because I also have over ten years of experience teaching English as a second language, travelling the world and working with English-as-the-second language speakers. Other native English speakers don’t have the same experience, they’re not English teachers. So, in order to communicate with people, they just speak like they would speak with other native English speakers. I’m speaking to you right now like I would speak to my native English-speaking friends. What I mean is I think I’m more aware of speaking clearly, I annunciate my words. People that work on the radio or in broadcasting, or on TV also speak very clearly whether they’re English speakers or not. Other people that are used to working all day every day with other Americans speak pretty quickly, and they might combine their words more. So, for example, I might say, ‘Don’t you know how to understand native English?’, and they might say, ‘Don’t you know how to understand native English?’ ‘Don’t you know?’ Which is also vert Minnesotan of me to say.

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  • The Amazing Impact of Mastering English Fluency in your Life

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JSKkrdFAMU0     Episode transcript below: Hello! How are you doing? I’m so excited to talk to you about why you should become fluent in English. Maybe you’ve thought about why you want to become fluent in English language. Maybe you haven’t thought much about it. Maybe you’ve just been studying, because it’s something you are required to do or you think you should do, but maybe you haven’t thought much about it. Well, if you have or haven’t, either way, this episode of Go Natural English is going to present some ideas that are probably new, you probably haven’t thought about. And so, I’m going to share with you my reasons why I think English fluency is the best thing that you can do for yourself. So, I’ve made a lot of notes, so I’ll be looking over at them while I talk to you. So, a lot of people talk about why you should become fluent, and I think there’re some basic reasons that you probably already know. I’m going to say these, and you’re going to think, ‘Duh. Yeah, I know that.’ So, for example, freedom of communication. English is the language of the Internet, the language of science, medicine, technology, travel. You can find out a lot of information in English. As opposed to, perhaps, if your native language is not as widely used as English. So also, English can give you a lot of opportunities to travel abroad, to study abroad. When you travel, you might want to use English to communicate with people who speak other languages. Maybe English is their native language, maybe it’s not. Did you know that there’s more people in the world that speak English as a second language (or third, or fourth, or fifth) than people who speak it as their native language. I just think it’s a fascinating fact. So, English is really the language that we use to connect with each other internationally. So, if you want to travel the world and work abroad, or study abroad, or meet people from different countries, English is the best way to be able to do that. I was lucky that I was born into an English-speaking family in an English-speaking country, so I have English, but I’ve worked really hard to become fluent in Spanish, Portuguese, I can speak some French and Japanese, so I know what it’s like to learn another language. Also, English, of course, is really helpful for your career. Most careers will benefit from speaking English. If you work with international colleagues, if you have to travel for work, if you have to do research for work, if you’re selling things to people in different countries or doing marketing (I mean I could go on and on, and on), if you work in tourism of any kind, if you work in a hotel, restaurant, giving tours or anything like that, really, your career is going to benefit from English. Think about if you want to go to a conference overseas, you’re going to benefit from knowing English. So, all of these things so far, you’re probably thinking, ‘Okay, Gabby. I’ve already thought of that. Really, what’s new?’ Well, I’m going to share my not-so-obvious reasons for becoming fluent in English. And before I do that, I want to talk to you about levels of fluency in English. Because I think that fluency in English means that you can do what you want to do in English. So, if you want to order coffee, for example (I just got a coffee myself, so that was the first thing I thought of). I ordered my coffee in English, because I’m here in Bangkok actually, and I don’t speak enough Thai to order my coffee in Thai. But I did learn how to say ‘Hello’ and ‘Thank you’. But anyway, I said, ‘Could I please have a coffee?’ So, ‘Could I please have a coffee?’ Was that five, six words? Well, for that moment,

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  • English is Essential – Join the New Class Fluent Communication

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rkbd5Z_l9F0   Episode transcript below:   English is essential. It’s the number one second language in the world. There’s more non-native English-speakers than native speakers. And in any case, English is essential for your professional, for your personal life, and for growing as a person. If you want to do business, if you want to study or travel abroad, if want to connect with people, if you just want to know more about the world around you, English is the best tool to do that. Maybe you’ve been studying English for years, but you still struggle with shyness, with hesitation. You struggle to speak. If you’re struggling to speak, it’s unfortunately probably because traditional English classes haven’t really caught up with the modern English-speaking world. We lack practice in the classroom speaking with native speakers and other fluent English speakers. The same thing happened to me when I was learning Spanish. I was taking university Spanish classes and I learned a little bit of grammar, how to read and even how to write a little bit, but then, when it came to speaking Spanish in the real world, I was totally lost. So I created my own method for learning Spanish fluently and that’s how I created Go Natural English, to help English learners like you. Now, the Go Natural English method is a course online. The Go Natural Team and I have created our best course ever, and I want to invite you to be part of it. Fluent Communication is the best course to help you with your fluency. We cover all skills and you get tons of practice. Compared to taking private English classes, it’s much faster and easier. That’s my goal: to make it fast, fun and easy for you to learn English. Instead of taking years of private lessons and spending a lot of money, the fluent communication course is sixteen weeks long and it’s an incredible value. With one week of lessons at a time, you can study independently online from anywhere on your own time. No commuting, no worrying about schedules. It’s all up to you. And now there’s more detailed video lessons and lots of supplementary materials to help you to learn faster and easier, and to get tons of practice too. So you feel confident in the skills that we’re learning together. With Fluent Communication, you’ll feel confident in your English fluency and you’ll also feel like you belong in our community of like-minded English learners. You’ve probably met me through Go Natural English online, but in case you don’t know, I’m Gabby Wallace, an American English teacher and I’ve been teaching English in the classroom for ten years, and online for five years. So I know what it’s like to struggle with English, but my goal is to help you to learn quickly, in a fun way, and I’ve also studied and learned other languages to fluency myself, so I know what it’s like to be a learner. Also I have my master’s degree in teaching English, and I’ve taught in the US and abroad, to university-level students and to corporate business people as well. Check the details below for how to join the course. You can click on “Buy Now” to be part of the course when it launches. Now, I hope that you’ll take action to get fluent now. Don’t wait on your decision for fluency. Start enjoying confidence and fluency in English now. I hope to see you on the inside of the course. The post English is Essential – Join the New Class Fluent Communication appeared first on Go Natural English.

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  • How to Learn Fluent English and Feel Awesome

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

    When was the last time you did a good deed for someone, or maybe somebody performed a good deed for you? Can you remember what it was? Do you recall where it was? Well, it just might be time that you try again. In this episode Gabby brings up the idea of doing a good deed for someone using English language skills.   As travelers in foreign lands we could all use help once in a while, whether it’s about the signs that are not in English, or the restaurants where the menus are not in English. Wouldn’t it be nice if you were in a strange city, and somebody noticed that you looked lost, and then offered to help you find your way again – in English?   Tips like this are useful and can be found at gonaturalenglish.com, along with other resources materials and support. Be sure to take advantage of all that Gabby and the Go Natural English community have to offer.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGGc2UjTEZU   Episode transcript below:   Hey there! How’s it going? Welcome to Go Natural English. Are you ready to get fluent? Let’s get started. In this English quick tip I’d like to talk with you about the idea of a good deed English day. A lot of the time we focus on how English can benefit you. You can make more money; have a better position; have an international career; meet new people; be able to communicate with people from all over the world; enjoy travel; enjoy access to knowledge and information; and the list goes on. Obviously English is a very powerful tool for you and your success. But wait just a minute. It’s not all about you. English can actually be a tool to make the world a better place. And that’s what I want to encourage us to think about today – with a good deed English day. So, today, after you watch this episode, I’d like you to do a good deed involving English. What is a good deed? Well, a good deed is when you volunteer to help someone. You do something where you go out of your way – something you didn’t have to do, you didn’t need to do, but you did it because you want to help people. You want to be a good person, and you want to make the world a better place. So, a good deed doesn’t have to be big. You don’t have to make world peace. A good deed is something small. Maybe you could say “Good morning” to someone, especially if you live in an English-speaking country. Use your English to greet someone, and smile, and make that person’s day a better day. If you don’t live in an English-speaking country, you can certainly still do a good deed in English. You could someone a message on social media or by email in English. Perhaps you know an English speaker, or you could communicate with the Go Natural English community at facebook.com/gonaturalenglish or on Twitter at gonaturaleng, and help us out (glitch on recording here) on the page or tweet a positive message to someone who you know who is also learning, or who speaks English. How can you use your English to help people? Perhaps if you see someone who looks a little bit lost like I was today in the train station here in Tokyo. A very nice man came up to me and he said, “How shall I help you?” which is very proper English – not very common actually. I would suggest saying, “How can I help you?” or “May I help you?” You could help someone if you see them lost or perhaps if you see someone trying to find their way using a map, or maybe they need some kind of help from you. It could be a different situation depending on your daily situations or where you live. So, think about how could you use English to do a good deed today? Could you pay a compliment? Could you help someone with information? Could you even do something more like offer your help with a bigger p...

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  • Native English Answer: What’s the Difference Between Being and Been?

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

    Are you being faithful and persistent in your English-learning journey? Have you been pushing yourself to listen and hear as much spoken English as you possibly can? Learning English is hard enough but mastering it takes an extra effort. The good news is you can do it. Don’t give up!   It takes a bit of work to understand tenses in English because English is such a descriptive language. In Gabby’s English tips such as this one, she explains how to have a better understanding of the grammar and usage of all the parts of speech in American English. We have been working hard to provide excellent materials and support to assist you on your quest to learn English.   To have a full understanding of English you should read and listen to native English speakers. This will allow you to better grasp sentence structure and the flow of the words. Remember also, the premium Go Natural English course provides many more resources to help you. Get involved in the conversations and practice speaking English as often as you can.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqkG9J9Fbg0   Episode transcript below:   Hey! How’s it going? Welcome to Go Natural English. In this English tip I’m going to answer a question from a Go Natural English audience member, Kenza. Kenza asked, “What is the difference between “being” and “been?” So, Kenza, that’s a great question. It’s kind of a grammar and usage question and I’m happy to share my answer with you. So, I would like to start off by saying that a really great way to start to be an independent learner is to expose yourself to a lot of English and you can start recognizing the differences between things like “being” and “been.” Of course, it’s going to help a lot and you’re going to learn faster if you have some direct explanation. At least, in my opinion, I learn better when I have some direct answer like this English tip video. And also in the premium Go Natural English course where you get more explanations, you get more answers directly, and you learn from exposure to more English because in the course we have tons of native English conversation for you to listen to and see how we really use vocabulary and grammar in everyday American English conversation. So, you can find out more about that on my website, gonaturalenglish.com. So, back to your question, Kenza, about “being” and been.” Now, they’re both a form of the “to be” verb, but they’re used in different tenses. So, I could use “being” with the progressive like “I am being” – let me change that a little bit – “He is being annoying.” Okay? “I am being amazing.” Okay, so, “He is being annoying.” Another progressive tense would be “He has been annoying.” So, see, with the present perfect progressive we use “been” and in the present progressive we use “being.” So, “He is being annoying – He has been annoying, but now he’s not annoying.” So, they’re both forms of “to be” so I would recommend to perhaps review grammar a little bit but don’t focus on your books. Get out of your books. Listen to more English, perhaps for identifying how you use “being” and “been” in different tenses. It would be helpful to listen to stories or to conversations, and as I mentioned with the Go Natural English premium course, we have a lot of conversations where we talk about the past and experiences, so we use tenses like “has been” or “have been” so you’ll be able to hear a lot of examples. So, one more time just to recap – they’re part of the same verb “to be” but we use them with different tenses. So, again, “I am being a great teacher”, okay? – the present progressive and in the present perfect progressive, “I have been a great teacher.” So, we just use them in different tenses. Alright?

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  • Mansion Ingles Podcast October 2013 - Aprende gramática y vocabulario inglés

    · 00:39:10 · Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free

    Hello once again and welcome to another Mansion Ingles podcast. This is podcast number 66 recorded for October 2013. En el nivel básico practicamos las colacaciones de los verbos, y también un poco de vocabulario general. En el nivel intermedio estudiamos el uso de los verbos GET, GO y HAVE y también una selección de preguntas sobre la gramática. In the advanced section, we practise more advanced collocations, and there's business vocabulary as usual, and a translation exercise, all to help you improve your English and take it to the next level. En los podcasts mensuales hablamos de los temas, vocabulario y ejercicios que salen en nuestro cuaderno mensual. Así podéis practicar la pronunciación y repasar el material del cuaderno. Si quieres recibir gratis el cuaderno cada mes, ver la trascripción de este podcast o leer los anteriores, ve a mansioningles.com y sigue los enlaces en la página principal. Antes de empezar, quiero dar las gracias a todos nuestros seguidores en Facebook. Ya tenemos más de 30,000 fans y seguimos creciendo cada día. Si tienes alguna pregunta, comentario o duda sobre el inglés o simplemente quieres hacer ejercicios adicionales, puedes encontrarnos en facebook.com/mansioningles Ok, let's start then with el nivel básico to make a noise - hacer un ruido - hacer se puede traducir como to make o to do, pero cuando va con el sustantivo a noise, decimos make a noise. Repite: make a noise. Shhh...don't make a noise they're sleeping. Who was making all that noise last night? También decimos take photos Repite: take photos - How many photos did you take? I took hundreds of photos. Estoy seguro que sabes que en inglés decimos drive a car or drive a bus or a taxi. Pero cuando hablamos de las motos, las bicicletas y los animales decimos ride - R-I-D-E Repite: to ride a bike, ride a horse, ride a motorbike. Can you ride a motorbike? Have you ever ridden a horse? I would love to ride an elephant. I rode a camel in Egypt. ¿Cómo se traduce 'llevar gafas'? to wear glasses Repite; wear -wear glasses. I wear glasses - I've been wearing glasses for years. He's wearing a jacket - Are you wearing jeans? Luego tenemos la expresión to run for the bus. Repite: the bus - run for - run for the bus. I ran for the bus this morning. ¿Como se dice suerte en inglés? - luck - Repite: luck - Luck es un sustantivo. ¿Cuál es el adjetivo? - lucky. Repite: Lucky. I'm lucky! Are you lucky? Are you a lucky person? I am. I think I'm very lucky. El verbo to book significa reservar. For example you can book a room in a hotel. Repite: to book - to book a room. Can I book a room, please? I'd like to book a room. También puedes book a table in a restaurant. Repite: to book a table. Can I book a table, please? I'd like to book a table for two, please. If you book a room in a hotel, you stay in the hotel. Repite: stay in the hotel. Where are you staying. Are you staying in a hotel? ¿Cómo se dice mandar un correo electrónico en inglés? - to send an email. Repite: send an email. Did you send me an email? I'll send you an email. I'll send you an email next week. Very good! - ¡Muy bien! También en el nivel básico este mes hemos practicado un poco de vocabulario. Vamos a ver si te acuerdas de las palabras.   A dress, skirt, trousers, shirt, socks are all examples of.....clothes. Repite: clothes. I like your clothes. I need new clothes. What do you cut your food with? You cut your food with a...... knife - K-N-I-F-E. Repite: Knife. knife and fork - knife, fork and spoon. Can I have a knife, please? Spring, summer, autumn and winter are the four....seasons. Repite: seasons. What's your favourite season? I like spring and autumn. I think autumn is my favourite season. En el inglés americano, autumn se dice fall - F-A-L-L because the leaves, las ojas, caen de los arboles. What do you usually drink tea and coffee and hot chocolate from? You drink tea and coffee from a ....cup. Not a glass, a cup. You drink Coca Cola from a glass, you drink beer from a glass. You drink tea and coffee from a cup. Repite: cup - a cup - a coffee cup - a tea cup. A cup of coffee. A cup of tea. Now, what is the name of the part of the house where you cook? You cook in the ....kitchen. Repite: kitchen. Ten cuidado con la diferencia entre kitchen and chicken. Chicken is pollo.  Repite: kitchen - chicken - kitchen. We cook in the kitchen. The chicken's in the kitchen. What's the name for the room where you usually have a shower, clean your teeth or wash your face? It's the bathroom. Repite: bathroom. Excuse me, where's the bathroom?   Ok good, now moving on to the intermediate section, Listen: 'Have you ever been to this restaurant?’  - ‘No, this is the first time.’ 'Have you been' is the present perfect tense. Listen: Have you been to New York? Has estado una vez en Nueva York? Repite: Have you been to New York? Have you been here before? Have you ever eaten Japanese food? Listen: We don’t have to be at the meeting. 'Have to' is similar to 'must' for obligation. The difference is that 'must' is often external obligation (it comes from outside the speaker) and 'have to' can be the obligation you feel inside. For example, your boss says "Everyone must go to the meeting", so you feel you have to. The government says "you must pay your taxes" so we all have to pay our taxes. A mother tells her son that he 'must do his homework', so the son tells his friend "I can't play with you now because I have to do my homework. My mother says I have to do my homework." Another difference of course is that 'have to' can change to the past: "I had to do my homework" and to the future "I will have to do my homework" or "I'll have to do my homework". We cannot say, X"I will must do my homework."X That's wrong! Repeat: I'll have to work on Saturday. - I had to work late yesterday. Do we have to go to the meeting? Listen to a different example from the same exercise: "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Listen again. Which verb tenses do you hear? "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Did is the past of do, so didn't remember is past simple. What about the second verb tense? I "had parked". Had + past participle is the past perfect tense. I had is often contracted to I'd. Repeat: I'd parked - I'd parked my car. I didn't remember - I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. (No recordaba dónde había aparcado el coche.) Repeat again: I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. - I didn't remember where I'd left my bag. I didn't remember what I'd said to her - I didn't remember what I'd done with my keys. Escucha otro ejemplo y, como antes, piensa cuales son los tiempos verbales: I was sitting on the train when suddenly my mobile rang. I was sitting - past continuous - my mobile rang - past simple. The sitting is the longer action. I was sitting before my mobile rang. I was sitting when my mobile rang, and I was sitting after my mobile rang. Repeat: I was sitting - I was sitting on the train - I was sitting on the train when my mobile rang. I was watching TV when I heard a noise. I was reading when you arrived. I was sleeping when you phoned. Here's one more example from the same exercise. Listen: Exercising before breakfast is the best time if you want to burn calories. Why is 'exercising' a gerund in this sentence? Why is it verb + ing? Well, it's because we often use a gerund as the subject of the sentence. Repeat: Exercising is good for you. Smoking is bad for your health. Jogging is a popular pastime. Reading is something I don't do very often. In the next exercise in this month's 'cuaderno', we looked at some expressions with the verbs get, go and have. Listen and repeat the sentences to practise pronunciation. Listen: How many e-mails do you usually get? Repeat: usually get - do you usually get - How many? How many emails? - How many e-mails do you usually get? Listen: Does she usually get drunk? Repeat: get drunk - usually - usually get drunk - Does she? - Does she usually get drunk? Listen: Did you have a shower? Repeat: have a - have a shower - Did you? - Did you have a shower? Listen: Did you go away for the summer? Repeat: the summer - for the summer - go away - go away for the summer - Did you - Did you go away for the summer? Listen: Did you go anywhere nice? Repeat: nice - anywhere - anywhere nice - Did you go? Did you go anywhere nice? Listen: What time did you get home? Repeat: get home - did you - did you get home - What time? - What time did you get home? Listen: Do you always get up early? Repeat: early - get up early (nota como se junta el sonido final de /up/ con el sonido vocal al principio de /early/ - up early. Repeat: up early - get up early - Do you always? - Do you always get up early? Listen: Did you go out on Saturday? Repeat: on Saturday - go out - go out on Saturday - Did you go out on Saturday? Listen: Where did you did you get your phone? Repeat: your phone - get your phone - Where did you? - Where did you get? Where did you get your phone? Listen: Where did you go for lunch? Repeat: lunch - for -  for lunch - go for lunch - Where did you? - Where did you go for lunch? Listen: Who did you have dinner with yesterday? Repeat: have dinner with - have dinner with yesterday - Who did you? - Who did you have dinner with yesterday? In the advanced section this month, we looked at some more collocations. The first of which was to make the best of something which means to do as well as possible with something that is not too promising. Repeat: I'll make the best of it. I don't like it, but I'll make the best of it. we can also say 'make the most of it'. Repeat: make the most of it. Make the most of a bad situation. Make the most of a bad job. Make the most of your time in the UK. (¡aprovechadlo!) Now, if you draw (someone’s) attention to something, you attract someone to notice or focus on someone or something. Repeat: draw your attention to - let me draw your attention to this wonderful painting. My attention was drawn to a small insect on the floor. If you jump for joy you are extremely happy. Repeat: I jumped for joy when I got my exam results. When she agreed to have dinner with me I jumped for joy. The children jumped for joy when we got to Disneyland. To draw out something means to make it longer than it needs to be. Repeat: to draw out a meeting. It wasn't necessary to draw out the meeting for so long. Why does he have to draw it out so much? Repeat: to draw out something. If you make allowances (for something) you take certain facts or circumstances into consideration. Repeat: to make allowances for. When we go to the UK we should make allowances for the weather. You have to make allowances for the age of the property. If you jump or are thrown in at the deep end, you start doing something new and difficult without help or preparation. Repeat: jump in at the deep end / thrown in at the deep end. I was thrown in at the deep end when I worked in a professional kitchen for the first time. You should jump in at the deep end and buy your first computer. Repeat: jump in at the deep end - I was thrown in at the deep end. stand a chance (of doing something) is another popular collocation. It means there's a possibility. You have a chance that something will happen. Repeat: stand a chance - Do you think I stand a chance? Do I stand a chance of winning? No, I don't think you stand a chance to be honest! You don't stand a chance of getting that job. Our last expression was to jump the gun which means to start before the starting signal. Guns used to be used to start a race. If you start before the gun goes 'bang' you jump the gun. Repeat: jump the gun. Don't jump the gun. Be patient! You're always jumping the gun. He apologised for jumping the gun.   In the Business English section this month we looked at some more business English vocabulary, and the first expression was to become head of something. This means to be in charge, to manage (ser el jefe). Repeat: She's head of sales. He's head of design. She became head of the company in March. Who's head of the department? Let's discuss means vamos hablar de.... Repeat: let's discuss the sales figures. Let's discuss your role in the company. Let's discuss the release date of the new product. outsourcing is subcontracting to an outside company. In Spanish, I think it's subcontratación o la externalización of a product or service. Repeat: outsourcing. Many companies are outsourcing their manufacturing. It's cheaper to outsource the work. Finally, the phrasal verb to run on means to continue without stopping or go on longer than expected. Repeat. Run on. What's the past of run? - ran. Repeat: the meeting ran on. - The meeting ran on for nearly three hours. - The story ran on for months. ¡Muy bien! - Very good! We also gave you some more sentences to translate in this month's cuaderno. First, you had to translate from English to Spanish. So,  I'll say the English sentences and you say the Spanish translation before I do. Then, repeat the English sentence after me to practise pronunciation. Are you ready? They didn’t want to stay here. - No querían quedarse aquí. Repite: They didn’t want to stay here. - stay here - to stay here - They didn’t want - They didn’t want to stay here. Unemployment is increasing / rising / going up. - El paro está subiendo. Repite: Unemployment - Unemployment is increasing - rising - Unemployment is rising - going up - Unemployment is going up. Don’t talk to me about economics. - No me hables de economía. Repite: economics - talk to me - Don't talk to me - Don’t talk to me about economics. The economy is beyond our control.  - La economía está más allá de nuestro control. Repite: the economy - beyond our control - The economy is beyond our control. How many beers do we have left? - ¿Cuántas cervezas nos quedan? Repite: left - have left - How many? How many beers? How many beers do we have left? How many beers do we have left? Good, now I'll read some Spanish sentences and you translate to English before I do. Then repeat the sentences after me to practise your pronunciation. OK? ¿Quieres decir que ésta es la última? - Do you mean this is the last one? Repeat: the last one - this is the last one. Do you mean? - Do you mean this is the last one? Habrá más vino. - There’ll be more wine. Repeat: more wine - There will - there'll - there will be - there'll be - There’ll be more wine. Corrieron a la farmacia. - They ran to the pharmacy/chemist (UK) /drugstore (US) Repeat: They ran to - They ran to the pharmacy - They ran to the chemist - They ran to the drugstore. ¿Por qué no querían quedarse? - Why didn’t they want to stay? Repeat: want to stay - Why didn't they? - Why didn’t they want to stay? Dijeron que tenían muchas cosas que hacer. - They said they had a lot of things to do. Repeat: things to do - a lot of - a lot of things to do - They said they had - They said they had a lot of things to do. - They said they had a lot of things to do. Well, I've got a lot of things to do also, so unfortunately that's the end of this podcast, but we'll be back with you next month as usual with another podcast based on our monthly newsletter, our cuaderno de inglés mensual. Remember, you can listen to all our previous podcasts at mansioningles.com and of course on iTunes. Si te gustan nuestros podcasts, puedes ayudarnos con una corta reseña en iTunes contribuyendo así a que más personas puedan conocernos y escucharnos. Gracias a todos los que ya han escrito algún comentario. Thank you to all of you who are writing reviews. Thank you very much for listening to this podcast, and for being part of the community of La Mansión del Inglés. Remember, If you want to contact us you can find us on Facebook. Just search Facebook for La Mansión del Inglés where you can ask questions, make comments and do exercises and practise your listening. Or you can send me an email to: mansionteachers@yahoo.es. You can also follow us on Twitter where we tweet useful links to improve your English, English slang vocabulary, quotations and much more. Our Twitter name is MansionTwit. Puedes ver el cuaderno mensual de este mes, y todos los cuadernos anteriores en www.cuadernodeingles.com/ Until next month then, keep practising and taking your English to the next level! Take care and bye for now!   The music in this month’s podcast is by Revolution Void, the album is The Politics of Desire and the track is called Outer Orbit.                                              Mansion Ingles Podcast October 2013 - Aprende gramática y vocabulario inglés   Hello once again and welcome to another Mansion Ingles podcast. This is podcast number 66 recorded for October 2013.   En el nivel básico practicamos las colacaciones de los verbos, y también un poco de vocabulario general. En el nivel intermedio estudiamos el uso de los verbos GET, GO y HAVE y también una selección de preguntas sobre la gramática. In the advanced section, we practise more advanced collocations, and there's business vocabulary as usual, and a translation exercise, all to help you improve your English and take it to the next level.   En los podcasts mensuales hablamos de los temas, vocabulario y ejercicios que salen en nuestro cuaderno mensual. Así podéis practicar la pronunciación y repasar el material del cuaderno. Si quieres recibir gratis el cuaderno cada mes, ver la trascripción de este podcast o leer los anteriores, ve a mansioningles.com y sigue los enlaces en la página principal.   Antes de empezar, quiero dar las gracias a todos nuestros seguidores en Facebook. Ya tenemos más de 30,000 fans y seguimos creciendo cada día. Si tienes alguna pregunta, comentario o duda sobre el inglés o simplemente quieres hacer ejercicios adicionales, puedes encontrarnos en facebook.com/mansioningles   Ok, let's start then with el nivel básico to make a noise - hacer un ruido - hacer se puede traducir como to make o to do, pero cuando va con el sustantivo a noise, decimos make a noise. Repite: make a noise. Shhh...don't make a noise they're sleeping. Who was making all that noise last night?   También decimos take photos Repite: take photos - How many photos did you take? I took hundreds of photos.   Estoy seguro que sabes que en inglés decimos drive a car or drive a bus or a taxi. Pero cuando hablamos de las motos, las bicicletas y los animales decimos ride - R-I-D-E Repite: to ride a bike, ride a horse, ride a motorbike. Can you ride a motorbike? Have you ever ridden a horse? I would love to ride an elephant. I rode a camel in Egypt.   ¿Cómo se traduce 'llevar gafas'? to wear glasses Repite; wear -wear glasses. I wear glasses - I've been wearing glasses for years. He's wearing a jacket - Are you wearing jeans? Luego tenemos la expresión to run for the bus. Repite: the bus - run for - run for the bus. I ran for the bus this morning.   ¿Como se dice suerte en inglés? - luck - Repite: luck - Luck es un sustantivo. ¿Cuál es el adjetivo? - lucky. Repite: Lucky. I'm lucky! Are you lucky? Are you a lucky person? I am. I think I'm very lucky.   El verbo to book significa reservar. For example you can book a room in a hotel. Repite: to book - to book a room. Can I book a room, please? I'd like to book a room. También puedes book a table in a restaurant. Repite: to book a table. Can I book a table, please? I'd like to book a table for two, please.   If you book a room in a hotel, you stay in the hotel. Repite: stay in the hotel. Where are you staying. Are you staying in a hotel?   ¿Cómo se dice mandar un correo electrónico en inglés? - to send an email. Repite: send an email. Did you send me an email? I'll send you an email. I'll send you an email next week.   Very good! - ¡Muy bien!   También en el nivel básico este mes hemos practicado un poco de vocabulario. Vamos a ver si te acuerdas de las palabras.     A dress, skirt, trousers, shirt, socks are all examples of.....clothes. Repite: clothes. I like your clothes. I need new clothes.   What do you cut your food with? You cut your food with a...... knife - K-N-I-F-E. Repite: Knife. knife and fork - knife, fork and spoon. Can I have a knife, please?   Spring, summer, autumn and winter are the four....seasons. Repite: seasons. What's your favourite season? I like spring and autumn. I think autumn is my favourite season. En el inglés americano, autumn se dice fall - F-A-L-L because the leaves, las ojas, caen de los arboles.   What do you usually drink tea and coffee and hot chocolate from? You drink tea and coffee from a ....cup. Not a glass, a cup. You drink Coca Cola from a glass, you drink beer from a glass. You drink tea and coffee from a cup. Repite: cup - a cup - a coffee cup - a tea cup. A cup of coffee. A cup of tea.   Now, what is the name of the part of the house where you cook? You cook in the ....kitchen. Repite: kitchen. Ten cuidado con la diferencia entre kitchen and chicken. Chicken is pollo.  Repite: kitchen - chicken - kitchen. We cook in the kitchen. The chicken's in the kitchen.   What's the name for the room where you usually have a shower, clean your teeth or wash your face? It's the bathroom. Repite: bathroom. Excuse me, where's the bathroom?     Ok good, now moving on to the intermediate section,   Listen: 'Have you ever been to this restaurant?’  - ‘No, this is the first time.’   'Have you been' is the present perfect tense. Listen: Have you been to New York? Has estado una vez en Nueva York? Repite: Have you been to New York? Have you been here before? Have you ever eaten Japanese food?   Listen: We don’t have to be at the meeting. 'Have to' is similar to 'must' for obligation. The difference is that 'must' is often external obligation (it comes from outside the speaker) and 'have to' can be the obligation you feel inside. For example, your boss says "Everyone must go to the meeting", so you feel you have to. The government says "you must pay your taxes" so we all have to pay our taxes. A mother tells her son that he 'must do his homework', so the son tells his friend "I can't play with you now because I have to do my homework. My mother says I have to do my homework."   Another difference of course is that 'have to' can change to the past: "I had to do my homework" and to the future "I will have to do my homework" or "I'll have to do my homework". We cannot say, X"I will must do my homework."X That's wrong!   Repeat: I'll have to work on Saturday. - I had to work late yesterday. Do we have to go to the meeting?   Listen to a different example from the same exercise: "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Listen again. Which verb tenses do you hear? "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Did is the past of do, so didn't remember is past simple. What about the second verb tense? I "had parked". Had + past participle is the past perfect tense. I had is often contracted to I'd. Repeat: I'd parked - I'd parked my car. I didn't remember - I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. (No recordaba dónde había aparcado el coche.) Repeat again: I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. - I didn't remember where I'd left my bag. I didn't remember what I'd said to her - I didn't remember what I'd done with my keys.   Escucha otro ejemplo y, como antes, piensa cuales son los tiempos verbales: I was sitting on the train when suddenly my mobile rang.   I was sitting - past continuous - my mobile rang - past simple. The sitting is the longer action. I was sitting before my mobile rang. I was sitting when my mobile rang, and I was sitting after my mobile rang. Repeat: I was sitting - I was sitting on the train - I was sitting on the train when my mobile rang. I was watching TV when I heard a noise. I was reading when you arrived. I was sleeping when you phoned.   Here's one more example from the same exercise. Listen: Exercising before breakfast is the best time if you want to burn calories. Why is 'exercising' a gerund in this sentence? Why is it verb + ing? Well, it's because we often use a gerund as the subject of the sentence. Repeat: Exercising is good for you. Smoking is bad for your health. Jogging is a popular pastime. Reading is something I don't do very often.   In the next exercise in this month's 'cuaderno', we looked at some expressions with the verbs get, go and have. Listen and repeat the sentences to practise pronunciation. Listen:                                                                 How many e-mails do you usually get? Repeat: usually get - do you usually get - How many? How many emails? - How many e-mails do you usually get?   Listen: Does she usually get drunk? Repeat: get drunk - usually - usually get drunk - Does she? - Does she usually get drunk?   Listen: Did you have a shower? Repeat: have a - have a shower - Did you? - Did you have a shower?   Listen: Did you go away for the summer? Repeat: the summer - for the summer - go away - go away for the summer - Did you - Did you go away for the summer?   Listen: Did you go anywhere nice? Repeat: nice - anywhere - anywhere nice - Did you go? Did you go anywhere nice?   Listen: What time did you get home? Repeat: get home - did you - did you get home - What time? - What time did you get home?   Listen: Do you always get up early? Repeat: early - get up early (nota como se junta el sonido final de /up/ con el sonido vocal al principio de /early/ - up early. Repeat: up early - get up early - Do you always? - Do you always get up early?   Listen: Did you go out on Saturday? Repeat: on Saturday - go out - go out on Saturday - Did you go out on Saturday?   Listen: Where did you did you get your phone? Repeat: your phone - get your phone - Where did you? - Where did you get? Where did you get your phone?   Listen: Where did you go for lunch? Repeat: lunch - for -  for lunch - go for lunch - Where did you? - Where did you go for lunch?   Listen: Who did you have dinner with yesterday? Repeat: have dinner with - have dinner with yesterday - Who did you? - Who did you have dinner with yesterday?   Siempre me ha gustado la idea de aprender inglés con videos. Por eso te recomendamos ABA English. Los videos de ABA English son muy profesionales y están muy bien hechos.    Además de las 144 clases gratuitas de gramática en vídeo, también tienes la posibilidad de probar la primera unidad de tu nivel (hay 6 niveles distintos) y realizar todas las secciones de esta unidad para probar su metodología única de aprendizaje.    Tú aprendes inglés viendo películas cortas con subtítulos, que ya es un método muy eficaz para aprender inglés,  pero también actúas en estas películas! Es muy divertido! En la misma unidad realizas ejercicios de speaking y role play actuando en el diálogo del cortometraje que has visto!   Los cortometrajes, con situaciones de la vida real, son la base de cada unidad del curso de inglés. Llevan incorporada la tecnología de reconocimiento de voz propia.  Echa un vistazo a los videos de ABA English.com. Puedes empezar los cursos gratis sin coste alguno y además con apoyo en español. Al empezar, tienes que facilitar una dirección de email y contestar algunas preguntas básicas, pero no es necesario que realices ningún pago. Pienso que si una empresa ofrece un producto gratis para probarlo es porque es bueno y la empresa cree en sus productos.   ¡Regístrate hoy y aprende inglés gratis con video, en casa y a tu ritmo. ABA English.com! Pruébalo no tienes nada de perder. In the advanced section this month, we looked at some more collocations. The first of which was to make the best of something which means to do as well as possible with something that is not too promising. Repeat: I'll make the best of it. I don't like it, but I'll make the best of it. we can also say 'make the most of it'. Repeat: make the most of it. Make the most of a bad situation. Make the most of a bad job. Make the most of your time in the UK. (¡aprovechadlo!)   Now, if you draw (someone’s) attention to something, you attract someone to notice or focus on someone or something. Repeat: draw your attention to - let me draw your attention to this wonderful painting. My attention was drawn to a small insect on the floor.   If you jump for joy you are extremely happy. Repeat: I jumped for joy when I got my exam results. When she agreed to have dinner with me I jumped for joy. The children jumped for joy when we got to Disneyland.   To draw out something means to make it longer than it needs to be. Repeat: to draw out a meeting. It wasn't necessary to draw out the meeting for so long. Why does he have to draw it out so much? Repeat: to draw out something.   If you make allowances (for something) you take certain facts or circumstances into consideration. Repeat: to make allowances for. When we go to the UK we should make allowances for the weather. You have to make allowances for the age of the property.   If you jump or are thrown in at the deep end, you start doing something new and difficult without help or preparation. Repeat: jump in at the deep end / thrown in at the deep end. I was thrown in at the deep end when I worked in a professional kitchen for the first time. You should jump in at the deep end and buy your first computer. Repeat: jump in at the deep end - I was thrown in at the deep end.   stand a chance (of doing something) is another popular collocation. It means there's a possibility. You have a chance that something will happen. Repeat: stand a chance - Do you think I stand a chance? Do I stand a chance of winning? No, I don't think you stand a chance to be honest! You don't stand a chance of getting that job.   Our last expression was to jump the gun which means to start before the starting signal. Guns used to be used to start a race. If you start before the gun goes 'bang' you jump the gun. Repeat: jump the gun. Don't jump the gun. Be patient! You're always jumping the gun. He apologised for jumping the gun.     In the Business English section this month we looked at some more business English vocabulary, and the first expression was to become head of something. This means to be in charge, to manage (ser el jefe). Repeat: She's head of sales. He's head of design. She became head of the company in March. Who's head of the department?   Let's discuss means vamos hablar de.... Repeat: let's discuss the sales figures. Let's discuss your role in the company. Let's discuss the release date of the new product.   outsourcing is subcontracting to an outside company. In Spanish, I think it's subcontratación o la externalización of a product or service. Repeat: outsourcing. Many companies are outsourcing their manufacturing. It's cheaper to outsource the work.   Finally, the phrasal verb to run on means to continue without stopping or go on longer than expected. Repeat. Run on. What's the past of run? - ran. Repeat: the meeting ran on. - The meeting ran on for nearly three hours. - The story ran on for months.   ¡Muy bien! - Very good!   We also gave you some more sentences to translate in this month's cuaderno. First, you had to translate from English to Spanish. So,  I'll say the English sentences and you say the Spanish translation before I do. Then, repeat the English sentence after me to practise pronunciation. Are you ready?   They didn’t want to stay here. - No querían quedarse aquí. Repite: They didn’t want to stay here. - stay here - to stay here - They didn’t want - They didn’t want to stay here.   Unemployment is increasing / rising / going up. - El paro está subiendo. Repite: Unemployment - Unemployment is increasing - rising - Unemployment is rising - going up - Unemployment is going up.   Don’t talk to me about economics. - No me hables de economía. Repite: economics - talk to me - Don't talk to me - Don’t talk to me about economics.   The economy is beyond our control.  - La economía está más allá de nuestro control. Repite: the economy - beyond our control - The economy is beyond our control.   How many beers do we have left? - ¿Cuántas cervezas nos quedan? Repite: left - have left - How many? How many beers? How many beers do we have left? How many beers do we have left?   Good, now I'll read some Spanish sentences and you translate to English before I do. Then repeat the sentences after me to practise your pronunciation. OK? ¿Quieres decir que ésta es la última? - Do you mean this is the last one? Repeat: the last one - this is the last one. Do you mean? - Do you mean this is the last one?   Habrá más vino. - There’ll be more wine. Repeat: more wine - There will - there'll - there will be - there'll be - There’ll be more wine.   Corrieron a la farmacia. - They ran to the pharmacy/chemist (UK) /drugstore (US) Repeat: They ran to - They ran to the pharmacy - They ran to the chemist - They ran to the drugstore.   ¿Por qué no querían quedarse? - Why didn’t they want to stay? Repeat: want to stay - Why didn't they? - Why didn’t they want to stay?   Dijeron que tenían muchas cosas que hacer. - They said they had a lot of things to do. Repeat: things to do - a lot of - a lot of things to do - They said they had - They said they had a lot of things to do. - They said they had a lot of things to do.   Well, I've got a lot of things to do also, so unfortunately that's the end of this podcast, but we'll be back with you next month as usual with another podcast based on our monthly newsletter, our cuaderno de inglés mensual. Remember, you can listen to all our previous podcasts at mansioningles.com and of course on iTunes.   Si te gustan nuestros podcasts, puedes ayudarnos con una corta reseña en iTunes contribuyendo así a que más personas puedan conocernos y escucharnos. Gracias a todos los que ya han escrito algún comentario. Thank you to all of you who are writing reviews.   Thank you very much for listening to this podcast, and for being part of the community of La Mansión del Inglés.   Remember, If you want to contact us you can find us on Facebook. Just search Facebook for La Mansión del Inglés where you can ask questions, make comments and do exercises and practise your listening. Or you can send me an email to: mansionteachers@yahoo.es. You can also follow us on Twitter where we tweet useful links to improve your English, English slang vocabulary, quotations and much more. Our Twitter name is MansionTwit.   Puedes ver el cuaderno mensual de este mes, y todos los cuadernos anteriores en www.cuadernodeingles.com/   Until next month then, keep practising and taking your English to the next level! Take care and bye for now!   The music in this month’s podcast is by Revolution Void, the album is The Politics of Desire and the track is called Outer Orbit.                                            

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  • How English Learning Can Help You to Travel the World

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmXF-Jspmig   Episode transcript below:   Hey there! What’s up? I’m really excited about today’s episode because I love to travel. We’re talking about world travel. Do you love to travel? Do you want to travel the world? Have you thought about how English can help take you around the world? You might have thought of this a little bit before. But in this episode, I’m going to share five reasons why I think English is the best tool to help you travel the world. First of all, English is the most widely spoken second language in the world. So I don’t mean that it’s the most spoken native language in the world. There’s actually, more non-native English speakers in the world than native speakers, which is super interesting to me, because that means that wherever you go, you’re going to be able to use English to connect with other people that could be from any country, really. They don’t have to be from an English-speaking country and you might find yourself speaking more English with other English learners than you ever imagined. And so, this concept of world English is very, very useful. It means that, yeah, you want to be able to communicate with people from all different countries, so you need to be able to speak clearly, to have a wide array of vocabulary so you can understand different situations. And you want to have cultural knowledge, right? So, a great way to do that is to build your vocabulary and clarify your pronunciation. So, again, the reason why English will help you to travel the world, the first reason, is that it is the number one second language in the world. Super useful! And in my travels, it’s been amazing. I’m so lucky to be able to speak English. I’m so lucky I’m a native English speaker because everywhere I go, from Thailand to Brazil, many, many people English and so they make it easy for me to travel. But if English is not your native language, then I encourage you to become fluent in it so that, wherever you go in the world, you can use it as a tool to communicate. And if you’re feeling like you want to be able to help other travelers that come to your city, it’s really awesome if you can use English to welcome foreigners in your country and to your city. So, English is just an awesome tool for that. So instead of learning all the languages of all the countries that you may want to visit, you can really optimize your time and effort by focusing on learning English. Now, I love learning languages. Don’t get me wrong. I’ve learned Spanish, Portuguese, some French, Japanese – I love learning languages, and I think that learning as many languages as possible is just something that makes life wonderful. So I totally encourage you to learn a lot of languages, learn about a lot of different cultures, because I know how amazing that is. It lets us see the world through different cultures’ eyes. But we only have so much time in life, right? We all just have, you know, 24 hours a day, right? So how many hours can you spend learning a language in your day? Maybe it’s a good idea, I think, to focus on English. And when you reach English fluency, then you could try other languages, too. Another reason why English is a great tool to help you travel the world is that it is the official language in sixty-five countries and territories around the world. And that doesn’t even include my country, the United States. Apparently, we don’t have an official language. But I would say that English is probably the best language to learn if you’re coming to the United States. Another interesting fact is that the number of US citizens with passports is increasing. It’s at an all-time high. So, you’ll be seeing more Americans traveling around the world, maybe to your home country. And of course, other native English speakers love to travel. And so it’s a great way to connect with foreigners coming to your city,

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  • Mansion Ingles Podcast July 2013 - Aprende gramatica y vocabulario ingles

    · 00:42:14 · Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free

    Aprender ingles gratis con La Mansion del Ingles. Un podcast para mejorar la gramatica, el vocabulario y la pronunciacion del ingles. Una leccion del ingles con ejemplos y ejercicios. Learn English free with podcasts from La Mansion del Ingles. Improve your grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. This English lesson contains examples and exercises. Hello once again and welcome to another Mansion Ingles podcast. This is podcast number 63 recorded for July 2013. Este mes, en el nivel básico practicamos los adverbios de frecuencia como always sometimes, never etc.   En el nivel intermedio enfocamos en las frases condicionales, los 'if' sentences y tenemos más ejemplos del vocabulario de la personalidad - character and personality. In the advanced section, we practise more advanced collocations, and there's business vocabulary as usual, and a translation exercise all to help you improve your English and take it to the next level. En los podcasts mensuales hablamos de los temas, vocabulario y ejercicios que salen en nuestro cuaderno mensual. Así podáis practicar la pronunciación y repasar el material del cuaderno. Si quieres recibir gratis el cuaderno cada mes, ver la trascripción de este podcast o leer los anteriores, vete a mansioningles.com y sigue los enlaces en la página principal. Ok, let's start then with el nivel básico. y los adverbios de frecuencia - adverbs of frequency. Voy a decir algunos adverbios en español, y tu dices la traducción en inglés antes que lo digo yo. Luego, repite la palabra en inglés para practicar la pronunciación. Ready? - ¿Listo? siempre - always casi siempre - almost always a menudo, frecuentemente - often generalmente, normalmente - usually (normally) a veces - sometimes   pocas veces, casi nunca - rarely (hardly ever) nunca - never Very good! ¡Muy bien! Ahora, escucha y repite algunos ejemplos con los adverbios anteriores: Escucha: I always have breakfast. Nota como el I y el always se juntan con un sonido en medio - I always. es el sonido /y/ como en las palabras yes, yesterday, yellow. Escucha y repite: always - yalways - Iyalways - I always have breakfast - I always have breakfast. Escucha: I never go shopping by bus. Repite: by bus - go shopping - go shopping by bus - I never go shopping by bus - I never go shopping by bus. Escucha: I sometimes read magazines. Repite: magazines - read magazines - I sometimes read magazines - I sometimes read magazines. Escucha: I rarely see English films. Repite: English films. - see English films - rarely - rarely - I rarely see - I rarely see English films. - I rarely see English films. Escucha: I often do exercise. Repite: do exercise. - often - often - I often do exercise. - I often do exercise. Escucha: I almost always have lunch at home. Repite: at home. - have lunch - have lunch at home. - almost always - almost always - I almost always have lunch at home. Nota que aquí también entre el I y el almost existe otra sonido /y/ Escucha: Iyalmost - Repite: Iyalmost - I almost always - I almost always - I almost always have lunch at home. Escucha: I hardly ever go to the cinema. Repite: the cinema. - go to the cinema. - hardly ever - la /h/ no se dice desde la garganza. No se dice "ch" hardly se dice /h/ hardly imaginate que estas limpiando las gafas. Escucha. /h/. Repite. /h/ hardly - hardly - hardly ever - hardly ever -  I hardly ever go to the cinema. - I hardly ever go to the cinema. Escucha: I don't usually have coffee. Repite: have coffee. (nota que se dice have coffee y no take a coffee. Tomar un cafe en inglés es have coffee.) Repite: have coffee - usually have coffee - I don't - I don't usually have coffee. - I don't usually have coffee. Escucha: I sometimes speak English. Repite: speak English. - I sometimes speak English. - I sometimes speak English. Escucha: I never speak French. Repite: speak French.- I never speak French - I never speak French Escucha: I rarely leave home before 8. Repite: rarely - rarely - I  rarely - I rarely leave home - I rarely leave home before 8.00. - before 8.00. - I rarely leave home before 8.00. - I rarely leave home before 8.00. Escucha: I often get up before 7. Repite: before 7 - get up - get up before 7. - I often (también aquí hay este sonido raro en medio). Escucha: Iyoften. Repite: Iyoften - I often get up - I often get up before 7. - I often get up before 7.   Ok, moving on to the intermediate section, we practised some conditional 'if' sentences. Listen: If I get home before 6, I’ll start making the dinner. Repeat: making the dinner. - I’ll start making the dinner. - If I get home before 6, - If I get home before 6, I’ll start making the dinner. - If I get home before 6, I’ll start making the dinner. Listen: If it doesn’t stop snowing, the flight might be cancelled. Repeat: might be cancelled. - the flight might be cancelled. - If it doesn’t stop snowing, the flight might be cancelled. - If it doesn’t stop snowing, the flight might be cancelled. Listen: If we don’t hurry, we’ll miss the last train. Repeat: the last train - we’ll miss the last train. - If we don’t hurry, we’ll miss the last train. - If we don’t hurry, we’ll miss the last train. Listen: If he doesn’t work harder, he won’t make any commission. Repeat: make any commission. - he won’t make any commission. - If he doesn’t work harder, he won’t make any commission. - If he doesn’t work harder, he won’t make any commission. Listen: If the film starts at 7, we’ll have time for dinner. Repeat: we’ll have time for dinner. - If the film starts at 7, we’ll have time for dinner - If the film starts at 7, we’ll have time for dinner Listen: If I help you, will you do me a favour? Repeat: do me a favour? - will you do me a favour? - If I help you, will you do me a favour? - If I help you, will you do me a favour?      Listen: If you aren’t very hungry, I’ll only make a salad. Repeat: make a salad. - I’ll only make a salad. - If you aren’t very hungry, I’ll only make a salad. - If you aren’t very hungry, I’ll only make a salad. ¡Muy bien! ¡Bien hecho! - Very very good! Now, also in the intermediate section this month we studied some adjectives of character and personality. Vamos a ver si recuerdas el vocabulario. What do you call a person who doesn’t notice what is happening around her/him and who very often forgets things? This kind of person is - absent-minded - despistado. Repeat: absent-minded. My dad's very absent-minded. He's always forgetting things. Actually, my girlfriend says the same thing about me. She says I'm absent-minded. You're as absent-minded as your dad!", she says. We can say in English "Like father, like son." which means you're the same as your dad. You're just like your dad. Repeat: Like father, like son. What's the name in English for someone who believes in his/her own values and abilities. - self-confident. Repeat: self-confident. Self-confident is the adjective. He's a very self-confident young man. What's the noun? self-confidence. Repeat: self-confidence - He's got a lot of self-confidence. He's full of self-confidence. A person who shows good sense and judgement. A practical and logical person is sensible. He's very sensible he's got a lot of sense. He's a sensible boy. Someone who is difficult to please because they only like a few things, or they like things in a particular way and will only accept exactly what they want is... fussy. Repeat: fussy. I'm quite fussy with some things. My mum's very fussy with her food. Do you say 'especial' in Spanish? Ella es muy especial con la comida - She's really fussy. Repeat: she's really fussy. She's such a fussy girl. She won't eat any vegetables. What do you call someone who will listen to you. A person who's ready to understand you and help you? This kind of person is sympathetic. Repeat: sympathetic. She's very sympathetic. What's the noun of sympathetic? Sympathy. I have absolutely no sympathy for you. Next, this type of person is determined and will not change her/his point of view even if he/she is wrong. Stubborn (tozudo). Repeat: stubborn. He's a stubborn man - my boss is so stubborn. He never admits being wrong or making a mistake. A similar word is obstinate. You're so obstinate.           A person who changes temperament and has a variable character, the kind of person who can be happy one minute and miserable, annoyed and depressed the next minute is called a.......moody person. - malhumorado - Repeat: moody. Don't be so moody. Cheer up! Someone who doesn’t like being the centre of attention and feels uncomfortable with others. This person is not typically very sociable. Do you know?- shy - timido o timida - repeat - shy. I'm really quite shy. I am! I'm a shy person. Somebody who is always smiling, optimistic and in a good mood is cheerful - repeat: cheerful - You're very cheerful today. She's a cheerful, happy person. And finally, what do you call somebody who tries to hurt or upset people on purpose, someone who doesn't care about how these people feel. A cruel person. Repeat: cruel - don't be cruel. You're such a cruel person. OK, listen to the adjectives again and repeat them after me to practise pronunciation. absent-minded self-confident sensible fussy sympathetic stubborn moody shy cheerful cruel Moving on! In the advanced section, we looked at some more collocations. The first of which was to meet a deadline. Deadline is fecha límite and to meet a deadline is cumplir con la fecha de entrega. Por ejemplo: Will you be able to meet the deadline? repeat: meet the deadline - Can you meet the deadline. They were unable to meet our deadline. To shed a tear is another way to say to cry. Be careful with the word tear because the spelling, T-E-A-R is the same as the verb to tear (arrancar). Listen to the difference in the pronunciation: tear and tear. Tear is lagrima. Repeat: tear - to shed a teat. Don't shed any tears for me. The next collocation was to cast light on (something). To cast means lanzar, echar. So to cast light on something simply means to throw or put light on a situation or a problem. Someone who casts light on a situation provides an explanation for it or information that makes it easier to understand. Repeat: to cast light on something. As a lawyer, he was able to cast some light on the problem. Another thing you can cast is a net, una red, as fishermen do. Metaphorically speaking, if you cast your net wider you look in a larger area. If we don't get many interesting candidates this time round we may have to cast our net a little wider. You can also cast doubt on something si tienes una duda sobre algo. The police cast doubt on his story. They didn't really believe him. Repeat: to cast doubt. They cast doubt on his story. Another collocation with cast is to cast a shadow. shadow is sombra, and my students often ask me the difference between shadow and shade, because in the dictionary, shade is also sombra. Well, shadow is the dark shape that the sun makes when it shines on an object. So, if you walk along the street on a sunny day you see your shadow on the ground. But shade is an area that the sun doesn't get to. It has no clear shape. You can sit in the sun or in the shade. On very hot days in Valencia, I prefer to sit in the shade. Shade is an uncountable noun. Shadow is a countable noun. The old house was full of dark shadows. Repeat: Shade - to sit in the shade. Let's sit in the shade. Shadow - to cast a shadow - That building is casting a long shadow on the ground. Another collocation with cast is to cast your mind back, which is when you try to remember something. Repeat: cast your mind back - cast your mind back to when we first met. Cast your mind back is usually followed by 'to'. "Cast your mind to when..." or "Cast your mind back to the time when..." or "Cast your mind back to September of 2012. The first collocation we looked at was to meet a deadline. Also with the verb meet we can say to meet your match. If you have met your match you have met someone who is equal to you or able to defeat you in some way. Repeat: to meet your match - He finally met his match when he was beaten by a computer. Another thing you can meet is disaster.  He met with disaster as the rope snapped and he fell to his death. You can meet with disaster and with triumph and in the famous poem 'If' by Rudyard Kipling: "If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster and treat those two impostors just the same." If you compromise with someone, we can say that you meet them halfway. Repeat: to meet someone halfway. I think we should meet them halfway on this. I won't give in completely, but I'll meet you halfway. To shed a load is an expression often used when a lorry or truck loses the load it's carrying by accident and it drops it all over the motorway or highway. Notice that lorry and motorway are British English terms, while truck and highway are more common in American English. Repeat: to shed a load. A lorry shed its load on the M25 this morning during the rush hour. If you bleed we can say that you shed blood. To shed blood can also mean to kill in a violent way. No blood was shed during the revolution. Repeat: to shed blood. A lot of blood was shed when the rebels took the village. Listen to the collocations and expressions again and repeat them after me: meet a deadline shed a tear shed light on (something) cast a net cast doubt on (something) meet your match shed a load meet with disaster cast a shadow cast your mind back meet (someone) halfway shed blood In the Business English section we looked at some more business English vocabulary, and the first word was tangible (something real or concrete - tangible). Repeat: tangible. We didn't see any tangible benefits. There were no tangible differences. To reap - R-E-A-P is a verb and an agricultural term. It means cosechar, recoger. If you reap the benefits of a situation you get the benefit - cosechar los frutos, you profit from something. Repeat: to reap the benefits. I hope that we can reap the benefits in the future. You can also reap the rewards and reap the profits. If you measure up (to someone or something) you compare well to someone or something. Repeat: to measure up - He just doesn't measure up to Sarah in intelligence. - This meal doesn't measure up to my expectations. Do you think he'll measure up to the job? Tech support is technical support or servicio técnico. Repeat: tech support. If you need help, contact tech support. The tech support team is familiar with the ins and outs of a device. They are able to troubleshoot most problems that a user experiences. Technical support may be provided over the phone, through email, or with a live-chat interface. If you see eye to eye with someone, you are in agreement with them. Repeat: to see eye to eye. I think we see eye to eye on this - We never saw eye to eye on this question. We don't really see eye to eye on this issue. We just can't seem to agree on it. Our last expression was to write someone or something off. It's a phrasal verb. To write off. To write off means to drop something from consideration, to give up on something. For example, we're not making any money on this product. In fact, we're losing money! I think we should write it off. In the Spanish dictionary, it says descartar o declarar siniestro total - to write off. I'm sure they'll recover. Let's not write them off just yet. We also gave you some more sentences to translate in this month's cuaderno. First, you had to translate from English to Spanish. So,  I'll say the English sentences and you can say the Spanish translation. Then, repeat the English sentence after me to practise your pronunciation. Ready? It rained all night. - Llovió toda la noche. - It rained all night. Repeat: - It rained all night. I haven't had this much fun since the Eighties. - No me he divertido tanto desde los años ochenta. Repeat: - since the Eighties - this much fun  - this much fun since the Eighties. - I haven't had - I haven't had this much fun since the Eighties. You're the prettiest girl in this bar. - Eres la chica más bonita en este bar. - Listen: You're the prettiest girl in this bar. Repeat: - the prettiest girl - the prettiest girl in this bar - You're the prettiest girl in this bar. I can't really speak Spanish; I only learned a few phrases from a website. Realmente no puedo hablar español; solo aprendí unas frases de una página web. Listen: - I can't really speak Spanish. Repeat: - I can't really speak Spanish. I only learned a few phrases from a website. - from a website. - learned a few phrases - I only learned a few phrases - I only learned a few phrases from a website. It was such a boring meeting that I fell asleep. - Fue una reunión tan aburrida que me dormí. Repeat: I fell asleep. - a boring meeting - It was such a boring meeting - It was such a boring meeting that I fell asleep. Good, now I'll read some Spanish sentences and you translate to English. Then, repeat the sentences after me to practise your pronunciation. OK? Este pastel es suya, ¿no? (de él) - This cake is his, isn’t it? Repeat: This cake is his, isn’t it? - This cake is his, isn’t it? La habitación de mi hermana está allí. - My sister’s room is over there. Repeat: over there - My sister’s room is over there. - My sister’s room is over there. ¿Quién lo pisó? - Who stepped on it? Repeat: - Who stepped on it? Perdía el vuelo. - I missed the flight Repeat: - I missed the flight Así es la vida. - That’s life! Repeat: - That’s life! Well, that's all we have time for on this podcast, but we'll be back with you next month as usual with another podcast based on our monthly newsletter, our cuaderno de inglés mensual. Remember, you can listen to all our previous podcasts at mansioningles.com and on iTunes. Si te gusta este podcast, puedes hacernos un gran favor y escribe por favor una corta reseña en iTunes. Si escribes una reseña en iTunes más personas pueden escucharnos porque subimos en el 'ranking' de iTunes. Y también puedes darnos algunas estrellas, si te gusta nuestros podcasts. Thank you very much for listening to this podcast, and for being part of the community of La Mansión del Inglés. Remember, If you want to contact us you can find us on Facebook. Just search Facebook for La Mansión del Inglés and join our growing community of more than 25,000 fans. Or send me an email to: mansionteachers@yahoo.es. You can also follow us on Twitter. Our Twitter name is MansionTwit. Puedes ver el cuaderno mensual de este mes, y todos los cuadernos anteriores en www.cuadernodeingles.com/ Until next month then, keep practising and taking your English to the next level! Take care and bye for now! The music in this month’s podcast is by Revolution Void, the album is The Politics of Desire and the track is called Outer Orbit.                                            

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  • Never Say These 5 Phrases to Your English Teacher

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

      Episode transcript below:   Shh! I have a secret to tell you. But you cannot tell your English teacher! In this episode, I’m going to share the five things that you should never say to your English teacher, even if you’re thinking them. So is it okay? Can I share them? Can we keep it a secret? Okay. Awesome! Just before I share these five phrases, I want to let you know that you can come to gonaturalenglish.com and I have a free training for you. The Seven Steps to Fluency Training will help you start improving your English – now, today, immediately! So, be sure to check that out. Now, I want to share these five things to never say to your English teacher. First of all, never, ever, ever say, “I’m too busy to study.” Why? Maybe it’s true. Maybe you’re really busy. But why should we not say this? “I’m too busy to study.” Well, we’re all busy. Teachers, especially, are super busy. So, I’m not sure if your teacher would feel sorry for you. Maybe. But the thing is, we make time for our priorities. So, if you do want to improve your English, you have to make it a priority and give it some time in your day. Okay. Number two: Never ever say, “Yes, I understand,” if you don’t understand. This is very important for you because it doesn’t help anyone to lie. If you don’t understand something, it’s much better to say, “I don’t understand. Could you explain? Could you help me?” Teachers usually like to help their students and, of course, it’s better for you to have a full understanding of the point or the phrases that you didn’t really understand. So, I know it can be a little embarrassing sometimes to say, “I don’t understand,” but it’s okay. Just understand it’s a good thing to ask for help. So, don’t be shy to do that. Okay, the third thing that you should never say to your English teacher is anything not in English. I’ve had students come up to me and ask me questions in their native language – like in Japanese. And my Japanese is not very good and I couldn’t respond in Japanese to my students’ question. Actually, English class is a time for English. So do everything in English. Do not revert to your native language. This is a time for you to try out new things, to make mistakes. So go ahead and even if you’re not sure or you’re not comfortable about how to say something in English, just try it in class. It’s a great time to experiment. Okay, next. Another thing that you should never say to your English teacher is, “I’ll never use this tense.” Okay, a lot of people don’t like to learn grammar, right? It can be boring. It can be dry. But just understand that your English will sound so much better if you use the compound tenses. So, you can probably communicate just fine if you use simple tenses, but if you want to sound like a professional in English, like you’re fluent in English, then you need to know all the tenses and you’ll definitely find times when you can use them. Finally, the last thing that you should never say to your English teacher is, “Since I only need to write emails, I don’t need to learn how to speak in English.” Or it could be vice versa. Maybe you might say, “Oh, I only want to learn to speak, so I don’t need to learn how to write.” Well, this is not really a good idea to tell your English teacher, because your English teacher wants to help you with your all-round fluency. And in order to have really good English fluency, you need to know all the skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking. Now, if you’re doing more speaking than writing, you could focus more on those skills. Like at Go Natural English, I focus mainly on listening and speaking because those are the skills that help you to connect with people on a daily basis. Of course, you want to use writing and reading every day, too. But it’s really important to know each skill and then you can focus on learning what you like according to your goals. Alright!

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  • Fluency in 15 Minutes a Day – Go Natural English Book Release News

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

    Are you able to learn to speak and understand American English? Gabby says that while English is a crazy language, if you have the ability to speak, you can learn other languages beside your native language, including English. It is well worth the effort as English is spoken around the world. With Gabby’s release of the Go Natural English book, you will have at your disposal a wonderful tool to make the most of your American English journey. Along with the book, when you visit gonaturalenglish.com you will be introduced to materials and support to help you with your learning. Don’t be afraid to explore the Go Natural English method and see how you can reinforce your language skills, while at the same time meeting other American English learners with whom you can communicate.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6RtqHdMX7M   Episode transcript below: Hello, and welcome to Go Natural English. I am so excited to announce the release of the Go Natural English book. This book will share with you the natural way of learning language. I’m Gabby Wallace, your American English teacher and Number One fluency coach. And I’m here to share special strategies I’ve developed for learning the English language. English is a crazy language, but I believe it is possible for anyone to learn it, and that includes you. It’s our natural ability to be able to use language to communicate with each other, and if you can speak your native language, then you can speak English. In the book you’ll learn strategies for speaking English with confidence and fluency. You’ll see real examples from native speaker conversations broken down into lessons that you can easily understand, and vocabulary that you can use in your everyday conversations. I believe this book is the perfect guide for the intermediate English learner who desires to become fluent and confident to use English as a tool in your daily life, to live the life that you want, an international life where you’re connecting with people from all over the world, and you’re using English as a tool to be able to pursue your passion, and your professional life. So, if you’d like to find out more about the book, come to gonaturalenglish.com/book – that’s b-o-o-k. I’ll see you there. Bye for now. The post Fluency in 15 Minutes a Day – Go Natural English Book Release News appeared first on Go Natural English.

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  • Step 7 for Fluent English Listening and Speaking

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

    The seventh step to fluency with the Go Natural English method is to repeat, review, and grow. What does this mean? Well, as you learn you should be repeating what you have learned to reinforce it in your mind. Throughout your English learning experience you should also continue to review the materials. As you blend the new materials with the information that you already know, you will see that your path to fluency becomes quicker and easier. As you review and repeat the material, you will be surprised at your growth in English.   At Go Natural English, Gabby wants you to have all the materials, support, and practice that you need to become a successful American English speaker.  Try to watch and listen to as many English videos and podcasts as you can. In addition to that, push yourself to read more and try writing simple sentences at first, and then gradually create larger sentences and turn them into paragraphs.   Languages are living, changing entities and learning a language should be an adventure. Seek out native American English speakers and talk to them. Find newspapers, magazines, and books to read that challenge your skills a little bit. Listen to music and American English shows so you can learn to imitate the sounds. You can do it!   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b__tVWdkx2Q   Episode transcript below:   And welcome to Step 7 of the 7 Steps to Fluency with the Go Natural English method. Step 7 is to review, repeat, and grow. You want to review the vocabulary, and the phrases, and everything that you’re learning in English. You want to repeat the other six steps that I mentioned before, and you want to continue to grow with your English skills. Find different ways of expressing yourself. Find synonyms; find related words or antonyms, the opposite of the words that you’ve just learned. The beautiful thing about learning a language is that you can continue to evolve with the language. You can continue to develop your skills. It is an ongoing, living adventure and that is so exciting. I hope that you enjoy continually developing your skills with the English language. It is a real pleasure to be able to do that throughout life, and I want to give you the tools and the guidance to become a lifelong independent learner, so that English becomes your tool that you are constantly using and improving on. I want English to become your tool for a wonderful, successful, enjoyable, and meaningful life. So, thank you for being a part of the Go Natural English community. I’m so happy to have shared the 7 Steps to Fluency with you. Please come back and see me again at gonaturalenglish.com and I hope to see you become part of the premium Go Natural English course. Thanks so much for watching and I hope to see you again real soon. Bye for now. Hey guys, one last thing before you go. I’d like to share all seven of the Go Natural English steps to fluency with you in a free mini course. You’ll receive all the videos, all the audio, and transcripts of everything if you come to gonaturalenglish.com/7steps, that’s the number 7 s-t-e-p-s. Alright, I hope to see you there so that I can share this awesome English learning material with you to help you get fluent. So, let’s go I’ll see you there. The post Step 7 for Fluent English Listening and Speaking appeared first on Go Natural English.

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  • Academic English Vocabulary - AIRC87

    · 01:00:33 · Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free

    If you are a new listener to this award-winning podcast, welcome! I'm Craig. I’m Reza. With over 40 years of teaching between us, we'll help you improve your English and take it to the next level.(Grow your grammar, vocalize your vocabulary and perfect your pronunciation) In this episode: Academic English   Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/  More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/    Thank you to JUAN LEYVA GALERA who has become a Patron of this show. If you would like to support us and help us to our goal of $100 per month to give you transcriptionsof Aprender Ingles con Reza y Craig, go to patreon.com/inglespodcast Elisa from Finland sent us a message for the Christmas episode inglespodcast/82. ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/12/20/reza-and-craigs-christmas-special-airc82/ ) She said "you guys sang surprisingly well" - She also gave some inside information on Santa's sleigh and recommends people visit the website santapark.com. Elisa said, "Santa Claus lives here in the Santa Park with Mrs Claus and Elves!"(I thought it was "Elvis"!) We also have a voice message from our good friend Mamen from Biescas. She listened to episode 81 about British and American English pronunciation differences : inglespodcast.com/81 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/12/13/british-and-american-english-pronunciation-differences-airc81/ ). Here is Mamen practising the different pronunciation of US and UK English…… There are reasons why Mamen is improving her English:-She’s engaging with the language.-She’s taking the time to practise speaking, record her voice, coming on Blab. (inglespodcast.com/blab)-She’s enthusiastic about learning. Listener Feedback: Jesús VélezHi Craig and Reza! Thanks for your podcast, I think it's fantastic. It's a huge help for "travelers" (commuters): my journey from my home to job (work) is about 120 km (1 hour...). I use your podcast to take my English to the next level. Currently, I'm preparing my C1. Would you mind to speak (speaking) about academic English? For example keywords I must use in the university with some colleagues, research concepts (paper, article, stay, fellowship...) I think there's a lot of material on the internet, but it's a disaster... There's no order at all. Thanks in advance (excuse me for my poor English) and continue with the programs!Kind regards, Jesús Vélez   ACADEMIC ENGLISH Academic English style is generally evident in a:Journal (like a technical/academic magazine); Text book; Essay; Academic article; Report; Dissertation; Thesis; etc. WRITTENLecture; Talk; Workshop; Presentation; Tutorial; Seminar; Conference; etc. SPOKEN Different style of language compared to General English. Key features include: More abstract, more impersonal, more structured, more organised, usually formal (written), often more technical, often more complex, avoids ambiguity, may include references to other sources. -Avoid personal pronouns, eg. I, me, you, us, etc. -Use the Passive (to be impersonal): eg. the liquid was heated to 20 degrees C; it can be seen that the species evolved. -Avoid contractions in written academic Eng., but usually OK spoken:eg. It will not be resolved (not “won’t”); the conclusions are not definitive (not “aren’t”) -Nominalisation = using nouns rather than verbs. This sounds more academic:eg. “...the Norman invasion of Britain in 1066, provoking a huge linguistic change.” is better than “...when the Normans invaded Britain in 1066 and it provoked a huge change.” -Use plenty of linking words or signpost your discourse: eg. Firstly; Secondly; Next; A further point; Finally; Lastly - LISTING Moreover; In addition (to); Additionally; Furthermore; What is more - ADDING INFO. However; Nevertheless; Nonetheless; Despite; In spite of; Whereas; Whilst; Although; Albeit; Notwithstanding; Be that as it may; On the other hand - CONTRAST/CONCESSION For example/instance; As an/one example; As exemplified by___; To illustrate - EXAMPLE According to Smith (1987); As Smith (1987) said; Smith (1987) wrote/stated - REFERENCE In conclusion; To conclude; To sum up; In brief; All in all; In short - CONCLUSION   Italki ad - Reza’s experience with a French teacher, Justine.   Common university campus terms: There are usually several departments in one faculty eg. the Department of Physics in the Science Faculty bachelor’s degree; master’s degree - comes after or is longer than a bachelor’s degree eg. She has a BA (Bachelor of Arts) in History; He’s doing an MSc in Mathematics (Master of Science) at Oxford. a doctorate or PhD - the highest post-graduate uni. qualification, requiring a few years of study, research and a doctoral thesis an undergraduate - a student studying on a bachelor’s (first) degree course a graduate - a person who has completed a bachelor’s degree course a post-graduate - a person who is studying on a higher course after passing their first degree a fellow - someone who (temporarily) teaches/researches (and perhaps still studies on a post-graduate course) at a university, but not a full lecturer a fellowship - the job given to a fellow a lecturer - a person who gives lectures at a university a professor - an experienced, distinguished, more senior lecturer (NOT the same as teacher) a grant - money given by the govt. to help support students throughout the year, depending on their financial situation a scholarship - money given by a university/college/school/company to a student because they won it or are poor but talented. halls of residence - official university accommodation on campus, usually a large block vice-chancellor (VC)- the top person in charge of a university (the dean in a North American college) pro-vice-chancellor (PVC)/deputy-vice-chancellor (DVC) - second in command, under the vice-chancellor higher education (HE) - tertiary-level education, ie. higher than primary and secondary education eg. university, college, medical school, etc. For the most common vocabulary used to study at HE level, the Academic Word List:http://ksngo.org/images/download/LDOCE_AWL.pdf Reza has taught Academic English at Queen’s University, Belfast and the University of Ulster. Here are a few well known books he has used:http://www.amazon.com/Writing-Academic-English-Edition-Longman/dp/0131523597 http://www.amazon.com/Presenting-English-Successful-Presentations-Updated/dp/1111832277 http://www.cambridge.org/us/cambridgeenglish/catalog/english-academic-purposes/academic-vocabulary-use/academic-vocabulary-use-answersAn example unit from the book:http://assets.cambridge.org/97805216/89397/excerpt/9780521689397_excerpt.pdf A great place to listen to talks and lectures on just about any (academic) topic:https://www.ted.com/talks ...and now it's your turn to practise your English. We want you to tell us if you have had experience of academic English. Have you been to university? Do you have a degree? Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. speakpipe.com/inglespodcast (90 seconds - need an app for mobile) Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.Please show us some iTunes love. Write a review, give us some stars on iTunes.If you do that, we become more visible and more people can find us. Show us some love. On next week's episode: The Past Continuous The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later' Please show us some iTunes love. Write a review, give us some stars on iTunes.If you do that, we become more visible and more people can find us. Show us some love.   Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/  More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/     On next week's episode: The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

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  • The Ultimate Guide to Fluency in English Conversation

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jFv88ZK5Zs     Episode transcript below:   Hello! How’s it going? Welcome to the Ultimate Guide to Fluency in the English language. This is without a doubt the best place to learn how to become fluent in English and what not to do, things to avoid on your journey to fluency. I have an extensive, exhaustive list of what to do and what not to do to become fluent in English that I have to look down at my laptop to remember everything. So, let’s get started with the first and possibly most important tip right away. You need to become an independent and motivated English learner. Without proactive action on your part, you cannot become fluent. You cannot rely on other people to tell you what to do. You have to be motivated on your own as an independent learner to become fluent in English. So, this is about your mind set. Before you even touch a textbook or watch a lesson, you need to be motivated and independent to become fluent in English. Next, know your goals. What do you want to learn in English? Do you want to know English to become a doctor? Or do you want to know English for general conversation? Your goal will determine what you study. Next, change your thinking. You have to consider yourself an English speaker from the beginning, from the get-go. Don’t consider yourself an English learner or a student of English. Start thinking of yourself now, from today, as an English speaker. Next, find a conversation partner. You need to practice whether it’s with a tutor teacher or a friend who will help you to practice. You could find a conversation partner which means someone who wants to learn your native language in exchange for helping you with English. Now, there’s a lot of sites on-line where you can find an on-line conversation partner. Or if you’re lucky enough to live in a city with a lot of English speaker, or you could find an in-person face-to-face language exchange partner. Next… Next, my computer should turn back on. Okay. Get more out of listening to English. Don’t just focus on the meaning of the words you hear, but listen to how the words are set. Listen carefully to pronunciation, intonation, stress, and how we use English as native speakers. Next, don’t stress out. If you make a mistake, just keep going. This is so important. Relax and enjoy your journey to fluency. Have fun with it. Don’t stress out. If you make a mistake, just let it go. Next, try keeping a speaking journal. This is a great strategy to practice and also to see your improvement over time. You could keep your speaking journal on your smartphone or another device when you can record. And try speaking a little bit every day recording yourself and listening to it later on to check and see how you can improve and how you are improving. Next, practice common sentence structures. Learn phrases that will be useful for your conversations in English. It could include, for example, ‘I think that’, ‘It’s interesting that’, ‘I find it’, ‘It’s better to’ and so on. You need to review, review, review, review. This is super important. Don’t expect yourself remember everything the first time that you learn it. Unless you’re some kind of superhero, it’s just not something that you should expect yourself to do, to be able to remember everything that first time. We have to repeat, reuse, review, reflect. Use it and recycle it to remember it. All right, next, we need to learn to think in English. You have to begin to use English in every way you can, and that begins with your thoughts. So,

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  • Why English is so Difficult and 7 Steps to Fluency in Listening and Speaking

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

    Listen up! I want to tell you about an exciting offer that Gabby is making for the Go Natural English community to help build confidence and English fluency. In the coming weeks there will be a series of YouTube videos released regarding steps to fluency in listening and speaking.   You will not want to miss this if you are serious about improving your American English language skills. Go natural English is dedicated to teaching you how American English is actually spoken, not just the rules of grammar that so many courses teach.   Be sure to visit gonaturalenglish.com to find out about all of the resources and support available to you regarding the learning of American English. This is a great opportunity to share your adventures with other English language learners. Stop by and leave a comment, or ask a question. Just remember, there are many people out there in the same boat as you who want to be able to communicate in English to improve their fluency. Don’t be afraid to make contact with them.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0t4eA-CkgEU   Episode transcript below:   Hey. How’s it going? I’m Gabby Wallace, your American English teacher and today I’m not in a recording studio. Today I’m coming to you from the shore of the Bosphorus River. You can see behind me. I hope it’s not too distracting but this is the best place – kind of quiet – where I could make a quick English tip and update for you today. So, in this quick tip, I want to talk about why it’s difficult to become fluent in English and what the answer is. How to become fluent in English. I get this question so much. How can I become fluent in English? What should I do? Well, I think the biggest problem is that in most English classes we don’t start with steps or formula, or instructions. You know how when you get a new – it could be a new toy, it could be a new piece of furniture, it could be a new game – you usually read the instructions or maybe a friend tells you how to play the game. But you need to know the rules in order to play the game, and for me, that’s a lot like learning English. I mean, in my mind it really helps me to know the rules before I play a game, and learning a language to me is a lot like playing a game. So, what I’d like to do with you over the next seven quick English tips, back-to-back, I’m going to share my seven steps for English fluency. These are steps that I made for the Go Natural English community, for you, to show you exactly the rules of the game – How to become fluent in English. So, it’s kind of detailed, so, I want to take it one step at a time. Now, if you would like the video, audio, and the text – all of the subtitles for all seven steps, come to gonaturalenglish.com/7steps. That’s the number 7 s-t-e-p-s, and you can download all of that with one click. I want you to come visit so, I would love to share that valuable resource with you to help you improve your fluency. I’m going to keep this really quick but for today what I want you to remember is that it’s really important to understand the rules of the game if you want to win it. Okay, so that’s what we’re going to do with English – with our seven steps to fluency over the next few days. This is a really valuable series that I’m sharing with you that could be its own course but I want to offer it free for you to help you as much as I can. So, come on over and grab the video, audio, and text for all seven or you can wait over the next week or two weeks, I believe, it’ll take some time since we’re on a Monday, Wednesday, Friday release for quick tips. You can wait and you can watch the videos separately, the audio separately, and read the subtitles as you watch the videos on YouTube, or you can come over to gonaturalenglish.

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  • Learn Fluent American English: Must vs Have to

    · Go Natural English Podcast | How to Speak Fluent E

    Learning English is not easy, but can be both fun and challenging. You must have heard people talk of their own experiences and struggles trying to become fluent in English. There are so many little words and phrases that can either make you sound more natural, or less natural, depending on how you use them. Everybody wants to sound like a native speaker and that takes effort and perseverance.   In these American English language tips Gabby provides hints and suggestions on how to sound less stiff and more native-like. If you want to achieve success at American English fluency, you have to listen to as much American English as you can, whether it be music, radio, or television programs. You should also take advantage of all the resources that Gabby makes available to you.   Make sure you visit gonaturalenglish.com and get a free eBook guide and don’t be afraid to join some of the many English language conversations that are going on. Almost everybody there has been nervous at one time or another about being embarrassed by their accents, or vocabulary, or grammar. The Go Natural English community is there to support you and encourage you along the way to American English fluency.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUIQH410Rsc   Episode transcript below:   Hello there! How are you doing? Welcome to Go Natural English. In this video tip we’re going to take a great question from Paolo. Paolo asked, “What is the difference between ‘Must’ and ‘Have to?’” Paolo, I love this question because the confusion I think comes from traditional – I was going to say “bad.” I don’t want to say “bad” – I don’t like passing judgment but you know what? Bad! Bad traditional English lessons that are too focused on grammar and that don’t look at real, natural conversational use of English – at least American English. Remember, I’m your American English teacher so I’m talking always about American English. So, “Must” and “Have to” according to the grammar books are very similar. They mean the same thing, right? Kind of like “Should – You should do something” – it’s a suggestion but more powerful, right? So, here’s the catch. What your grammar books don’t tell you is that we really only use “Must” when we’re talking about probability. This is how we really use “Must” in conversation – in daily use. You know how I know when someone hasn’t had enough exposure to real English is when they use “Must” to suggest something. Like “You must go to bed at 8 PM because it is good to go to bed early.” Okay, thanks. It sounds really unnatural. You could say in a better, more natural way “You should” or “You have to go to bed at 8 PM” right? That’s really early I don’t know why I said 8 PM. Oh, another dead giveaway that you really haven’t had much exposure to natural English is if you say, “Ought to.” “You ought to go to bed at 8 PM.” Now, actually I should take that back because I think people might say that in other countries like maybe British English but like I said – disclaimer – I am teaching American English. I am American. I have very little exposure to British English so keep that in mind. Okay, so “Must” is used for probability, not suggestions. In real life, okay, I’m talking about real-life usage so, “You must have” so we always use – I shouldn’t say always but most of the time we use “Must” and “Have” together. “Oh, you must have read the weather report; you brought your umbrella, so you know it’s going to rain.” Wonderful, okay? “Oh, you must have gone to bed at 8 PM last night because you’re looking so handsome today” – so, probability, right. We use “Must have” to show probability which is not actually discussed that often in traditional English classes.

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