gym

  • 00:40:01

    Owing A Training Facility w/ Matt Gary & Paulie Steinman

    · The Reactive Training Systems Podcast

    Mike: Today we’re going to be talking about what it’s like to own a gym. Matt you already mentioned having the doors open at your place, it sounds like SSPT is a no-AC kind of place.   Matt: We joke that we provide a free sauna in july and august. It can be hot but we find that most people like to be warm while they train. We try to keep the door open when people train. It lets the sunshine in and gives people the opportunity to walk in and out. Since we are only 2000 square feet, it makes the gym feel bigger.   Mike: Both of you own gyms. Matt you own SSPT, and Paulie you own South Brooklyn Weightlifting Club. Matt when did you start SSPT?   Matt: We opened our doors in January 2009, so we’ve been in business for around 6 years now. The idea was born prior to that and it took us almost an entire calendar year to   Mike: Paulie what about you, when did SBWC become a real thing.   Paulie:  Becca and I had a screen-printing business and it started out of my own personal need to find a place where I could train the way I wanted to train. It’s very similar to SSPT in that we’re only about 3000 square feet. It’s kind of funny, we keep the garage doors open and in the winter, we’ve had the problem of people learning how to actually get in the gym when it gets cold out.   Mike: So it kind of evolved from your need to find space to train. Matt do you have a similar story?   Matt: Souix-z and I were training out of another facility and the owner allowed us to commandeer a corner of the gym where we did train. We started growing out of that space and we desparately wanted to start doing our own thing. We thought, we can do this better on our own and we can set our own expectations with our equipment and just do it our way. Out of that corner we wanted to expand a little bit.   Mike: Although we’ve been saying gyms, they aren’t really gyms in the traditional sense, but rather they are more like barbell clubs.   Paulie: Yes absolutely. We have to take time to differentiate by saying that we’re more of a training facility participating in two primary sports: Olympic weightlifting and powerlifting. It’s worked for us to be able to explain in that way. People generally understand.   Matt: I agree with Paulie completely here. I use the analogy that there are 9 other fitness facilities and we really aren’t competing with them because we are the only niche market game in town for what we do. People are completely polarized one way or another. We are exclusive with what we offer and what we don’t offer. People are attracted by our attention to detail, coaching, and equipment. And that either exactly what they want or they are completely blown out of the water and they want the sauna and the juice bar and that’s not what we are about, so we send them on their merry way down the road.   Mike: I think that is a really good point and important for any business is to have a good idea who your clientele really are. If you are in a spot where you can’t appreciate that we have Eleiko plates and you want to play squash then this just isn’t for you.   Paulie: It’s much easier for us as well. We’ve clearly defined ourselves for what we are and what we are not. We’re surrounded by CrossFit gyms and rock climbing gyms, an archery center, a fencing center, two chain gyms in addition to all the gyms in this area. We really don’t work really hard to sell people on joining this place. People do their homework and if they want a place to powerlift and to get strong then this is a great option for them.   Mike: I think that’s really cool. You mention that there are two chain gyms opening. You don’t seem to be concerned about it. That has to do with how you differentiated your product. It’s something that you aren’t going to get at a 24 Hour Fitness. Any gym owner isn’t going to be concerned if a Burger King opens down the street, it’s not even the same thing. And I think you are getting that same feeling.   Paulie: Absolutely. As a gym owner we stick to our game and it gives us confidence as we’re going forward. Things have changed a lot in the last 5 and a-half years, and we’ve created our own voice. SBWC is its own organism unique to gyms.   Mike: When you first started was it that way or did you need to evolve?   Paulie: I think so. It’s kind of like sourdough. It doesn’t automatically come with the flavor. It takes time. We always end up talking about food here in Brooklyn. Anyways, it took time to develop the gym culture and time for that to proliferate. Our gym is growing up and as people move they are taking that culture with them out to the rest of the world.   Matt: I would say that SSBC also has a similar tenor. It’s taken some time for us to evolve. Our voice and the way that we do things has come around. Our focus was narrow and we hit the nail on the head and now we are living and breathing the way that we want to be. Both of our training facilities are Platinum status in USAPL and both are known nationally. Paulie and Becca do a great job with their members and they have an extended family that is around the country now.   Mike: Shifting gears a little bit. Seeing as you both have facilities, what sort of advice would you give to somebody who is just starting out?   Paulie: There’s a lot of advice, but it’s up to them if they want to listen. (laughs) My kneejerk answer is “Don’t do it”. And I say that because I want to temper people’s expectations because people automatically assume they’ll have all the time in the world to train and it’s going to be awesome. And for the first few months it is. But then you get tired and you realize that you have to make money and you have responsibility for people’s lives and make decisions about peoples lifting careers. And then you have to keep the lights on.   Mike: It’s like that coaching relationship. You can be friends and have that relationship but there is a bit of professionalism that goes with it.   Paulie: Absolutely, these are all people but we are face to face three to four times per week and you have to sometimes be tough with people because you are their coach and you have to be impartial at times. I have a reputation for being the grumpy one, but it’s the agenda of the lifter that drives it. I’ll look after everybody and push them toward their goals as much as they are able to be pushed.   Mike: Ok Matt, what’s your take on opening a gym.   Matt: Ditto to everything Paulie said. But three main pieces of advice. One, start small. Everybody has these delusions of grandeur but you have to pay the bills and keep the lights on and additional square footage means more cleaning and higher rent etc. If you open and you start out too big then you are going to be in trouble. Secondly, be almost singularly focused. Much like SBWC, SSPT focuses on powerlifting and weightlifting. We consider ourselves some of the best in those disciplines. You’ve got to realize that in the first 3-5 years you’re going to be losing money.   Mike: Did that come as a surprise?   Matt: I don’t want to say we were surprised. But we opened in 2009 when the economy was bad but we did our due diligence and had a solid business plan and we were able to retain 99.9% of our clients and we were able to make realistic projections. We came in with flawless credit and zero debt. We didn’t need a loan, but we took one anyway as a cushion and paid it off really quickly. That’s fine, we’re not saying you need to be like us, but you have to be ready to take a few steps back before you take a few steps forward.   Paulie: In addition to that, you cannot make decisions based on any emotions. Before you do anything you need to sit down and look at the numbers. Same with coaching. Do your homework, do your homework some more and make rational decisions going forward.   Mike: Was there anything surprising when you first opened?   Matt: We didn’t realize the hours would be as crazy as they were. For a long time we put in a ton of work for the first 6-8 months before we could find another employee to cover some shifts and perhaps close the gym in the evening for us.   Paulie: Just realizing you have responsibilities is pretty sobering. I’d say 95% of our sessions are run by Becca or me. We’re pretty much working 12-hour days. The surprise is being able to replicate our culture in other staff members. A lot of people that we’ve hired in the past, it seems like they want to start their own gym inside of our gym. There’s a lot more to it than just opening the doors and turning on the lights.   Mike: What is the training atmosphere like at peak hours for SSPT?   Matt: Our facility is different than SBWC, but we operate like pretty much any other gym. They can purchase a membership and train whenever they need. If they want one-on-one coaching it’s by appointment only. Depending on the day, during prime time for us is the late afternoon to early evening. If we happen to be on the floor training with the other members they are either training themselves or working with a training partner or one of our other five coaches.  Our sessions aren’t done in groups, different from SBWC, but rather clusters that train together.   Mike: Paulie your sessions are more coached?   Paulie: It’s different from other gyms but not necessarily from SSPT. Just in the sense of the quality of the training that goes on. We are on the floor coaching all the time. Our evening sessions run from 4:30-9PM and peak is from 6-8 when people are getting off work. People that show up at the same time tend to become each other’s training partners. We’re always giving oversight and answering questions depending on what the training works out. We assign members to one another based on a few different variables (ability, height, experience) so that everybody can learn from each other. We don’t have music and we don’t have mirrors. I don’t allow people to wear baseball caps or headsets with music. If you come to our gym you want to be coached.   Mike: That’s a very specific coaching atmosphere that you’ve made and a lot of people appreciate that sort of mentality. That goes toward making a really sustainable atmosphere. Matt you guys have music but it’s nothing crazy.   Matt: Yeah it’s more of a background music type thing for the most part.   Mike: Both of your gyms have produced super high quality top shelf athletes and that leaves a ton of clues for sure.   Paulie: It’s definitely not for everybody and we’re happy with that. We’re not a huge gym and we wouldn’t be able to accommodate everybody. We want people who want to work and people who want to get strong.   Mike: That’s not just a gym owning thing. That’s a business thing. It’s about knowing your target audience. I’d rather have 1000 raving fans than 10000 who are just lukewarm. How can people get in touch with you guys.   Matt: We’ve got www.supremesportspt.com and we’re listed as a platinum level training center with USAPL. We’re on Facebook, etc.   Paulie: You can find us on the web at www.southbrooklynwc.com or just google us. We’re also a platinum regional training center. If people want to powerlift in our region, they’ll definitely find us.   Mike: Thanks a ton for your time.    

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  • 00:46:33

    #25: One father's unbelievable quest to help disabled people around the world through weight training--with CNN Hero Ned Norton

    · The Shin Fujiyama Podcast | Social Entrepreneurship | Nonprofit Organizations | International Development Aid | NGOs

    Ned Norton could deadlift 660 pounds. But that's one of his smaller accomplishments in life. Ned is a social entrepreneur and a Top 10 CNN Hero from Albany, New York. He is the founder of Warriors on Wheels. In this episode he tells his story all the way from growing up as a scrawny kid (like me) and how that motivated him to become a competitive athlete and power lifter. He became a fitness trainer and trained several Olympic athletes, helping them win gold medals. But even that wasn't enough for Ned Norton. He needed a greater challenge. Through a series of random events, he began to train a friend who had been paralyzed from an accident. Soon, many people in wheelchairs and with physical disabilities like spinal cord injuries, cerebral palsy, and traumatic brain injuries began to seek his help. So in 1988, Ned started the nonprofit organization, Warriors on Wheels, opening a gym at his home town specialized for individuals with disabilities. At one point, he trained five members at his gym to bench press 300+ pounds. Through his newest initiative, The Hercules Project, Ned ships free fitness and rehab equipment to individuals with disabilities in more than ten countries, including Mali, Darfur, Guatemala, and Somalia. Ned has a saying at his gym: every person who comes in our front door will become their own success story. Show Notes & Summary Ned Norton was a scrawny kid growing up When Ned was 12, his uncle gave him a set of weights, which was a great discovery for Ned At his peak, Ned was deadlifting 660lbs He loves going to the gym, he can't wait to get there each day (like me) "It becomes part of your life. Like brushing your teeth." Ned Norton is 58 years old He got his dream job, to work at a gym. He became a trainer. He worked with a few Olympic gold medal winners He was a strength coach for three Olympic teams, basketball teams, football teams, bodybuilders He learned about a 20-year-old guy who had gotten paralyzed after falling off a tree. The kid was so depressed that he was suicidal Ned started training him at the gym, which instantly boosted the kid's confidence and self-esteem, eventually leading him to return to college and find a job Nobody at the hospital could believe he was the same guy. This inspired 6 other people from the hospital come in to train with Ned He had no specialized equipment They called themselves the Warriors to have a cool name The guys were making social and psychological transformation through Ned's training 60 people began to seek Ned for training after a story was published in the local newspaper Ned saw the need and formed a nonprofit organization to help his disabled trainees They get that feeling of well-being, confidence, progress, positivity He found an abandoned floor in a public housing project which he was able to use for free for the new facility People thought he was crazy for working in the "projects" He charges a fee at his gym, but if people can't afford it, they don't need to pay Less than 25% of his members are paying When Ned got the phone call from CNN, he thought it was some kind of joke from the fire department guys So many times things were so tough he was on the brink of closing the doors It was on the day that Ned was contemplating how he was going to close down the gym and sell the equipment that he go the phone call from CNN Heroes The ups and downs of running a nonprofit organization is extreme Ned does it ALL ALONE. He runs the gym, he does the social media, the website, takes care of his family The CNN glory gave Ned about a year of fame and funding. After that, he has had to return to the grind. "It never ends lol." He was out meeting celebrities, movie stars, and on TV. Soon after, he was back in the projects hustling and grinding to keep the gym afloat Raising money is the most frustrating thing about running Warriors on Wheels Ned has a hard time asking for money (he's like a giant teddy bear) After being on CNN, people with disabilities from all over the world began contacting him for help A guy from Cambodia asked for help for landmine survivors and that sparked the Hercules Project where Ned sends resistance bands for free all over the world Ned partnered up with the United Nations Mine Action Service He will be sending workout equipment to Cali, Colombia (I'll be there during October-November, 2016) He sent equipment to patients from a mental hospital in Somalia, where people had been chained down and their muscles had atrophied drastically One girl in his program lost a leg to bone cancer at age 18, then at 24 she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis which put her on a wheelchair, then she was diagnosed with breast cancer and had to get a double mastectomy. Yet she still never misses a workout. Ned has a strict morning routine where he works out at the gym and/or goes for a long run to "outrun the thoughts in his head." To help the people in wheelchairs bench press 300+ pounds, Ned followed the strategy: Less is More. He only had them do 3-5 bench press sets per workout using his 6-8 weeks program. Because his athletes dominated so many competitions, Ned eventually felt like he was the "evil coach" from the Karate Kid movie lol I decide on the show to name our home gym at the Villa Soleada Children's Home the "Warrior's Gym Honduras" Ned read up on Arnold and Franco's workout tips during his early days, before the internet was available Arnold said to Ned in a seminar: "Don't ever do any of the workouts I talk about in the magazines. I never did any of them!" Ned's "go-to" fitness resource is Muscle and Fitness "Once you get hooked into enjoying it [fitness], it opens up a whole new world for you." "You can always do more than you think you can. Never give up." "You've only tapped into 40% of your potential." He calls his best friends at the gym "the smelly monkey butts" lol Ned trains people with Down's Syndrome. They oftentimes are good at powerlifting and bench pressing because they have shorter limbs. When people come into the gym for the first time after recovering from an injury, they have terrible self-esteem Sometimes doctors, family, and people at the rehab office focus on telling their patients what they can't do, what not to do. Whereas Ned talks about the amazing things they will be able to do after his 3-month training program.

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  • 00:17:56

    #26: Cardio samma dag som man tränar på gym – vad är rätt för ditt mål?

    · Kaliper: Träning, hälsa och resultat | Bygg muskler | Bränn fett | Transformera ditt liv

    En klassisk fråga är om man ska köra cardio samma dag som styrketräning eller huruvida man ska träna sin cardio före styrketräning eller efter passet. Det beror på vilket mål man har, vilken form av cardio man föredrar och hur mycket tid man har att lägga på sin cardio – tycker Christoffer. Vi utgår från två… Read more om #26: Cardio samma dag som man tränar på gym – vad är rätt för ditt mål? Inlägget #26: Cardio samma dag som man tränar på gym – vad är rätt för ditt mål? dök först upp på Min PT Online.

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  • MTG 084: Building A Muay Thai Gym in Issan, Thailand with Frances and Boom Wattahanaya

    · Muay Thai Guy Podcast

    Muay Thai Guy Podcast - Episode 84Muay Thai and martial arts can be a powerful tool to help people overcome life's adversities. In the effort to help the less fortune kids of rural Issan, Thailand, Frances and Boom Wattahanaya have been working tirelessly to finish building a Muay Thai gym to in Boom's hometown. It's been quite a journey so far with it's share of ups and downs, but they feel they are on the right path and talk about it during our interview.We go into detail about their charitable project and discuss the intricacies of owning and running a gym in Thailand, including:How Frances and Boom met and eventually ended up getting married only 6 months later.What initially gave them the idea to try and open up a gym in Thailand.The steps they've been taking to make their gym a reality.The challenges they faced prior to opening up a gym and how those challenges ultimately led to their decision to try to build a gym.What type of kids and adults they see coming to the gym on a regular basis.How they believe that the kids are benefiting from training Muay Thai in a positive, supportive environment.What the life situations of these children are and why Muay Thai is such an important tool to give them a chance at life.The unseen costs that go into opening and running a gym.Why taking the kids to fights are the biggest expense and how it's important for them to continue to bring the kids to fights.Their main goals for the gym and what their plans are for the immediate future.How amazingly supportive the Muay Thai community has been in helping with their mission.And so much more!Click Here or on the podcast player at the top of the page to listen to MTG 084: Building A Muay Thai Gym in Issan, Thailand with Frances and Boom Wattahanaya Support a good cause and donate to the Wor Wattahana Gym project created by Frances and Boom! Check out their GoFundMe page here ===> www.gofundme.com/worwattahanaMake sure to like them on Facebook ===> www.facebook.com/worwatthanaBe cool and click here to leave a rating and review.Let me know what you thought about the interview in the comment section below!MTG 084 back to more MTG podcast episodesBack to Home Page<enclosure url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/muaythaiguy/MTG084.mp3" length="57589093" type="audio/mpeg" />

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  • 01:31:12

    177: Stella Umeh

    · GymCastic: The Gymnastics Podcast

        This week Canadian legend, Olympian, World vault finalist, 13-year Cirque du Soliel veteran, entrepreneur and NCAA team champion, Stella Umeh tells her story. Known for her incredible power combined with her dance background helped Stella perform floor routines that ballerinas and jazz dance fans alike sigh with ecstasy. Jessica joined Stella and her 3-month-old daughter, Billie (cue adorable baby gurgles in the background), in November while Stella and her husband, Sam, (head electrician for Cirque's Kurios show) stopped in California.  We discuss: On being an A-typical Canadian gymnast in her era and being labeled as difficult for standing up for herself and doing things her own way: "I work hard, I play hard. I'm responsible because I love what I'm doing, I'm not going to jeopardize it (also because I don't want to get injured).... I would always do the job but because I didn't fit the mold, it looked like I was fooling around or Mickey Mousing or I wasn't taking things seriously. But I don't think you have to completely conform and lose yourself to take something seriously--because if you are meant to do it, and it is your passion, it's going to be serious regardless of who you are or what you look like. You see a person's heart and soul in what they are doing; and that is what people should be looking at." Injuries and accidents: Crying and developing an eye twitch every single day for a year she performed on Teeter Board in Cirque du Soleil's Mystère because she was terrified of the apparatus. Competing with a sprained neck and back . Competing with labyrinthitis, a condition caused by California-specific seasonal allergies, which led to a broken bone and very scary crashes. College Culture Shock Moving to LA immediately after the 1994 earthquake when UCLA looked like "Beirut" Not finding the United States to be as multi-cultural as her home in Mississauga, near Toronto, Canada. Getting booed in a college meet. Her opinion of current college difficulty compared to her era in the 90's and how the loss of compulsories effect the current skill level of incoming elite gymnasts. Being Different Her dance foundation and wanting to be like her famous choreographer sister, Anastasia (Stacy) Umeh Feeling out of place in school and in her upper middle-class gym Being bullied--being chased home from elementary school by rock-throwing girls Gymnastics always being the happy, safe place. Elite Gymnastics Scoring low domestically Her advice for learning a painful skill, doing it Fashion show, changing leotards for each event, mobster leos Hair fashion when Stella didn't have enough hair for a scrunchy, but the head coach wanted her in one (cue comedy) "I never saw myself as a black athlete. I always come back to, this is what I love to do. I don't really care what my color, my creed, my size, my shape is. This is where I am supposed to be.  If someone wants to sort of, discriminate against me or make things difficult for me because I'm different, then that's their shit. I'm still going to go out and do what I need to do." Dealing with the reputation of being difficult and non-conforming because she stood up for herself and her teammates. For example: The time Stella asked a judge what rumors she has heard about her. The time Stella told off a Canadian judge for giving the Canadians lower scores than the international judges from the window of a taxi, as she took Larissa Libby (née Lowing) to the emergency room! Artistic Style The story her coach, Alex Bard, loves to tell about the time she refused to dance for him! Her unique style was "not revered in Canada," but it was abroad because being different was an asset. "I was loved internationaly, because in the end of the day, it was just about what I was doing on the floor." The Barcelona Olympic Games  in 1992 She cried for 30 days after the games because of the emotional investment in the journey and how fast it came and went. Parties, make-out sessions and how she snuck out of her room with the help of the Olympic wrestling team. Transitioning out of sport for the first time at age 40 Never had an orthopedic surgery due to or during her gymnastics career. Had her first surgery after 13 years as an acrobat with Cirque du Soliel. Thought she wouldn't be able to walk after college. Thought her body would be "decimated." Advice to her younger self, "Do it your way. Do it the way that feels right and intrinsic to you. Follow that passion. Dream huge and don't let any thing or anyone, including yourself, stand in your way. Because if you believe in what you are doing and you are loving it, you can't go wrong. Whether you place first or last, you can't go wrong." The Ivory Elephant Group: theivoryelephantgroup.com Join Club Gym Nerd here to support the show and get free perks in return.  Check out our awesome shirts here. The Essential Gym Nerd Gift Guide 168: Shannon Miller, Belarusgate, NED vs GB 148: Shannon Miller Episode 9: Chellsie Memmel, Swiss Cup & FIG Presidential Proposals Episode 12: Miss Val Part 2 Episode 11: Miss Val Episode 15: Joan Ryan Author of Little Girls in Pretty Boxes Episode 17: Growing Up In The Soviet Gymnastics System And Training At Round Lake Episode 22: Beth Tweddle Episode 28: Kristen Maloney Episode 31: Elise Ray Episode 33: Simone Biles & Her Coaches Episode 48: Kyla Ross 61: Katelyn Ohashi Clears The Air 77: Aly Raisman 81: Jenny Hansen 99: Princess Catherine Lyons and Coach Rochelle Douglas 101: Olivia Vivian 137: Lady Lisa Mason  

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  • 00:41:27

    Aristo Luis ★ der YouTuber und Kampfsportler im Interview

    · DNX Podcast ???? Marcus Meurer

          Interview mit Aristo Luis von Culture of Warrior Hey Leute, hier ist Marcus, hier ist LIFEHACKZ! Willkommen zu einer neuen Folge! Ich habe mich heute mit Aristo Luis, dem Culture of Warrior. Aristo ist Kampfsportler, Aristo ist Youtuber, hat eigene Show dort. Aristo steigt auch selber in den Ring und macht Kämpfe. Aristo probiert aber auch sämtliche anderen Kampfsportarten aus. Kurz gefasst: Super sympathischer, spannender Kerl. Check it out, viel Spaß! In dieser Folge lernst du: Welcher der ideale Kampfsport für Einsteiger ist. Was Kampfsport mit dem Leben zu tun hat und was man an Motivation aus dem Sport rausholen kann. Wie dir der Sport hilft auf Reisen Leute kennenzulernen. Schreib mir an marcus@lifehackz.co, hinterlass eine kurze Bewertung auf iTunes und abonniere die Show! 1. Sicher dir jetzt kostenlos das ultimative DNX Erfolgskit für Online Unternehmer mit meinen 7 Erfolgsgeheimnissen für deine persönliche und finanzielle Freiheit ???? [www.dnxnews.de] 2. Komm jetzt in die kostenlose DNX LIFE HACKZ Facebook Community mit tausenden von gleichgesinnten Lifehackern???? [www.dnxcommunity.de] 3. Sei bei der nächsten DNX Konferenz in Berlin dabei (20€ Gutscheincode "DNX-PODCAST")  ???? [www.dnx-berlin.de] 1.000 Dank, Dein Marcus  SHOWNOTES YouTube Kanal: Culture of Warrior Aristo Luis Facebook Spitfire Academy Invictus Fight Night. [su_accordion] [su_spoiler title="Diese LIFE HACKZ Folge zum Nachlesen" icon="plus-square-1"] Interview mit Aristo Luis Marcus: Ja Hi, Willkommen zu einer neuen Folge von LifeHackz! Wir sind hier in Friedrichshain bei richtig geilem Wetter. Endlich ist der Sommer auch in Berlin angekommen. Und was noch viel geiler ist, ich habe einen mega spannenden Menschen neben mir, den Aristo. Hi Aristo, was machst Du und wer bist Du? Aristo: Hi, mein Name ist Aristo Luis. Ich betreibe mit meinem Kollegen Dominik den Channel Culture of Warrior und ich bin Leistungssportler, lebe den Sport und bin ein Mensch, der das Leben genießt. Marcus: Ja, das finde ich ehrlich gesagt auch richtig cool und faszinierend an Dir. Wenn man anfängt Deine Videos zu gucken auf Deinem Youtube Kanal merkt man direkt, das was Du machst, erfüllt Dich total mit Freude und es ist auch total authentisch. Ich gucke eigentlich jede Folge auch immer wieder gerne, weil ich weiß, das ist authentischer Scheiß. Da ist nichts vorgespielt, sondern mitten aus dem Leben und ich glaube, genau so geht’s. Vielleicht kannst Du mal sagen, wie ihr auf die Idee gekommen seid, einen Youtube Chanel zum Thema Culture of Warrior zu machen? Vielleicht sagst Du uns auch noch einmal die URL und was ihr damit alles covert. Aristo: Die Idee kam eigentlich als ich auch eine zeitlang als Fitnesstrainer gearbeitet habe. Ich kenne auch solche Leute, wie Julian Zietlow und Eyal. Vor allem auch Julian hat mir damals gesagt “Aristo, mach doch mal was mit einem Channel in Richtung Kampfsport. Anfangs war es nicht mein Ding. Mit der Zeit wird man natürlich älter und da habe ich mir gedacht “Hey, ich probiere das einfach mal aus, was soll ich daran falsch machen?” Dann habe ich Dominik über seine Freundin kennengelernt und habe ihn darauf angesprochen.Er fand, es war eine coole Idee, weil mit solchen Sachen wie Aufnehmen und Schneiden, da habe ich echt keine Ahnung von. Da habe ich wirklich jemanden neben mir gebraucht. Er hat dann auch zugesagt. Und somit ist das Ganze dann entstanden. Dann war es einfach “cool, wir verstehen uns, kommen auf einen Nenner, lass uns einfach loslegen!” Dann haben wir die ersten paar Videos gemacht und gesehen, dass es bei den Leuten cool ankam. Da habe ich auch mit Julian Zietlow den Start gehabt. Und von da an, haben wir gesagt, cool, wir bleiben am Ball. Marcus: Cool! Also ich glaube was ganz wichtig ist, einfach machen! Nicht zu viel einen Kopf machen. Da stand ich mir früher auch selber im Weg bei vielen Online Projekten, die ich gestartet habe. Und der Deutsche tendiert ja auch immer dazu, das perfekte Business durch zu planen. Vielleicht auch noch viel Kohle zu verbrennen und viel Zeit. Und dann gehst Du raus und denkst “Ey, keine Sau interessiert sich dafür” ne? Aristo: Genau. Das war ja das Problem, dieses Pro und Kontra abwägen. Wo sind die Vorteile? Wo sind die Risiken? Gerade die Risiken sind mir zu hoch, also mache ich es nicht. - Quatsch! Wenn Du eine Idee hast, dann mach es einfach. Man muss es so sehen: Entweder Du machst es oder irgendwann kommt ein anderer und macht genau dasselbe und Du beißt Dir dann voll auf die Zunge und sagst “Mist! Hätte ich das auch mal gemacht.” Und das war für uns einfach das Ausschlaggebende, wo wir gesagt haben “Ey, wir ziehen das jetzt einfach durch. Wir investieren kaum etwas und selbst, wenn es nicht klappt, wir haben es gemacht; eine coole Erfahrung im Leben gemacht; weiter geht’s”. Marcus: Auf jeden Fall. Man verliert ja nie ganz, weil man gewinnt immer an Erfahrung, egal was Du machst. Seit wann gibt es den Channel und wie viele Subscribers habt ihr da im Moment? Aristo: Also gerade sind wir auf die 3.000 gekommen, Tendenz steigend. Zum Glück, danke auch nochmal an alle User! Den Channel gibt es jetzt knapp ein Jahr. Wir steuern langsam auf ein Jahr zu. Man muss natürlich auch sagen, das fluktuiert natürlich auch immer. Wir haben Zeiten, wo man natürlich Schule und Ausbildung und so weiter hat und selber arbeitet. Da konnten wir nicht immer kontinuierlich drehen. Wahrscheinlich hätte man auch schon mehr erreichen können. Aber lieber man wächst langsam und stetig und dafür bleiben wir einfach authentisch. Anstatt dass wir, sage ich mal, 100 Videos in einer Woche machen und irgendwann merken und sehen die Leute “Hey, jetzt geht es einfach um’s Kommerzielle”. Sonst würde ich die Leute nicht so zuballern. Lieber machen wir wenig, vielleicht auch lieber ein gutes Video, wo die Leute sagen, das ist zwar nur ein Video, aber es macht Spaß das Video drei Mal hintereinander zu schauen. Marcus: Also lieber dann den Mund aufmachen, wenn man auch etwas zu sagen hat und nicht so “ey scheiße, ich muss ja jetzt jeden Tag drei Videos drehen” und irgendwann kommt nur noch Kacke bei rum. Aristo: Ja, das wollte ich jetzt nicht so sagen, aber wirklich, genau so ist es. Marcus: Und wielange beschäftigst Du Dich schon mit dem Kampfsport und wie bist Du dazu gekommen? Aristo: Oh, mit Kampfsport beschäftige ich mich jetzt eigentlich seit knapp 11 oder 12 Jahren. Ich bin jetzt 27 und habe mit 14 oder 15 angefangen. Davor habe ich auch Fußball gespielt, was ja viele nicht glauben. Ich hatte mich auch in Football und allem versucht. Ich habe schon immer diesen Körperkontakt gesucht. Beim Fußball habe ich immer gelbe Karten bekommen. Football war mir damals auch von der Familie her ein bisschen zu teuer, die ganze Ausrüstung. Und irgendwann bin ich mit den Kumpels so auf die Idee gekommen “Komm, lass doch mal zum Kampfsport gehen, das ist billig, Du brauchst nicht viel - einfach nur Deinen Willen”. Dann bin ich dahin gekommen und von da an, habe ich mich in den Sport verliebt. Weil Kampfsport ist für mich ein Sport, wo ich wirklich auch sage, da gehört kein Talent dazu. Du lernst dazu, wenn Du lernen willst und Du kannst immer besser werden durch hartes Training. Und deswegen liebe ich einfach Kampfsport. Marcus: Das heißt, für Dich ist Kampfsport einfach der heiße Scheiß. Du kannst Dich voll auspowern und durch jedes Training, das Du mehr machst, gewinnst Du dann wieder an Skills, ne? Aristo: Genau. Du wächst halt über Dich hinaus. Du kannst Deine eigenen Grenzen überwinden. Da gibt es kein besseres Gefühl. Für mich persönlich gibt es keine bessere Sportart wie Kampfsport, wo Du das halt so ausleben kannst. Vor allem in dem Maße. Marcus: Und wenn Du jetzt Kampfsport sagst, was meinst Du damit konkret? Beziehungsweise was hast Du schon alles getestet? Womit bist Du eingestiegen? Was würdest Du vielleicht auch Leuten empfehlen, gerade so zum Einstieg? Aristo: Also ich bin damals mit Muay Thaiboxen eingestiegen und es macht mir heute immernoch Spaß, weil Du lernst nie aus. Und wir müssen sowieso sagen, danach kam natürlich so ein Hype wie Ong-Bak mit Tony Jaa und jeder wollte Muay Thai und K1. Aber ich habe auch viele andere Sachen ausprobiert, wie Kali, Escrima, Stockkampf. Da habe ich auch schon krasse Videos gesehen. Marcus: Wo kommt das her? Aristo: Ich glaube, das hat ein Franzose damals erfunden. Ich habe es damals in der Sportschule mal gemacht. Das war halt so ein Mix aus Stockkampf, Messerkampf und ein paar Muay Thai Elementen. Ich glaube aber, der Ursprung war in Frankreich. Ich möchte aber nichts Falsches sagen. Also korrigiert mich, wenn ich da falsch liege. Aber der Ursprung soll wohl Frankreich gewesen sein und hammer geil. Also ich sag, Kampfsport - egal welche Kampfsportart. Wenn es Dir Spaß macht, dann mach es. Ich selber bin in Sachen Kampfsport offen. Ich habe mich sogar mal im Kung Fu versucht. Das war in dem Sinne nix für mich, weil für Kung Fu musst Du viel ruhiger sein. Ich bin da gerne auch so einer, der will nach vorne marschieren, sag ich mal so. Einfach mal drauf los hauen, wild durchdrehen. Und im Kung Fu war es immer “bleib mal gelassen”. Dann habe ich gesagt “ist zwar auch geil, wenn Du es drauf hast, aber ich will eher wirklich etwas, wo es heißt: Auf die Fresse”. Marcus: Und gibt es jetzt einen Kampfsport, wo Du auch in den Ring steigst und regelmäßig Wettkämpfe machst? Aristo: Ja mit K1, Kick Thaiboxen. Da mache ich selber Wettkämpfe und bin auch selber aktiv. Ich denke auch noch nicht daran, damit aufzuhören. Marcus: Auch nicht, wenn Du dann irgendwie total zerbeult nach dem Kampf in der Kabine sitzt und vielleicht auch noch verloren hast und denkst “Scheiße, wofür machst Du denn hier die ganze kacke?!” Kannst Du Dich da immer wieder motivieren und woher holst Du dann die Motivation? Aristo: Also wenn ich zerbeult in der Kabine sitze dann sage ich: Jetzt erst recht! Jetzt will ich weiter trainieren und noch besser werden. Die Motivation hole ich einfach daraus, dass ich sage: Wenn ich jetzt im Kampfsport aufgebe, dann gebe ich eigentlich auch irgendwo mein Leben auf. Ich verknüpfe das mit meinem Leben. Gewinne ich einen Kampf im Ring, dann zeige ich mir selbst “Ey, Du kannst auch im Leben einiges erreichen”. Verliere ich, dann sage ich “Gut, reiß Dich zusammen, steh wieder auf und mach weiter”. Also ich beziehe das immer aufs Leben. Im Leben hast Du mal gute Zeiten. Dann geht es Dir echt beschissen und Du musst Dich wieder zusammenreißen. Dann hast Du auch mal dementsprechend gute Zeiten, schlechte Zeiten. Also es pendelt immer hin und her. Und so ist es auch im Kampf. Du kannst nicht immer gewinnen. Mal verlierst Du. Ich habe auch sage ich mal, die ersten zwei Kämpfe in diesem Jahr verloren. Den ersten sogar ganz bitter. Im zweiten habe ich schon ein bisschen besser gekämpft. Da konnte ich sagen “Okay, den hast Du zwar verloren, aber irgendwo bist Du Sieger der Herzen”. Aber wenn ich jetzt anfange aufzugeben in Sachen Kampfsport, dann sage ich ganz ehrlich: Dann werde ich im Leben auch immer aufgeben. Du kannst es Dir nicht erlauben, im Leben aufzugeben, also geb in allen anderen Sachen auch nicht auf. Marcus: Irgendwie dreht hier im Hintergrund einer durch, glaube ich. Aristo: Der flippt da total aus. Marcus: Ich weiß nicht, ob man das hört, aber ich glaube, gleich beruhigt er sich wieder. (beide lachen) Marcus: Vielleicht müssen wir da gleich mal rüber und vorbeischauen, was da los ist. Ja, also ich muss sagen, ich selber habe früher mal Karate gemacht, als ich so 12 oder 13 war. Das war ganz cool, um da mal so ein bisschen reinzukommen und ja, nicht irgendwie um Erlaubnis fragen zu müssen, dass man auch mal schlagen darf oder treten oder so. Ich meine, wir haben jetzt keinen Kontakt gemacht. Das war alles ohne Kontakt noch in dem Alter. Viel auswendiglernen. Die Katas und so. Ich finde, das gehört irgendwie auch dazu. Manche Menschen brauchen aber auch das Ventil, das mal rauslassen zu können, weil sonst explodiert das dann irgendwann und dafür ist der Sport genau die richtige Plattform, ne? Aristo: Ja natürlich. Wenn ich mir heutzutage die Menschen angucke. Jeder hat irgendwo seinen Frust, Probleme, Freundin trennt sich, Arbeit läuft nicht. Also eigentlich habe ich manchmal so das Gefühl, als würden die Menschen so generell immer mehr Probleme haben und wir haben kaum ein Ventil, wo wir es rauslassen können. Die, die Sport machen haben einen Vorteil. Die, die es vielleicht arbeitstechnisch nicht schaffen oder aus welchen Gründen auch immer, drehen irgendwann auf der einen oder anderen Seite komplett durch oder klappen zusammen. Wo ich echt nur jedem empfehlen kann - es muss nicht Kampfsport sein - aber such Dir ein Ventil. Sei es, dass Du sagst, ich will Klavier spielen, dann mach es. Du brauchst dieses Ventil. Genauso, wie Du es gerade angesprochen hast. Für mich gilt genau dasselbe. Auch beim Kampfsport, ich sag mal so, dass mal die Polizei kommt und sagt “So, Junger Mann, geht so nicht, mitkommen!” Du kannst Dich mit anderen messen. Habe ich jetzt gut trainiert; bin ich besser geworden; bin ich schlechter geworden; habe verloren - okay, muss besser werden. Also Du bist einfach nicht gebunden. Du hast keinen Zwang und vor allem: Du kannst Dich selbst immer nur so entfalten, wie Du es willst. Marcus: Genau und was ich auch spannend finde und auch erst später dann selber erfahren habe, dass Du beim Kampfsport im ersten Augenblick denkst “Was sind das für Verrückte? Die kloppen sich da die Birne ein und umarmen sich danach. Das kann doch irgendwie alles gar nicht wahr sein.” Und wie viele Mental Skills auch dahinter hängen, um vorbereitet in so einen Kampf zu gehen. Um das abrufen zu können in der Sekunde und dann auch ruhig zu bleiben und nicht auszuticken, wenn Du das erste Mal eine abkriegst. Wie viel Prozent Deiner Vorbereitung steckst Du auch in dieses mentale Ding rein? Oder sagst Du, das ist einfach da. Entweder man hat es oder man hat es nicht. Oder meinst Du schon, das kann und sollte man trainieren? Aristo: Trainieren ist schwer, weil Du hast mit vielen Eindrücken zu kämpfen. Aber das Mentale eigentlich so an sich - Du musst es irgendwie selber herbeirufen, aber es kommt auch von alleine. Also wenn Du Dich wirklich auf den Kampf fokussierst, dann kommt es eigentlich von alleine. Du musst mental sehr stark sein. Du bist hohen Belastungen ausgesetzt, Du hast Angst, Du bist aufgeregt. Marcus: Also Du hast nach wie vor Angst, auch nach 60.000 Stunden im Gym und Vorbereitung? Aristo: Ja natürlich, Du bist aufgeregt. Du bist tierisch aufgeregt. Ich habe damals Kollegen gehabt, die haben fast über 30 Kämpfe. Wenn ich denen manchmal auf einer Veranstaltung  begegne, die sitzen da und ich sage “Dicker, ich bin gerade voll aufgeregt” Dann gucken die mich an und sagen “Du, mir geht es gerade nicht anders.” Und die haben sogar noch mehr Kämpfe gehabt als ich, wo ich dann sage “Alter, Du auch?” Du bist immer aufgeregt. Weil es ist ja so gesehen immer ein neuer Gegner. Es ist immer ein neuer Mensch. Wenn es immer derselbe wäre, wäre es etwas anderes. Aber dadurch, dass es immer andere Personen sind, bist Du immer auf’s Neue aufgeregt. Es ist immer so, als würdest Du Dein erstes Fight Debut haben. Also aufgeregt ist man immer. Du musst mental stark sein. Vor allem - wie Du gerade gesagt hast - dass Du im Ring ruhig bleibst. Und natürlich brauchst Du eine gewisse Aggressivität, drehe aber nicht durch. Bleibe so ruhig, dass Du alles abrufen kannst. Hör auf Deinen Trainer und versuche trotzdem fair zu bleiben. Du musst vor dem Kampf nicht mit Deinem Gegner best friends sein, aber sich nach dem Kampf wenigstens den Respekt zollen und sagt “Hey, cool gekämpft, Hand drauf, freue mich auf den nächsten Kampf.” War bei mir auch so. Ich habe meinen ersten Kampf dieses Jahr verloren. Es ging um eine deutsche Meisterschaft. Ich habe eine gute Vorbereitung gehabt. Mein Trainer hat mich richtig hart rangenommen. Mein Gegner war aber in dem Moment mental einfach stärker. Ich war zwar mental auch da und bin auch nach vorne gegangen. Aber er hat einfach mehr gemacht. Ich habe mir sozusagen, das Ruder selber aus der Hand nehmen lassen, aber am Ende habe ich natürlich auch gesagt “Hey Dicker, hast mich heute geschlagen. Ich hoffe, wir treffen uns irgendwann im Ring wieder.” Er hat sich natürlich auch gefreut und geil und ich gönne ihm das. Das macht ja Spaß. Beim Revanche-Fight freue ich mich, wieder gegen ihn anzutreten, weil ich weiß, er ist gut, er wird mich fördern. Und wenn ich ihn besiege, dann weiß ich, ich habe wieder einen weiteren Schritt auf der Leiter gemacht und bin noch ein Stück besser geworden. Dann gehst Du natürlich noch selbstbewusster in den nächsten Kampf. Somit steigerst Du Dich wieder. Marcus: Ja klar, von daher sind Niederlagen ja auch immer eine mega Chance selber zu wachsen und zu sagen: So, beim nächsten Mal mache ich es besser. Und wenn ich dann nochmal die Chance habe, gegen genau den zu kämpfen oder so, dann zeigt es ja auch wieder, ob es irgendetwas gebracht hat und ob Du Dich selber wieder weiter steigern konntest, ne? Als Du das erste Mal in den Ring gegangen bist für einen Wettkampf, was ist Dir dann da durch den Kopf gegangen? Als Du wirklich Faust an Faust und Auge an Auge ihm gegenüber gestanden hast. Kannst Du Dich noch daran erinnern? Aristo: Ja, sogar sehr gut. Bei meinem allerersten Kampf, da war ich glaube ich 16 oder 17 glaube ich, bin ich böse K.O. gegangen. Ganz böse K.O. Marcus: Wie kam das? (Beide lachen) Aristo: Das war in Cottbus. Das war damals unter meinem alten Trainer Meo, Gott möge seiner Seele gnädig sein. Der ist nämlich verstorben. Ich sollte halt gegen jemanden in meiner Gewichtsklasse kämpfen. Ich habe damals, glaube ich, 75 kg gerade mal gewogen und mein Gegner ist aber ausgefallen. Und da war halt ein anderer, der 10 kg mehr gewogen hat und ich natürlich übermütig “Ja ja, ich kämpfe gegen ihn und ich kämpfe auch gegen den”. Tja, der war aber leider auch erfahrener. Ich bin dann also gegen ihn in den Ring gegangen. So die erste Minute habe ich mich nicht schlecht verkauft. Dann habe ich aber beim dritten Kopf die Deckung fallen lassen und er hat natürlich einen rechten Haken rausgehauen, mich perfekt am Kinn getroffen. Dann hat er nochmal zwei, drei Dinger hinterhergesetzt und ich lag flach auf dem Boden. Also Kiefer ausgeränkt, Amnesie. Bis heute kann ich mich unabhängig von der DVD, die ich davon zu Hause habe, an den Kampf sogesehen nicht erinnern. Also ich kenne es nur aus dem Video, aber so kann ich mich nicht mehr daran erinnern. Danach war der zweite Kampf. Das war dann so Repeat. Der erste Kampf war dann mehr oder weniger abgehakt. Beim zweiten Kampf ging mir dann schon die Muffe. Der Gegner hieß Mohammed Ali. (Beide lachen) Marcus: Jetzt ohne Scheiß oder was? Aristo: Der hieß Mohammed Ali aus dem Süden von Hamburg glaube ich. Marcus: Wie geil, ich habe mal irgendwo einen Michael Jackson kennengelernt. Ich komme gerade nicht mehr drauf, wo das war, aber ... (Beide lachen) Aristo: Geil und wenn Du natürlich so in einem Ring steckst oder auch noch viel früher. Wenn Du dann natürlich hörst “Hey, Dein Gegner heißt Mohammed Ali”, dann denkst Du Dir auch so “Was soll der Scheiß denn?” Das ist mein erster Kampf und dann muss ich gegen jemanden antreten, der Mohammed Ali heißt. Zum Glück hatte Mohammed Ali, genauso wie ich, nicht wirklich die beste Kondi an dem Tag. Konditionell war ich vielleicht 5% besser. Ich hatte halt die bessere Physis und bin viel nach vorne marschiert, aber ich weiß noch, der Weg zum Ring - am liebsten wäre ich abgehauen. Wir sind bei der Veranstaltung angekommen, alles schön und gut. Da waren glaube ich 20 Kämpfe. Kurz bevor mein Kampf stattfand, war ein Boxkampf. Und der junge Mann, der sich auch mit mir in der Umkleidekabine fertiggemacht hat, der kam dann plötzlich mit einem zertrümmerten Nasenbein in die Kabine. Und überall Notärzte, Securities, der Veranstalter schrie rum “Holt den Notarzt!” Und seine Nase lief und die Securities stürmen in die Umkleidekabine und kommen zu mir “So Junge, Du musst jetzt in den Ring, Du bist jetzt dran!” Und überall liegt Blut. Aber wirklich, als, Sorry dass ich das jetzt so sage, aber als hätte man da ein Schwein geschlachtet. Und ich hatte gerade mit der Aufwärmung angefangen. Normalerweise hätten wir 20 Minuten Zeit gehabt, aber dadurch, dass der Kampf vorzeitig beendet worden ist und die wollten, dass die Show weitergeht, musste ich natürlich schnell antreten. Und ich dachte so “Ey, das war’s. Der kommt hierein, Nasenbein zertrümmert, blutet wie ein Schwein, Panik, der Veranstalter schreit rum, die Notärzte rennen alle im Kreis und ich soll jetzt dareinsteigen oder was? Sag mal, haben die ne Macke?!” Und mein Gegner heißt dann noch Mohammed Ali. Ich weiß noch den Weg dahin. Vor mir mein Trainer, ich in der Mitte, hinter mir so ein 2,10 m Security Typ, Glatzkopf, richtig böser Blick. Und ich genau in der Mitte. Die Scheinwerfer auf mich und ich denke “Hey, Du kannst hier nicht abhauen.Links und rechts sitzen die Zuschauer, vor Dir Dein Trainer, hinter Dir diese blöde Security. Wo willste denn jetzt hier hin?” So. Da bin ich ehrlich. Im Kopf habe ich mir echt gedacht “Gibt es hier eine Möglichkeit abzuhauen? - geht nicht. Der Typ da hinter mir, neben mir die … egal, zieh es durch.” Ich gehe also darein, Augen zu, gekämpft, zum Glück gewonnen. Aber danach war ich auch echt erleichtert und dachte mir  “Uhhhh, Nase steht noch, alles wunderbar. Gesicht. Siehst noch top aus.” Aber ich sag’s Dir, da ging mir echt die Flaute. Also hätte ich abhauen können, wer weiß, ich hätte es glaube ich gemacht. Da bin ich echt ehrlich. Marcus: Ja krass. Du sagst gerade, Gesicht noch dran, Nase noch alles ok. Das waren ehrlich gesagt auch erstmal so vor ein paar Jahren noch meine Empfindlichkeiten bevor ich dann mit Krav Maga angefangen habe und jetzt mega leidenschaftlich Krav Maga trainiere und auch Level Testings mache. Da habe ich jetzt im Oktober die nächste Prüfung. Und wenn ich unterwegs bin, mache ich auch immer Muay Thai oder MMA um meine Technik im Krav Maga zu verbessern. Bisher zum Glück ist das Gesicht noch nicht so sehr deformiert, aber das war auch immer so mein größter Punkt, wo ich sage “Scheiße, was passiert, wenn Du Dir die Nase zertrümmerst?” Was machst Du dann? Oder spielen diese Gedanken bei Dir irgendwie eine Rolle oder legt man die irgendwann ab? Aristo: Also eine Sache muss ich sagen: Zum Glück haben wir Afrikaner solche flachen Nasen. (Beide lachen) Das heißt, bei uns brechen die nicht so schnell, aber Du musst damit rechnen! Du darfst in dem Sinne nicht zu viel darüber nachdenken, aber wenn es passiert, dann passiert es. Ich habe mir immer ausgemalt, oh der erste K.O. Am Ende kriegst Du sowieso nichts mit. Bei meinem ersten K.O. waren die Lichter einfach aus. Dann waren sie wieder an und dann hieß es “Dicker, Du bist pennen gegangen” und ich habe mir gedacht “Was? K.O.? Kann doch gar nicht sein, ich muss mich doch gerade noch warmmachen.” Ich sage letztendlich mal so: Im Kampf kriegst Du es gar nicht mit. Wenn, dann erst im Nachhinein. Aber so körperliche Schmerzen, die vergehen. Die bleiben halt zum Glück nicht lange. Irgendwann hast Du die wieder vergessen und sagst “ich bin dran gewohnt”. Ich hatte auch mal die Nase angeknackst und das sogar im Sparring. Rechnen musst Du damit immer. Wenn Du es im Ring nicht haben willst, dann steigst Du entweder nicht rein oder Du wirst verdammt schnell oder Du siehst zu, dass Du eine verdammt gute Deckung hast. Anders kannst Du es nicht vermeiden. Wenn es passiert, dann passiert es. Marcus: Und wie hart geht ihr im Sparring? Sprecht ihr euch da ab oder kann es schon mal sein, dass sich das auf einmal so hochschaukelt? Aristo: Also, dass es sich hochschaukelt ja. Das ist ganz normal. Ich meine, Testosteron knallt auf einander. Der eine haut mal zu hart zu. Da denkst Du Dir “Ey Du Arsch” Sorry. “Das bekommst Du sofort zurück.” Aber danach reicht man sich auch die Hand. Nee, aber beim Sparring - wenn jetzt keine Wettkampfvorbereitung ist - gibt es kein hartes Sparring. Natürlich technisches Sparring. Und es muss auch schon ein bisschen Zecken knallen. Ich glaube, da stimmt mir jeder Kampfsportler zu. Aber Du hast nichts davon, wenn Du immer 100% beim Sparring gibst. Irgendwann bist Du auch durch. Vor allem muss man auch sagen, Du arbeitest, hast eine Ausbildung und wenn Du dann jedes Mal mit einem blauen Auge hingehst sagt Dein Chef auch “Du, bei Deinen Kämpfen ist okay, aber Du musst jetzt nicht jede Woche so angetanzt kommen”. Aber grundsätzlich, wenn da ein Wettkampf ist, dann wird auch schon gepfeffert. Es kann natürlich auch sein, dass auch mal die Nase oder die Augen etwas mitkriegen, aber ich sage so, ich spreche mich mit meinen Kollegen nicht ab. Wenn ich in den Ring gehe, spreche ich mich mit meinem Gegner ja auch nicht ab. Der kommt dahin, um mich zu besiegen. Also müssen mich meine Teamkollegen darauf vorbereiten und sagen “Hey Aristo, heute greifen wir Dich an”. Weil selbst wenn er nicht so hart schlägt wie mein Gegner, aber er wird mit Dir genau dasselbe vorhaben. Er wird Dich sogar fertig machen wollen. “Wir wollen Dir helfen, dass Du stärker wirst.” Also dafür bin ich überdankbar. Marcus: Genau, das ist bei uns im Training, beim Krav Maga, auch so, dass manche das missverstehen und denken so “okay, dann mach ich mal nicht ganz so heftig Du kannst ja gar nicht wachsen. Der Eyal Yanilov, der Höchste vom Krav Maga Global in Israel sagt auch immer: Du bist nur so gut, wie Dein Trainingspartner und der muss Dich voll fordern und fördern. Der muss richtig hart mit Dir trainieren, damit Du auch weiter kommst. Wie seid ihr protected bei den Sparrings? Habt ihr dann noch einen Helm an und irgendwelche Schutze, die ihr im Ring nicht habt? Aristo: Also so eine Standard-Ausrüstung natürlich. Beim Kick Thaiboxen Schienbeinschoner, T-Schutz, Mundschutz, Kopfschutz auch manchmal, obwohl ich muss sagen, ich bitte meinen Trainer immer darum, die Dinger abzunehmen, weil die nerven echt. Erstmal schwitzt Du dann dadrunter, wie ein Schwein und dann tritt Dir der eine gegen den Kopf, dann dreht sich das Teil um 180 Grad und dann siehst Du schonmal gar nichts mehr. Dann wird jedes Mal Stop gemacht. Grundsätzlich machen wir das dann so, dass selbst beim Hartsparring, dass natürlich der Trainer sagt “okay, es wird heute hart gekämpft, aber es muss nicht alles 100% zum Kopf gehen. Körper, Leber 100%, Low-Kick, zieh ihm das Ding rein. Wenn Du jetzt mal einen High-Kick abkriegst, halt die Deckung oben, kann auch mal passieren.” Aber sonst achten wir natürlich auch darauf, dass wir jetzt nicht sagen “okay, ich renn jetzt beim Sparring 100% mit reingesprungenes Knie meinem Trainingspartner voll ins Gesicht”. Das mache ich dann natürlich nicht. Man achtet trotzdem schon aufeinander, aber man geht auch mit Wums rein. Wie gesagt, der Kopfschutz. Ich bin nicht der wirkliche Fan. Ich weiß, das gehört dazu. Das soll auch so sein, aber da bin ich ganz der Fighter und sage “Ey, lieber fall ich tot um, als dass ich mir das Ding da drauf setze.” Weil Du kannst Dich dann einfach nicht wehren, Du siehst nichts. Jeder der schonmal mit einem Kopfschutz gekämpft hat, weiß das. Du siehst einfach nichts. Das Ding verrutscht und dann bekommst Du ein Ding von der rechten und Dein Trainer “Ja, nimm den Deckel hoch!” “Sorry Trainer, ich sehe rechts nichts.” Das Ding verdeckt mir da komplett die Sicht. Wir sind da schon gut protected. Wir haben natürlich auch immer dicke Handschuhe. Marcus: Wie viele Unzen habt ihr? Aristo: Beim Sparring haben wir 14er, je nach dem. Wir haben natürlich auch manchmal Riesen bei uns, Schwergewichtler. Die ziehen dann sogar bis zu 16er an. Weil die haben natürlich Wums dahinter. Also 14er, 16er ist dann schon wirklich Standard im Sparring. Vor allem im harten Sparring. 10er haben wir dann natürlich im Ring. Also bei den Handschuhen achten wir darauf, dass die schön dick sind. Marcus: Und wie oft trainierst Du? Aristo: Bei Wettkampfvorbereitung: So oft wie es geht. Zwei, manchmal wenn ich noch die Kraft habe, bis zu drei Mal am Tag. Das dritte Training ist dann eher so ein leicht regeneratives Dehnen und so weiter, aber zu Wettkampfzeit schon bis zu zwei Mal am Tag. Das muss sein. Marcus: Stehst Du gerade vor einem Wettkampf? Wann ist der nächste? Aristo: Ich stehe eigentlich gerade vor zwei Wettkämpfen. Am 19. September die Invictus Fight Night. Marcus: Wo ist die? Aristo: Die ist in Blankenburg. Ich muss da noch einmal nachschauen. Marcus: Wir schreiben das in die Shownotes. Aristo: Also, da bin ich auch verlinkt. Das sieht man auch bei mir auf Facebook. Und dann auf Schloss Dietersdorf am 8. Oktober. Man merkt auch die Zeitspanne ist relativ kurz hintereinander. Deswegen will ich jetzt so fit sein. Der Kampf am 8. Oktober ist auch eine EM. Das wird also ein EM-Titel Fight, wenn alles gut läuft. Deswegen heißt es für mich auch erster Fight. Erster Fight ist nach knapp acht Wochen Pause wieder. Also jetzt in der Sommerzeit, aber das ist auch für mich wiederum eine Vorbereitung für den 8. Oktober. Das heißt, wieder komplett reinzukommen und dann will ich die beiden Fighter sozusagen, ordentlich unter Feuer nehmen. Marcus: Die beiden Fighter sind schon bekannt. Wie bereitest Du Dich darauf vor. Guckst Du dann alte Videos oder denkst Du Dir, Du bereitest Dich so gut vor wie Du kannst und alles andere wird sich im Ring zeigen? Aristo: Jein. Also der erste ist bekannt. Das mit den Videos überlasse ich meinem Trainer. Ich weiß nicht, wie es bei Boxprofis aussieht, aber generell macht so etwas eigentlich immer der Trainer, weil als Kämpfer willst Du Dich damit nicht befassen. Es reicht schon, dass man generell schon aufgeregt ist, dann muss ich mir den nicht noch reinziehen. Mein Trainer sagt mir, was ich zu tun habe. Der guckt sich das an. Von manchen gibt es noch nicht einmal Videos. Das ist auch manchmal so. Gerade in unserer Klasse ist das so üblich. Da wird auch nur vom Hörensagen erzählt. Der Trainer kümmert sich dann darum. Zum Beispiel mein erster Gegner dieses Jahr, Yuri De Souza. Das war ein harter Fighter auf jeden Fall gewesen. Der war bekannt für gefährliche Knie. Ich habe zwei Knie davon gefressen. Eins voll auf mein linkes Auge. Marcus: Obwohl Du es wusstest und wo Dir jeder gesagt hat “pass auf”. Wie ist das, geht das dann zu schnell oder was? Oder er macht eine Finte und dann kommt doch das Knie? Aristo: Ich muss sagen, ich habe viele Knie von ihm blocken können. Das war der Vorteil. Er hat mich glücklicherweise nicht mit seiner besten Waffe runterbekommen, weil ich einfach gut vorbereitet war. Das mal ein Knie durchkommt, war klar. So ein, zwei Knie ist natürlich klar. Du bist ja kein Supermensch. Aber ich habe es größtenteils verhindern können. Wenn er davor die Gegner generell mit Knien runtergeholt hat. Bei mir hat das zum Glück nicht geklappt, weil mein Trainer sich das angehört hat. Meine Trainingspartner haben mich dann auch viel mit Knien angegriffen, sodass ich dann in der Zeit noch gelernt habe, echt viel wegzublocken, was die Knie betrifft. Um so etwas kümmert sich der Trainer, schaut sich Videos an, fragt nach, wie er kämpft, hört sich an. Das macht der gegnerische Trainer natürlich genauso. Und dann werden halt Trainingspartner gesucht, die entweder so kämpfen oder Deine Trainingspartner werden dementsprechend geschult. Dann sagt ihm der Trainer “pass auf, heute kämpfst Du mal so und so”. Da muss man sich eine Strategie aufbauen. Und wie gesagt, bei manchen Kämpfern weiß man nicht, wie er kämpft und hat noch nie etwas von ihm gesehen. Da heißt es einfach “Alter, trainier, versuch irgendwie besser zu werden, geh rein und sieh zu, dass Du das Ding mit nach Hause bringst.” Marcus: Ja. In welcher Gewichtsklasse kämpfst Du? Aristo: Ich kämpfe bis 81 kg. Also der Kampf, der jetzt angesetzt ist, geht bis 81 kg. Die letzten beiden waren sogar bis 82 kg. Das ist bei uns Mittelgewicht. Aber ich will sogar auf 79 kg runtergehen. Das ist so die Gewichtsklasse, in der ich mich auch richtig wohl fühle und wo auch meine Luft am besten ist. Aber ich sag mal 79 bis 82kg kann ich schon und werde ich auch kämpfen. Marcus: Was wiegst Du jetzt so in der Offseason oder vor dem Kampf? Wie viel geht dann immer runter? Aristo:  Jetzt wiege ich so knapp 79, 80 kg. Marcus: Kommt das immer auf den jeweiligen Fighter an? Also manche sind da gerne schwerer und schwitzen sich dann wieder runter wie Sau und müssen dann wieder schnell auffüllen. Wie machst Du das? Aristo: Ich habe das Problem nie gehabt, glücklicherweise. Also ich habe selten zu Wettkämpfen erlebt, dass ich mehr gewogen habe. Und wenn, dann war es wirklich so: Gramm. Das waren 100 oder 200 Gramm zu viel. Also nie irgendwie ein ganzes Kilo. Das habe ich wirklich selten gehabt. Sonst bin ich immer so der, der generell ein bisschen weniger wiegt, zum Wiegen hin. Danach fressen und Du hast es sowieso wieder alles drauf. Ich mache es dann auch immer schon von vorne herein, dass ich dann schon ein bisschen runtergehe. Dann wiege ich lieber ein bisschen weniger und habe auch bessere Luft und alles, sodass wenn es dann zum Kampf hingeht, muss ich mir auch keinen Kopf machen in Sachen “Was muss ich jetzt einen Abend vorher essen? Was darf ich nicht essen?” Das ist ja auch immer total nervig, weil Du bist dann aufgeregt und wenn Du dann einen Tag vorher noch voll am hungern bist, dann fehlt Dir auch die Kraft am nächsten Tag. Deshalb gehe ich lieber schon generell mit dem Gewicht runter, sodass wenn es dann heißt “Hey Waage, hier mein Gewicht; passt; wunderbar; fertig; ab.” Marcus: Ja Du sagtest auch gerade, dann fehlt Dir die Kraft, wenn Du runtergehst. Was ich bei vielen auch gemerkt habe, zum einen mache ich noch Bodybuilding und Fitnesstraining. Und da habe ich mal in so einem krassen Bodybuilding Gym trainiert in Münster, wo auch ein paar auf die Bühne gegangen sind. Die waren super gereizt und aggressiv, als die dann nur noch am hungern waren und andere Kämpfer auch, so wie ich das so mitgekriegt habe. Also ich finde es wahrscheinlich cooler, immer stable zu sein, um dann auch einen richtigen Mindset zu haben und nicht scheiße frustriert gewesen zu sein und dann wieder sich auf einen Kampf konzentrieren zu müssen. Aristo: Du hast das gerade gut angesprochen. Die sind gereizt, übel gelaunt und alles. Das geht auch echt auf die Substanz. Wie auch vorhin angesprochen, da kommt auch noch dieser mentale Druck, dann fehlt Dir die Kraft, dann zweifelst Du an Dir selbst “oh, ich habe wenig gegessen und da fehlt mir die Kraft”. Also so etwas kann dann auch echt zur Negativeinstellung führen. Deswegen bin ich da wirklich von vorne herein so, dass ich sage, da sichere ich mich lieber ab. Lieber wiege ich zwei Kilo weniger und komme dann dahin. Selbst wenn ich dann ein Kilo zu viel habe, dann kann man immernoch sagen “er ist immernoch auf seinem oder unter seinem Gewicht”. Dann bist Du echt sorgenfrei. Vor allem kannst Du dann auch einen Tag vorher ordentlich reinhauen. Wenn Du so zwei, drei Kilo weniger hast, kannst Du noch einen Tag vorher ordentlich essen. Dann gehst Du vielleicht nochmal auf die Waage und hast vielleicht ein, zwei Kilo mehr drauf und hast am nächsten Tag immernoch Dein Gewicht. Das ist optimal. Marcus: Perfekt. Lass uns jetzt nochmal auf Deinen Youtube Channel zu sprechen kommen. Du sagst ja, Du hast den Dominik dabei. Der quasi das ganze Technische übernimmt bei euch. Das heißt, Du bist eher der Typ vor der Kamera, machst die Interviews und hast gar keine technischen Skills und willst das auch gar nicht? Oder wie sieht das bei euch aus? Aristo: Wollen ist eine andere Frage. Aber es ist sauschwer. Ich krieg das ja immer über ihn mit, wenn wir manchmal Videos machen. Man muss ja sagen, es ist etwas anderes, wenn ich ein Fitnessvideo schneide oder ein Kampfsportvideo. Weil Du hast bei Kampfsport viel Bewegung drin. Dreh, geh mit, gucken, Ton, alles muss passen. Und ich sehe auch manchmal, der sitzt dann wirklich tagelang. Manchmal rufe ich den an “Hey Dicker, wielange braucht denn das Video?” - “Ja, ich bin hier noch am schneiden.” Man will den Leuten ja auch etwas cooles zeigen und denen etwas gutes bieten. Vor allem wollen wir auch, dass die Zuschauer einiges mitbekommen. Wir haben jetzt zum Beispiel eine Reihe gehabt für BBJ Skills, wo dann einmal alles gezeigt wird. Da wollen die Leute ja etwas mitkriegen. Selbst wenn es einer zu Hause nachmachen will. Er will ja sehen, was wird da gemacht. Und wenn Du das natürlich scheiße schneidest, dann sieht der ja nichts. Und das wollen wir natürlich vermeiden. Und deshalb sitzt Dominik echt lange und verbringt sehr viel Zeit damit. Dieses technische Know-How was er hat, das kann ich mir gar nicht aneignen. Also ich frage immer, er erklärt dann auch immer, aber ich bin ehrlich: ich verstehe nur die Hälfte. Bei der anderen Hälfte sage ich “Na gut Dicker, ich vertrau Dir, Du machst das schon, Du packst das!” Es ist nicht mein Bereich. Er weiß genau, wenn ich ihm irgendwo helfen kann, dann mache ich das immer gerne. Aber sonst vertraue ich ihm da. Ich bin da auch wirklich so: Wir drehen ein Video - der braucht mich auch gar nicht fragen, weil wir kennen uns schon so gut, dass ich sage “Weißt Du was, wir haben das gedreht, Du schneidest es” und ich weiß, es wird gut! Marcus: Perfekt. Man muss ja auch nicht alles können. Dafür hast Du andere Skills und kannst den Affen vor der Kamera machen, den Clown, und hast das Fachwissen. Aristo: Das macht mir auch mehr Spaß. Marcus: Und wie Du schon sagtest: Ihr dreht ja dann auch zu bestimmten Skills und seid ja im richtig krassen BJJ unterwegs. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu und so. Kommen die Leute alle aus dem eigenen Netzwerk oder wie kommst Du dann an die Leute ran, wenn Du unterwegs bist für Deinen Channel. Aristo: Das ist das geile am Sport. Einmal das eigene Netzwerk und auf der anderen Seite schreiben mich auch so Leute an, die ich gar nicht kenne. Also man sagt echt, Sport verbindet. Wenn ich so überlege, wie viele Leute mich in ihre Gyms eingeladen haben oder mir gesagt haben “Ey, wir eröffnen bald ein neues Gym, komm mal gerne vorbei!” Also teils teils und es macht echt Spaß. Du machst mal mit dem was, dann sieht der das und fragt mal an. Und ich bin da immer offen. Also jeder, der auch schonmal auf Facebook oder mit mir geschrieben hat “Ey Dicker, komm doch mal bei uns in das Gym”. Die denken oftmals ich antworte nicht und plötzlich schreibe ich zurück “Ja, sag mal, wo ist das Gym?” “Hey krass, wusste ich gar nicht, dass Du antwortest, geil! Dann und dann”. Ich sag auch immer: Du kannst von jedem dazulernen, also da bin ich echt weltoffen. Marcus: Ja ich muss auch sagen, ohne Sport wäre ich wahrscheinlich nicht derjenige, der ich bin und gerade wenn wir viel reisen und erstmal keine Kontakte oder Wurzeln haben. Das erste was ich mir suche, noch vor dem Supermarkt oder so, ist wo ist ein lokales Gym? Wo kann ich vielleicht pumpen gehen? Open Air ist noch am coolsten und wo sind auch die local guys? Also nicht irgendwie mit Touristen in irgendeinem Hotel unten dann in so einem Fitnessstudio abzuhängen. Das macht auch voll keinen Spaß. Beispielsweise in Curacao war ich dann in so einem Hinterhof im Kickboxverein und so und habe nur mit den ganzen schwarzen, den locals da, trainiert und das hat so viel bock gemacht. Dann warst Du auch direkt connected und hast die wieder in der Stadt getroffen. Ich glaube Sport, da brauchst Du keine unterschiedlichen Sprachen, da brauchst Du keine Übersetzer, da sind irgendwie alle gleich. Egal wie aussehen, wie groß, wie klein, wie dick. Aristo: Das siehst Du ja. Ich glaube, Du bist da das beste Beispiel. Du sagst, Du reist um die Welt und lernst durch den Sport noch andere Leute kennen. Besser geht es gar nicht. Und ich bin sogar nur in Deutschland und lerne dadurch schon viele Leute kennen. Dann will ich mir gar nicht ausmalen, was denn wäre, wenn man wirklich so international irgendwie unterwegs ist. Man kommt immer auf einen Nenner. Man versteht sich, man weiß “Hey cool, das ist auch ein Sportler.” Du verstehst Dich auf Anhieb. Ich war auch bei voll vielen Leuten in deren Gyms. Da bin ich reingegangen und man hat sich auf Anhieb verstanden. Oder auf der Straße “Hey cool Dicker, ich mache auch Sport, lass doch mal zusammen trainieren.” Sport verbindet einfach. Es gibt nichts besseres. Da ist es egal woher Du kommst, woran Du glaubst, welche Hautfarbe, was auch immer. Wir sind alle Sportler und wir teilen einfach dieselbe Leidenschaft. Marcus: Und da musst Du auch keinen Schiss haben, gerade beim Kampfsport das erste Mal, da kann ich mir vorstellen, dass manche denken “Oh, das klingt ja vielleicht ganz spannend. Ich weiß nicht, ob das vielleicht etwas für mich wäre, aber hey wie krass ist das denn, wenn ich da mal in so ein Kampfsport-Gym reingehe und dann gucken mich alle an und dann verprügeln die mich vielleicht im schlimmsten Fall noch.” Aristo: Das versuchen wir auch mit unserem Channel mehr oder weniger so an den Mann zu bringen. Seid offen für alles. Geht ruhig hin. Das ist ja auch immer dieses klischeehafte “Boah, MMA, nee! - Mama, darf ich MMA machen? - Nee nee, wie brutal, die hauen sich da. Dann kommst Du mir mit blauen Augen nach Hause!” Ach, das ist Quatsch. Du gehst dahin. Wenn Du erstmal Probetraining machst, Du bist ja sowieso erstmal Anfänger. Du musst die Skills überhaupt erstmal lernen. Wenn Du mal etwas abkriegst, dann ist das auch nicht schlimm. Aber Du wirst Anfangs nie irgendwie unter Feuer genommen oder so. Das ist schwachsinnig, das passiert nicht. Sei es im Thaiboxen, Kickboxen, da kann ich wahrscheinlich für jedes Gym reden und sagen: Wahrscheinlich gibt es irgendwo auf der Welt Gyms, die so asozial verhalten sind, dass wenn da ein Frischling kommt, dass die den erstmal zu Tode prügeln oder so etwas. Aber ich sag mal so, der größte Teil ist nicht so drauf. Und das zeigen wir glücklicherweise hoffentlich auch mit unserem Channel. Dass die Leute sich das echt trauen können. Mich fragen auch immer viele “Hey Aristo, ich mache Fitness. Ich traue mich aber nicht zum Boxen zu gehen. Vielleicht bin ich zu langsam und kriege voll einen vorm Kopf.” Da sage ich immer “Dicker, geh hin, mach das Alter. Mach das, warum nicht? Probier es aus. Wenn es Dir nicht gefällt, dann ist es etwas anderes, aber vor den Kopf kriegst Du anfangs nicht. Du musst erstmal die Skills lernen, bevor Du da überhaupt irgendetwas machen kannst.” Ich habe selber auch von Kumpels gehört “Hey Dicker, komm doch mal mit zu unserem Training!” - “Ja Dicker, ich will aber nicht gleich Sparring machen”. Ich so “Wat für’n Sparring?! Du kommst zum ersten Mal mit, da werden wir Dich bestimmt nicht in den Ring ziehen und mit Dir Sparring machen.” “Achso.” Und der andere “Nee, ich will nicht kämpfen.” “Du musst nicht kämpfen, wenn Du nicht kämpfen willst, dann wirst Du auch nicht kämpfen. Du musst erst alles andere lernen, damit Du überhaupt in den Ring steigen kannst.” Also das sind Vorurteile. Marcus: Ja absolut. Bei uns, beim Krav Maga - also für die, die es nicht kennen, das ist ein israelisches Selbstverteidigungssystem. Das kommt aus dem Militär, also ziemlich tough. Und da bin ich dann auch zur first lesson gegangen und da gibt es ja extra so first lessons. Du darfst nämlich gar nicht mit den Leuten trainieren, die schon länger dabei sind. Das macht auch gar keinen Sinn. Du musst ja auch erstmal soft rangeführt werden und erst wenn der Trainer sagt “okay, der ist ready, der darf mal mit zum normalen Training”, dann darfst Du da mittrainieren. Und bevor Du zum Beispiel einen Fight Club machen kannst, was bei uns einmal die Woche ist, musst Du ein Jahr mittrainiert haben. Also da wird keiner verheizt oder so, sonst macht das ja auch überhaupt keinen Sinn, ne? Aristo: Natürlich. Was soll er da jetzt? Du bist komplett fortgeschritten und wahrscheinlich schon fast - in dem Sinne - Profi dann. Was willst Du dann mit einem Anfänger? Das bringt niemandem etwas. Obwohl Krav Maga muss ich sagen, will ich auch mal ausprobieren. Marcus: Ja komm vorbei. Also Warschauer Straße oben im Dojo sind wir da bei dem Taekwondo Dojo, jeden Donnerstag und Dienstag ist First Lesson. Wäre mal cool, wenn Du mit am Start bist. Aristo: Da kommen wir auf jeden Fall vorbei. Die Einladung nehmen wir an! Marcus: Okay, sehr geil! Ich denke mal, wir sind soweit auch durch. Oder, willst Du noch irgendetwas loswerden hier? Für die Leute, die vielleicht jetzt auch Bock haben trainieren zu gehen. Wo trainierst Du oder was sind gute Gyms in Berlin oder gibt es irgendwelche Webseiten, die Du empfehlen kannst, wo man sich informieren kann Deutschlandweit? Aristo: Also gute Gyms Deutschlandweit und in Berlin gibt es viele. Ich bin in der Spitfire Academy. Wir machen jetzt auch bald Neueröffnung ab August. Das Training findet jetzt schon statt. Man kann auch trotzdem vorbeikommen. Aber da bin ich ansässig, das ist mein Team. Für das Team kämpfe ich auch und steige in den Ring. Und sonst kann ich sagen, wir haben viele Gyms. Also da fallen mir alleine, wo ich auch gedreht habe, Boxtempel, Waschhaus, Hauptstadtgym. Es gibt viele coole Gyms. Golden Glory gibt es. Also viele Gyms, wo man vorbeischauen kann. Ich sage prinzipiell: Du kannst nie etwas schlechtes über ein Gym sagen, weil Du musst hingehen, den Trainer kennenlernen, ds Trainingskonzept erkennen lernen und wenn es Dir gefällt, dann gefällt es Dir. Nicht jeder Kämpfer fühlt sich bei jedem Trainer gut oder bei jedem Gym. Das ist immer von Mensch zu Mensch unterschiedlich, aber Du kannst überall hingehen. Letztendlich ist es Sport. Und selbst wenn es Dir da nicht passt, dann kannst Du da hingehen. Also wir haben viele coole Gyms in Berlin und auch Deutschlandweit, wo ich sage: Geht hin! Tut euch keinen Zwang an, probiert Kampfsport aus. Es macht jedem Spaß. Ob Du Fitness machst, Fußball, ob Du es nebenbei machen willst. Und lös Dich von diesem Gedanken “ich bin zu alt, ich bin nicht stark genug, ich bin nicht mutig, ich kann nicht einstecken, ich habe kein Talent”. Davon lösen, jeder kann es machen. Das kann wirklich jeder machen. Mann, Frau. Ich habe auch schon gegen Frauen Sparring gemacht, wo ich echt am Ende sagen musste “Puhhh, zum Glück habe ich diesen rechten Haken abgeblockt.” Sonst wäre ich runter gegangen. Also das macht keinen Unterschied. Das kann jeder machen. Macht es! Auch wenn Du ein Youtuber werden willst. Wenn Du eine coole Idee hast und ein cooles Konzept, mach es, tu es! Überleg gar nicht lange. Wie Du vorhin gesagt hast: Bevor ein anderer Deine Idee macht, nicht klaut, aber bevor er die umsetzt, mach Du sie lieber! Marcus: Ja saugeil! Gutes Schlusswort, vielen Dank Aristo! Wir sehen uns im Gym! Aristo: Ich danke Dir! Marcus: Hau rein Dicker! Aristo: Hau rein! Marcus: That´s it Freunde, Folge Nr. 12 ist im Kasten. [/su_spoiler] [/su_accordion]

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  • 00:34:59

    002. The TheoFit Principles

    · TheoFit Podcast

    Read this full podcast here on the TheoFit website: 002. The TheoFit Principles THEOFIT RESOURCES: TheoFit Membership Weekly Email TheoFit Store Facebook | Instagram | Twitter 002. THE THEOFIT PRINCIPLES Most fitness programs usually focus only on diet and exercise, but neglect teaching people how to win the mental game of fitness — how to become self-disciplined. And a majority of the stuff out there on self-discipline doesn’t work for most people. On top of that, you can have all the discipline in the world, but if you’re doing the wrong things, you won’t see the results you want. In this podcast, we’re going to outline the fundamental principles of TheoFit that explain why every person ever gets in shape. If you see a success story from the Beachbody program, ora CrossFit gym, or the Paleo diet, it’s because these principles are secretly at work behind the scenes. The truth is: There is no magic bullet. Just a few unchanging principles that can be adapted to pretty much everybody. Now, there are three principles of fitness, and three principles of discipline. That means there are six TheoFit principles total. In this podcast, we’re going to explain what they are, how they work, and what happens if you neglect just one of them. However, they’re all extremely simple to understand, they can be adapted to any fitness level, and they’re the only principles that cause real change in any person’s health and fitness. As you listen to these principles, you’re going to have lots of questions come into your mind about how exactly to implement them practically. That’s what the TheoFit membership is for — for you to ask questions that I will answer here on this podcast, and to interact with other TheoFit members who are going through the same struggle. You can join at www.theo.fit/membership. Now, let’s get started. THE THEOFIT FITNESS PRINCIPLES Now, there are complexities to each of these realities that I explain in more detail in the CORE SERIES, which is a free comprehensive guide to the TheoFit program in a series of articles — you can access it at www.theo.fit/core. Let’s dig into these three principles in depth: You were committed. bought the “Six Pack PDF.” You signed up for the website membership. You paid the shredded instagram model. You bought the broccoli and the chicken. You signed the gym contract. And you tried. You really tried. But the results were unimpressive. So, you conclude, these kinds of things Just. Don’t. Work. Sadly, the fitness industry is built on selling half-truths as if they were the holy grail of getting in shape. Carb modulation. Power lifting. High Intensity Interval Training. Paleo. Crossfit. The ketogenic diet. Most people latch onto one of these ideas, hit it extremely hard for a day, a week, maybe a month—and usually stop when they stop seeing results. Here’s the problem, unfortunately: They weren’t doing it right. Getting in shape comes down to three simple practices. And all of these cultish fitness movements usually get one or two of these things right, but sabotages results by neglecting the third. If you can do these three things consistently, you will, without a doubt, lose fat and maintain muscle: Hit a daily 20% calorie deficit. What that means is: However many calories your body burns on average each day, including exercise, subtract 20% from that, and eat that many calories every day. If you don’t do this, you’ll never lose fat. Lift weights at least 4 times per week. If you only eat less food, but don’t lift weights, your body will just use your muscle and fat as an energy source, and you’ll just end up a smaller, skinny-fat version of your current self. Eat 1 gram of protein per pound of lean body mass. You don’t usually need this much protein, but when you’re in a 20% calorie deficit, and you’re lifting weights, your body is in severe need of protein. So, if you’re 250 pounds, and have about 50 pounds of fat, aim for 200 grams of protein per day. If you’re 200 pounds with about 60 pounds of fat, aim for 140 pounds of protein per day. You get the picture. I know this sounds like just another program claiming to be the key, like the atkins diet or some celebrity workout plan. But it’s not. If you boil down every other plan, every success story, every impressive before-and-after photo, these three elements made it work: Calorie Deficit, Weight Lifting, Protein. Some people start eating organic food and lose 10 pounds, and then start telling everyone that organic food makes you lose weight. Or, they’ll eat a high fat, low carb diet, and praise that approach. Or, they’ll join a spin class and lose a bunch of weight, and tell you that their spin class is the only way to get in shape. And they’ll all tell you that you don’t need to count calories or pile up on protein or lift weights. But each of these approaches basically accomplished a calorie deficit by accident. When you eat only organic food, it’s hard to find organic candy bars and donuts that are very high in calories, so you end up eating fewer calories by accident. Same goes for eating low carb—even though you’re eating more fat, you’re cutting out most of the foods that were easy to overeat. Same goes for the spin class—they might be eating the same amount they used to, but they’re increasing their daily caloric output, therefore increasing the calorie deficit they’re in. Just listen to me explain these three points very briefly, very plainly. THE 20% CALORIE DEFICIT A pound of fat is 3,500 calories. If you want to lose one pound of fat in a week, you must achieve a 500 calorie deficit every day for 7 days. If you want to lose 2 pounds a week, you must achieve a 1,000 calorie deficit per day for 7 days. You can achieve a deficit in 2 ways: By eating less, or moving more. That’s it. This is an unmoveable law of fitness that you can never change. Fat loss always come down to achieving a caloric deficit. If you don’t achieve a caloric deficit, you can be crossfitting 6 times a week and doing cardio 2 hours a day—you won’t lose fat. Most people who train for marathons come to realize this. They’ll tell you: Yes, they burn an extra 2,000 calories per day by training, but they also eat a lot more, and don’t even really look that much different. THE WEIGHT LIFTING However, most people are right to point out that caloric deficits can be extremely unhealthy. And they are if your goal is weight loss. But most people I know don’t want weight loss. They want fat loss. Weight loss means you just want the number on the scale to go down—whether you’re losing muscle or fat, it doesn’t matter. But that’s a terrible mindset, because you can look just out-of-shape at 140 pounds as you do at 160 pounds. That’s why you have to lift weights while trying to lose fat—so that you maintain your muscle mass while your body loses fat. Your body doesn’t want to lose fat, so you have to trick it to leave. You don’t want to be smaller for the sake of being smaller. Eating less by itself will just make you tired, irritable, and skinny-fat. But a 20% caloric deficit combined with weight lifting 4 times a week will make you stronger and faster, with more vitality, more focus, and a much better-looking body. When I combined these principles for the first time, I went from being able to grab handfuls of belly fat to having veins run across my abs in a timespan of 3 months. Weight lifting is also highly correlated with lifespan longevity, far more than cardio, running, yoga, etc. Weight lifting is essential if you want to achieve fat loss, instead of just getting smaller. THE PROTEIN Now, the protein. This is the smallest essential part of getting in shape, but it’s pretty important. If you end up eating only 80-100g of protein to day as a girl, or 160-180 as a guy, you’ll be okay. But the more, the better. When you lift weights, you’re actually damaging your muscles with little muscle-tears. Your body makes your muscles bigger by repairing those small tears with scar tissue. Your muscles are essentially just groups of scar tissue. Proteins are the building blocks of that new tissue your body adds. If it doesn’t have enough protein, all that work in the gym will result in your body repairing your muscles to the same size, possibly smaller than before. But if your body has a surplus of protein, they’ll make your muscles bigger and stronger. When you’re in a caloric deficit, your body wants to break down your muscle for energy anyway. So weight lifting, and especially protein, is your way of saying to your body, “NO! This muscle is mine. Stay away. If you want energy, you’re gonna have to go to the fat.” Now, I know what you’re thinking: “That sounds great! It sounds just as great as all those other diet and exercise plans I’ve tried that left me totally disappointed.” Fair enough. But the thing is: I’m not telling you all those other programs were wrong. I’m telling you the fundamental principles that make any success in any other program possible. Other people are trying to sell you programs and tips and tricks. I’m teaching you the fundamental, scientific principles of your body that either put you in better physical shape, or worse. Carb modulation and ketogenic diets aren’t essential components of your life. But these three principles are always operating inside of you—this clean functioning relationship between your caloric intake, your weight training, and your protein consumption. The only question is whether you will embrace this system or ignore it; whether you will build your habits based on the principles themselves, or some marketing offshoot that overemphasizes one and neglects another. This is the only way to lose fat, and there is no other way. I’m not scared of saying that, or being thought arrogant, because I didn’t come up with it. It’s just the way the body works. The more you comply with all three of these practices consistently and simultaneously, the faster and better you will see changes in your body. The less you comply with all three principles, or choose only to focus on one or two, you will find yourself once again putting all your focus and discipline into a program built on a half-truth, which will likely leave you frustrated and disillusioned with your fitness goals. If you haven’t tried implementing these three principles, then you’ve never really tried the one thing that actually works. Now, it's popular today to say that the bodybuilder mindset about protein is wrong — that only meatheads on steroids eat stupid amounts of protein. It's popular to say that we should only be eating 50g of protein per day. And guess what? That's true for most people. Do you know why? Because: Most people aren't lifting weights (damaging their muscles), so they don't need the protein to recover (that would be like buying building materials for a house with no land). Most people aren't in a 20% Caloric Deficit and trying to lose fat, so their body isn't inclined to turn to their muscles for energy — they are likely living an athletically stagnant life, slowly becoming fatter and weaker. Most people aren't trying to build muscle, trying to hit muscle and strength goals. So, they have no need to consume materials that are intended to build muscle. If you're a stagnant person and you do consume massive amounts of protein, because you're not resistance training and counting your calories, your body has no purpose for the protein. So, it likely increases your caloric intake unnecessarily and causes weight gain — again, if you're living a stagnant, goal-less life in regards to fitness, then yes, protein is unnecessary. But if you’re lifting weights regularly and pushing yourself while trying to lose fat or gain muscle, you’re going to destroy your body and completely sabotage your fitness goals. So, in summary, these are the TheoFit Fitness Principles: Resistance train 4-5 times per week. Maintain a 20% calorie deficit if you want to lose fat, and a 10% caloric surplus if you want to gain muscle. Eat 1g of protein per pound of bodyweight. THE THEOFIT DISCIPLINE PRINCIPLES So, you know what to do to get in shape. You’ve got all the head knowledge. You’ve done all the research. But how do you get yourself to do it? How do you beat the labyrinth of laziness in your mind? What practical elements are necessary to succeed in your fitness program? These are the three TheoFit Discipline Principles: Intensity. Consistency. Longevity. Intensity—meaning, get crazy. Go hard. Be extreme. You see your diet and exercise through ferocious eyes. You dig deep within yourself and charge at your daily fitness obligations with force, with power, with vigor. You break through those psychological walls like a berserker. Intensity. Consistency—meaning, you Do. Not. Slip. Up. You go to the gym every day. You finish your workout every day. You hit your calorie deficit every day. People could set their clocks by when you work out. For all you know, the world runs because you run. You crush it Every. Single. Day. Consistency. Longevity—meaning, you keep going. Day 2, the hardest day—you keep going. Day 3, you keep going. Day 8, you keep going. Day 32, you keep going. Longevity means patience with results. Longevity means persistence, stamina, grit, psychological endurance. Trying to get fit without Intensity is like trying to break the speed limit while barely touching the gas pedal. Push that pedal into the ground. Push your engine into the red. Push yourself from comfortable to uncomfortable. Trying to get fit without Consistency what most people do. Most people try to go all out with fitness, but they only go all out 60% of the time. So the other 40% completely negates the 60%. This is the most frustrating place to be, because that 60% is really hard. But it’s giving you the same results as 0%. Consistency is important because, like school, fitness requires at least an 85% success rate in order to get anywhere with it. Trying to get fit without Longevity is like taking out a loan to buy 10,000 lottery tickets. There’s a small chance you could accomplish something, but it will more likely yield depression and frustration than results. THE PERSONALITY WEAKNESSES Most people fail because they have one or two of these three things. They all have names. Try to think about which one of these personality types you are. First, there’s The Robot, who is consistent for a long time, but whose exercise is limp-wristed and their diet is so-so. They’re patient and compliant, but they never push the needle hard enough to go anywhere, even though they follow the directions perfectly. Then, there’s The Berserker, who’s intense about diet and fitness for a long time, but only on weekdays. They have intensity and longevity, but not consistency. up and down every day, always cancelling out 5 days of compliance with 2 days of indulgence. They’re speeding down the highway, but pulling in at every single rest stop to get more snacks. Then, there’s The Sprinter, who’s intense and consistent, but only for a week. They have intensity and consistency, but not longevity. They’re going from 0 to 100 in 5 seconds and crashing into a stop sign. THE LOGISTICAL SOLUTIONS Which one are you? Robot, Beserker, or Sprinter? The problem with these first three is that they choose the two challenges that come easiest to their personalities. But they don’t push themselves out of their comfort zone. Nobody is naturally extreme, consistent, and patient. Everybody has to stretch themselves into something that feels unnatural in order to accomplish these results. Getting fit doesn’t come easily to anyone. Find your missing quality—are you missing intensity, consistency, or longevity? Which come easy to you? Which is the hardest? Here are a few ways to achieve each one if you find it hard. To achieve intensity if you’re a Robot, you need to write down your workout—every exercise, every set, every rep. Then, do two things: Turn all your sets into 5 sets of 5. This means that you’re going to be doing weight that’s hard to do, which means it’s heavy for you. This will drastically increase intensity. And don’t look at it as something you can decide or improvise when you get to the gym. Write it down, and make it a commitment. Fold your intensity into your consistency. The second thing: Strictly enforce a 30-second-rest policy for all your sets. No more than 30 seconds rest between the last rep of your set and the first rep of the next set. When you do these things, your intensity will skyrocket, and it’s a way of logistically fabricating intensity by setting standards for yourself that are hard, and fast. To achieve consistency if you’re a Beserker, you need to build three non-negotiable rituals into your life. These habits must become the simple rails that the heavier habits of working out and dietary compliance run. These are elementary decisions and habits that drastically decrease the willpower requirements of the important behaviors of working out and eating less. First, set a time that you go to the gym every day. It’s an unmoveable time. If you don’t set this time, you’ll never be consistent. Whether it’s 5am or 5pm, set the time, and be there 6 days a week at that time, if possible. Make this the unmoveable date that everybody understands is your gym time. Second, pack your gym bag every single night with everything you need. Don’t trust your “morning self” with this task. Your morning self is weak and untrustworthy. Pack it at night. You don’t go to sleep until your gym bag is packed. If it’s not packed, just assume that you’re already giving up the next day. Third, make a diet rule for yourself: You don’t eat anything until you enter it into your calorie counting app or notebook first. Count calories before you eat, not after. That way, you’re not relying on your post-meal self to be disciplined. Be disciplined before you eat, and then, compliance merely becomes a matter of eating what you’ve put on your plate, rather than taking on post-meal responsibility of calculating and entering your calories, which you’re probably not going to do. To achieve longevity if you’re a Sprinter, you need to find a way to stop sabotaging the satisfaction you could get out of your diet and exercise compliance. You get a sick delight in the pain of pushing yourself, but quickly fall off the cliff of your own overcommitment when you realize how miserable it’s making you. When it comes to exercise, keep yourself to a time limit. If you’re intense and consistent, limit your workout to one hour. In and out. Weights, abs, cardio, leave. That way, when week 2 comes, and you dread the idea of going to the gym for a long, grueling workout, you can remember: “It’s not an endless slog of pushing myself to exhaustion. It’s just the most I can do in an hour. That’s enough. In and out. Go.” When it comes to diet, make a list of low-calorie treats that feel like fulfilling indulgences. Don’t feel like you need to make yourself miserable with the food you eat. For example, scarf down a tasteless head of lettuce before dinner to make yourself feel more full, and then give yourself a low-calorie but filling indulgence afterward. I personally like pre-made sugar free Jell-O, or plain Greek Yogurt with blueberries. Or, you could drink some heated bone broth (or soup), or a fat-burning tea like Slenderizer. That way, you to hit your calorie goal without sinking too deeply into a psychological pit of feeling hungry and empty at the end of every day. At the end of the day, in order to make sure you come through on your plans, or to make sure your plans work at all, you need to know: What’s my personality type? What is hardest for me to achieve—extremity, consistency, or longevity? And how can I make it easiest for me to achieve that difficult attribute so that I can finally make effective plans that last? Hopefully now you have your diagnosis and your answer. Now go do it. CONCLUSION Now, all of the TheoFit content is based on these six principles in total: Resistance Training Calorie Manipulation Sufficient Protein Consumption Intensity Consistency Longevity How exactly you implement these principles into your life is what the rest of the TheoFit community and future podcast episodes are about. Ask me questions, read the books, get the albums that help you get started. But realize that these principles are the fundamental principles that make all other programs work. There’s no way of getting behind these rules. You can’t neglect a single principle. They are all necessary. They all work in tandem. To neglect only one is to sabotage all the effort you’re putting into maintaining the other five. This isn’t meant to intimidate you from fitness, or to say that if you can’t be perfect you shouldn’t try at all. But part of getting in shape is about facing reality. And these six principles are necessary realities of getting in shape. If you aren’t seeing the results you want, it’s good to know why — you’re probably neglecting one of these six principles. It’s probably not an issue of hormone imbalance or meal timing or failure to get the perfect program in place. It comes back to these principles. Do them. Figure out how to apply them to your own individual life, which might look a lot different from someone else. But make these your ideals that you’re always aiming for. To the degree that you achieve them, you body will transform at shocking rates and in surprising ways. Don’t be intimidated. You can do this. Keep coming back to these six principles. Peace.

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  • 《疯狂学校》My Weird School Book 5 Chapter 2 (附原文)

    · Max冬冬

    Chapter 2 Smarty-pants and Dumbhead“Yippee!” I shouted.“Hooray!” shouted my friends Ryan and Michael. We all whooped and hollered and high-fived each other. Finally we could go to Fizz Ed and leave all that reading and writing and arithmetic behind for a change. Miss Daisy gave each of us a name tag so Miss Small, the Fizz Ed teacher, would know who we were.“What’s Fizz Ed?” asked this girl who has red hair named Emily (well, actually the girl is named Emily, not her hair). “Are we going to learn about soda pop?”Me and Ryan and Michael slapped our own heads. We couldn’t believe it. That was like the stupidest thing anybody ever said in the history of the world.“Fizz Ed is gym class, dumbhead!” I told Emily. “Everybody knows that.”Emily looked all upset like she was going to start crying. That girl cries at any old thing.“A.J.!” Miss Daisy said with her mean face. “Hold your tongue!”“Okay.”So I stuck out my tongue and held onto it. Everybody laughed. Well, everybody but Emily and Miss Daisy.The whole class lined up in size order so Miss Daisy could walk us over to the gym, which is all the way at the other end of the school. Ryan was the line leader.“I bet Miss Small will let us play football and baseball and hockey and dodgeball,” Michael whispered to me as we walked. Michael and Ryan are really good at sports. They’re the best athletes in the second grade.“Sports are cool,” I said.“Except for curling,” said Michael. “That’s just dumb.”“That’s not even a sport,” I said.“Curling is what girls do to their hair.” This girl with curly brown hair named Andrea Young must have heard me, because she laughed even though I didn’t say anything funny.“Curling is too a sport,” she said. “I saw it in a book about the Olympics. They take this big rock and slide it down the ice while somebody sweeps the ice in front of it with a broom.”Andrea thinks she is so smart. She probably goes home after school and reads the dictionary for fun. That way she can brag about how much she knows.“You don’t know anything about sports,” I told Andrea.“Do too,” Andrea said back at me. “I take a dance class every day after school.I’m learning ballet, jazz, tap, hip-hop, and clog dancing.”Andrea is one of those kids who takes lessons in everything. All she has to do is sneeze and her mother probably signs her up for sneezing lessons.“Dancing is not a sport,” I said. “Dancing is dumb.”“A little less chitchatting in the hall, please,” said Miss Daisy as we walked to the gym.“Do we really have to go to Fizz Ed, Miss Daisy?” asked Andrea. “Isn’t it more important for us to learn reading, writing, and arithmetic?”“Strong mind, strong body,” said Miss Daisy.Ha-ha-ha! Smarty-pants Andrea Young was gonna to have to do something she didn’t like for a change. She wouldn’t be the best in the class for a change. Welcome to my world, Andrea!I couldn’t wait to beat Andrea at basketball. Beat her at baseball. Beat her at football. This was going to be the greatest day in my life!Andrea Young probably doesn’t even know the difference between a football and a footprint.Finally, after walking about a hundred miles, we reached the gym. It’s this giant room with a basketball hoop at each end. “Miss Small?” called Miss Daisy. “Are you here?”Nobody answered, but there was an echo in the gym so we could hear Miss Daisy’s words over and over again when they bounced off the walls.“Miss Small? . . . Miss Small? . . . Miss Small? . . . Miss Small? . . . Are you here?. . . Are you here? . . . Are you here?”It was cool.“Hello!” I yelled.The gym yelled back, “Hello! . . . Hello! . . . Hello! . . . Hello! . . . Hello!”“Echo!” yelled Michael.“Echo . . . echo . . . echo . . . echo,” yelled the gym.“A.J. is stupid!” yelled Ryan.“A.J. is stupid! . . . A.J. is stupid! . . . A.J. is stupid! . . . A.J. is stupid!” yelled the gym.I was gonna yell, “Ryan is a dumbhead,” but instead Miss Daisy yelled, “Stop that, boys!”“Stop that, boys! . . . Stop that, boys! . . . Stop that, boys!” yelled the gym.It was cool.At that very moment, somebody came running out of the office at the other end of the gym. It was the most amazing thing any of us had ever seen.It was Miss Small.

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  • 00:03:43

    Motivation 005. When You Don't Want to Go to the Gym

    · TheoFit Podcast

    Show Notes: https://theo.fit/podcast/motivation5 Audible Trial: http://www.audibletrial.com/theofit TheoFit Resources: Get a Free Trial of Audible (They kick us a couple bucks at no cost to you — if you click through this link). I love Audible. I'm currently listening to a university lectureship on existentialism, which is riveting.  Truly. I recommend taking the Great Courses through audible's free trial. It's a nice counterbalance to make you feel less trashy for only listening to podcasts — like drinking Cognac and eating Doritos. (Get your intellectual cognac HERE before you listen to this Dorito-level podcast) — http://www.audibletrial.com/theofit Archive of All TheoFit Podcast Show Notes TheoFit Membership Weekly Email TheoFit Store Facebook | Instagram | Twitter Motivation 005. When You Don't Want to Go to the Gym It’s time to actually show up. We’re done with pre-habits. No more prep. No more practice. Showing up to the gym for the first time, or at all, is intimidating. You don’t even want to pull into the parking lot. You cringe when you walk through the door. Your joints are stiff. There are a bunch of knuckle-dragging apes blocking the water fountain. The lights are too bright. All your equipment is always taken. You have a million reasons not to go. Run through your list of Pre-Habits. Review your workout — what muscle are you working today? Where will you do your ab workout? Where will you complete your cardio? Would it be better for your phone to be off? I see a ton of people in the gym sitting still, hypnotized by their phones. I promise you, they’re not getting in better shape. Turn the phone off when you’re done reviewing your workout. You can turn it back on when you’re doing cardio if you need it. But treat this like business. Can the gym suck? Yes. Does it feel like you don’t belong there? Yes. Is it a reminder of how out of shape you are? Yes. Are you going to the gym because you love the pain of exercise? No. You’re going to the gym because you can choose what kind of pain you experience — The pain of working out for an hour a day, or the pain of being out of shape every day for the rest of your life? Your whole future hangs on today. Your whole future hangs on this moment right now. Will you work out or not? If you don’t, you’re just enforcing your reason not to go tomorrow. Don’t tell yourself, “I can take a day off.” No. A day off easily turns into a week off. And that turns into a life off. That’s what you’ve already been doing. To give up today is to give up forever. To work hard today is to incrementally transform who from a weak person to a strong person. Everything hangs on your choice right now. You’re not doomed to your fitness level. The screaming voices in your head, “I can’t! I can’t!” are liars. You get to choose whether to believe your self-doubt, or whether to disprove it. If you can get to the gym today, today will serve as scientific evidence for your future self that you can make your body do things it doesn’t want to do. You can choose to be disciplined. Don’t beleive the voice in your head that says you can’t. It wants you to be weak. It wants you to beleive that you can’t really change your body or change your life. It wants you to believe that you will forever be plagued by chaos and disorder and frustration and self-hatred. It’s time to throat punch that voice. The idea that you are too weak to go is a lie. Get up. Get going. Go to the gym. Go. Right now. Because you can.

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  • 00:40:04

    TheoFit Q&A #1: Fast Food, Deficit Numbers, And Getting Protein

    · TheoFit Podcast

    Read Full Show Notes Here: https://theo.fit/podcast/question1 TheoFit Resources: Archive of All TheoFit Podcast Show Notes TheoFit Membership Weekly Email TheoFit Store Facebook | Instagram | Twitter   TheoFit Q&A #1: Fast Food, Deficit Numbers, And Getting Protein   How do I meal plan in real life? I get meal planning, but how how do I eat healthy when I don't know where all my meals are going to be?   ANSWER: This answer has two parts. First, it’s not a totally necessary component of fitness. Meal planning is good for Type A personalities who like to write everything out. And if you want to do that, I recommend this little journal called the Fitlosophy Fitbook (Which I link in the show notes — at theo.fit/podcast/Question1). But I rely more on meal prep to enable me to eat healthy. And what I do is I buy 4-5 pounds of chicken breast (not chicken thighs — they’re cheaper, but have a lot more calories) and a couple bags of frozen broccoli, and I just bake them on Sunday night, or whenever I have the time. I also cook a bunch of rice. Then, I put them in a bunch of tupperware and put them in the fridge. (I use these — they have compartments, made of glass, and pretty cheap, but very high quality). That part is simple, but it’s a great Pre-Habit than enables you to make healthy diet decisions throughout the week. I use these pre-cooked meals as my “foundation,” and if I want to supplement with some other stuff to keep me sane, I’ll have some Pistachio Halo Top Ice Cream (which is like, this amazing high-protein Ice Cream) or even some Pizza Rolls that I can pop in the over.   Second, there are a lot of times you’ll be out and about and won’t be able to get to your prepared food. That’s fine. That’s why I don’t teach you some specific “TheoFit Diet” that you have to eat, but just TheoFit principles that you can adapt to any situation you’re in. The tough part about eating out isn’t eating healthy, but reflecting on your invisible psychological scripts running in the background that tell you that you have to eat unhealthy if you’re eating out. For example, let’s say you’re out at McDonald’s with friends. Get their Artisan Grilled Chicken Sandwich and substitute the fries for a side salad — and get a water or diet soda. That’s less than 400 calories, and you get get 40 grams of protein. And they have the same options at Wendy’s, or even Taco Bell has a protein bowl and salads that you can get that are very filling, but keep you in the 4-500 calorie range, rather than pushing you into the 1200 calorie range.   The important thing to realize is that if you’re eating fast food, you don’t have to get the unhealthy thing. Even if you’re at a Pizza Hut, get a salad or something.   And one more point on this — and I want to make this point about free food. You don’t have to eat free food. You just don’t. Someone brought a really nice french toast casserole to church or to work? You don’t have to eat it. In fact, you should especially refrain from eating that. Same thing with free pizza. Or free ice ice cream. You don’t have to. Or, and this is even harder, if you’re in a position where it would be truly rude to refuse food or drink that’s being offered to you, take a small serving, just take a little bite, or a small sip. You don’t have to gorge yourself or go for seconds. Just taste it and say that you’re full. If people judge you for not stuffing your face with their food, then they’re the ones being rude, not you.   But the bigger point here is this: You can’t plan all of your meals. Life happens, and nobody can perfectly plan out everything they eat. Nor do they need to. In each meal that you find yourself, remember that you’re trying to eat high protein, moderate carb, low fat — that will optimize your fullness and minimize your caloric intake. And you never, ever have to eat unhealthy food. When you realize that most of your eating habits are more a matter of psychological habit than real need, you can start rewiring your instincts. Human beings can go days without food without suffering any nutritional deficit. You can go a few hours until your next meal without “cheating.”   Hello Paul, First of all thank you for this challenge and all the valuable info you've put out. I'm excited to get started. Forgive me for bringing this up again because you've explained it in great details on the podcast and the core series article. Coming up with my TDEE has been more confusing than ever. I used both the calculators on TheoFit and the one Nate posted in the Facebook group and arrived at significantly different numbers. I'm not sure which number to go with. Your recommendation from the podcast is around 2450 (20~25% deficit)  for my weight (262 lbs.). With the calculator on theo.fit my TDEE was 2620 calories which puts me at ~2000 to maintain a deficit.   Does my body fat % have to be factored into the calculating my TDEE? Does it even matter? With my prior attempt at this it was needed to get a more accurate TDEE. I could be completely wrong.   Also for the sake of counting my calories and tracking things on MyfitnessPal is it important to know the other macros(fat and carbs)?. In other words does it matter how much carbs, and fats I'm eating as long as I hit my 20% calorie deficit, lift weights and consume enough protein? I am so grateful for all your help, and for taking the time to answers these questions. Thank you!   ANSWER: Great questions! Two points. First, So in short, yes, you do need to take body fat percentage into account when calculating your TDEE and calorie deficit. However, I’d say that if you’re doing weight lifting and cardio 4-5 times per week at 262 pounds, then 2450 is a safe number. That calculator in the CORE SERIES gives numbers a bit on the low end, because I think it’s better to underestimate your caloric deficit, then overshoot it and think you’re in a caloric deficit when you’re really not. As you lose weight, you should decrease that number. For example, when you drop 10 pounds, move that goal from 2450 to 2350. And continue to decrease it as you lose weight in order to continue losing fat. Sorry about the confusion — there’s a bit of an art to it since people’s bodies are so different. But 2450 is a good number for you.   Second, aside from getting your protein in, it does not matter what your carb/fat intake is, as long as you hit your caloric deficit. But carbohydrates, especially unprocessed carbohydrates, are much more filling than fat. And carbs also are a much better source of energy. So, since you’re in a deficit, in order to get as much energy as possible, I would recommend getting as many carbs as you can to fuel your workouts, while hitting your deficit. If you overeat fat and undereat carbs while in a caloric deficit, you’ll feel very sluggish.   Also, one point for you on protein — since you’re a female and you have over 60-70 pounds of fat to lose, I’d say you’ll be fine shooting for 150g of protein a day. No need to shoot for more than that. Great questions.   Hey Paul, excited to see this launch! Looking forward to delving into all the stuff you've got here. I recently got my first ring muscle-up, but for about 4 or 5 days I had a bit of discomfort/pain in my left elbow. I haven't attempted any muscle-ups since as I don't want to injure myself—what's your recommendation for getting my elbows nice and injury-resistant?   ANSWER: Great question! So, for those who don’t know, a muscle-up is basically a pull-up that you turn into a dip. So, you begin hanging from a bar, and you pull yourself up so high that you’re on top of the bar and you push yourself up vertically.   My advice to you: Stop doing muscle-ups. Especially if you’re injuring your elbows. It’s purely a vanity a movement, meaning — it looks really cool, but it doesn’t work anything particularly well. If you want to work your arms and back, just do pull-ups. If you want to work your chest and triceps, just do dips. But that strain on your elbows comes from transitioning from the pull to the push movement with your full bodyweight adding a ridiculous amount of torque on your joints. So, if you’re trying to get a date with the kind of girl who is impressed by muscle-ups, by all means, keep doing them. But if you’re pursuing fitness and wanting to work your muscles, just give up on muscle-ups. They’re not adding anything to your fitness level. My calorie counter tracks my cardio and subtracts calories from my total goal. Does that mean I can eat more than my calorie goal? For example, my calorie tracker says I burn about 350 calories during cardio, and my calorie goal is 2000. Does that mean I can eat 2350 calories?   ANSWER: No! If your calorie counter app subtracts calories burned from steps you take throughout the day, ignore that subtraction. Your caloric goal is based on your TDEE, which already takes into account your activity level. Hit your caloric goal, no matter what. Don’t add extra calories because you did extra work for the day. That’s a very bad habit, and you can easily negate your caloric deficit for weeks on end, thinking you’re in a caloric deficit, when you’re really not. Why are fast food restaurants trying to kill us? Chipotle, Chick-fil-A, Taco Bell...maybe the answer's no, but are there "healthy" fast foods that won't destroy your day and your calorie deficit?   ANSWER: Another good one. I dealt with this a bit above, but you can get lots of good, healthy food at fast food restaurants.  Yes, 99% of their food will absolutely kill you if it’s a staple of your diet. But eating healthy food is much more about how much you eat than what you eat. So, for example, people say that it’s expensive to eat healthy. Not if your goal is fat loss. I talk about this more in the CORE SERIES article “How To Eat To Get Fit,” but remember: It doesn’t cost more to eat less. So wherever you go, you can make opportunities to eat healthy if you rewrite the invisible psychological programming in your brain associated with fast food. It just takes intentional reflection when you’re in those situations.   This is a great question, and a difficult decision to make in the moment — but it is very possible to choose the healthy option at the fast food restaurant.   I’m on day three of my taking my overall healthy seriously. TheoFit has been exactly what I needed–not simple how-to instruction, but motivation and mindset development. Thanks, Paul! My questions: What are your thoughts and recommendations for increasing protein? While staying on a low-calorie diet. If you have covered this elsewhere and I haven’t read or remembered that please forgive me. ANSWER: That’s a great question! I haven’t covered it yet, and it can get really tricky trying to lower calories and increase protein at the same time. First, get a protein powder and supplement with a protein shake. You might think, “I can’t afford a protein powder!” But actually, you get about 20g of protein per scoop, and most protein powders cost about $1 per scoop. Even if you were to buy chicken or ground beef, you’re not going to get that amount of protein in real food for that cheap. So, I highly recommend picking up a cheap protein powder supplement at your local target (I use a protein called IsoPure Zero Carb, which is very low-calorie and extremely high quality protein, and I absolutely love it). But you can get almost the exact same thing for half the price per scoop — about .50 cents per 20g of protein — with Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard Protein, which they sell at Costco or here at Amazon.   Also, this is just a little diet trick — most things we think have a lot of protein don’t. So, for example, General Tso’s Chicken, which has “Chicken” in the title, so we think it’s full of protein, is composed of about 80% fats and carbs. So, unless you’re eating pure chicken or cold cuts or steak or fish, most of its caloric value will come from fats and carbs. Deep-fried fish or deep-fried chicken can be especially deceptive in this way — we think it’s a protein-based snack, but we’re spending 200-300 calories per meal just on taste.   One little way to cut these calories out while keeping some flavor in our diets is learning how to use spices in our food. For beginners, I recommend this little 4-pack called Legion of Spice that combines some spices into little packs that you can use on meats, veggies, whatever. That’s a great way to keep flavor in your food without adding a ton of calories with butter, oil, or carbs.   How do I mentally prepare to go into the gym for the first time and/or the first week? Personally I imagine it feeling really awkward and embarrassing and probably pretty humiliating, so maybe my preparation is to just come to terms that it will suck for a short period.   ANSWER: Another good one. I cover this in the album One More Try in the track called “When I Don’t Want To Go To The Gym.” I highly recommend going that album, which you get for free as a TheoFit member, before embarking on a fitness journey — especially if you’re just getting started. Just remember: When you’re weighing the decision about whether to follow through on your commitment to work out, you’re not just deciding for today. You’re deciding for forever.   If you don’t go to the gym today, you’re more likely not to go tomorrow, and the next day. Skipping one day most of the time turns  into skipping the next day. A day turns into a week, which turns into a life time, and all of a sudden one decision of laziness just rolls into a whole sedentary lifestyle, which is the very thing you’re trying to escape. So we often choose not to go to the gym because we think, “Well, I can miss one day and it’s not a big deal.” No. Today, you’re deciding your destiny. The moment of decision about the gym is the very real fork in the road for you. It’s a lie that you can skip one day and it’s not a big deal. No. Skipping is like rust. It’s like cancer. It spreads.   So here’s how to make it easier. Run through your workout one more time. Write the whole thing down in your journal before you even walk into the gym. Go to the TheoFit workout page with your workout and watch the videos of the exercises you’re about to do. Think to yourself, “I can do this. I can do that.” And go into the gym with htis mindset: “The faster I complete these, the sooner I’ll be done.” Think of it as a debt to be payed.   Fitness is not something that you own, like a house. When you work out, you’re not building physical equity. Fitness is something you rent from the universe. And payment is due in the form of difficult exercise and healthy diet. There’s no skating by on yesterday’s work. There’s no paying late. There’s just today, and you either seize this moment and start walking down the path of fitness, or you skip, adn you spend the rest of the day, and probably the rest of your life, trying to forget what could have been if you just tried. And let me tell you: When you try, life gets really good. It’s really hard in all the same ways. But you win every day, even if you lose. Because you’re mastering your body. But when you don’t try, you feel like a loser. And to some degree, the rest of your life is spent trying to forget that.   So try. Choose the gym. Pay your rent. Pay your debt to the universe and take what’s yours. Take your health. Take your fitness. Take your strength. Take it for yourself. Don’t even think about it anymore. You’re going to the gym. Consider your decision made. What are some warm up ideas routines or stretching? Should you stretch? Personally, I know some good stuff here, but would love to hear your thoughts.   ANSWER: Two things. The best stretching you can do is a little light jogging or elliptical or a short, brief walk before your workout. Then, do a couple sets of each exercise with lighter weight before you hit the exercises really hard. This will remind your body what the exercise should feel like and kind of gets you into the “mode” of the workout. It feels like it rewires your nervous system to be in “bench mode” or “deadlift mode.” After you’ve done those lighter warm up exercises, then you can do any relevant stretches to push your muscles to the extent of their flexibility. This can be helpful, again, just to strengthen that psychosomatic link between the mind and the muscle. When you feel your fibers straining in the warmup and stretching in the stretch, it heightens your internal sense of control and authority over that particular muscle. That sounds a little tacky, but I’ll tell you what — it works.   I’m wondering how to divide up my allotted calories each day. How many do I give to breakfast, to lunch, to snack, to dinner. Do I include a protein/post workout shake. Again, so many options. I'm more open to trying things and seeing how it goes. Seems like, based on knowing myself, I'd like the most food at Dinner, so I can go to bed full, but if I don't eat something within 2 hours of waking up, I'm gonna have a headache all day. So, idk where I'm going with that. Would love to hear your thoughts in general.   ANSWER: Just try different stuff out, man. Do a day where you have a pre-workout meal, and a post-workout meal, and maybe you have 5 or 6 meals that day. Try another day where you fast all day and have a big meal at night. Make note of how they make you feel during the day, and at night. What’s your experience? Do you find it easier knowing you’ll be able to eat in a few hours, or do you feel better experiencing the hunger of not eating all day, knowing you’ll get to indulge in a large meal at night?   It’s very individual, and no particular meal timing schedule gives you any sort of advantage in muscle gain or fat loss. One thing, just out of habit — and I think there is a little science behind this — I sometimes drink a protein shake after I work out, even if I’m fasting all day until dinner. There’s some science that indicates that it’s good to drink protein right after a workout, because your body is primed to use a higher percentage of it for muscle-building — almost like the muscle is a protein sponge right after your workout. But other science says that it’s better to fast after a heavy workout, because your body is pumping human growth hormone throughout your body — especially if you worked out in a fasted state. So, either way, I don’t think it matters that much. It’s just important that in the 24-hour period, you hit your protein goal, you work out, and you hit your calorie deficit. Hey Paul, what are some good items to purchase that will help one go deeper into fitness. I feel like I have a good arsenal of things already? For instance, I have some nice Nike Metcons Series 2 work out shoes, a jump-rope that is fit to my height, a nice workout bag, a protein shake bottle with mixer ball, a food scale, a foam roller, etc. But I’m curious what else you might thing to be good. Just curious about anything and everything related to purchasing something that will make the discipline of fitness easier.   ANSWER: Great question. I’m going to do a future podcast on this. Sorry to leave you hanging — it’s a great question. More info to come.   Are there workout apps that are good for tracking workouts?   ANSWER: Yes! For weightlifting, I recommend two apps — one is called Strong, and the other is called Stacked. I prefer Strong, because Stacked can give you some advertisements for other products at times, but they’re basically the same. Those are linked in the Show Notes.   Do you recommend any workout supplements? I'd love a podcast devoted to this. Personally, I've never taken Pre-workout, but it sounds awesome. and a great way to ensure I actually go hard in a work out. But part of me wonders, would my 300+ lb body have a heart attack if it were under that kind of stress? Would protein shakes and other supplements be a good idea if fat loss is the goal?   ANSWER: Also on this, I’m going to do a whole podcast on supplements — it might even be the next podcast. Great question. I even want to wait to answer your question about how to use supplements for different goals in that supplement podcast. But that’s great stuff.  

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  • 00:51:28

    210: Women's Podium Training from RIO

    · GymCastic: The Gymnastics Podcast

    IN THE NEWS In the news, Uncle Tim, Spencer and Jessica chat about: Please take this super short survey. It helps our podcast host find advertisers to fit your every desire. How to watch live on BBC, CBC or NBC (details here). INDYSTAR Expose: How USA Gymnastics protected coaches over kids "IndyStar tracked down four cases in which USA Gymnastics was warned of suspected abuse by coaches but did not initiate a report to authorities. Those coaches went on, according to police and court records, to abuse at least 14 underage gymnasts after the warnings.” Episode 56: Preventing Abuse in Gymnastics 163: ENOUGH Marvin Sharp accused of sexual abuse. We created #GymUnsafe Because the USA Gymnastics system is wildly inadequate, we created a spreadsheet to track coaches who make the news for suspected abuse–filling the gap between the time coaches are investigated and subsequently banned or exonerated. For example, USAG permanently ineligible member, Zac Lawson, has opened a new gym. Skills Highlights: Ponor, Mustafina, Hong Un Jong, Paseka, Shang Chunsong, Chusovitina, Team Brazil and Larisa Iordache finds a gym, finally. Team USA Podium Training The all-around spot is between Laurie and Aly and will be decided tonight, BUT based on today’s podium training, what could one conclude? FX: Gabby, Laurie, Simone, Aly VT: Laurie, Gabby, Aly, Simone UB: Aly, Simone, Gabby, Maddy BB: Gabby, Aly, Laurie, Simone Maggie Haney is as upset about it as Jessica is. Our favorite off-the-cuff comments from the arena, equipment "decorations," fashion news, and reality of living in Rio. GYMTERNET NEWS Round-up of the latest news from Rio includes: NY Times: “The Bedazzling of the American Gymnast”  There is a petition to remove Al Trautwig from NBC gymnastics coverage! The Russians have finally been cleared to compete.  Australian Chef de Mission claims the Australian gymnasts were "on standby" and ready to compete! We are skeptical. CONTEST: A winner every other podcast in August! What: The Bronze Movie Watch Party Kits (gym bag with goodies and the movie), The End of the Perfect 10 book, a U.S. Olympic Trials T-shirt or GRAND PRIZE*: A Bronze Movie gym bag filled with real props used in the film and a one-of-a-kind Aliya Mustafa handmade cross-stitch by Spanny Tampson. How: Tweet, Instagram, Voicemail or Tumblr tag us and use the hashtag #BronzeContest to tell us which retired gymnast you would want to coach you, The Bronze style, to Olympic glory and why? Winners Announced: On every other podcast for the entire month of August! Starting with the women's podium training podcast.  Grand Prize Deadline: August 21st at midnight. Open to Club Gym Nerd members only* SUPPORT THE SHOW Join Club Gym Nerd here. Buy one of our awesome gym nerdy gifts and goodies here. RELATED EPISODES 209: Men's Podium Training at the Rio Olympic Games 208: Rio Olympics Preview 2016 Olympic Team and Coaches Episode 33: Simone Biles & Her Coaches 161: Women’s Finals Recap with Aimee Boorman and Christian Gallardo Episode 77: Aly Raisman Episode 41: Laurie Hernandez & Coach Maggie Haney 151: Danell Leyva Episode 32: Sam Mikulak & 2013 Men’s NCAA Championships 2014 Winter Cup: Chris Brooks on Broken Bones, Blaniks, and Rio Episode 35: Jake Dalton 72: John Orozco 187: McKayla Maroney 206: The Russian Situation 201: Men’s Olympic Trials and P&G Champs Preview Gymbuster: Domestic vs. International Scoring 200: Alicia Sacramone 162: Wrap Up of the 2015 P&G Championships 160: PG Championships Women’s Prelims Recap Episode 48: Kyla Ross Episode 58: Charlotte Drury, Fall Euro Series & NCAA De-commits Episode 31: Elise Ray 148: Shannon Miller Episode 28: Kristen Maloney Episode 55: Worlds Wrap Up & Ferlito-Gate Episode 54: Event Finals Recap from 2013 World Championships Episode 53: All Around Finals Recap from Antwerp World Championships Episode 52: Triumph & Heartbreak Prelims Recap from Antwerp Worlds 114: Fallout From Gymnastike’s Handling of Maroney Hack & Tumble Episodes 3 and 4 with special guest Jenni Pinches! Episode 16: Elizabeth Price 146: Taylor Rice and The 2015 NCAA Championships Episode 9: Chellsie Memmel, Swiss Cup & FIG Presidential Proposals Episode 37: Julie Zetlin 81: Jenny Hansen Episode 15: Joan Ryan Author of Little Girls in Pretty Boxes Douglas Family Gold on Oxygen Podcast Recaps Douglas Family Gold: Finale DFG: World Selection Camp DFG PODCAST: Last Days of Summer Douglas Family Gold: A Companion for Gabby Douglas Family Gold S1E2: Graduation Day Douglas Family Gold: The First Hurdle Douglas Family Gold Preview Show

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  • 01:07:43

    187: Jerred Moon: The Ultimate Training Guide To Becoming A Garage Gym Athlete

    · Super Strength Show with Ray Toulany | Interviews with Health and Fitness Leaders, Strength & Conditioning Coaches, Elite Athletes and Iron Game Legends

    About This Episode In this episode of the Super Strength Show, Strength & Conditioning Coach, Jerred Moon, is here to talk about his new book "The Garage Gym Athlete - The Practical Guide to Training Like a Pro, Unleashing Fitness Freedom, and Living the Simple Life" To quickly rate and review the show click here. Jerred joined us back in episode 100, so if you want to get a bit more context around today’s guest and his background, definitely check out that episode. To bring you up to speed, here is quick bio... Jerred is a Strength and Conditioning Coach and creator of End of Three Fitness which specializes in simple, effective barbell-centric fitness for the other guy. He's a former Physical Training Leader and Fitness Program Manager within U.S. Air Force Special Operations command and he's been featured in CrossFit Endurance, WOD Talk Magazine, Sweat RX Magazine, Life Hacker, The Huffington Post, The Art of Manliness and many other websites and publications. He currently coaches and programs for hundreds of athletes from military operators to stay-at-home mom's. Get access to all the resources Elaine LaLanne mentioned during this interview by visiting SuperStrengthShow.com/187.    -------------------------------------------------- More Specifically In This Episode  From the Air Force to the physical fitness industry Side hustle and training people to become better What is The Garage Gym Athlete and what are the benefits to creating your own garage gym set up? Why everyone should have a some kind of home gym set up Achieving an elite level of fitness with a basic $500 garage gym set up The consistency associated with "at home workouts" DYI Squat & Bench Rack Barbell vs Dumbbells The versatility of Rings and why they're a great addition to your garage gym The Great Mistakes - how to stay accountable and get feedback on your form The importance of building a foundation for the basic lifts Advanced athletes and learning the basic principles of programming The benefits of Block Programming Tips for completing your workout in 60 minutes or less Keeping your eye on the time and cutting down on transition times Tips for keeping yourself accountable, benchmarking, and training alone Learn why you should be waking up early to train -------------------------------------------------- Rate, Review, and Subscribe In iTunes  Reviews for the podcast on iTunes are greatly appreciated (especially 5 star reviews). They allow us to get the word out about the show and grow as a community. This also helps us bring on fantastic guests to share their hard earned knowledge and wisdom with YOU. We read every single review on iTunes and believe that each one goes a long way in helping us make the show even better! It would mean the world to us if you participated in rating/reviewing our show in iTunes. To quickly rate and review the show click here.   -------------------------------------------------- Free Report Head on over to InstantStrength.com to get access to your free report titled, Instant Strength: The One Little Trick that Will Instantly Boost Your Strength by 10lbs or More In Your Main Lifts.   -------------------------------------------------- Connect With Us Email: info@superstrengthshow.com Facebook: facebook.com/thesuperstrengthshow Twitter: twitter.com/strengthshow YouTube: YouTube.com/superstrengthshow Want even more FREE strength, conditioning, and muscle building tips from today's top experts, delivered directly to your inbox? Subscribe to Super Strength Show e-Newsletter for FREE by visiting SuperStrengthShow.com   -------------------------------------------------- Got A Comment or Question? Good, bad, or fugly, we want to get your feedback. If you listened to this show, tell us what you think by sending an email to feedback@superstrengthshow.com. We want to hear from our community and look forward to connecting with you! -------------------------------------------------- To Read the Full Transcript, click here. You'll see the transcript drop down menu just past the audio player and brief intro paragraph.  

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  • 00:15:58

    S2-E5 - The Tools I Used To Lose 40 Pounds In 16 Weeks

    · Goal Getting Podcast with Tony Woodall

    Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very far.-Thomas Jefferson Click Below to Listen to Today's Show   This is an appropriate quote for today's show. Thomas Jefferson, a great American founding father, Vice President, President and Statesman shared this great quote about the benefits of walking. Walking is the best possible exercise. It can be done by just about anyone that has the ability to walk, as exercise. The most important part of what he says in the the second half of his quote. Habituate yourself to walk very far. Habituate -- I like that word. One of the keys to developing a great #WorkOnWellness program is to make what you do a habit. Habituating activities that burn calories will make it easier to complete them. When you habituate these activities, your mind doesn't have to think about should I do this. It is conditioned and primed to start as soon as you think it. Habits I started getting up at 4:00 a.m. a year ago when I started my podcast. I needed the extra time to be able to write up my show notes, record episodes. When I started interviewing my expert guests, I had to have a couple hours in the morning to be able to talk with people on the east coast. My 5 a.m. is there 8 a.m.  Now, I wake up almost every morning at 4 a.m. without my alarm clock. I, unfortunately, wake up about 10-15 minutes before the alarm goes off....Even on the Weekends when I can sleep in.  So there's power in Habituating your activities. We'll cover habits more in a later episode in more depth, because habits can help you develop the right routines to achieve your #WorkOnWellness goals. Tool 1 - The Gym Back to Jefferson's quote. He says you should habituate yourself to walk very far. Walking long distance is an exercise I used frequently when I was working on losing 40 pounds in 16 weeks. I would spend a lot of time in the gym. I like going to the gym. I am a member of Planet Fitness. I have tried other gyms in my area where I live, but keep coming back to Planet Fitness. The main things I like about Planet Fitness are: Great Equipment - new or in good shape - I prefer the models they use over the ones at other gyms Friendly staff Clean locker rooms and facilities Prices - great options from $10 - $25 per month. I have a Black Card which allows me to use any Planet Fitness facility, anywhere. I started going to the one near my office. It's a five minute walk. I would leave work and be there 5 minutes later. If I waited to get on BART for my commute home, I could think of a million things I could be doing better than going to the gym. Tool 2 - The Elliptical I still haven't finished my thoughts on Jefferson's quote about habituating yourself to walk very far. That's where the elliptical comes in. Using the elliptical is like walking. I have a "bad" knee. I had my meniscus removed when I ripped in playing tennis a few years ago. Sometimes it hurts, sometimes it doesn't. It isn't anything that stops me from doing any running. I still run some but I like using the elliptical. It's easier on the knees and I can adjust the levels to make it a little harder workout.  So back to Jefferson and walking far. I started doing 1 hour on the elliptical. I worked my way up to doing 5 miles in an hour. That burns about 700 calories with my weight (at the time) and the levels I used. 5 miles is far. It's recommended that you walk at least 10,000 steps per day. 10,000 steps is about 5 miles. After I hit that goal, I started trying to go for 2 hours. I wanted to get in at least 1200 calories burned in that work out. Remember, I was consuming 1200 calories per day on my eating plan. I had to burn more calories than I was eating. I was burning additional calories with the other walking I was doing throughout the day along with the other activities I did.  If I could burn 1200 calories in my workouts, that meant I would have a calorie deficit. The more days of deficit, the more weight lost. I worked up to 2 hours and burning over 1400 calories on the elliptical each day. That's 10 Miles on the elliptical, 4 days per week. Tool 3 - Map My Walk I usually only went to the gym when it was winter. That's our "bad season" in San Francisco. No mind you, it's not Minnesota, Boston, or even cold. But it does rain from November through April some (not enough) in San Francisco. As the time changed and the sun was out later, I would go to the gym to change clothes and then head out to Walk The Streets of San Francisco. I work in the downtown San Francisco, one of the top tourist destinations IN THE WORLD. There's a reason it is. The scenery is beautiful, the weather is usually nice. This is where I took Jefferson's quote to heart. There is so many great places to walk in the city. I work about 2 blocks from The Ferry Building, which is on The Embarcadero. It a great road that runs along the San Francisco Bay and wharfs. It goes from Fisherman's Wharf all the way past AT&T Park, where the Giants play. On nice days when the sun was up until 7:30 - 8:00 p.m., I would leave the gym and walk down Sansome Street towards Fisherman's Wharf.  Before I left the gym I would plug in my headphones to my iPhone, crank up my playlist and then Start My Workout on my Map My Walk app.  Map My Walk is one of my favorite apps. It uses GPS to track your location and measures the distance you walk, the elevation and many other great things. It integrates into the iPhone health app, as well as fitness appliances like FitBit. I would head out down to Fisherman's Wharf. At the Wharf, I would get on The Embarcadero and start walking south. The scenery is great. When you are at Fisherman's Wharf, you have the tourists, Alcatraz island, you can see the Golden Gate Bridge, as you walk the Embarcadero, the people watching is great. You walk past Coit Tower on the right. There is a great hill and steps you can walk up to get a good burn on your walk. I do that when I want to get some extra calories burned. As you pass the Ferry Building, you can now see the Bay Bridge. There is a beautiful light show on the bridge after dark if you walk at night. Oh, and did I say you walking along The Bay the entire time?  What a view. Well, Jefferson would be very proud of me for habituating myself to walk far. I continued on to AT&T Park where I would turn onto 2nd or 3rd Street and head back into the city. I would head back up to Market Street and then onto Sansome and back to the gym. It usually took me about 90 minutes to complete that walk. It is about 8 Miles. Map My Walk would track my journey, alerting me to each mile as I passed it. I also use it on the weekends when I take my far walks along the waterfront and hills near my house. I would walk 10 - 15 miles on Saturday and Sunday mornings.  Thanks Thomas Jefferson. I did what you said. Tool 4 - My Fitness Pal Another one of my favorite tools that keep me honest and up to speed on my calorie consumption was the My Fitness Pal app. With My Fitness Pal, I can enter and track everything I eat. You can scan bar codes on the food you eat and it will pull the calories and other values from the manufacturer. You can set goals and keep track of your weight as well as your exercise. When you enter all of your meals, your exercise and close out at the end of the day, it will give you a total of what you did and an estimate of how much you will weigh in 1-2 weeks if you keep eating the way you are going. This is great inspiration. I would see that "If you keep eating this way, you will weigh 220 pounds in 5 days. Whoo Hoo! These are the top tools that I used to lose 40 Pounds in 16 Weeks. I've provided links to the websites on our show notes page at Goal Getting Podcast dot com / s2e5  but you can just switch over to the app store on your smartphone and download them. They are both free. I hope this helps you take Thomas Jefferson's quote to heart and Habituate Yourself to walking far as one of your exercises in your #WorkOnWellness journey. If I can work up to it and get to walking 8-10 miles around the city or on the elliptical, you can, too. Go Out Today, #WorkOnWellness with me and Let's Lose 40 Pounds in 16 Weeks, like I did.   I get a lot of my quotes from great books that I read. And if you like to listen to books on Audio like I do, I put together a deal with Audible to give Goal Getting Podcast listeners a FREE Audiobook of your choice AND a 30 Day Trial of Audible's service to try them out. Just click the link in the Blue Box to get to the Audible sign up! Get Your Free Audiobook Here  ~~~~ Goal Getting Masters Private Facebook Group ~~~~ Are you a Goal Getter that wants to learn to Master Goal Getting! We've started a private Facebook Group to have a place for you to meet other like-minded, Goal-Oriented people that will support you and help you Get The Goals You Set. If you want to be a part of the Goal Getting Masters Group, go to Goal Getting Podcast.com / masters Sign up and I will add you to the group. Come prepared to participate and share your goals with other Goal Getters.       If you like our podcast you can easily go Subscribe to our show on iTunes at Goal Getting Podcast.com/itunes   QUICK & EASY - Click here to go leave a review on iTunes   Make Today a Great Day! Please follow us below on your favorite social media channel.  We would love to hear from you there, too. Send us a Tweet, or Instagram Like. You can connect with us on your favorite by going to GoalGettingPodcast.com / and then Twitter or Facebook, or Instagram They will easily take you to the social media platforms and make it easy to follow us. Like our Facebook pagehttp://www.facebook.com/GoalGettingPodcast Follow us on Twitter:Podcast at @GoalsPodcastTony Woodall, Your Host at @TonyWCMB   Follow us on Instagram at @GoalGettingPodcast

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  • 00:57:21

    109: Troy Dodson: Part 1: Power Your Mind To Move, Function, and Perform Better

    · Super Strength Show with Ray Toulany | Interviews with Health and Fitness Leaders, Strength & Conditioning Coaches, Elite Athletes and Iron Game Legends

    About This Episode In this episode of the Super Strength Show, Troy Dodson takes us on his journey to becoming a Functional Health Coach and practitioner of Z-Health®, a neurology-based movement system which enhances athletic performance, injury prevention and pain relief. During this interview, Troy teaches you how to power your mind to move, function, and perform better.To quickly rate and review the show click here. Troy has two decades of experience as a coach, consultant, and mentor and over 10 years experience as a Functional Health Coach. He has studied under some of the leading strength and rehabilitation experts in the world.  By applying the sciences of biomechanics, anatomy, physiology, motor learning and functional neurology, he performs individual assessments for clients and develops customized programs aimed at the enhancement of movement, function and athletic performance in the areas of sport, recreation, exercise, and work. Dodson is a practitioner of Z-Health®, a neurology-based movement system which enhances athletic performance, injury prevention and pain relief. He's also a USA Weightlifting Club Coach, is certified in CrossFit (Levels 1-3), and holds Olympic Weightlifting, Kettlebell and Gymnastics certifications through CrossFit. Get access to all the resources Troy Dodson mentioned during this interview by visiting SuperStrengthShow.com/109.    -------------------------------------------------- More Specifically In This Episode  The brain is the ultimate target when you do an exercise movement. How well you move is dependent on brain function. Sometimes the brainstem needs extra help. Any movement that’s voluntary on the right side of the body is initiated and controlled by the left frontal lobe. Only 10% of the output from the frontal lobe is used to create voluntary movement, and the rest of the 90% is used to stabilize the other side of the body. Cranial Nerves Find what problems you have and resolve them as oppose to compensating for them. Asking the questions, getting the history, and looking at what has happened and then how does that tie back into function. The brain does 3 primary things: It receives sensory input, it makes a decision about that input, and then it provides an output. When you can create a stronger sensory stimulus that allows the brain to provide a stronger output. As your ability to compensate degrades, your problems becomes more exposed because compensate as much as you did before for them. -------------------------------------------------- Rate, Review, and Subscribe In iTunes  Reviews for the podcast on iTunes are greatly appreciated (especially 5 star reviews). They allow us to get the word out about the show and grow as a community. This also helps us bring on fantastic guests to share their hard earned knowledge and wisdom with YOU. We read every single review on iTunes and believe that each one goes a long way in helping us make the show even better! It would mean the world to us if you participated in rating/reviewing our show in iTunes. To quickly rate and review the show click here.   -------------------------------------------------- Free Report Head on over to InstantStrength.com to get access to your free report titled, Instant Strength: The One Little Trick that Will Instantly Boost Your Strength by 10lbs or More In Your Main Lifts.   -------------------------------------------------- Connect With Us Email: info@superstrengthshow.com Facebook: facebook.com/thesuperstrengthshow Twitter: twitter.com/strengthshow YouTube: YouTube.com/superstrengthshow Want even more FREE strength, conditioning, and muscle building tips from today's top experts, delivered directly to your inbox? Subscribe to Super Strength Show e-Newsletter for FREE by visiting SuperStrengthShow.com   -------------------------------------------------- Got A Comment or Question? Good, bad, or fugly, we want to get your feedback. If you listened to this show, tell us what you think by sending an email to feedback@superstrengthshow.com. We want to hear from our community and look forward to connecting with you!   --------------------------------------------------- Read The Full Transcript Below [INTRODUCTION]   [00:00:19] RT: What's up, Strength Maniacs? And thanks for tuning in. I'm pleased to welcome today's guest, Troy Dodson.   Troy has two decades of experience as a coach, consultant, and mentor, and has over 10 years experience as a functional health coach. He has studied under some of the leading strength and rehabilitation experts in the world by applying the sciences of biomechanics, anatomy, physiology, motor learning, and functional neurology. He performs individual assessments for clients and develops customized programs aimed at the enhancement of movement, function and athletic performance in the areas of sport, recreation, exercise, and work.   Dodson is a practitioner of Z-Health, a neurology-based movement system, which enhances athletic performance, injury prevention and pain relief. He's also a USA Weightlifting Club coach, is certified in functional diagnostic nutrition, CrossFit levels 1-3, and hold Olympic weightlifting, kettlebell and gymnastic certification through CrossFit. The guy’s got all kinds of things going on here.   You can connect with him by visiting his website at brainbasedfitnessrx.com.  So it’s just simply the words guys, Brain-based-fitness, and then the letter “r” the letter “x”.com. Troy, welcome to the show, absolute pleasure to have you here my man. We got a lot to talk about, dude. This is really interesting here, your background. How about you tell us a little bit more about yourself?   [00:01:46] TD: Thanks, Ray, I appreciate it. Yes, so I basically got started in the fitness world back in 2005. I opened up one of the first CrossFit gyms in the country or world at the time, back when nobody knew what it was really. I guess just early on in that process, I realized that the clients I was seeing had mobility issues, they had coordination issues, and had challenges with compensations in their movement, and trouble learning new skills – things of that nature. I just really wanted to set out to find ways to help resolve and support them so that they could have better success in the program and not get injured.   I had enough experience at the time with, I dabbled in some strength-related stuff that I believe was taught through Pavel, formerly of RKC. I never did any certification or anything like that, but just some of his information he used to put out so I had some experience with using some brain hacks and stuff. It was relatively crude at the time, but enough for me to feel confident that there would be a pretty good solution for the challenges I was facing as an entrepreneur and gym owner and a coach.   So, I looked for a solution involving neurology to help improve and resolve some of these issues for folks and that is really what lead me to Z-Health performance. Got started with them in 2006 and did just about every certification available and have really just loved doing that. So it's now kind of morphed into its own business so I sold the CrossFit gym a couple of years ago and have been doing this exclusively. I'm essentially in a wellness centre that specializes in recovery and rehab-type stuff for athletes, so 90% of the people walking on the door are athletes and I get the opportunity to help them move better and perform better on a daily basis.   [00:03:52] RT: That actually sounds very interesting.   You're telling me right now that the majority of what your practice is technically Z-Health. That's your thing now, correct?   [00:04:02] TD: Yeah, yeah, exactly. I called my business Brain Base Fitness because ultimately at the end of the day whether you realize it or not, when you're dealing with fitness for yourself to improve your own health and wellness and fitness, or if you're approaching fitness from a functional perspective like you're an athlete that's trying to improve performance, whether you realize it or not, the brain is the ultimate target of the exercise that you're doing or the movement that you're doing. Ultimately, it's going to get changed by the way you move, and how you move, and what you do and how much, and at the same time how well you move is depending on brain function. There's a lot more to it, the body has lots of systems so the brain happens to be the governing system but it's not the only one. So it doesn't mean that every problem is a brain problem, but it's usually involved in some form or fashion because of its connectivity in everything.   [00:04:56] RT: Very interesting. Now, you're saying that you're in a wellness clinic, like you are actually one of the health practitioners within the wellness clinic. Is that the idea?   [00:05:08] TD: Yes, exactly. Yeah. It's basically an arrangement where they have the right type of client who are coming in and I've got services that they're not able to provide.   [00:05:19] RT: Okay. So you're seeing mainly athletes on a day-to-day basis, which is fantastic because that’s actually our listener base, that's our audience, it's people who are into training, athletes, even coaches and I'm very interested in knowing about what is it that you see the average person when they come in. What is the average malady or problem that they're having and I'd like to hear how you go about dealing with that and see what kind of recommendations you have for people, and if you could tell us some details when it comes to that?   [00:05:49] TD: Yes, that sounds good. So it's hard for me to give you an average. Everybody is walking in with different things. I do get, a lot more people are more willing to come and try something new like this when they're in pain, unfortunately. This is really a good solution for improving performance, but people aren't always looking for that newest thing whenever they're looking for performance improvements, but they're a lot more eager to find something that resolve pain. So I do get a lot of that.   I’ll give an example, a few months ago or maybe more than a few months ago at this point, a functional medicine doctor gave me a referral and he sent over an Olympic athlete who's a Taekwondo competitor. He came to see me. He was a little unique because his main complaint was that he had an injury that occurred in one of the tournaments about seven months prior and ever since that injury, every single tournament he was in – so one or two tournaments per month for six or seven months – he would get kicked in the face from the left side without even seeing it coming.   [00:06:57] RT: Not good!   [00:06:58] TD: Yes, totally. Out of all the times he got kicked, four of the times he got knocked out unconscious and one of those times dissipated his jaw as well. So from his viewpoint, he was like, “Hey, I've got an extremely good shot at being in the Olympics next year. I really want to be there, but at this rate I'm not going to be healthy enough to actually be worth anything.” I said, “Yes, I totally agree. We should probably do something about that.” His main goal at that point was to stop getting kicked in the head without seeing it coming.   So in that first session, one of the things that I always do assessments on is vision and checking how the visual system is functioning and doing his visual assessment, I'm looking at eye movements. One of the eye movements is convergence where you're looking at an object go from farther away as it approaches closer to your face. And what I noticed with him was that his left eyes was not able to converge well, which means it couldn't turn in well enough to track and it wasn't being coordinated well. So it would kind of float off into a different position instead of following the target.   So if you have that kind of thing going on, if you play a sport that involves catching a ball, or in this case punching and kicking, or blocking kicks, then you're not going to see something that's coming towards you if it's coming towards you fast enough. It's just not going to even appear in your vision. So to me that explained probably why he was getting kicked without realizing it was coming and ultimately he left that session with one vision exercise that was designed to stimulate frontal lobe on one side, brainstem on side, and cerebellum on one side based off some assessments that we did.   In the process, he went off and he did that, it took him about 30 seconds each time he did a set, roughly maybe a minute and he would go and do 10 sets a day throughout the day and he did that seven days a week, and he didn't come back in for a month because at the time I think we had some ice storms, we had a couple of ice storms in two different weeks, which is weird for Dallas.   [00:09:11] RT: I was going to say, “Wait a minute.”   [00:09:13] TD: Yes, I'm in Dallas. We had a really weird winter weather this year.   He couldn't come in because of that and then he was also out of the country for two different tournaments, two different weeks back to back and he had like – I don't remember now if it was like four or six fights total in those – and he came back in and said, “Hey, I think we resolved it because I didn't get kicked in the face once.” I said, “Well, did anybody try to kick you in the face?” He goes, “Yes. You know at first I didn't think they didn't so I went back and reviewed the tapes and I realized that there was four really good ones that were really quick.” He said, “I normally wouldn't have caught those. They would have hit me, I think.” He said that he was surprised to see his left hand reflexively block the kick without him even realizing it had happened because it was so quick.   So that was kind of cool and then we're able to move on to the next thing, which sometimes it's a challenge. When you're an athlete and you're not in pain and somebody says, “Well, what do you want to do next?” It's like, “Well, I don't know. I don't have any problems.” That's kind of how it was for him and he just thought about it and he said, “Well you know,” because I'd ask him a question. I said, “You know, is there a different side to side on anything?” He said, “Yes, when I do my roundhouse kicks, my right side stops halfway. I wanna kick through the target and my right foot stops at the target and I want it to go through an extra two or three feet.”   I videotaped it – and now I sound old saying videotaped – “I recorded it with my iPhone” [RT: Laughs] and we looked at his left-side roundhouse kicks and we compared it to his right-side and sure enough, he stops halfway there. He said it feels like it hits a brick wall and he can't do anything to change it, and nothing he has ever tried has ever made any improvement in it.   [00:11:03] RT: Okay, hold on. When you say, “It feels like it hits a brick wall,” what does he mean? He means when it contacts the target, or just something in his body isn't moving?   [00:11:11] TD: Picture him throwing a roundhouse kick with his right leg and picture – he's doing this in the air, there's no target he's kicking. He's just showing me. I'm videotaping it, right?   [00:11:22] RT: You meant recording it.   [00:11:24] TD: Yes, I do, golly.   [00:11:26] RT: I'm just teasing you. Okay, yes, so he’s just throwing out some of those kicks.   [00:11:29] TD: He throws a kick and then it's like watching his foot come around from the right and then right when it gets to the mid-line, centre line of his body, it just completely stops. Like it can't go any further past that. He's trying and he's telling me. He said, “Look, the reason why I'm even able to get it as far as I get it is I'm throwing my shoulders around to try to compensate to get my foot to go further. If you watch the left side, when it comes around from the left and it goes to the mid-line, it goes through the mid-line, across to his right an extra two or three feet. He's a really tall dude, he's got long legs and everything.   He said, “I want my right side to be just like my left, but I can't get the foot to go through the target.” He said, “It feels like there's something stopping it like the movement just stops and it's involuntary and I can't change it.” Does it sound like it make sense?   [00:12:26] RT: Oh yeah, definitely.   [00:12:29] TD: Then we'd already establish his primary pattern of the brain function that needed support was that left frontal lobe, left brainstem and sometimes the brainstem just needs more, extra help. So we did some more assessments and kind of the way it works is if you think about if you're going to move your right – in this case we're moving the right leg – so whether you're moving your right finger, right hand, right leg, whatever, any movement that's voluntary on the right side of the body is initiated and controlled by the left frontal lobe.   So, you can essentially assume that if you have a right side movement issue, that you either have a left frontal lobe issue that's keeping you from having good voluntary movement on the right side, or the other flip side of the coin is the left side of your body – if I'm kicking you with my right leg, I need the left side of my body that I'm standing on the left leg, I need it to be nice and stable, and I needed to have good reflexive control.   The way it works is about 10% of the output that goes from the frontal lobe to make movement happen that's voluntary, only 10% of that output is used to create voluntary movement. The other 90% of the frontal lobes output goes down to the brainstem on the same side to help the brainstem reflexively control the left side of the body, so that you have good stabilization, good balance, so that you can actually create strength and movement on the right side while the left side is stable. I looked at it like, “Well, either he's got one or the other” and they're basically related to each other. I knew that we've done some stuff to improve frontal lobe function, I felt like maybe there's more we could do to improve brainstem function, we did some additional assessments and this is kind of a weird one, but it's kind of cool at the same time. It turned out in the assessments that he had some weak function in his cranial nerve 12 and 10.   So there's 12 pairs of cranial nerves, there's a set on each side of the brainstem and cranial nerves are essentially sensory and motor nerves that originate in the brainstem and they go to somewhere in the cranium or face and they do different things like hearing, and smell, and vision, and jaw movement for chewing, and then taste and tongue movement, and swallowing and those kinds of things. The cranial nerve that is basically involved when you swallow, it's also a nerve that goes down to all your organs like your heart and your gut, and things like that. That one wasn't working so well. Also, the one that controls tongue movement, it anatomically sits in the brainstem really close by the one that's involved with swallowing and it goes to the gut. That one is for the tongue and that one actually controls tongue movement like coordination and turning on the muscles of the tongue to make the tongue move.   What that looks like is if I say, “Hey, stick your tongue out at me.” And your tongue goes to the right or to the left, that means that some of your tongue muscles aren't turning on well enough to even out the movement, so it goes one way and not straight. If all of the muscles are working, the tongue will come straight out. For him, his tongue was going one way or the other. I don't remember which way now. That tells me, “Hey, we need to stimulate that cranial nerve 12.”   So he ended up doing division exercise that was still helping him, he then took a 9-volt batter y and stuck it to one side of his tongue like on the top that basically stimulate that nerve. Sounds weird but it works, definitely creates some stimulus and then after that he gargled some water because gargling water stimulates that cranial nerve 10 that goes down to the gut and the organs. Just by doing that, that took him maybe 10 seconds on the tongue and then maybe 15-20 seconds on the gargling and then I said, “Okay, cool. Let's go ahead and look at your kicks now.” This is after about 45 minutes of assessments, so this is getting towards the end of the session.   I was like, “Hey, let's go ahead and check your kicks again and let's see if anything has changed.” He goes back and he tries his left-side first and it still looks the same, he can follow through the same as he could before, and then he tries his right-side. Well, his right-side followed through even further than his left. So he went from being stuck at hitting the centre line, to being able to kick all the way through an extra three feet or so. It's rather incredible. I didn't expect that level of a change that quick, but at the same time I wasn't surprised because I see that kind of stuff happen on a daily basis.   What's interesting is he texted me later that evening and he said, “Hey, man. I thought about this and that's been going on for at least five years.” Then he texted me about an hour earlier, he goes, “Dude, I've been thinking about it even more and I can't think of a time that this wasn't happening where I had better kicks on my left than I did on my right.” He said he's in his mid-20s and I'm sure he has been doing Taekwondo for a really, really long time, so that's probably 10-15 years.   That's what's interesting and that's what I love about it, is that sometimes the problems that you think you have aren't really the problems that you have and if you don't have somebody and if you're not looking for these types of problems, you're not finding them and you're not addressing them. Then if you're not addressing, you're usually just compensating for them as opposed to resolving them.   [00:18:08] RT: Yes, favoring another side or trying to alter your technique which many times...   What was that again? Go ahead.   [00:18:17] TD: Yeah, like he’s commented to me like he's throwing his shoulder around just to get his foot to the target. Yes, compensating just like that.   [00:18:22] RT: Yes and probably there are certain ways of compensating where you adjust your form so much, that's probably going to start wearing out joints in ways that they probably shouldn't be worn out, too, I would imagine.   [00:18:33] TD: Totally, yes. I would agree.   [00:18:34] RT: Especially when it comes to lifting.   [00:18:36] TD: Yes. Even if you're not creating a structural change, those kinds of things happen over a longer period of time, but you're still going to be putting excessive stress on a joint. Even if that doesn't hurt you at the moment, it kind of sets you up where if you get lots of reps, where you have added stress to that one joint, then when you do something that is a little bit beyond your capacity or whatnot, that can actually hurt you. It kind of sets you up for more injury.   [00:19:06] RT: Right. You put a lot of wear and tear and at some point, it's just the feather or “the straw that broke the camel's back.” Right?   [00:19:14] TD: Yes. An interesting way of looking at that, I don't know if you've heard of Dr. Eric Cobb, he's one of the owners and founder of Z-Health Performance. He's a really good guys and really knowledgeable. But he explained something one time that was just really fascinating, the way he explained it. And I’m gonna see if I can do it some justice here, but essentially, he was giving an example of an average man as 200 lbs – we're just going to make some round numbers here. So 200 lbs-weight, maybe six-foot tall, something like that. Maybe the stride length isn’t quite three-feet, but it's two-something, but we're going to call it three to just make it easier on the math.   Every time they take a step, that's 600-foot lbs of force that's going through the body. One of the things with any type of brain-based training and brain-based fitness approach, you're looking to see what's not moving. One of the things we'll do is gait assessment and if you're watching somebody walk, it's very common to see something like the shoulder on one side not swinging as much as the other or not swinging at all. Then you have other things like if the shoulder is not swinging enough and maybe the elbow is swinging a lot more to compensate. You see those kinds of things.   When you have somebody that's producing 600 foot-pounds of force with every step and even if they're sedentary, they're still walking like 2,500-3,000 steps a day, that ends up being 1.2-1.8 million foot-pounds of force per day that's going through their whole entire system. Then if you have this extra movement that's normally not supposed to be in the elbow because it's compensating for the shoulder, now you have some of that force that's repeatedly going through that joint and it's not going to necessarily hurt you right then but it sets you up, where now you're in the gym and your form is off a little bit on your presses, your bench press, or your pull ups, or you do a little bit too much, or whatever the scenario is and now you're like, “Okay, I've got some inflammation.” You get a doctor, you get diagnosed with tennis elbow or tendinitis or something and you get told not to do anything for three months and let it heal or whatever – it's those kinds of things that just tends to provide enough extra stress on the joint and just sets you up for potential injury down the road.   [00:21:42] RT: It's funny. It makes me think of in school when you're doing in physics, I think it was vectors, I think it's what it was. There was always that example if you're off course just by tiny, tiny bit, down the road you end up a mile off course once you add some time to that equation and this sounds somewhat similar. You're slightly misaligned and that's very interesting the way that you put that, every step’s putting whatever 600 lbs of force and even a sedentary person is putting 2,500-3,000 steps a day, you do the math on it and it ends up being a whole lot of force, just bit, by bit, by bit, just wearing, and wearing things out.   [00:22:20] TD: What's incredible is if you look at people that weightlifting their workouts and they do different workouts like they had to get a lot of volume in, even if they do a lot of volume and they're really strong, they do lots of work throughout their workout, they're not coming anywhere close to that much work. 1.-whatever million foot-pounds of work in a day, they're not coming anywhere close to that.   [00:22:42] RT: No. A workout is like - let me try to do some math here.  A workout is measured like in tens of thousands of pounds.   [00:22:47] TD: Yes, exactly.   [00:22:48] RT: I don't think it gets really beyond much more than that.   [00:22:51] TD: Yes. I mean a pretty solid workout’s 40,000-100,000 foot-pounds of work, somewhere in that range. People really don't look at how they're walking and how they're doing, other sitting, those are the things that we all do the most everyday and they can definitely set us up for some movement issues.   [00:23:14] RT: Now something that just popped in my mind there as you were talking is if you're walking – let's say every step is 600 lbs, but if you're squatting, let's just say with some serious weight, does that equate into more forces going through per – let's just call it repetition – and does that put you more at risk, or is it – as I'm talking about this, I think I'm piecing this together. Maybe I see what happens is all of those steps with your misaligned structure, let's call that, is causing wear and tear, wear and tear, wear and tear. Then you go do something like let's say a heavy duty squat, or deadlift, or something to that nature, or put a lot of force through your body because you're playing some type of a sport, you just landed really hard, or maybe you took a big hard hit, that's when all of that wear and tear from all those lighter steps let's just say in the example you provided, finally cause the crack to happen, or the break, or the injury with that greater force. Is that kind of the way that points out?   [00:24:08] TD: Yes. That's how I look at it. Nothing is written in stone so there's always more than one factor, but I just look at that as being how it works. It's kind of like if you ask the question, “What happened before what happen happened?” It's like, “Yes, I hurt myself squatting.” “Yes, but what happened before that?”   [00:24:27] RT: I like that.   [00:24:28] TD: “Oh, well, I've been moving this way for this many years.” “Okay, what happened before that?” “Oh, well I had a surgery and I've got this trauma from this set and the other.” What it's like is asking the questions, getting the history, looking at what's happened and then how that ties back to function. It's not necessarily like – I'm not knocking the medical world, but sometimes you hear about doctors, how they will tell people that, “Oh, yes, you have this issue and this is exactly what happened.” People believe that. So it's not about creating that belief of having certainty, but it's more of from a practitioner's standpoint, being able to look at it and say, “Okay, well what happened before there was pain that might have contributed to this so that we can actually start addressing more of the root?”   [00:25:18] RT: Okay, very interesting.   Now, what are the methods that you use to assess somebody? Because some of the ones that you've provided earlier with the example with the guy in Taekwondo, they don't seem to be very invasive by any means.   [00:25:32] TD: Yes, totally. We're not removing brains and examining them under microscopes, thank God. Non-invasive at all. Everything, it all comes down to function. So we're looking for what's not functioning well and how the brain works, it does three primary things. It receives sensory input and then the second thing is it makes a decision about that input, and then the third thing is that it provides an output. You're getting information in from all these different sources and then you're going to create a motor output to respond to the input. If you think about it, we all want to be stronger or I guess maybe everybody on the podcast wants to be stronger any ways, and we want to add weight to our lifts.   To some degree with brain based training, your focus is to give the brain an input that either wasn't getting before that it needed, or finding a weak input that you can make stronger. So when you can create a stronger sensory stimulus, that allows the brain to provide you with a stronger output. In this case, that would be lifting more weight.   [00:26:44] RT: And again, that’s because - I think you and I were talking about this earlier today. If you're having any issues, it's almost like some breaker switches have been flipped off or on, and the signal is not going to the muscles because your body knows something is not right and the last thing it want you to do is apply too much force through or power through that area and potentially cause yourself some serious problems, and therefore you end up not being able to maximize your full force, your full power. You're not able to express it right so you can't lift as much.   [00:27:15] TD: Yes. It's like the sensory stimulus is coming in, the brain is applying a heuristic to it saying, “Okay, is this thing safe? Is what I'm experiencing sensory-wise, compared to what I'm doing, is it safe?” When it decides it's not safe, it's going to slam on the breaks and so, that's going to look like excess muscle tension around joints to limit your range of motion, to limit your speed, to limit your force production, it might turn muscles off to limit your ability to create force. So it’s kind of like when you're deadlifting, maybe you're having a really good day and you just made a lift that was 10 or 20 lbs above your previous PR and it came up easy. Like it was fast, and easy, and effortless, and you broke it from the ground, just came straight up and it was like when you see that, you're like, “Man, I can do 20 more pounds. No problem.” And you put five pounds on because you know if you make too many of the jump, you're going to screw yourself. So you put on five pounds and you can't even get it off the floor. You can't break it free from the floor.   What’s just happened is not that your structure can't support it, it's more that your brain doesn't think it can based off the sensory stimulus is getting. It's in, “No, this isn't safe. I'm going to shut things down. We're not going to make this movement happen.”   [00:28:29] RT: It's amazing, that built-in intelligence that we got. Right? It's funny how a lot of the times we try to circumvent it and we just end up many times just getting into trouble. It's just amazing how ultimately we just listened to the body and the body already has this built-in – like I said, this intelligence, it's been thousands and thousands and hundreds of thousands and millions of years even, and maybe even billions of years if you want to talk about from the very first amoebas that were being formed or one-celled organisms, and here we are all the way till today and all of that survival and the intelligence has been built into the body and it only seems logical to hack that, to figure it out so you can work with it.   I had Tony Blauer on the other day and he actually, he explained a pretty interesting exercise he did, which is basically he just stood there and he had one of his – I think it was his instructors – one of his coaches. He told him, “Listen man, put on some gloves, I'm going to put a mouthguard in and you’re going to, we’re going to pretend like we're going to get to an altercation and you're just going to sucker me.” He was like, “Are you sure?” “Yes.” He just kept doing it over, and over, and over and I think Tony was videotaping – like actually videotaping because this is back in the '80s he was doing this. And he noticed that sometimes he'd get away and other times, many times he got caught and he was like, “What's going on here?” He's always getting all banged up, mouses under his eyes, bloody lips and nose and stuff, to get this all figured out.   Then what he found was he was just going with the flinch reaction of the body, when he would just kind of go with that and not even realizing that he was doing it, he was able to avoid getting hit and deal with the situation. For those who are listening right now, they may think that, “Man, really?” A lot of the times I'm going to guess that many people probably have issues and they probably don't even realize it either because it's either minor, or they've just gotten so accustomed to them. Would you agree with that?   [00:30:24] TD: Yes, absolutely. It's kind of like some of us are so good at compensating for things and it's all reflexive we don't know it's autonomous, we don't know that it's happening and it allows us to function at a high level. It's just that when the ability to compensate degrades whether it's due to trauma, or maybe your metabolic function doesn't support that level of compensation anymore, or you just age, all this kind of factors coming into play with that. As that starts to decline, now you're having problems because right now your problem is getting more exposed because you're not able to compensate for it anymore.   [00:31:05] RT: Yes. The reason I bring that up is because some of us may listen to this and think, “Well, there's nothing wrong with me,” right? But the reality is there's something going on that's extremely intelligent trying to help you compensate or whatever it may be to deal with the situation you got going on, but ultimately, we really probably should go get screened. Even if you don't think there's anything wrong with you, and just to tie it back, it's again just work with that built-in intelligence kind of like I was saying Tony Blauer, work with that flinch reaction of the body, that built-in instinct and he was able to create something amazing out of that.   Very similar of what's going on here. You're saying that you guys are doing some very basic test for the most part. I mean there is some complexity to them in terms of deciphering exactly what's going on and you need to be trained to be able to do that. But there are some very basic tests, somebody comes into you and they do an assessment, you could slowly start to pick things out and then what's really interesting from what I'm gathering here, and correct me if I'm wrong, you can show people what's going wrong – any issues that they may be having – and then you could actually create a change relatively quickly. It almost sounds like in one session you could show somebody that, “Look, here. Boom! Look what we did.” And they could start feeling the difference. Does that sounds correct to you?   [00:32:19] TD: Yes, that happens all the time. That's actually my goal with every first session with somebody and it happens probably 9 times out of 10. It's the really hard cases where it doesn't, but yes, absolutely. If you look at the way that this all comes together, most of what we're talking about is reflexive. Your spinal posture, most of your posture, 90% of it is reflexively controlled. So this is stuff that yes, you can override reflexes a little bit to some degree, but not for very long. If I try to change how I stand and whatnot, you'll have a very difficult time actually changing the posture alignment of single vertebrae joints. If you can create any significant change, as soon as you shift your focus somewhere else, you're right back to that reflexive position that you're in.   So, how do you get around to changing those kind of things? Posture and stability, balance...   [00:33:20] RT: Actually, Troy, you beat me to it. I was just going to ask you that, actually and I was going to go to a break first and come back to it. So how about we do that? Let's jump to a break, we'll be right back and actually that's what I wanted to hear, that's what I was going to ask you – how do you maintain the changes that you're causing and helping people with it during the session? How do they stick?   We're going to go to a break, we'll be right back with our guest Troy Dodson from brainbasedfitnessrx.com. We'll be right back, guys.   [BREAK]   [00:33:50] RT: The world of working out is seriously confusing at first. It punishes uneducated lifters with years of poor gains and injures, and reward smart ones with slabs of lean muscle and superhuman strength. If you don't know if you're using the right form, have hit a plateau, or things just seem a whole lot more confusing than you thought they'd be, I want to help you out. Let me save you from wasting time and money on BS advice and sweating away in the gym with little-to-nothing to show for it. Head on over to www.Instantstrength.com to get access to your free report titled “Instant Strength: The One Little Trick That Will Instantly Boost Your Strength by 10 lbs or More in Your Main Lifts.”   Whether you're a novice lifter or have years of experience in the Iron game, this is a very helpful resource that you can either apply to your own training or use as a helpful guide to teach others. Stop wasting time and effort in the gym and get the info you need to maximize your gains and minimize your risk for injury. Visit www.Instantstrength.com and get your free report today.   [INTERVIEW CONTINUED]   [00:34:55] RT: Okay, guys. We're back with our guest, Troy Dodson from brainbasedfitnessrx.com and right before the break, I was thinking of the question I wanted to ask him because just based off from what he was saying and then all of a sudden he starts getting to it himself. We're kind of on the same wavelength here.   You were essentially going to tell us how you are getting these results to stick, like this isn't just something that's happening during the session and then a day or two later all of a sudden, is this something that people have to continuously keep coming back to you, or can they get to the point where they “fix this” and as long as they don't go back to getting re-injured or whatever it may be, there isn't a need for a daily or weekly type of visits all the time. You can get to a point where you're okay. Does that sound right, or is it something that continuously needs maintenance?   [00:35:42] TD: Yes. It depends and yes to both. Let me explain. With regards to “is this something that you'll have to do forever in order to keep it going?” You shouldn't have to. Sometimes things don't stick well because somebody's metabolic function isn't working well enough to support neurological changes.   [00:36:03] RT: Okay, hold on one second, dude. Metabolic function, what do you mean by that? Cause you've mentioned that a few times and I'd be remiss if I didn't ask you to elaborate.   [00:36:11] TD: I kind of use that as a catch-phrase for tons of stuff. There's a lot of stuff encompassed in that. Let's talk about the primary things like breathing, like getting enough oxygen, get enough CO2 out. Also blood sugar balance, hormonal balance – those are some of the big highlights, but there's a lot of biochemistry stuff that happens that's just always happening. You can have stuff going wrong in that department. It gets into a huge rabbit hole, but that's what I mean when I'm talking about metabolic function. Every neuron in your brain has to have fuel and activation to survive. Fuel is basically at a very base level, it’s oxygen and glucose and activation is other neurons turning on that neuron.   What happens is if a neuron isn't getting stimulated, it will start lowering the threshold that it turns on. So if you heard of a tinnitus where people hear a ringing in their ears, that's a really good example because essentially they're hearing sound when there isn't any sound because the neurons that are associated with hearing those tones are lowering their threshold to activate and turn on because they don't have enough fuel and one of the ways, the only way that a neuron is going to create fuel is to be activated. It has to get turned on in order to make its own fuel. It's just kind of a process that neurons go through as they’re degrading a function and starting to die off and whatnot and that's happening all the time. It's not like it's a drastic thing.   [00:37:49] RT: So you were saying, just to kind of get us back on track, you were going to explain how this all sticks. Go ahead, go for it.   [00:37:54] TD: Okay. So I kind of wanted to explain, take a minute or two to explain how this is working so that I can talk more clearly about the kinds of things that people are doing and then I’ll wrapped that up with how they do it to make it stick. Does that sound good?   [00:38:09] RT: Yes, that sounds great. Go for it.   [00:38:11] TD: Alright, perfect. Essentially when we're talking about all these sensory stimuli in this case coming up to the brain, what we're doing is we're looking to affect one of four systems. We're looking for improved posture balance, or stability, or better movement. Any one of those, if you make improvements in those, that can affect your ability to create more strength right? And all these are controlled by the brain and the quality of each one of these is really determined or depends on how the brain answers a couple of questions. The first one is, “Where am I in my environment?” And the second one is, “Where is my environment in relation to me?” The better your brain can answer those questions, the better it can produce a strong output for you.   The way that the brain answers those questions is by getting sensory information from four primary systems, which are the visual system, that accounts for most of the stimulus that comes in your brain; then we've got the vestibular system which is your balance, determining which way you're going and whatnot; and then the auditory system which is hearing; and then the proprioception or somatosensory system, which is feeling, movement and light touch, vibration, hot-cold, those kinds of sensory signals that come from the whole body.   Basically the brain is getting the sensory information that's coming through the visual fields, through sound, through motion, and through proprioceptive stuff that's in the joints, muscles, tendons, fascias, skin – that kind of stuff – and it takes us all, and the better all this sensory information matches and fits together and it’s the same thing, in other words the better it integrates, the better it can actually answer those two questions of, “Where am I compared to my environment? Where's my environment compared to me?” That's going to provide you with increases in improvements in posture or stability movement and balance.   The problem comes whenever we have one of the systems that's not working at its best and the information that it's providing doesn't match up with the other systems. For instance, if we have balance sensors that are telling the brain that we're moving in a certain direction, but then the eyes or the vision is telling the brain that, “No, we're not actually moving in that direction.” Then there's like a mismatch and when there's a mismatch, the body has to compensate because the brain has to compensate, so it has to use the body to create the compensation for the brain.   [00:40:43] RT: Okay.   [00:40:46] TD: This compensation can actually affect nearly any system in the body because they're all controlled by the brain at a root level. So as an athlete or as a coach, this is really important because we see compensations all the time in the gym and when we start addressing the sensory input, we can take away those compensations, we can increase strength output and whatnot. As an example, a few years back in my gym, one of my coaches and I, we're working with a female athlete that weighed 105 lbs and her previous PR on deadlift was 185 lbs and she had come in and her workout that day was basically maximizing out on deadlifts and she PR'd at 195 lbs. It was one of those PR’s where, like I said earlier, where they came up really fast and easy and then she put on five more pounds to 200 lbs and couldn't even break the floor with it. Left the weights all racked on the floor and then went to one of our mobility classes where we happen to be doing a lot of vision and the vestibular work in that class. So lots of sensory work.   She did about 30 minutes of that, she came back to the bar to rack the weights because it's Friday night, it's time to go out. Right? She said, “You know, I'm just going to go and try it anyways.” There was 200 lbs laying there on the floor and she lifted it like it was nothing. Nice and easy.   [00:42:11] RT: This is after 30 minutes of not doing anything? Technically she was basically cold?   [00:42:16] TD: Cooled down, exactly. Yes, that's exactly right. So then she goes, “I'm going to add some more weight.” So she puts on 205 lbs like it's nothing. She ended up going to 225 lbs. She maxed out at 225 lbs after she maxed out 30 minutes or 45 minutes prior at 195 lbs, which at the time was a 10 lbs PR. That is crazy.   [00:42:37] RT: All from doing a bunch of exercises that in a million years nobody would ever think would lead to into lifting that much more iron.   [00:42:46] TD: That's right. On the surface level, yes, but if you look at it, what really happened was her increased strength was a symptom of her improved motor output that came from the brain. That was a direct symptom of improved sensory input that came into the brain.   [00:43:05] RT: Yes. So some people, they would do, they do some warmups where they're doing like muscle activations. They're doing glute bridges, glute/ham bridges, so they're trying to get their glutes firing, or their hams firing, or they may do standing crunches with a high pulley cable to activate their core more. So when they go do their squats or deadlifts, they can really brace that core real hard, and that's kind of waking up other muscles. But what you are saying was done, was essentially you weren't waking up a muscle so much, you are basically making sure that there was less resistance along that conduit, along that nervous systems so we could fire in that signal will go all the way through and that muscle will fully activate all the muscles that are required to activate? That's kind of what was happening. Does that sound right to you?   [00:43:49] TD: To some degree, yes. How I would describe it is with, like we talked about earlier in the call, was the brain does three things: it takes an input, it makes a decision and it gives you an output. If you aren't getting good sensory input from your eyes or your balance systems, or they're not matching up very well, what kind of decision do you think your brain is going to make about that input in relation to the output that you want? Is it going to think that lifting more weight is safe or less safe potentially?   [00:44:20] RT: Yes, exactly.   [00:44:21] TD: So it might be less safe and then it's going to give you a weaker output because it wants to down regulate forced production in order to protect the system because the whole entire body is wired for survival. It could care less if your body falls apart 10 years from now. It's a lot more concerned with keeping you alive in the next 30 seconds and that entails not tearing ligaments, tendons, muscles and things like that, soft tissue.   [00:44:45] RT: It's funny because I myself have been in situations where just pulling crazy, crazy, crazy hours and I was telling you this, I mean there was a time when I was getting zero sleep. I'm not even kidding. We're talking less than an hour, a night, for stretches of time, a couple of weeks at of shot and it was just not good. Not a good situation to be in to push yourself in the gym. That was really stupid. And there were times when I could feel myself just going to pull the bar and it's just nothing. It's like almost a switched got turned off. It's literally what it felt like, a switch got turned off. This is weight that I would do – let's just say it's a deadlift. This is something that I would do speed pulls with. So it shouldn't even be an issue here and there's just nothing there. I'm just, “Psh, nothing!” It's off and I'd have to pace back and forth, pace back and forth, and just work myself back up and then I'll go and I'll do it, and I'll force myself to do it but in the back of my mind I'm telling myself, “Man, I got to get things in order here, sleep, whatever it may be and get things back to a normal, something like a normal schedule so this doesn't happen.”   But the reality is I need to be not doing that period because I'm really on the razors edge of getting injured when I was doing that in all likelihood.   [00:45:57] TD: I think a lot of the athletes, not saying that you were doing this but a lot of the athletes - let’s me rephrase this. A lot of athletes were people that are more new to weightlifting, they haven't been around the block for a long time and I think it's a very common mistake that they might make, is coming in thinking that they have the same body and the same neurology day-to-day. So if I got a 500 lbs deadlift before and today's my deadlift day, I've got to get that today. They have to have ways of assessing their own system to see if that's actually the case, or should they go for it, or should they be a little more conservative because it's a dynamic system. You don't have the same body every single day and they're expect to get the same result. Kind of sets you up for failure into some extent. It's also related to people that do the percentage, when they do weightlifting, they do the percentages, percentages of one rep max.   That's the thing, your one rep max might change day-to-day depending on how you're functioning, depending on your neurology and a whole bunch of other factors.   [00:47:12] RT: Yes, it's interesting we have Frankie Faires on, he talked about biofeedback and basically doing a specific exercise that would let you know whether or not you should be doing either a certain movement, or a certain amount of weight, whatever it may be that day. That kind of ties into, it almost feels like instinctive body building to a certain degree you're like listening to your body and what does your body is telling you.   [00:47:34] TD: That's right, yes. Biofeedback is something that's covered within the Z-Health system. It's definitely more than that. Frankie was involved in Z-Health a long time ago, a very long time ago actually, and I know him to some extent personally. What he does and the system he has created is amazing. I would highly recommend it to any of your listeners if they're interested in what he had to say. Definitely having that type of approach would be a very good way to go about it if you're just an individual person that's looking to get some information about how you're moving.   Another thing I would recommend is there is some technology you can use – a couple different things I'd recommend, actually. One is trainwithpush.com and that's basically a sensor that you would wear on your arm, and you do your lifts, and it actually measures your barbell speed, and it will calculate your work, your power and all that kind of stuff.   [00:48:30] RT: Yes. Is that a TENS unit? I think they use that in power lifting. I'm trying to remember the name.   [00:48:33] TD: A TENS unit is more of a stimulation. This is just actually measuring. It's like an accelerometers measuring.   [00:48:38] RT: Sorry, not a TENS unit.   [00:48:40] TD: Oh, I know. You could just call it TENDO.   [00:48:42] RT: The TENDO, yes..   [00:48:43] TD: Yes. I was like, “Where are you going with that?”   [00:48:46] RT: Yes, completely off. TENDO. Is it kind of like a TENDO?   [00:48:48] TD: Yes, it's like a TENDO but it's more consumer-friendly and it's a lot cheaper, like way cheaper.   [00:48:54] RT: Okay. What was it called again?   [00:48:55] TD: It’s called, the website is trainwithpush.com. I think it's called PUSH. It's very interesting because you can actually - I’ve actually done this with weightlifters where we will measure their barbell speed on a lift, and then we'll go and do some sensory work like I'm talking about, and then measure their speed again and see a big increase in speed right there. They have an assessment that they do with box jumps while wearing the device. You get a baseline and then you compare that. Like if you're going to go max out on a certain day, you can go, you can wear that and do that assessment on the box jump and it will tell you if that day you should max out or not because it can basically tell if your nervous system is working well that day or not. That's kind of interesting way of going about it with some technology.   Another thing, kind of somewhat related, a lot of people lose sight of when you train, you're training to create an adaptation and so the training process itself actually makes you weaker and it's through the adaptation process that you actually get better and make improvement. So your goal shouldn't be to get a hard workout, it should be to actually adapt and progress as much as possible from the stimulus given. One technology that I've had some success with in the past with athletes is using what's called HRV which stands for Heart Rate Variability.   That's essentially measuring the timings between heart beats and it can infer through that the level of balance between your autonomic nervous system. So the sympathetic nervous system which is more of your fight or flight stress response and the parasympathetic nervous system which is more of your rest and digest. Once you get a baseline, it can do a pretty good job of telling you whether that's a day that you should go all out, or should back off and do more recovery stuff, or maybe just modify the workout and do a little bit less volume of work.   [00:50:56] RT: I think that was mentioned in Frankie’s interview. I think he did talk about that. I believe so.   [00:51:00] TD: Cool, yes. I didn't listen to it, but he's a really sharp dude. He's really good. Good info.   When I was at Golds, when I sold my gym, I actually was a director at Golds corporate for a year and started up a new program nationwide for them and as part of that, I did a little informal – I don't want to call it “study”, I'm using air quotes you can't see it like my own little personal “study” – and I got some people in one of our gyms to do this thing where we did like a baseline workout on day one, we did it again on day 31, we're 30 days in between like one group use HRV, and the other group didn't use HRV, and then we looked at what the differences were.   So the group that used HRV, they had an 86% performance improvement within that 30 days on the same workout whereas the other group had a 45% improvement on performance. That's almost double, but the main thing for me was that in the group that used HRV, nobody got worse over the course of that month and nobody regressed. With the group that didn't use HRV, we had almost a third of the people actually got worse on the second workout than they did on the first workout.   [00:52:12] RT: Really?   [00:52:13] TD: Yes.   [00:52:15] RT: An HRV, is that something complicated to incorporate?   [00:52:19] TD: No, it's totally simple. It's a one-minute test every morning after you wake up, and go to the bathroom and get around. Here is the best way to do it in my opinion, you go to this website, it's hard for me to say. It's the word “my” - M-Y, and then it’s like the word “athlete”, but instead of an a in the beginning it’s an “i”. Myithlete - it’s like change out the “a” for an “i”.com. myithlete.com. It's a company out in the UK, really good people, they do a lot of good work with their app, update it all the time and essentially you download a $10 app, then what I'd recommend is the finger sensor that fits on your finger and plugs into your phone, you can also use a heart rate strap. If you have one that is bluetooth-enabled, you can look up on their website. You might be able to use it and just download the app. But sometimes I have some connection issues so I prefer the finger sensor.   Essentially it's a 55-second test. It gives you an HRV score and then you rank your sleep, and hydration, and how much volume you did the day before on your workout, the soreness you're feeling, and your mood, all these things. I might be missing one or two, and then it's going to put all that in there and associate it with your HRV score, and then it will actually feedback the information to you in a way that tells you whether or not you should do your workout as planned, or you can go balls out and do more than what you planned, or if you're below baseline, maybe you need to modify or you need to focus more on recovery that day, go get some cryotherapy or something – that kind of thing.   [00:53:59] RT: Okay, Myithlete - is it .com?   [00:54:04] TD: That's right.   [00:54:06] RT: Okay, we'll have that on the show notes page.   [00:54:07] TD: The way just to wrap up that thought really quick, the way that I look at that from my perspective with the brain based training is for me, that's a way for my athletes to actually self-assess their brainstem function on a daily basis and their ability to respond to stress, and then adapt to the stress. So I want them training harder on the days that they can adapt to stress and then as a coach, I can look and see what their score looks like. I can see how they're eating, I can see kind of what the lifestyle factors are doing to their ability to adapt to workouts and better than that, they can see it. I kind of use it that way because it ties right into the brain stuff that I'm doing.   [00:54:46] RT: Okay, definitely going to check that out because I've heard before of a very basic manner to just check your heart rate, get an average heart rate for yourself over a period of time and then check yourself. If it's elevated, first thing in the morning when you get up, check yourself and if it's above what your average heart rate is – and that's probably good indication that you're still recovering. That's like a very rudimentary stone age method of doing it. Anyway, at least a method I've heard thrown around. This new gadget sounds actually pretty darn interesting.   [00:55:14] TD: Yes. This stuff, it's been around since the '60s and up until a few years ago, it was $30,000 to get a system and you had to have a PhD to operate it kind of thing. So only the professional teams and athletes use them. Now you can do it on your iPhone and it's really cheap and I think it's probably going to be a lot more sensitive and give you more information than the other method which is still an okay method. There’s nothing wrong with that.   [00:55:39] RT: Oh, the one that I just mentioned? Yes, that stuff is nowhere near as accurate as what you're talking, but at least it doesn't seem to be.   All right. That's the end of part one. We're going to wrap that up right now. Highly recommend you go to superstrengthshow.com, put in Troy's name, T-r-o-y D-o-d-s-o-n, “Troy Dodson,” you'll get the show notes pages, you'll get access to this interview and you'll have all kinds of goodies on there. But just keep in mind, this is a two-parter, guys. Obviously as you could tell I got cut off here at the end because a lot of good information he's sharing. We're going to come back with part two next time.   superstrengthshow.com, Troy Dodson is the name you put in, you will get the show notes page, you'll have access to the interviews, you will have the interview itself, you can download it if you want, you will have access with the various podcasting platforms we're on which I highly recommend you sign up for because then you have them come straight to you. Then you have all the goodies on the show notes page. Any good resources he mentioned will also be on there, so I highly recommend you go check that out. Feedback, good, bad or fugly, let us know, guys. What do you like, what do you want to see more and what don't you like? Don't hold back. Just let us know alright?. We love hearing the stuff.   Also, don't forget the free report that we got when you sign up to the eLetter, the newsletter there. We have a fantastic report. It teaches you how to maximize your strength while minimizing your risk for injury which is great because it means iron on the bar, which means more muscle on your frame and better performance, and decreasing the likelihood of injury is crucial because you do not gain when you're banged up and you're on injured list. That's never good.   Okay, guys, so that being said, till the next time. Train smart, train hard, talk to you then. [END]

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  • 01:25:15

    Austin Malleolo on CrossFit and Corporate Culture PH77

    · Pursuing Health with Julie Foucher

    https://youtu.be/bM5x4gDxJhI “My big, my goal… if someone asked me, “What’s your goal for the gym?” I’d say “I wanna get the 50 people in the company that don’t workout, that have never worked out, into the gym.  How do we do that?”  I can get anyone that wants to workout in the gym, and I can…that’s easy, that’s not hard.  And I can get people fitter, stronger, blah, blah, blah, that’s fun.  It’s good.  But I wanna get the person that is sedentary.  And they’re embarrassed, they’re nervous.  They’re intimidated.  Whatever it is that they have more negative self-talk than you could ever fathom.  How do we get that person in the gym and they… to realize that we’re all on the same playing field?  And you step foot in the gym, and you’re fighting the same fight we are.” – Austin Malleolo Austin Malleolo is a three-time winner of the Northeast Regional (2011-2013) and six-time CrossFit Games competitor, including individual finishes in the Top 10 in 2010 and 2012, and a 5th place finish as a member of Team Reebok CrossFit One in 2017. Austin got his start in the fitness industry as a personal trainer, and over time, has added an ever-growing list of achievements to his name, including becoming a CrossFit coach, earning his exercise science degree, excelling in his role as a flowmaster on the CrossFit HQ Seminar staff, becoming the head coach at Reebok CrossFit One and owner of Reebok CrossFit One Nation, and developing an online training program, The Ham Plan. Each year, Reebok brings together CrossFit Games athletes to introduce Reebok’s brand campaign, apparel and footwear for the upcoming year. It’s an opportunity for athletes to give feedback, train together, and spend time with each other in a relaxed environment.  I was excited to sit down with Austin at this year’s Reebok Athlete Summit in the Bahamas to chat about how CrossFit has shaped the corporate culture of Reebok, how Austin’s experiences as a youth taught him the importance of personal responsibility and surrounding himself with the right kind of people, and why he is so driven to keep accomplishing more. In this episode we discuss: How Austin’s relationship with Reebok began What prompted the move of Reebok’s headquarters from Canton to Boston What CrossFit has done for Reebok employees How Reebok subsidizes their employee’s gym memberships and incentivizes them to attend Austin’s goal to get people who have never worked out into the gym Austin’s belief that corporate responsibility for preventative healthcare is the future How CrossFit has impacted Reebok’s culture What Austin was like prior to starting CrossFit How Austin learned to take responsibility for his actions and surround himself with the right people Austin’s introduction to CrossFit through the benchmark Fran and how he went all in His desire to reach people and kids that have fallen off the straight and narrow path, and what he would say to help them The importance of surrounding yourself with a good team so that you can positively impact more people What a typical day looks like for Austin Why Austin keeps up such a high pace with so many commitments The advice Austin would give to an aspiring affiliate owner, aspiring competitor, someone who is just starting out with their coaching career, and someone who is afraid to get started in the gym Three things Austin does on a regular basis that have the biggest positive impact on his health One thing he struggles to implement that could have a big impact on his health What a healthy life looks like to Austin You can follow Austin on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Links: Naked Money The Language of God Related Episodes: Ep 28 – James Hobart on teaching, competing, and the real purpose of CrossFit Ep 47 – Coffee Talk with Katrin, Jen,

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  • 00:35:22

    no. 9 - The Fitness on the Road Episode

    · This Unmillennial Life

    A skimpy selection of weights, a broken treadmill and a crowded room of conference goers -- hotel gyms often lack the allure of your regular routine and can make you want to hit snooze instead of lacing up your sneakers. But don't let a bad hotel gym sideline your good intentions. With a few smart tips you can make the most of in-room options and be prepared to keep up your workouts on the go. In today's episode, I interview Amie Hoff, inventor of the FitKit and uncover new ideas for keeping up your workouts while traveling. You'll hear: Tips for in-room fitness options -- no equipment required. Tips for "other" places within the hotel to get in a workout, including how to make the most of your hotel hallway and stairwells. Why you only need 15 minutes to get in a good workout. How getting up and getting in a quick workout may actually make you more productive on the road. What's in a FitKit and how these few simple, light pieces of packable equipment can open up hundreds of new exercises you can do in your room. (To purchase your own FitKit using the discount Amie offered listeners in the show, use the code "UNMILLENNIALLIFE.") I close out this week's show first with a promise to post some of hotel workouts I do when I stay in a hotel that has a decent selection of weights. (Images posted below). And lastly, I share listener submitted answers to the question "What Makes You So Unmillennial?" I also share a personal invite for listeners to join the This Unmillennial Life Group on Facebook to help group-think a list of "If I had a VCR I'd tape this recommendations" for binge-worthy TV.  As always, thank you for listening, subscribing and sharing with a friend! Listeners tell me it's the kind of podcast you want to tell your girlfriends about. So if you haven't done that, please share! Or provide me feedback by leaving me a voicemail OR joining the This Unmillennial Life Facebook Group. Thanks for subscribing. If you enjoy the show, please leave a review! Until next time, ~Regan Never miss another episode! This Unmillennial Life is available each week via iTunes, NPROne and Libsyn. This week’s episode is sponsored by HealthyAperture.com — the web’s first and only dietitian-curated recipe discovery site. Musical support provided by Ben Williams at Kudzu Studio. Website support provided by Katy Widrick at MakeMediaOver.com. Additional support provided by Robin Plotkin of RobinsBite.com. *** Disclaimer: I am not a personal trainer. If you're new to working out, please consult your physician first. These workouts were compiled from various workouts I read about online. I've found them to be doable in most any hotel gym with just a little bit of room and a few weights. The last of these workouts is a BodyPump inspired set of reps geared toward high-rep, slightly lighter weight. The 1 x 1 and 2 x 2 refer to the timing of the move (so 1 x 1 being a faster 1 sec up and 1 sec down move and 2 x 2 being a slower move). Note that "slightly lighter" does not mean light. You should choose weight heavy enough that at least 1/2 to 2/3 of the way through the workout you are feeling fatigue to the point of questioning your weight choice. As my friend Katie Webster (former BodyPump instructor) likes to say "You should be a little scared that you chose too much weight."   

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  • 01:15:04

    Runner's High: Marijuana's Surprising Effects On Athletic Performance (& Whether Weed Really Can Make You Better At Sports).

    · Ben Greenfield Fitness: Diet, Fat Loss and Performance

    https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/weedpodcast The recent controversial article featured on Greatist entitled "Why More Athletes Are Turning to Weed" starts like this... "It’s a typical Wednesday evening. After a long run, Andrew, who works in digital media in New York City, is following his standard post-run routine. Like most runners, he’ll quickly cool down, stretch, drink water, and maybe grab a post-workout snack. Unlike many runners, he’ll also smoke pot. The avid runner and cyclist, whose racing résumé includes the Umstead 100 Ultra, typically lights up immediately before his athletic activities and usually within an hour or two post-sweat session. Andrew isn’t alone in his habit—in fact, combining cannabis and sport has become an underground trend in distance-running culture. Ultra runners such as Avery Collins and Jen Shelton have admitted to running under the influence of marijuana. And former professional runner Chris Barnicle, a cannabis advocate living in Los Angeles, calls himself the “world’s fastest stoner” on Twitter. Pro-cannabis running groups, like Run on Grass in Denver, are dedicated to staying fit and educating others about cannabis, while online communities like Cannafit and NORML Athletics also promote cannabis' association with healthy living. And it's not just runners who are experimenting with weed. Bodybuilders may hit a bong to prevent soreness and sleep better, while action sports athletes such as mountain bikers, skiers, and snowboarders may light up on the lift to get in the zone, loosen up, or release their inhibitions. Even some athletes participating in niche sports such as skeleton, bobsledding, and ice hockey toke up." Last year, in my own article The Effect Of Weed On Exercise: Is Marijuana A Performance-Enhancing Drug?, I delved into whether THC, CBD, or other ingredients in marijuana actually enhance athletic performance on a molecular level. Then, just a few months ago, USA Today reported on the world's first "marijuana gym", describing a San Francisco gym called "Power Plant Fitness", where clients have the option to bring their own cannabis or order edibles, the gym’s preferred form of cannabis, while they are at the gym. A delivery service brings desired edibles to the gym within 15 minutes after clients place orders, and the gym has a designated space for those inhaling marijuana. The gym, which advertises itself as the world's first cannabis gym, touts using the drug for pain, focus and meditation. With the growing popularity of the combination of cannabis and sport, I decided it was high time to get an industry leader on the podcast to take a deep dive into whether weed really helps with exercise performance, and the current state of marijuana in the sporting industry. So my guest on this podcast is Tim Moxey, owner of botanicaSEATTLE, Tim Moxey and botanicaSEATTLE maks some of the best tasting and, in my opinion, healthiest marijuana and hemp based edibles that exist. Take, for example, the label of one of my favorite products that they produce, a tiny Altoid sized product called "Moxeys Mints", which are infused with ginkgo leaf, siberian ginseng, indian gooseberry, echinacea root, chamomile, california poppy, cinnamon, peppermint, ginger and more. Born in the Pacific Northwest, Moxey's Mints are crafted in small batches to promote wellbeing in mind and body. Each pastille is formulated with herbal synergists tailored to elevate the cannabis experience. Moxey’s herbal allies can brighten your day with Siberian Ginseng and Gingko, lower stress and allow you to kick back with California Poppy and Camomile and restore and maintain balance in mind and body with Indian Gooseberry and Echinacea. So how did Tim come up with all these ideas that spawned an enormously successful edibles company? After studying Physics at Warwick Uni, Tim joined British investment bank Barclays de Zoete Wedd, with roles on the derivatives, risk and strategy teams before getting an MBA from Dartmouth’s Tuck School in 2001. After a stint in the Australian division of strategic management consulting firm, Bain and Company, Tim left to build specialist triathlon wetsuit company ‘blueseventy’ into the leading brand in the sport. He then went on to found ‘nuun’, a pioneering hydration company which spawned a new category in sports nutrition. In 2012 Tim was living in the U.K. when he read an article in ‘The Economist’ about Washington State voting to legalize cannabis. It had a profound effect and he was convinced that the socioeconomic benefits from a legal framework far outweighed the prohibition model. He promptly relocated to the US to build a company that would set the standard in a regulated environment. Tim currently runs botanicaSEATTLE with co-founder Chris Abbott. botanicaSEATTLE (www.botanicaseattle.com) is now the leading edibles company in the most developed legal market in the world and is committed to creating innovative micro-dose products that focus on quality and responsibility. It has created and built a portfolio of brands such as “SPOT”, “Mr Moxey’s Mints”, “BOND”, “Journeyman” and “Proper Chocolates” in addition to smokable cannabis brand, “Vashon Velvet”. During our discussion, you'll discover: -Tim's experience at the Tough Guy obstacle course in the UK, one of the world's most difficult obstacle course races...[8:44] -How Tim went from the triathlon industry running blueseventy and nuun into, of all things, cannabis...[14:15 & 20:00] -The current perception of cannabis that athletes and exercise enthusiasts have...[28:10] -Why pro athletes around the world still use weed pretty extensively, whether Tim thinks it gives any direct sports performance benefits, why Tim thinks cannabis is "banned" by organizations like USADA and WADA...[32:40] -The ratio of CBD to THC that seems to give the best effects for athletes...[41:20] -Which specific marijuana strains seem to be most beneficial for athletic performance...[47:15] -The many frustrating hoops a cannabis company has to jump through to even stay in business...[49:40] -The next big products in the industry when it comes to cannabis for athletes...[62:20] -And much more... Resources from this episode: -Botanica Seattle -The Effect Of Weed On Exercise: Is Marijuana A Performance-Enhancing Drug? -Psychopharmacology researcher Ethan Russo -Ben Greenfield's CBD blend at GetNatureBlend.com -My "Sleep Cake" recipe Show Sponsors: -Blue Apron - Create incredible home cooked meals and get your first three meals free, with free shipping! Go to BlueApron.com/Ben. -Quip - Quip is an electric toothbrush that packs premium vibration and timer features into an ultra slim design, that's half the cost of bulkier brushes. Go to getquip.com/BEN to get your first refill pack free with a Quip electric toothbrush. -Organifi - Go to BenGreenfieldFitness.com/organifi Discount code BEN for 20% off your order! -Earth Runners - Go to BenGreenfieldFitness.com/EarthRunners and use code "BG10" to get 10% off your purchase. Do you have questions, thoughts or feedback for Tim or me? Leave your comments at BenGreenfieldFitness.com and one of us will reply!

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  • 00:39:05

    #199: Garage Gym Athelete

    · The Art of Manliness

    Last year I put a garage gym in my house. It's been fantastic, but it's not without its problems. For starters, there's the issue of space. How do you cram in a gym when you have to fit a car in your garage as well? The start up costs for a garage gym are hardly anything to flinch at. How can you save money on equipment without skimping on quality? Which equipment do you actually need? The other issue is just motivating yourself when working out by yourself. How do you motivate yourself to workout when it's just you in your garage and it's dark and 30 degrees outside? My guest today, he has spent his career doing garage gyms and helping people transition to garage gyms. His name is Jared Moon. He's written a lot of content for our site on how to make DIY fitness equipment, like the ever popular DIY prowler. He's got a new book out called Garage Gym Athlete. Today on the podcast, we're going to talk about how to become a garage gym athlete: the pros and cons of garage gyms, the math of garage gyms, the economics of garage gyms, why it might be more affordable than a regular gym, and how to motivate yourself when you're working out by yourself. If you've been thinking about switching over to a garage gym, this podcast might finally push you over the edge.

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  • 00:18:26

    S2-E4 - The HOW Part 2 - How Did I Lose 40 Pounds in 16 Weeks?

    · Goal Getting Podcast with Tony Woodall

    To me, good health is more than just exercise and diet.It’s really a point of view and a mental attitude you have about yourself.-Albert Schweitzer This is a great quote as we discuss the second part of our episode on How I lost 40 pounds in 16 weeks. Good health is more than just diet and exercise. To really have good health we should also be mentally healthy. As Albert Schweitzer says, good health is a point of view. It's really dependent on the mental attitude you have about yourself. There are many physically healthy people that are mental negativity that keeps them from being in good health. The mind itself can take these mental thoughts and even with you in good physical health, make you sick. There are many people that have nothing physically wrong with them. However, their mental beliefs and attitudes about themselves prevent them from living a healthy life. While you are striving for your #WorkOnWellness goal, keep you mental attitude sharp, and strong. Exercise that brain muscle with good, positive thoughts. Remember what I've said before. "Thoughts become things. Choose the good ones." That's one of my favorite thoughts from Tut.com.  Click Below to Listen to Today's Show   This is the continuation of Season 2 Episode 3. We were discussing How I lost 60 pounds in 16 weeks.    How many calories do you burn per day? I didn't exercise at all. I got up in the morning. I got dressed. I went to work. I sat in a desk, went to meetings and lead a pretty sedentary lifestyle. The most exercise I had during that time was walking from the rental car to the gate at the airport, carrying a 20 pound computer bag and rolling a carry on. If I burned 2000 calories in a day, I was lucky. I had a severe calorie overage. How do I lose weight? Losing weight is a simple equation. Eat Less + Exercise More = Weight Loss It takes 3500 calories to burn ONE POUND OF FAT. If I want to lose one pound, I have to burn 3500 more calories than I consume. 40 Pounds times 3500 calories is 140,000 Calories If I want to lose 40 pounds in 16 weeks I have to burn 8750 Calories more than I eat in 16 weeks. The recommended daily caloric intake for men my age was 1800 calories or 12,600 per week or a total of 201,600 in 16 weeks. Do you see the recommended weekly amount? 12,600 calories in a week. I was eating close to that in a day. To lose the weight I wanted to lose in the 16 weeks, I would have to burn 210,350 calories or 13, 147 calories per week. That is 1878 calories PER DAY. Depending on your daily activity, you can naturally burn some calories. If your extent of movement in a given day is limited, You will HAVE TO CHANGE IT. Just to give you an idea; an hour on the elliptical at level 1 will burn close to 900 pounds according to My Fitness Pal. According to the LifeFitness Elliptical machine, it's much less, from my experience.  I would estimate 600 calories per hour.  If you use that number, you would need to spend just over 3 hours on the elliptical, 7 days per week. Do you have 3 hours per day to spend on the elliptical every day? I didn't. I spoke to my doctor and I insist you do so with yours before you start a #WorkOnWellness program. I had to modify my caloric requirements to be able to accomplish my goal. My doctor put me on a 1200 Calorie per day eating plan. The 1200 calories per day was broken into this: 300 Calories for Breakfast 400 Calories for Lunch 300 Calories for Dinner 200 Calories for Snacks 12oo Calories per day for 16 weeks was 134,400 calories. I would have to burn 143,150 calories during that 16 week period. To make it simple; with a 1200 calorie per day intake I had to burn 1250 calories per day.  If I was burning about 600 calories per hour on the elliptical I would need to spend 2 hours per day on the elliptical 7 days a week. This is what I would HAVE to Do in order to lose the weight I wanted to lose in the time frame I set. 40 Pounds in 16 Weeks. Let's get real. Can I really do that? What if I don't have the time to spend 2 hours per day, 7 days a week to burn the calories I need to lose the weight in 16 weeks? Your goal is unrealistic. It isn't attainable. But, If you have the ability to set that time on the elliptical or a way to burn the same amount of calories in a shorter time, then your goal is one you should set. I decided to do what I needed to do to get the goal I set, Lose 40 Pounds in 16 Weeks. Using the Goal Setting and Goal Maintenance Worksheets Take your Goal Setting Worksheet out and let us look at what Action Steps we need to take to achieve my What. I must eat a healthy 12oo calories per day. I need to come as close as possible to this. We need to ensure we eat enough calories to be healthy. This should contain the correct amounts of protein, carbs and other nutrients. Limit the amount of carbohydrates as recommended by your doctor or nutritionist. I must burn more than 1250 calories per day. If you can burn more, that's better. How you burn them isn't important. I will workout a minimum of 6 days per week. It can be at the gym, or I can burn the calories any other way. I could run outside, I could do cross-fit exercises, I could ride a bike. Whatever you need to do to burn the total calories required is the workout. I will Stretch each morning. Stretching will burn calories, but it is more important to improve your flexibility before you begin your exercises and during them. It is a good time to do some meditation and visualization exercises during this time. Eat fruit or vegetables instead of sweets when hungry. Write down all of the main action steps you need to think about that will be required to achieve your goal. Now that you have outlined the main action steps, take out your Weekly Goal Measurement Worksheet. This worksheet will be filled out every day. It includes the ability to track a weeks worth of successful action steps. In the Date Range Box, we enter the starting and ending date for the week. Under the Major Steps section, we enter the top 3 Major Action Steps. - For my goal to Lose 40 pounds in 16 Weeks, I had these Major Steps: Eat 1200 Healthy Calories per Day Workout 6 Days Per Week Burn 1250 Calories per day Enter your top 3 Major Steps. Under The Action Steps Column we start to break down each of the specific action steps we need to do to accomplish this goal. For my goal to Lose 40 Pounds in 16 Weeks, I entered these action steps: Eat 300 calorie breakfast Eat 400 calorie lunch Eat 300 calorie dinner Eat 200 calories in snacks Eat No Sweets Today Go to the Gym Use the elliptical Stretch Visualize myself at my goal weight. Perform Body Weight Exercises (sit ups, push ups, burpees) Enter the specific action steps you are committing to do to achieve your goal. After entering the steps, Set up the Goal for each in the Goal column. If your goal is to go to the gym 5 days per week, you would enter 5 in the Goals column. For the Use the Elliptical action step, put the amount of hours or calories burned in the Goal Column. I used Hours. My goal was 2 hours. This is just ideas for Goals for each step. Set your goals for each step. The Measure column is used to define a measurement for achievement. When I was in school to be a loan officer, we used this worksheet with a Top Gun Theme. We used mileage to track our success. We set each action measurable by an amount of flight miles. We would track our mileage each week to get to a total number of miles as a goal each week. You can use whatever you want to that motivates you more. I use money. I pay myself an amount for action step. This is because I use money in the Mental Bank Program to reward myself for performing action steps or Value Events as we call them there. These action steps will be taken over to the Mental Bank Program when you are ready to use it. This is a motivational tool to help us keep our motivation going while we work on this goal. There is a column for each day of the week. You will enter the measure amount for each day that you are tracking. If I said I would do a step 5 X per week, then I would enter the amount into each day that I performed the action step. For example, if I had an action step to Go To The Gym and my measure was $500 for each completed action, I would enter $500 in each day column that I went to the gym. At the end of the week, you will total each row of Action Steps and enter that amount into Totals column. The Minimum Target column is used to set a minimum target value. If my target goal for going to the gym was 5 days per week and my measure value was $500 per action completed, the Minimum Target would be $2500.  This is the lowest amount I am working to earn each week for this action step. At the bottom of the Weekly Goal Maintenance Worksheet, is the Actual Totals for Day/Week row. You will be totaling down for each day of the week. Total your values from each day for each Action Step all the way across the week. Do this for each column, including the Totals and the Minimum Total columns. At the bottom of the sheet you will Sign and Date each weeks sheet. You will total the total measures on each sheet and enter in the Total Measures space. Enter the week number (i.e. If it is week #3, enter 3). The last thing to enter on the sheet each week is the average Weekly Measure. That will give you an idea if you are meeting the goals you are supposed to be hitting to Get The Goal You Set. This is how you set up and track your goal using the Goal Setting and the Weekly Goal Measurement Worksheets. Did I Win The Competition? I went to the gym right after work. It was a short walk. I spent 2 hours on the elliptical. I built up my endurance and levels as I went on. This allowed me to burn more calories as it got harder. I was burning over 1450 calories on the elliptical each day after work. On Weekends I would do the same plan. 2 hours on the elliptical on the weekends or walk up to ten miles a day. I did not honestly do 7 days a week. Some weeks I only did 5 or 6 days a week. What that meant was I had to work a little harder on the short weeks. That is why I did extra on those days I did go to the gym. I was dedicated to complete this. I was way ahead of everyone going into the last week. I did a little trash talk with my closest competitor. She is more competitive than I am. Her last week she went to Hot Yoga classes each night and reduced her calorie intake to 300 calories and ended up winning the competition by a couple tenths of a percent more loss than me and won the competition. However, I did win. I won second place in the competition but I achieved my goal at the end of the 16th week. I weighed in at home that morning at 210 pounds. I lost 40 pounds in 16 weeks.  I was successful. I would have loved to have won the competition, but I had no control over what the other competitors did. I had to compete with myself. I Lost 40 Pounds in 16 weeks. You can too. What is your goal you are going to work on?  What are the Action Steps you are going to have to take to Get The Goals You Set? Once you set The What and The How, you can now start working on The Why.  We will talk about The Why in the next episode. This is where we will get into the Meat of the Motivation for what we do. Listen to the next Episode as we discuss The Why - Why are you wanting to achieve this goal you set?   I get a lot of my quotes from great books that I read. And if you like to listen to books on Audio like I do, I put together a deal with Audible to give Goal Getting Podcast listeners a FREE Audiobook of your choice AND a 30 Day Trial of Audible's service to try them out. Just click the link in the Blue Box to get to the Audible sign up! Get Your Free Audiobook Here    ~~~~ Goal Getting Masters Private Facebook Group ~~~~ Are you a Goal Getter that wants to learn to Master Goal Getting! We've started a private Facebook Group to have a place for you to meet other like-minded, Goal-Oriented people that will support you and help you Get The Goals You Set. If you want to be a part of the Goal Getting Masters Group, go to Goal Getting Podcast.com / masters Sign up and I will add you to the group. Come prepared to participate and share your goals with other Goal Getters.       If you like our podcast you can easily go Subscribe to our show on iTunes at Goal Getting Podcast.com/itunes QUICK & EASY - Click here to go leave a review on iTunes     Please follow us below on your favorite social media channel.  We would love to hear from you there, too. Send us a Tweet, or Instagram Like. You can connect with us on your favorite by going to GoalGettingPodcast.com / and then Twitter or Facebook, or Instagram They will easily take you to the social media platforms and make it easy to follow us. Make Today a Great Day! Like our Facebook pagehttp://www.facebook.com/GoalGettingPodcast Follow us on Twitter:Podcast at @GoalsPodcastTony Woodall, Your Host at @TonyWCMB   Follow us on Instagram at @GoalGettingPodcast

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  • 00:05:38

    QOD-193: Motivation gets you going and habit gets you there. ~~ Zig Ziglar

    · Goal Getting Podcast with Tony Woodall

    Today's Quote is from Zig Ziglar Click Below to Listen to Today's Show     Motivation gets you going and habit gets you there.~~ Zig Ziglar   Zig Ziglar is one of the greatest motivational speakers ever. I have listened to Zig for years, read his books, but unfortunately never had the opportunity to meet the man. This quote was shared by yourbusinesspodcast on Instagram. I wanted to share it with you because it resonates with the topic we've been discussing, health and wellness. Many people get motivated to lose weight or get in shape. New Years Resolutions are set and lost every year. For many years the #1 New Years Resolution was "To Lose Weight".  This year, according to BusinessWire Americans’ 2016 New Year’s Resolutions: Enjoy life to the fullest (45.7%) Live a healthier lifestyle (41.1%) Lose weight (39.6%) Spend more time with family and friends (33.2%) Save more, spend less (30.1%) Pay down debt (27.5%) So losing weight is now #3. Living a healthier lifestyle and is very closely related and I think people said that as a way to cloud the issue of losing weight. I think they are assuming that will lead them to weight loss as well. But hey, that's just me. But as Zig Ziglar said, Motivation gets you going. New Years Resolutions start the motivation. However, usually after mid-March, most people that were motivated to lose weight, go to the gym, workout, usually give up. It isn't because they weren't motivated at the time they started. We are often motivated, it's what gets us going. BUT, unless you develop the habits needed to prolong those resolutions, those goals, the odds of getting to the completion of that goal, that resolution are slim. We aren't any slimmer, but the odds are. I am working on getting back in the habit of going to the gym. My goal is to go and work out 5 days per week. If  I get back into the habit of going to the gym I am more likely to continue. In 2012 I was motivated to lose weight. I had lost a lot of weight but needed to get to the goal weight I needed to achieve. I started working out after work and built it into a habit. It was easy to go every day once I set the habit. I even built the habit to do 2 hours on the elliptical. I burned over 1400 calories each day I worked out. Creating the habit made it easy for me to what to go to the gym and work out hard. It kept the motivation going. It resulted in me losing over 40 pounds in 16 weeks.  I was closer to my goal weight. Habits are almost as easy to break as they are to build. I ended up breaking the habit after my mother passed away. I stopped going to the gym for over a month. I spent my mom's last 4 weeks with her. I walked every day, but didn't go to the gym because there wasn't one close by her house. That change in my routine developed a new, habit of not going to the gym. The loss hit me pretty hard afterward as well and I lost some of the motivation. I change my eating routines and back I went to old habits. I am not working on changing the bad eating habits and building up the habit of going to the gym and working out back again. Because as Zig Ziglar accurately states, Motivation Gets You Going And Habit Gets You There. Work on creating the positive, health habits. Change some of the triggers or the responses to those triggers to something positive and you will succeed in your goal.   Go Out Today, Make Success A Habit Goal Achievement Success System I want to help you get the goals you set and make this year the best year ever for you. Do you want to achieve your goals? Do you want to walk your own path and go where no one has ever been before? Does your subconscious mind play goalie for the other team, blocking your goals and dreams? You can change your mind and make it play for your team. I've put together my Goal Achievement Success System to help you do that. The Mental Bank Program is a major part of this system. I discuss the Mental Bank Concept in these three episodes: Episode 34 - Is This What You Struggle With? Episode 35  - Is Your Mind Killing Your Dreams? 6 Steps to Stop It Now. Episode 36 - Success Is Not An Accident - Take That To The Bank! Using the Mental Bank Program and the 3 Keys to Successful Goal Setting and you will have the best year of your life. You will change your subconscious mind into the Goal Getting Machine is was designed to be. Pick up your copy of the Mental Bank Ledger we discuss in Episode 36 to use to reset your Subconscious Mind to work for your team. Get your copy at GoalGettingPodcast.com/mbl . The Mental Bank Ledger along with the lessons taught in Goal Getting Podcast Episodes 34, 35 and 36 will help you Get The Goals You Set. Contact me if you have questions after listening to these 3 Episodes, 34, 35 and 36 and ask for help.  ~~~~ I'd love to hear your thoughts on this. Please go to our show notes page at GoalGettingPodcast.com/qod193 and give me your feedback in the Comments section. ~~~~ Are you a Goal Getter that wants to learn to Master Goal Getting! We've started a private Facebook Group to have a place for you to meet other like-minded, Goal-Oriented people that will support you and help you Get The Goals You Set. If you want to be a part of the Goal Getting Masters Group, go to Goal Getting Podcast.com / masters Sign up and I will add you to the group. Come prepared to participate and share your goals with other Goal Getters.   ~~~~ Thanks for listening to Goal Getting Quote of the Day. If you like this or any of the Quotes, please leave a comment.  I would love to hear your thoughts. If you like our podcast you can easily go Subscribe to our show on iTunes at GoalGettingPodcast.com/itunes or Subscribe to us on Jabbercast at GoalGettingPodcast.com/jabbercast The new Jabbercast App is the best listening experience for podcasts. Check it out.   Please follow us below on your favorite social media channel.  We would love to hear from you there, too. Send us a Tweet, or Instagram Like. You can connect with us on your favorite by going to GoalGettingPodcast.com / and then Twitter or Facebook, or Instagram They will easily take you to the social media platforms and make it easy to follow us. QUICK & EASY - Click here to go leave a review on iTunes I get a lot of my quotes from great books that I read. And if you like to listen to books on Audio like I do, I put together a deal with Audible to give Goal Getting Podcast listeners a FREE Audiobook of your choice AND a 30 Day Trial of Audible's service to try them out. Just click the link in the Blue Box to get to the Audible sign up! Get Your Free Audiobook Here Hi, I would love to know what you think of the show. Do you enjoy these Quote of the Day segments? Let us know by leaving a comment below. Make Today a Great Day! Subscribe to us on iTunes Like our Facebook pagehttp://www.facebook.com/GoalGettingPodcast Follow us on Twitter:Podcast at @GoalsPodcastTony Woodall, Your Host at @TonyWCMB Follow us on Instagram at @GoalGettingPodcast

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