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  • Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio with Glen Popiel, KW5GP - ETH072

    · 01:33:41 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to talk with Glen Popiel, KW5GP, about all kinds of projects that you can do with an Arduino and about his two books dealing with the Arduino, Arduino for Ham Radio and More Arduino for Ham Radio. Facebook Question of the Week: Have you ever used an Arduino to build something? If so, what did you build? Tech Corner - Arduino Projects Glen Popiel, KW5GP author of Arduino for Ham Radio, More Arduino for Ham Radio and High Speed Multimedia for Amateur Radio Hamvention interview on 40m qrp transceiver video https://www.facebook.com/ARRL.org/videos/10154849135407408/   I had a great conversation with Glen in this episode. Glen is a great guy and is funny as it gets. Glen has been a ham for a long time and has a lot of experience in electronics and Ham Radio. He combines the love of electronics and the love of amateur radio in a way that everyone can understand. Some of the stuff that we talked about that are in his books, and realizing that you can get an arduino for SOOOO cheap, I cant wait to get his More Arduino for Ham Radio book and try out some of the stuff in there. I might even have to buy both of the books and see if my oldest daughter wants to build some of the projects with me as well. It would be some great father-daughter time if she did. Below is a list of each of Glen's books and the description of them as well as links to both Amazon using my affiliate link and a direct link to the ARRL if you want to buy directly from them. Arduino for Ham Radio Arduino Microcontroller Projects You Can Build Today!The Arduino has become widely popular among hobbyists and ham radio operators. Hams are exploring these powerful, inexpensive microcontrollers, creating new projects and amateur station gear. With its Open Source model, the Arduino community freely shares software and hardware designs, making projects easier to build and modify. Arduino for Ham Radio introduces you to the exciting world of microcontrollers and Open Source hardware and software. It starts by building a solid foundation through descriptions of various Arduino boards and add-on components, followed by a collection of ham radio-related practical projects. Beginning with simple designs and concepts and gradually increasing in complexity and functionality, there is something here for everyone. Projects can be built quickly and used as-is, or they can be expanded and enhanced with your own personal touches. Projects Random Code Practice Generator CW Beacon and Foxhunt Keyer Fan Speed Controller Digital Compass Weather Station RF Probe with LED Bar Graph Solar Battery Charge Monitor On-Air Indicator Talking SWR Meter Talking GPS/UTC Time/Grid Square Indicator Iambic Keyer Waveform Generator PS/2 CW Keyboard Field Day Satellite Tracker Azimuth/Elevation Rotator Controller CW Decoder Lightning Detector CDE/Hy-Gain Rotator Controllers Purchase from Amazon(Affiliate Link)  or directly from the ARRL More Arduino Projects for Ham Radio More Arduino Microcontroller Projects for Your Ham Radio Station!Building on the success of Arduino for Ham Radio, this book — More Arduino Projects for Ham Radio — includes 15 completely new practical and functional Arduino projects for the ham shack. This time, we branch out to use some of the newer Arduino variants and devices. Each project is complete and functional as-is, but room has been left for you to add personal touches and enhancements. That’s part of the fun of the Arduino and Open Source communities — building on the work of others, and then sharing your designs and innovations for others to learn, modify, and improve. More Arduino Projects for Ham Radio starts by building a solid foundation through descriptions of the many new Arduino boards and add-on components, followed by a collection of practical ham radio-related projects that showcase a wide variety of applications. There is something here for everyone. Projects Auto On/Off Mobile Power Control Station Power Monitor AC Current Monitor Load Tester Voice Memory Keyer Wireless Remote Coax Switch Wireless Remote Telemetry GPS-Based Ethernet Network Time Protocol Server Yaesu FT-series Transceiver Rotator Controller Interface Yaesu G-450A/G-800SA Rotator Controller Rebuild Yaesu Rotator Controller Modification 1 to 30 MHz DDS VFO Antenna SWR Analyzer 40 Meter QRP CW Transceiver 40 Meter QRP JT65 Transceiver Purchase from Amazon(Affiliate Link)  or directly from the ARRL High Speed Multimedia for Amateur Radio Build a High Speed Amateur Radio Microwave NetworkUsing commercial off-the-shelf equipment and developing their own software, groups of hams have created high speed wireless Amateur Radio digital networks with wide area coverage. The possible uses for these high speed data networks in the Amateur Radio community are endless. Virtually any service that works on the regular Internet can be adapted to an Amateur Radio high speed multimedia (HSMM) network, including video conferencing, instant messaging, voice over Internet protocol (VoIP), network sensors and cameras, remote station control, and many other services. With the capability to send real-time video and data files, the public service and disaster support aspects of Amateur Radio are expanded tremendously. This book introduces HSMM networking, explains the basics of how it works, and describes the various technologies in use today. Later chapters explain in detail how to deploy your own HSMM network, along with various applications to put it to work. Well illustrated step-by-step instructions will guide you through the process of installing and configuring software needed to get your HSMM network up and running. Includes: Introduction to High Speed Multimedia High Speed Multimedia Technologies HSMM Equipment for Amateur Radio TCP/IP for HSMM HSMM Applications Security and Filtering Backup and Redundancy Deploying HSMM Networks The Future of HSMM Purchase from Amazon(Affiliate Link)  or directly from the ARRL If you have any questions regarding the Arduino, or would like to collaborate on a project, Contact Glen and He will be happy to help any way that he can. Click here to send him an email. Links that we talked about in this episode: Amateur Radio Round Table - A live amateur radio show with Tom and the gang. Tom has one of the longest running amateur radio programs on today. His Tuesday night live webcasts are even retransmitted on a Shortwave radio station. Hamradio 360 - This podcast is one of my favorite podcasts. Cale, George and Jeremy do an awesome job with being ambassadors to the hobby of ham radio. George and Jeremy are the hosts of the Hamradio 360 Workbench podcast that does a more of a deep dive into the  technical side of the hobby. Do You Need Some QSL Cards? Check out KB3IHF QSL Cards. When you place your order make sure you mention that you heard about him on the Everything Ham Radio Podcast. If you do I will get a small commission on your purchase. West Mountain Radio Are you tired of lousy propagation conditions and wondering how to work some real DX for a change? Maybe you spin the dial and wonder what's going on below the voice segment of the HF bands? The answer is ... You're missing out! You're missing out on digital modes! A rapidly growing and exciting part of ham radio! Work real DX with the incredible JT-65 and JT-9 modes! It's no exaggeration when I tell you, you WILL work stations you never thought possible, even using low power and compromise antennas. Have fun making new contacts in modes such as PSK31, Olivia, Radio-Teletype, SSTV and many more! The RIGblaster Advantage is everything you need to operate these exciting digital modes. Made in the US, the RIGblaster interfaces have set the standard for nearly 20 years. Thousands of satisfied operators have learned their RIGblaster Advantage will provide solid digital communication, easy operating and reliability. The RIGblaster Advantage has: A high quality built in sound card A single USB cable to your computer - say goodbye to the rats nest of audio and serial cables.  Tidy up your station! Built in rig control that works with most radios Flexible transmit/receive switching -  Choose between VOX or computer PTT Volume controls on the interface - no more hunting through Windows just to alter your transmit level! Real Morse Code keying that actually uses the CW mode on your radio Operate RTTY FSK for radios which support it An easy to understand manual covers beginners and seasoned operators alike Comes with a universal mic cable which fits most radios - optional cables may be available for your particular radio. Don't miss out on the fun and excitement any longer! The RIGblaster Advantage is available right now for 199.95 with free ground shipping to the US 48.    For more information on the RIGblaster Advantage and to learn how to get your free USB Port Monitor with you purchase, click here. Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH047 - Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Servies

    · 01:11:16 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service(RACES), we talk about the Cleveland Amateur Radio Club from Cleveland, TN in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!     Tech Corner - Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Services(RACES) What is RACES?   Founded in 1952, the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) is a public service provided by a reserve (volunteer) communications group within government agencies in times of extraordinary need. During periods of RACES activation, certified unpaid personnel are called upon to perform many tasks for the government agencies they serve. Although the exact nature of each activation will be different, the common thread is communications.   ACS, in its RACES and other reserve emergency communications functions, provides a pool of emergency communications personnel that can be called upon in time of need. ACS/RACES units across the country prepare themselves for the inevitable day when they will be called upon. When a local, county, or state government agency activates its ACS unit, that unit will use its communications resources (RACES, if necessary) to meet whatever need that agency has.   Traditional RACES operations involve emergency message handling on Amateur Radio Service frequencies. These operations typically involve messages between critical locations such as hospitals, emergency services, emergency shelters, and any other locations where communication is needed. These communications are handled in any mode available, with 2 meters FM being the most prevalent. During time of war, when the President exercises his War Emergency Powers, RACES might become the only communications allowed via amateur radio. Activating under the FCC's restrictive RACES Rules is not always necessary when using Amateur Radio Service frequencies for emergency communications. For example, ACS communicators may need to communicate with ARES or other radio amateurs who are not government-certified to operate in a RACES net. ACS personnel also might become involved in non-amateur public-safety or other government communications, Emergency Operations Center (EOC) staffing, and emergency equipment repair. Who Does RACES Operate Under?   The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provides planning guidance and technical assistance for establishing a RACES organization at the state and local government level.   The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is responsible for the regulation of RACES operations. RACES is administrated by a local, county, or state civil defense agency responsible for disaster services. This civil defense agency is typically an emergency services or emergency management organization, sometimes within another agency such as police or fire. RACES is a function of the agency's Auxiliary Communications Service (ACS), sometimes known as DCS (Disaster Communications Service), ECS (Emergency Communications Service), ARPSC (Amateur Radio Public Service Corps), etc. Many ACS units identify themselves solely as RACES organizations, even though their communications functions and activities typically go beyond the restrictions of RACES operations. Other ACS units combine government RACES and non-government ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Service) activities and identify themselves as ARES/RACES organizations. Yet other ACS units who use amateur radio for emergency government communications identify themselves solely as ARES organizations, whether or not they activate under FCC RACES Rules.   The Amateur Radio Regulations, Part 97, Subpart E, §97.407, were created by the FCC to describe RACES operations in detail. Although no longer issued or renewable, RACES station licenses were issued in the past by the FCC to government agencies for RACES operations. The agencies may continue to conduct RACES operations without these licenses, using primary or club call signs. Training While each RACES organization may not require the same thing, there are a few “classes” that are required by the NIMS for all entry level first responders. These are the NIMS courses, IS-100b and IS-700b.While these two are the only ones that are required by the NIMS system for first responders, several RACES groups that I have looked at also require the IS-200 and/or IS-800.b.   Even though RACES and Skywarn are two separate entities on paper, because of the way that both of them work, sometimes Skywarn is run under the RACES flag so to speak. Since they are pushed together so often, some RACES groups require Skywarn training as well.   Other types of training should also be done within the RACES organization. Things like Net training, search and rescue operations, how to send a radiogram, and so much more. While most training is done in person there also should be on the air training. With RACES however, you are limited to one hour of on the air training a week. You can extend the one hour per week to up to 72 in length with the permission but you can only do this twice a year. This type of training is typically a large scale training event involving multiple agencies. Standardization   One of the things that we have learned over the years, since 9/11/2001 especially, is that things should be more standardized across different organizations or agencies. One of the things that a lot of RACES organizations have done all across the US is to standardize their power connections. When I first got my license 20+ years ago, there were several different types of power connections and each manufacture had a different style.   Things have gotten better over the years and now most radios have the same type of connections. I have not personally see any new radios in a while so I'm not sure if they are the same type of connects as they use to be, however, many RACES organizations have adopted a standardized power connection called the Anderson Powerpole Connectors.   One of the many reasons that I can think of to goto this type of power plug is because of the awesome power distribution system that West Mountain Radio has developed called the Rig Runner.These power distribution systems are an awesome piece of equipment and are very versatile! Liability Issues?   One of the things that I hear a lot when it comes to people volunteering is that they don't want to put themselves in a position where they can be sued. While this question doesn't come up a lot in the amateur radio community because a lot of people that are hams got into it to help people, this is still a valid concern. Thankfully, those that volunteer to be a RACES, ARES and Skywarn volunteer are protected under the Volunteer Protection Act of 1997.   While this act is not a get out of jail free card or total protection from a lawsuit, it does protect you from prosecution if you if you are doing what you are suppose to be doing. By that I'm saying that if you:   Work within the scope of your responsibilities,    The harm was not caused by willful or criminal misconduct, gross negligence, reckless misconduct, or a conscious, flagrant indifference to the rights or safety of the individual harmed by the volunteer If appropriate or required, the volunteer was properly licensed, certified, or authorized by the appropriate authorities for the activities or practice in the State in which the harm occurred, where the activities were or practice was undertaken within the scope of the volunteer's responsibilities in the nonprofit organization or governmental entity The harm was not caused by the volunteer operating a motor vehicle, vessel, aircraft, or other vehicle for which the State requires the operator or the owner of the vehicle, craft, or vessel to-- possess an operator's license; or maintain insurance.   RACES Organizations Around the Country Arlington County RACES Resource Library   Flashback: Comment by NA4IT on QRZ about Ep 46 ETH026 - Youth In Amateur Radio ETH035 - Elmers, Are You Doing Your Part?     Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Cleveland Amateur Radio Club   Website: https://www.carc.cc/ Twitter: @carc_tn Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/carcradioclub/ Club Callsign: W4GZX   The CARC is one of the few amateur radio clubs that owns its own building which is a huge blessing.  This allows for club member to congregate anytime they want.  Every Saturday our clubhouse is open from 8 AM to noon for members to come and work on radio projects, get on the air, or have a cup of coffee with fellow hams.  The CARC clubhouse is located centrally in Cleveland, TN on a high ridge and serves Cleveland and Bradley Co as an emergency communications staging area.  Testing has proved that this location is ideal allowing for VHF simplex coverage throughout the county and beyond.   History Larry G. Ledford KA4J prepared “The Beginning of the Cleveland Amateur Radio Club” for the club’s 50th anniversary in 2012. It is an excellant insight into the people who pioneered amateur radio in Bradley County and were able to share their interest in wireless communications with the founders of the club. The article can be viewed by clicking here.   Meetings General Club Meeting - 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of each month except December at 7pm Tutoring Meeting - Most Saturdays 8a-11a CW Classes - Tuesday Evenings 6:30p - 7:30p   Repeaters 146.925 - PL 114.8 System Fusion (Listen Live) 444.275 + System Susion   Nets Southeast Tennessee Amateur Radio(STAR) net - 1st, 2nd and 4th Tuesdays at 8:30pm on the 147.180 Repeater (Listen Live) The Bradley County Emergency Services Net is held every Monday night at 8:00 PM on the 146.925 repeater, Cleveland Amateur Radio Club Slow Speed CW Net (CARC SSCW). - 1st, 2nd and 4th Thursday nights of every month at 7PM EST/EDT (2300 / 0000 UTC), on a frequency of 7.070 MHz +/- QRM. Activities Field Day ARRL Sweepstakes CQ World Wide TN QSO Party ARRL VHF Contests Community Service   Upcoming Events     NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Dec 9 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 9 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 9 ARRL 10-Meter Contest 0000Z, Dec 10 to 2400Z, Dec 11 SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 1200Z, Dec 10 to 2400Z, Dec 11 International Naval Contest 1600Z, Dec 10 to 1559Z, Dec 11 AWA Bruce Kelley 1929 QSO Party 2300Z, Dec 10 to 2300Z, Dec 11 and  2300Z, Dec 17 to 2300Z, Dec 18 CQC Great Colorado Snowshoe Run 2100Z-2259Z, Dec 11 NAQCC CW Sprint 0130Z-0330Z, Dec 14 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 14 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 14 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Dec 14 and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 14 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 15 NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Dec 16 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 16 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 16 Russian 160-Meter Contest 2000Z, Dec 16 to 2400Z, Dec 17 AGB-Party Contest 2100Z-2400Z, Dec 16 OK DX RTTY Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 17 RAC Winter Contest 0000Z-2359Z, Dec 17 Feld Hell Sprint 0000Z-2359Z, Dec 17 Croatian CW Contest 1400Z, Dec 17 to 1400Z, Dec 18 Stew Perry Topband Challenge 1500Z, Dec 17 to 1500Z, Dec 18 ARRL Rookie Roundup, CW 1800Z-2359Z, Dec 18 Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0200Z-0400Z, Dec 19 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 21 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 21 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Dec 21 and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 21 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 22   *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar   Hamfests 12/09/2016 West Central Florida Section Convention (Tampa Bay Hamfest) - Plant City, FL   12/10/2016 Pearl River County ARC Hamfest - Poplarville, MS SantaFest - Cheltenham, MD   12/17/2016 MARA Annual Christmas Hamfest - Minden, LA   *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar     News ARRL Expands Initiative to Fire Up Collegiate Amateur Radio Clubs 11/30/2016 A growing number of campus radio clubs and student radio amateurs have begun to share ideas and suggestions on the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative (CARI) Facebook page, which is aimed at sparking renewed participation, activity, and idea-sharing among this special sector of the Amateur Radio community. The now-expanded initiative stemmed from two well-attended ARRL New England Division Convention forums for radio amateurs attending college, one hosted by the Amateur Radio clubs at Harvard (W1AF) and Yale (W1YU). As the forum explained, the activity level at campus Amateur Radio club stations can vary wildly from one year to the next, as students graduate and newcomers arrive. “The most common difficulty stems from uneven interest over time,” said ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, in his “Second Century” editorial, “Cheers for College Amateur Radio: Sis-boom-bah!” in December 2016 QST. “Even the strongest leaders in college Amateur Radio graduate every 4 years, sometimes leaving their clubs without adequate continuity or leadership succession.” Gallagher pointed out that “recognized” student activities require students in order to maintain that status. However, even officially recognized college club stations may find themselves at the mercy of administrations in terms of space for a station and antennas, and some clubs have had to move more than once to accommodate their schools’ space requirements. Issues involving safety and security can also affect college radio clubs. In a recent post, Kenny Hite, KE8CTL, a graduate teaching assistant at West Virginia University, said the university’s Amateur Radio club, W8CUL, has been unable to participate in recent on-the-air events “due to lack of working equipment and questionable antenna setups,” as he put it. “We are working to identify working equipment/coax lines.” Another poster, Dennis Silage, K3DS, who’s associated with the Temple University Amateur Radio Club (K3TU), said, “A key to a successful and long-running college club seems to be faculty involvement for stability and recognition.” He invited other CARI participants to check out the club’s website to see what members have been doing. “It occurred to us that, if college Amateur Radio could galvanize [mutual interests], then colleges might just provide the ideal bridge between youthful interest in the subject and lifelong participation in our community,” Gallagher wrote. Some ideas are already being suggested, and the Facebook page has spurred communication among an ever-widening network of those involved or interested in Amateur Radio on campus, from students, faculty members, and administrators to college radio club alums. One suggestion has been to harness the competitive nature of colleges to organize operating events — perhaps with “conferences” resembling those for sports — to keep interest alive. ARRL received permission to rebrand the Collegiate Amateur Radio Operators Facebook group, initially organized by Sam Rose, KC2LRC, as the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative. All collegiate radio amateurs, clubs, and alumni are invited to participate and to get involved in activities that advance the art and enjoyment of Amateur Radio. All suggestions are welcome. December Youngsters on the Air Event Set 11/29/2016 The annual Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event takes place during the entire month of December, with YOTA stations attempting to contact many other young radio amateurs around the world. The event offers an excellent opportunity for get radio amateurs in their teens and early 20s to get together on the air. “The idea of this is to show the Amateur Radio hobby to youth and to encourage youngsters to be active within the hobby,” said International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 (IARU-R1) Youth Working Group Chair Lisa Leenders, PA2LS. “Consider giving a demonstration at a school or local club, gather together with your friends, grab a pizza, and make some QSOs, or enjoy a great pile-up. Let’s show this great hobby to the world!” This is not a formal contest but a way to get young people on the air with their peers. Numerous participating stations, primarily in Region 1, will be sporting YOTA call sign suffixes.     Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH037 - We Have The Power!

    · 01:21:55 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Power Tech Corner - Power Cords Where to Connect Power on a Mobile Setup You should always connect the positive side to either the hot terminal of the battery or the input leg of the fuse bose as close to the battery as possible. The negative side should be connected to the chassis where your your battery is connected. The reasoning behind this is because vehicle come standard now with a battery monitoring system that monitors the battery voltage as well as power consumption needs of the vehicle(i.e. When the A/C is turned on, more power is needed). The monitor is typically connected between the batteries negative terminal and the chassis ground. You need to bypass this monitor when connecting radio equipment so alway connect your negative side to the same location as the negative battery lead is connected to. Because you are more than likely going to be killing the power to the entire vehicle, you could potentially activate the anti-theft device on your car radio and have to enter a security code to get it to work again. In some cases this could affect the starting of the vehicle as well, which could potentially have to be fixed at a dealership. Selecting the Correct Size Wire Make sure that you a big enough gauge wire to handle the amperage you need to power your equipment. There are several things to consider when selecting the size wiring you need. First off, you need to know what you Peak Current draw will be, not the average. A typical 100 watt radio draws about 22 peak amps while a 50 watt radio is about half that at about 11 amps. If you throw an amp in the mix that is even more. High Power Installations In high powered setups, like those that will include an amplifier, you should also install a second battery in your vehicle. This is typically done in the truck of the vehicle, if it has one. If you are going to install a second battery, you should use at least a 4 AWG wire or 2 AWG wire if the length of the wire is over 20 feet. You also need to make sure that you fuse the hot wire at both ends with about a 60 amp fuse to protect the wire. Also, make sure that you connect the negative side of that battery to the same chassis ground as your other battery, again bypassing the battery monitoring system. Multiple Devices Needing Power Whether you have a high powered setup or just multiple radios(which could technically be the same thing), one way to get power to all them the easiest is to use some kind of distribution power block, like a Rig Runner from West Mountain Radio. Like any other installation you need to know what you peak amperage is going to be when installing something like this. The higher gauge wire is only needed from the battery to the distribution block(Rig Runner). From there, you can use smaller gauge wire to each piece of equipment.   Can I Just Use the Existing Wiring? You never want to use the existing wiring in your vehicle to power you radios. Things like Accessory plugs(Cigarette lighter plugs), or tapping into the fuse panel inside your vehicle. While this may seem like the easiest way to do it, and I have been guilty of it myself, this can cause problems down the road. The high power consumption needs of your radio equipment can cause the wiring to overheat and cause RFI in your system. You would think that it would be ok to tap into your fuse panel because an open fuse spot on the fuse block can “kill two birds with one stone”. One it could fuse your power cord and two you don't have to go through the fire wall. While you could do it for the short term and it probably be ok, I highly recommend that you take to time to install your equipment properly. Boing through the fuse panel doesn't allow you bypass the battery monitoring system and could potentially cause problems.   If you use the accessory plug to power your radio, you can get RFI because of the circuitry that is built into the plug. Another possible cause of potential RFI is arcing can occur between the spring loaded tip of the plug and the socket. Both of these potential problems could cause errors to show up in your vehicle’s computer and causing your check engine light to come on or other warning lights or error messages to show up. Fuses We have talked already about how you should fuse you wiring, but let's dive a little deeper into it shall we. First off, what is a fuse? A fuse is a short piece of enclosed wire that is designed to melt if it is subjected to to high of a current. When the wire melts it will open the circuit and power will stop being supplied to your equipment. However, if you use a fuse that is rated for a higher amperage than what is required for whatever you are powering, it may not open or it may open but with a long delay. You want your fuse to do it’s job before the wire itself acts as a fuse and opens the circuit by potentially starting a fire. The above picture is a perfect example of using the wrong size fuse. The wire used in the picture above is a 6 AWG wire which is rated for a maximum of 100 amps, however, the fuse that the wire is connected to is 200 amps. There are several types of fuse holders out there for different types of fuses, but which should you use? Barrel Fuses The most common type of fuse that you see is a barrel type fuse. While there are several types of fuse holders for these type fuses, the most common that you will see are the inline ones. These are not the best kind to use, and here is why. With a barrel type in line fuse, you have two butt connections that you have make which are hard to solder and the wire that is supplied with the fuse holder is often two small of wire. If you are going to use this type of fuse, I recommend using a fuse block or something along those lines with proper end connectors. I recommend using the round end connectors over the split ones so that they maintain good connection and not slip out. Also, you should use insulated connector whenever possible so that they don't inadvertently come in contact with something else. Blade Fuses Another type of fuse that you see quite often is a blade fuse. You really see these in the automotive industry, however, the fuses that you use in your car are not the same type of fuses that you should use in your radio installation. The fuses that you use in your car are called ATO fuses. These fuses are not sealed and if moisture winds up getting inside of them, it can cause corrosion. You should use ATO style blade fuses because they are sealed. These are the type of fuses that you will see used in a Rig Runner or other type of commercially available power distribution system. There are also inline fuses that use these type of fuses, however you still run into the problem of have to use butt connectors to put them inline and the gauge wire issues are the same. Circuit Breakers Another option that sometimes is used is a circuit breaker. While you may think that this is a better option, because then all you have to do is reset the breaker if something happens, this is not really the case. Both fuses and circuit breakers have a time delay on when they open the circuit. With circuit breakers, that time is longer than with fuses. So your equipment will be subjected to a high amount of amperage for a longer period of time before the circuit breaker trips, potentially causing more damage to your equipment. How to Run the Wires First off, let's talk about the firewall. This is probably one of the most dreaded things for most people to do. It is right up there with drilling holes in your roof or truck to install an antenna. Car manufacturers don't typically design their firewalls with amateur radio in mind. That being said, there is, sometimes, a extra hole that is not used that is in the firewall for installation of high end radio installations that you can use. If your vehicle has one, great! Use it! If not, rather than trying to squeeze a wire through one that already has wires going through it, is often not a very good idea to try. Most of the time, these holes are already pretty much full and you won't be able to get another wire through it, especially if you are using a higher gauge wire. So, as a dentist says, we have to drill! Crap, I Have to Drill! If you have to drill, there are a few things that you need to remember when you are planning out where you are going to drill. Most modern vehicles have a fresh air inlet just behind the hood. Sometimes this area will also have the windshield washer assembly or the cabin air filter. For this reason, the upper area of the firewall should be avoided. Another thing to pay attention to, is in diesels and most high end vehicles, there is a second firewall that is in place to reduce engine noise in the cabin. The second firewall should also be avoided. Thirdly, often times, the brake lines are attached to the engine side of the firewall directly behind the brakes. Wherever you decide to drill, always make sure that you know what is on the other side of the firewall, so you don't damage anything that could potentially cost you a lot of money to get fixed. Once you have the hole drilled, make sure that you put the appropriate size grommet in the hole. This is to protect whatever wires you have coming through from rubbing on the side of the hole and causing them to fray or get cut. The last thing that you need to consider when choosing the location to drill, is make sure that the wires that you will be putting through the hole are not in a place where they will be stepped on or pinched. The closer to the outside of the vehicle on the driver side the better. Probably one of the best bits to use to drill through your firewall is a Rotacut drill bit. They are pricey but they do an outstanding job according to their website and reviews. We Are Going Under! There is another way that you can get to the battery from inside your vehicle, especially if it is a truck. Sometimes there is a hole that can be punched out under the driver or passenger seat. Sometimes, if you are lucky there is already a grommet there, sometimes not. On my 2008 Ram, there was, but on my 2012 Ram, there wasn't. If you decide to go this route, just remember to route your wires in a way where they won't be pinched and you will need to make sure and put some extra insulation on the outside of wiring to protect from moisture and heat. Make sure that you stay away from the exhaust system, suspension members, factory wiring and fuel lines. On some vehicles, you can follow the brake lines and use the hard points to secure your wiring. On my 2012 Ram, I was able to run my wires through my frame most of the way. In doing this, I was able to protect the wire from road debris, and to an extent, moisture. I'm Through the Firewall, Now What? Now that the hard part is done and we are through the firewall, the next thing that you need to think about is how you are going to run your wires inside the cab of your vehicle to make it look nice. I know of some people that it doesn't really matter to them if wires are going everywhere, but if this is not you, then keep reading. There are channels along the door that you can run your wires through. All you have to do is pull up the door kick plate and you will see it. These door trim pieces, just snap in and out. They generally pop out fairly easy and are just as easy to reinstall. See the picture below for an example of what I'm talking about. This picture is not of my installation although I did the exact same thing. This picture was taken from Alan Applegates, K0BG, website. I'm not sure if it is a picture of his installation or someone elses. You can also route you wires under the carpet of your vehicle, but sometimes this can be a real pain the butt, however, it can be done. The major thing that you need to remember when doing this, is to pay attention where you wires are lying. If they are lying in a place where they can get cut, or a screw be screwed through it, it is a recipe for disaster and you can see in the picture below. What About Base/Home Setups? So we have pretty much just been talking about mobile installations here, however, a lot of what we have talked about transfers over to a home or base station as well. The major differences is that you don't have to worry so much about external temperature, extra installation on your wiring, and going through the firewall…:) You will still need to make sure you have proper wiring size, fusing your connections and to a certain degree, a neat installation. Guys you know what I'm talking about, I'm sure your wife is probably like mine and don’t want a bunch of wires running all over the place making the desk look nasty! Further Reading: K0BG - Wiring and Grounding Ham Radio Mobile Installation - Going Mobile - Ham Radio School.com   -----------------------------------------------------  Are you looking for some new radio gear? Maybe you need a new computer for your shack? Did you lose a piece off you tower and you just can't find it without a metal detector? You can find all this and more at GigaParts.com. While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome! Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now! GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of... EHR10 ...at checkout to receive 10% off the price of the case!   Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Hall of Science Amateur Radio Club Website: http://www.hosarc.org/   Meetings Meetings which are held at the NY Hall of Science cafeteria (47-01 111th Street, Queens, NY) are open to the public and are held on the second Tuesday of the month at 7:30 PM. No meetings in July, August and December.   Repeaters WB2ZZO 444.200 (+5mhz offset), PL 136.5 Located in Alpine NJ KC2PXT 145.270 (-600 khz offset), PL 136.5 Will be up soon Activities Hamfest - Oct 9, 2016 starting at 9am - Flyer   Upcoming Events NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 30 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 30 YLRL DX/NA YL Anniversary Contest - 1400Z, Sep 30 to 0200Z, Oct 2 TARA PSK Rumble Contest - 0000Z-2400Z, Oct 1 15-Meter SSTV Dash Contest - 0000Z, Oct 1 to 2359Z, Oct 2 Oceania DX Contest, Phone -  0800Z, Oct 1 to 0800Z, Oct 2 WAB HF Phone - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 TRC DX Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 GTC CW Cup - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 Russian WW Digital Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1159Z, Oct 2 International HELL-Contest - 1600Z-1800Z, Oct 1 (80m) and 0900Z-1100Z, Oct 2 (40m) California QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 1 to 2200Z, Oct 2 FISTS Fall Slow Speed Sprint - 1700Z-2100Z, Oct 1 UBA ON Contest, SSB - 0600Z-1000Z, Oct 2 RSGB International DX Contest - 0700Z-1900Z, Oct 2 German Telegraphy Contest - 0700Z-1000Z, Oct 3 ARS Spartan Sprint - 0100Z-0300Z, Oct 4 Phone Fray - 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 5 CWops Mini-CWT Test - 1300Z-1400Z, Oct 5 and 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 5 and 0300Z-0400Z, Oct 6 432 MHz Fall Sprint - 1900 local - 2300 local, Oct 5 UKEICC 80m Contest - 2000Z-2100Z, Oct 5 NRAU 10m Activity Contest - 1700Z-1800Z, Oct 6 (CW) and 1800Z-1900Z, Oct 6 (SSB) and 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 6 (FM) and 2000Z-2100Z, Oct 6 (Dig) SARL 80m QSO Party - 1700Z-2000Z, Oct 6 NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Oct 7 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 7 Makrothen RTTY Contest - 0000Z-0759Z, Oct 8 and 1600Z-2359Z, Oct 8 and 0800Z-1559Z, Oct 9 Oceania DX Contest, CW - 0800Z, Oct 8 to 0800Z, Oct 9 Microwave Fall Sprint - 0800 local - 1400 local, Oct 8 SKCC Weekend Sprintathon - 1200Z, Oct 8 to 2400Z, Oct 9 Scandinavian Activity Contest, SSB - 1200Z, Oct 8 to 1200Z, Oct 9 QRP ARCI Fall QSO Party - 1200Z, Oct 8 to 2359Z, Oct 9 Pennsylvania QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 8 to 0500Z, Oct 9 and 1300Z-2200Z, Oct 9 Arizona QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 8 to 0600Z, Oct 9 and 1400Z-2359Z, Oct 9 FISTS Fall Unlimited Sprint - 1700Z-2100Z, Oct 8 PODXS 070 Club 160m Great Pumpkin Sprint - 2000Z, Oct 8 to 2000Z, Oct 9 North American SSB Sprint Contest - 0000Z-0400Z, Oct 9 UBA ON Contest, CW - 0600Z-0900Z, Oct 9   *Information taken from the ARRL and WA7BNM Contest Calendar Hamfests 10/01/2016 2016 Wichita Area Hamfest - Wichita, KS ARCOS SWAPMEET & COOKOUT - Shreveport, LA HamEXPO - Belton, TX Last Chance Tailgate - Plymouth, MN MBARC Fall Fest - Fishkill, NY Red Rose Repeater Association Hamfest - Brownstown, PA Rock Hill Hamfest - Rock Hill, SC San Diego Ham Fest - Lakeside, CA Valley Disaster Preparedness Fair - Granada Hills, CA VETTE CITY HAMFEST - Bowling Green, KY   10/02/2016 BARCfest - Longmont, CO Southeast Iowa Hamfest - West Liberty, IA   10/07/2016 Florida State Convention (Melbourne Hamfest) - Melbourne, FL Pacific Northwest VHF Society Conference - Bend, OR   10/08/2016 Alpena Swap - Alpena, MI BARA Fall Hamfest - Township of Washington, NJ Helena Hamfest - Helena, AL Kitsap County ARC Hamfest 2016 - Bremerton, WA LaGrange Hamfest -  LaGrange, GA Parkersburg/Wood County Hamfest - Mineral Wells, WV Randy Griffin Memorial Ham Fest - Morrilton, AR SwaptoberFest 2016 - Logan, UT WCLARC's 39th Annual Hamfest - Leesville, LA   10/09/2016 CARAFest 2016 - West Friendship, MD HOSARC Hamfest - Queens, NY Maysville Hamfest - Maysville, NC SEWFARS Swapfest - Hubertus, WI   News Amateur Radio Credited with Helping Injured Cyclist 09/23/2016 Members of the Huntsville Amateur Radio Club (HARC) in Alabama had a role in getting help for a Louisiana cyclist injured in a September 17 group ride in Madison County, Alabama. A representative of the sponsoring Spring City Cycling Club told WHNT-19 News that a number of riders, including Brian Guerrero, fell as a motor vehicle was passing in the opposite direction. The club spokesperson said it was unlikely that the motorist caused or contributed to the accident, and an investigation continues. The club praised the action of first responders and first aid from fellow cyclists — a trauma surgeon and a nurse. “Their actions in first aid and in directly calling for MedFlight likely saved his life. Huntsville Amateur Radio Club volunteers were instrumental in coordinating the communications amongst event organizers and volunteers, emergency personnel, and law enforcement. We extend our gratitude to law enforcement, first responders and HARC for their able and quick response to this terrible incident,” the club said. Guerrero remains hospitalized in Huntsville. — Thanks to WHNT-19 News Momentum Building to Urge Senate Passage of the Amateur Radio Parity Act 09/22/2016 The response to ARRL’s call to action urging the support of US Senators for the Amateur Radio Parity Act, H.R. 1301, has been gratifying — although the campaign continues. More than 50,000 e-mails have been sent to Capitol Hill viaRally Congress, and all 100 US Senate members have been contacted. The League continues to encourage members of the Amateur Radio community who have not yet done so to reach out to their two US Senators seeking their support. Just where things stand with respect to the bill’s future in the US Senate is not yet entirely clear. “As of this moment, we have no date set for action by the Senate,” said ARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, who has been deeply involved in promoting passage of the legislation. “The Senate will adjourn the September work period soon and members will return home to campaign. If we do not achieve consideration before they go into hiatus, we will have to wait until they return after Election Day.” On September 12, the US House of Representatives approved H.R. 1301 on a voice vote under a suspension of the rules, culminating many years of effort on ARRL’s part to gain legislation that would enable radio amateurs living in deed-restricted communities to erect antennas that support Amateur Radio communication. The bill calls on the FCC to amend its Part 97 rules “to prohibit the application to amateur stations of certain private land-use restrictions, and for other purposes.” Shepherded by ARRL, the overwhelming grassroots support for H.R. 1301 from the Amateur Radio community was credited for getting the bill through the US House, but it faces significant obstacles to passage in the US Senate. The earlier U.S. Senate version of the bill, S. 1685, no longer is in play, and the Senate is expected to vote on the version of H.R. 1301 that the House adopted this month. The vote came after ARRL worked with the Community Association Institute — which represents homeowners associations — to develop language that both organizations could support. Rally Congress makes it easy to generate letters to Senators in support of The Amateur Radio Parity Act. The entire process takes just a couple of minutes. “So it is critical that ARRL members continue to write their Senators,” Lisenco urged. “To those who have already written, thank you! If you haven’t done so already, please do so today. We can only do so much. After that, it becomes the responsibility of the membership to participate.” According to the amended bill provides, “Community associations should fairly administer private land-use regulations in the interest of their communities, while nevertheless permitting the installation and maintenance of effective outdoor Amateur Radio antennas. There exist antenna designs and installations that can be consistent with the aesthetics and physical characteristics of land and structures in community associations while accommodating communications in the Amateur Radio services.” More information on The Amateur Radio Parity Act is on the ARRL website.   ARRL Outgoing QSL Service to Raise Rates 09/22/2016 Although ARRL believes it’s important to maintain the long-standing tradition of the ARRL Outgoing QSL Service as a membership benefit, increased administration costs will require an increase in rates, in order to keep the Service available and viable. “The Service has been a member benefit for decades,” an ARRL statement said. “Since its official formation in November 1976, tens of millions of QSL cards have been shipped from ARRL Headquarters to Amateur Radio QSL bureaus of other national societies worldwide. At one time, this benefit offered a safe, reliable, and inexpensive way to exchange QSL cards for a fraction of the cost of the postal service. What Amateurs saved in financial cost, however, was made up for in time; it could take months, or even years, to send and receive a QSL through the bureau.” Effective November 1, the rate for 1 ounce of outgoing QSLs via the Service will increase to match the 1 ounce USPS international postage rate. As of September 2016, this rate is $1.15 per ounce — about 10 cards. An additional service fee of $7 will be charged per individual transaction, to cover administrative costs. ARRL said QSLing is very different now, and, while postal services are generally more reliable than in years past, international shipping costs have risen significantly. “With the advent of the Internet and online QSL confirmation services such as ARRL’s Logbook of The World, fewer and fewer paper cards are being exchanged,” the ARRL statement observed. Calling the Outgoing QSL Service “a significant tradition in the world of Amateur Radio,” the League said it’s committed to keeping that tradition and service alive for members who enjoy using it. “We are committed to ensuring our members will be able to send their QSL cards through the Service for decades to come,” the ARRL statement concluded.   Amateur Radio Volunteers on Call during Major Puerto Rico Power Outage 09/23/2016 Amateur Radio volunteers went on alert following an afternoon explosion on September 21 at the Aguirre Central Power Generator in Salinas that left some 1.5 million residents of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico without power. ARRL Public Information Coordinator Angel Santana, WP3GW, said that as Wednesday evening wore on, the most sought-after item was ice, followed by potable water — which depends on electricity to power the pumps that deliver it. The outage also resulted in traffic jams from non-functioning signal lights. The governor of Puerto Rico has declared a State of Emergency. “On the Amateur Radio side, the VHF/UHF linked repeater system of the Federación de Radio Aficionados de Puerto Rico (FRA), an ARRL-affiliated club, was the main source of information,” Santana told ARRL. “As soon as the situation began, lots of mobile and portable stations got on the air from east to west to report on the power loss, and ham radio was among the first to report the explosion, as smoke was observed soaring toward the sky.” According to FEMA, the fire at the Salinas switching station caused the island-wide power generation plant to shut down as a safety precaution. FEMA reported on September 23 that power had been restored to nearly 950,000 customers, with complete power restoration expected late in the day. FEMA said 305,000 customers were left without drinking water due to the loss of power to pumping stations. FEMA said that all critical facilities were operating on back-up generators, and airports, police stations, and water plants were “expected to receive first priority as power is restored.” The agency said telecommunications were operating normally. Santana said the eastern side of the island was covered by the 145.110 MHz repeater in Cayey, the western by a machine on 145.290 MHz, and in the center by the 146.830 MHz from the FRA. Repeaters on 70 centimeters became the main network for any emergency or health care traffic, Santana said. A routine Wednesday VHF net made it on the air as scheduled, and most comments and messages involved local situations as well as information about an October 9 FRA event. “Other repeater systems were on the air as part of a regular monitoring schedule, and some were active with normal conversations,” Santana said. On HF, Antonio Santiago, KP4IA, in Toa Alta was on the air from his energy-efficient home. Santana said KP4IA was “the main source of what was happening even before the situation got to the mainland news services,” checking into nets on 20, 40, and 75 meters and relaying information about the situation to other amateur stations on the mainland. Santana said local schools remained closed on September 23 and public services were to resume at 10 AM, as power and water service is returning gradually. “There are still Autoridad de Energía Eléctrica (AEE) customers who are without electricity,” Santana said. “Two cellular companies had problems. There was at least one death because of generator emissions and a few vehicle accidents. Kudos to the police personnel directing traffic.” FEMA said untreated wastewater and sewage were being discharged into spillways, hospitals were running on back-up generators and cisterns, and buses are being used to move passengers as the light-rail system is down. NASA provided a view from space, showing how Puerto Rico appears at night with full power as well as how it looked during the outage. Source: ARRL News   Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM  

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  • ETH045 - Being A Net Control

    · 01:06:07 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Net Control , we talk about the Columbia Amateur Radio Club from Columbia, SC  in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!   Tech Corner - How To Be A Net Control   Characteristics of a Good Net Control   Good Listener Ear to Hand Multitasking Speaking Clearly Good Handwriting or computer skills Good under pressure Decision making skills   Member Accountability   Always know where you net members are located, and always make sure that everyone is accounted for. There is nothing worse than someone not answering a roll call, or ending a net and someone not checking secure and you have to go and look for them. If you don’t know where they were, you don't even know where to look. Just like my role as a 911 dispatcher, it is your responsibility to do everything in your power to make sure that those that you are “working” with” go home safely.   Know your radio   During an emergency is not the time to find out that you don't know how to do something on your radio. Make sure that you know how to do all the functions with your radio before you are put in a position where you HAVE to know how to do something and you can't figure it out. It is also a good idea to make sure that you have your radio manual with you as well. That way in case you don't know how to do something or you have forgotten to do something you can always look it up.   Whether the radio that you will be using during a net is your own personal radio or if you go to a location like an Emergency Operations Center to run the net, you need to train using whatever radio you will be using. If you will be using a radio that is not yours, you should always try and use it as much as possible before you have to use it in an emergency situation.   Know your logging program(if you use one)   Short of using a pen/pencil and paper, make sure that you understand how to use whatever you will use to do your logging with. If you are just going to use a pen/pencil and paper, make sure that you write neat enough to where others can read your handwriting, especially if someone will be taking over from you.   If you will be using a computer program, make sure that you know how to use the program well before you need to use it during an emergency. Make sure you understand all the functionality of it and how to start the program in case it crashes on you or if you are the first one to use it during a net.   Mistakes Happen   If you make a mistake, acknowledge it, correct it and move on! Everyone is human and everyone makes a mistake. The difference is if you make a mistake, you need to acknowledge it and correct it. This will not only make sure that everyone that is listening to you has the correct information, but it will also help earn their respect for you as a net control operator.   Think before you key up   There are two things that are my biggest pet peaves when it comes to taking on the radio. One is when you don't listen to whats going on and I have to say something twice or more. The second is when people key up to give a weather report or something and they  say something then they will say like ahhh or ummm and then something else and then umm again and it just take forever to get done saying whatever it is that they are trying to say.   When you have something that you need to say on the radio, think about what you are going to say, get all your thoughts together and then key up, say it and unkey. Not only does this make whoever is talking look like they don't know what they are doing, but it also reflects on the organization for not training them enough and it ties up the frequency for other people to use that have something to report as well.   Use Standard Phonetic Alphabet   When you are operating on a net, make sure that you use the official International Phonetic Alphabet. If you use something other than that, the receiving person will have to think about it more than if you use the standard alphabet. I talked with one person on the radio one day that had a suffix of CFS and he identified himself as Chicken Fried Steak. While it may be “cute”, it still took me a extra second or two to realize what his callsign was. Partly because it wasn't the standard Charlie Foxtrot Sierra and partly because I was laughing when I heard it.   Have a Backup   There are two backups that you need to have planned for on a net, a backup net control and a backup frequency. Both should be announced at the beginning and during the net. You should have a backup net control in case something happens to you station during the net or if you need to take a bathroom break or a phone call or something. I have been on several nets where something has happened to the net control stations equipment and they just all the sudden when silent. One person I know that was running a net and his house got hit by lightning and everything got fried. There wasn't a backup in place and the net was in limbo until someone took over for him.   The other thing that you need to make sure that you have in place is a backup frequency. Just like that something could happen to your own station, something could happen to the repeater that you are using as well. If lightning were to strike the repeater and knock it out, the whole net would come to a halt. If you have a backup repeater or frequency in place and everyone knows it, if no one responds to you, you could automatically change to the backup frequency and continue with the net.   Be Respectful   No matter what happens either before, during or after a net, ALWAYS be respectful to who you are working with. If you don’t have the respect of those you are working with, things could be very stressful for both you and those you are working with.   If something happens during a net or event that was done against what you asked the person to do, don't talk to that person about it during the net or in front of others. Handle what needs to be handled during the event and afterwards, pull that person aside and talk to them about what happened. Don't jump down their throat or chew them out, talk to them civilly and with respect. The way that you talk to them could have all the difference in the world in later interactions.   Pace Yourself   Being net control can be very demanding on you. There is so much going on, multiple frequencies and radios to monitor, phones, other people and so much more. It is very easy to get overwhelmed. No matter how good of a net control that you are you need to pace yourself. Never stay as net control for more than two hours at a time. If you have the personnel, change every hour or thirty minutes depending on how busy you area in the net.   If at all possible, stagger your helper shift and your net control shifts. Have the first hour of your shift as a helper with someone else as net control. After an hour take over as net control and a new helper will take over for you. An hour later, you rotate out, your helper rotates to net control and a new helper takes over as helper.   Tactical Call Signs   Tactical call signs are probably one of the most useful things that I use as a net control. A tactical call sign is a word used to describe a location where a station is located at. For example, if you are running a net and you have two shelters, a Red Cross building, and an EOC. If each location has two operators at them, you may never know who is at the radio as net control. So if you call a location by call sign, you might have to call a couple times because you don't know exactly who to call.   Instead use a tactical call sign like Shelter 1, Shelter 2, Red Cross, and EOC. By doing this, no matter who is at the radio at that location, they will know who you are calling.         Amateur Radio Club Spotlight The Columbia Amateur Radio Club   Website: http://w4cae.com/   The Carolina Amateur Radio Club is a service-oriented club and has been in existence for more than 40 years. Originally known as the Carolina Repeater Society, it was an offshoot of the Palmetto Amateur Radio Club (which is the oldest South Carolina amateur radio club, having been founded in 1928 on “the Horseshoe” at the University of South Carolina). Around 1976 the club name was changed to the Columbia Amateur Radio Club to include a broader range of interests, not just repeaters. From the beginning the club was active in promoting amateur radio, giving classes for new hams, and maintaining a testing team.   Meetings First Monday of the month at 7:30pm at the SCETV Telecommunications Center, 1041 George Rogers Blvd, Columbia, SC 29201   Repeaters 146.775 - PL 156.7 Ft. Jackson 147.330 + PL 156.7 Columbia   Nets Every Sunday and Wednesday Evenings at 8:30pm on the 147.330 Repeater   Activities Annual Picnic Field Day Workshops License Classes Testing Sessions Bike Races Walk-a-thons Hamfest - in 2016 it was on the first Saturday of April.       Upcoming Events     NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 25 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 25 CQ Worldwide DX Contest, CW 0000Z, Nov 26 to 2400Z, Nov 27 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Nov 30 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 30 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 30 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 30 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 1 UKEICC 80m Contest 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 30 NRAU 10m Activity Contest 1800Z-1900Z, Dec 1 (CW) and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 1 (SSB) and  2000Z-2100Z, Dec 1 (FM) and  2100Z-2200Z, Dec 1 (Dig) NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Dec 2 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 2 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 2 ARRL 160-Meter Contest 2200Z, Dec 2 to 1600Z, Dec 4 TARA RTTY Melee 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 3 Wake-Up! QRP Sprint 0600Z-0629Z, Dec 3 and  0630Z-0659Z, Dec 3 and  0700Z-0729Z, Dec 3 and  0730Z-0800Z, Dec 3 TOPS Activity Contest 1600Z, Dec 3 to 1559Z, Dec 4 Ten-Meter RTTY Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 4 SARL Digital Contest 1300Z-1600Z, Dec 4 ARS Spartan Sprint 0200Z-0400Z, Dec 6 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 7 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 7 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Dec 7 and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 7 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 8     *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar     Hamfests     11/25/2016 Fair Lawn ARC Ham Radio Auction - Fair Lawn, NJ   11/26/2016 OARC Hamfest in the Woods - Okeechobee, FL   12/03/2016 Fulton County Winter Fest - Delta, OH SSRC 2016 HAMFEST - Ocala, FL Superstition SuperFest 2016 - Mesa, AZ   12/04/2016 LCARC Amateur Radio Swap/Hamfest - Madison Heights, MI     *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar       News Rocky Mountain Division Director Dwayne Allen, WY7FD, Overcomes Challenge to Win Election   11/18/2016ARRL Rocky Mountain Division Director Dwayne Allen, WY7FD, has won election to a 3-year term. As Vice Director, Allen assumed the Director’s seat last January, after the Board of Directors elected former Director Brian Mileshosky, N5ZGT, as Second Vice President. Allen outpolled challenger Garth Crowe, WY7GC (ex-N7XKT) 1112 to 528 votes, to win the seat in his own right.Ballots were counted November 18 at ARRL Headquarters. The Rocky Mountain Division Director’s seat was the only contested election for the 2017-2019 cycle.Allen served previously as Wyoming Section Manager, from 2005 until 2007. New terms of office begin on January 1, 2017, at 12 Noon Eastern Time. Work Continues to Strengthen Relationship between Amateur Auxiliary, FCC   11/17/2016 Work continues to promote the visibility of Amateur Radio enforcement within the FCC, the ARRL Executive Committee was told recently. The EC met on October 22 in Rosemont, Illinois. ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, chaired the session. ARRL General Counsel Chris Imlay, W3KD, reported that meetings have been held with the FCC concerning more effective FCC use of the volunteer resources of the Amateur Auxiliary (Official Observers) program, the current FCC-ARRL Amateur Auxiliary Agreement, and the development of a new Memorandum of Understanding that better incorporates the Amateur Auxiliary program — especially in light of the FCC’s recent closing of field offices and reduction of Spectrum Enforcement Division staff. The EC directed Second Vice President Brian Mileshosky, N5ZGT, to continue work on the review and revitalization of the Amateur Auxiliary, in cooperation with the FCC, to ensure active use of the Amateur Auxiliary program. In other FCC-related issues. The EC provided guidance in the domestic implementation of the worldwide Amateur Radio allocation at 5 MHz, agreed upon at World Radiocommunication Conference 2015 (WRC-15) last fall. Delegates to WRC-15 reached consensus on 15 kilohertz-wide band, 5351.5-5366.5 kHz, with stations limited to an effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) of 15 W.   Imlay, in conjunction with ARRL International Affairs Vice President Jay Bellows, K0QB, and Midwest Division Director Rod Blocksome, K0DAS, will review of the National Broadband Plan, with an eye toward determining any impact it might have on Amateur Radio allocations.   In addition, Imlay and West Gulf Division Director Dr David Woolweaver, K5RAV, will meet with officials of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and congressional offices to address the effect on Amateur Radio antenna systems between 50 and 200 feet tall of new painting and lighting requirements required under the FAA Reauthorization Act (H.R. 636).   ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, told the panel that several new educational initiatives under way, and, as those pilot programs are assessed and refined, the programs will be made available to the Amateur Radio community.   In his report, Bellows told the EC that the IARU Administrative Council has begun preparations to represent Amateur Radio at various meetings to be held in advance of World Radiocommunication Conference 2019. Minutes of the October 22 meeting are available on the ARRL website.     New ARRL Repeater Directory Will Leverage Crowdsourcing Technology   11/14/2016ARRL partner RFinder, the creator of a web and app-based directory of Amateur Radio repeaters worldwide, will supply all data for the 2017-2018 ARRL Repeater Directory®. RFinder will employ its crowdsourcing technology to aggregate timely and accurate information for the Directory, marking the first time crowdsourcing has been put to use in the production of an ARRL publication. “Crowdsourcing” is a means of using data gathered from public resources — in this case, repeater owners and frequency coordinators — via the Internet to obtain the necessary listing information more quickly and flexibly. Including RFinder’s data in The Repeater Directory will help users seeking the most complete listing of on-air repeaters. The Repeater Directory will continue to publish repeater listings according to state, city, frequency and mode.Although RFinder’s data is primarily user supplied, ARRL has invited volunteer frequency coordinators to contribute their coordination data to RFinder. RFinder has setup an online portal to accept uploaded data from coordinators. Every coordinator that supplies repeater data to RFinder will have its listings credited as coordinated repeaters both in the RFinder smartphone apps and web listings, and in the hard-copy Repeater Directory.As part of this program, RFinder will make the RFinder database available to all frequency coordinators free of charge, with the exception of the Apple iOS version app, which requires a $9.99 license. The Android-compatible database is a free download.“We believe this will help you in your coordination activities, as it will provide you with a complete map of machines, both coordinated or not,” RFinder said. “It will also assist coordinators to bring uncoordinated machines into coordination.”ARRL earlier this year established an agreement with RFinder to be the membership association’s preferred online resource of repeater frequencies. RFinder’s steadily growing worldwide repeater database now includes more than 60,000 repeaters in some 170 countries around the globe. RFinder listings are dynamic, regularly reflecting new, updated, revised, and deleted information.RFinder is integrated directly with EchoLink on both Android and iPhone and provides the ability to share repeater check-ins on Facebook, Twitter, and APRS. RFinder is integrated with RT Systems and CHIRP radio programming applications and has a routing feature that lets users find repeaters worldwide over a given route. Video demos of RFinder features are available on YouTube.ARRL had previously discontinued its own products that supported digital listings of repeater data including the TravelPlus for Repeaters™ software and its own apps.RFinder is $9.99 per year. Subscribe to RFinder by visiting http://subscribe.rfinder.net/ from your iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, or from your Android smartphone or tablet.RFinder also includes the ability to report radio jamming anywhere. Those without a device or subscription can file reports online. Individuals or entities responsible for coordinating anti-jamming activities also can request access to view jamming reports for their area. Southern Florida Assistant Section Manager Ray Kassis, N4LEM, SK   11/17/2016ARRL Southern Florida Assistant Section Manager Ray Kassis, N4LEM, of Cocoa, Florida, died unexpectedly on November 9. He was 69. Licensed as WB4CTZ in 1966, he served the ARRL Southern Florida Section for many years in various capacities, most recently as Space Coast District Emergency Coordinator (DEC) and Assistant Section Manager (ASM).Kassis had been the Brevard County Emergency Coordinator (EC) since 1991, and he was instrumental in constructing several mobile communications units in the area. He was the owner of, and air personality on, WWBC radio, where he maintained a second ham station.p“We have suffered a great loss in our Section family with Ray’s passing,” said Southern Florida Section Manager Jeff Beals, WA4AW. “Ray was a dear friend and a valued member of my section staff.”     Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH041 - Morse Code

    · 00:59:22 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about CW or Morse Code, the South Canadian Amateur Radio Society in Norman, OK, some upcoming events/contests and Hamfest a for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!   Tech Corner - Morse Code - CW What is Morse Code and It’s History?   Morse code is a method of transmitting text information as a series of on-off tones, Lights, of clicks. Morse code started way back in 1836! It was originally developed by an Amateur artist by the name of Samuel F.B. Morse, an American physicist Joseph Henry, and Alfred Vail. Their system sent electric pulses through wiring to a receiving station that used an electromagnet to make a mark on a piece of “paper”. Once the message was completed, the operator would translate the message visually. The original morse codep was only numbers that corresponded with words in a codebook. This didn't last to long because Alfred Vail soon expanded the code to include the letters of the alphabet as a few special characters. It was soon discovered by the operators of the telegraph stations that they could translate the clicks that the mechanical armature made when receiving a current. It was soon realized that operators could translate a message faster by listening to the clicks over let the machine do that work, then translating it from the “paper”. When Morse Code was adapted for radio communications, the characters we sent using a tone. In the 1890s, Morse code began to be used extensively for early radio communication, before it was possible to transmit voice. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, most high-speed international communication used Morse code on telegraph lines, undersea cables and radio circuits. In aviation, Morse code in radio systems started to be used on a regular basis in the 1920s. By the 1930’s all civilian and military pilots were required to learn morse code, both for use in early communications methods and for identification of navigational beacons which continually transmitted a two or three letter identifier in morse code. Morse code was used as an international standard for maritime distress until 1999, when it was replaced by the Global Maritime Distress Safety System. Before 1999, the standard phrase for distress was SOS ( … --- … ), who can tell me what it was before it was changed to SOS? When the French Navy ceased using Morse code on January 31, 1997, the final message transmitted was "Calling all. This is our last cry before our eternal silence.” In the United States the final commercial Morse code transmission was on July 12, 1999, signing off with Samuel Morse's original 1844 message, "What hath God wrought", and the prosign "SK". As of 2015 the United States Air Force still trains ten people a year in Morse. The United States Coast Guard has ceased all use of Morse code on the radio, and no longer monitors any radio frequencies for Morse code transmissions,p including the international medium frequency (MF) distress frequency of 500 kHz. User Proficiency Morse code speed is measured in Words-Per-Minute(WPM) or Characters-Per-Minute(CPM). Being that characters have different lengths, therefore words will have different lengths to them as well. The WPM is therefore measured by using a standard word, such as PARIS or CODEX. This allows the standardization of WPM speeds. Operators proficient at morse code can receive(copy) morse code transmissions at 40+ wpms in their heads. International contests in code copying are still occasionally held.  In July 1939 at a contest in Asheville, North Carolina in the United States Ted R. McElroy set a still-standing record for Morse copying, 75.2 wpm. However it is believed that there are some operators out there that can copy morse code in their heads at over 100 WPMs. Today among amateur operators there are several organizations that recognize high speed code ability, one group consisting of those who can copy Morse at 60 wpm. Also, Certificates of Code Proficiency are issued by several amateur radio societies, including the American Radio Relay League. Their basic award starts at 10 wpm with endorsements as high as 40 wpm, and are available to anyone who can copy the transmitted text. Members of the Boy Scouts of America may put a Morse interpreter's strip on their uniforms if they meet the standards for translating code at 5 wpm. International Morse Code Morse code has been in use for more than 160 years—longer than any other electrical coding system. What is called Morse code today is actually somewhat different from what was originally developed by Vail and Morse. The Modern International Morse code, or continental code, was created by Friedrich Clemens Gerke in 1848 and initially used for telegraphy between Hamburg and Cuxhaven in Germany. Gerke changed nearly half of the alphabet and all of the numerals, providing the foundation for the modern form of the code. After some minor changes, International Morse Code was standardized at the International Telegraphy Congress in 1865 in Paris, and was later made the standard by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Morse's original code specification, largely limited to use in the United States and Canada, became known as American Morse codeor railroad code. American Morse code is now seldom used except in historical re-enactments.   Amateur Radio The original amateur radio operators used Morse code exclusively, since voice-capable radio transmitters did not become commonly available until around 1920. Until 2003 the International Telecommunication Union mandated Morse code proficiency as part of the amateur radio licensing procedure worldwide. However, the World Radiocommunication Conference of 2003 made the Morse code requirement for amateur radio licensing optional. Many countries subsequently removed the Morse requirement from their licence requirements Until 1991 a demonstration of the ability to send and receive Morse code at a minimum of five words per minute (wpm) was required to receive an amateur radio license for use in the United States from the Federal Communications Commission. Demonstration of this ability was still required for the privilege to use the HF bands. Until 2000 proficiency at the 20 wpm level was required to receive the highest level of amateur license (Amateur Extra Class); effective April 15, 2000, the FCC reduced the Extra Class requirement to five wpm. Finally, effective on February 23, 2007 the FCC eliminated the Morse code proficiency requirements from all amateur radio licenses. Since Morse Code is not a requirement any long to obtain you amateur radio licence or to upgrade to a higher class, there has been an influx of people getting and upgrading their license. There has also been a rift forming with some operators who obtained their license before the code requirement was dropped. It is sad, but true. Some ofp those operators have not been very friendly to operators that got their license after the code was dropped. What are your feeling about the code requirement being dropped? Learning Morse Code There are three major methods on learning amateur radio, Mnemonics, the Farnsworth Method and the Koch Method. The Farnsworth method is probably the best way to learn according to a lot of people that I have talked to and/or read articles from. Mnemonics When I first upgraded to the Tech + class, I had to get 5 wpm code. I didn't have any plans on going any higher than that really. I just wanted a little sliver of 10 meter voice that I could possibly use to talk home on while I was in college. That didn't happen though, because my father didn't get his upgrade until after I had graduated college. While I did learn morse code and I got my tech + license, the way that I learned morse code was definitely not the best way that I could have. I learned using the Mnemonics method. What this means in that every letter has a sound-a-like that followed the pattern of the morse code dits and dahs. For example, let letter A has a sound alike of “Say Aww” and the letter B has a sound alike of “Band rat it tat”. While this method is OK for use at slow speeds, it really hampers ypou when or if you want to increase your speed. When you learn morse code with this method, you brain will automatically translate the morse code character into the sound alike and then into the letter. This adds an extra step when trying to receive a morse code message and limits how fast you can receive. Koch Method The Koch Method is named after a German Psychologist Ludwig Koch. This method is probably the second most popular method of learning morse code. The way that this method works is that you learn all the characters at full speed from the start. However, you start with only two letters and build from there once you can copy those two at 90% accuracy. Farnsworth Method The Farnsworth Method is probably the most popular method on learning morse code. It was developed by Donald R. Farnsworth, W6TTB, This method is similar to the Koch Method, however there is one real difference. With the Farnsworth method, all the characters are sent at your target speed, typically 13 or 20 wpms, but the spaces between the letters and words are exaggerated to make the overall speed of only about 5 wpm. This exaggerated space between the characters are so that you have extra time to think of the character. Bother the Koch and the Farnsworth Methods allow you to easily increase your speed of sending and receiving because you learning the sound of the actual character rather than the sound alike of the character. Keyers Straight Key The straight key is probably the first keyer that anyone uses. It is a mechanical key so it doesn't have any electrical parts and can be used with pretty much any kind of radio. This style of keyer has an up-down motion to it and contacts on the bottom of the arm. When the arm and the base meet it causes a tone to be sent out on the radio. The longer you hold the key down the longer the tone will be. I'm sure that most of yall have used or at least played with one of these types of keys at some point in your life. These keys are the easiest to use, since they are so simple, however, it is hard to achieve a speed of more that 20 wpm with them and that is probably pushing it. The other negative thing about these types of keys it the up and down movement of them can cause wrist issues like carpal-tunnel. Sideswiper A sideswiper keyer is similar to a straight key in that the longer you hold the contacts together the longer the tone that is transmitted will be. The other similarity is that they are totally mechanical. The major difference is that instead of an up-down motion, the key arm goes left and right with contacts on both side. The two advantages of having the key arm moving left and right instead of up and down, is that a higher rate of speed can be achieved and you don't have the carpal-tunnel issues that a straight key has.   Vibroflex “Bug” A Vibroflex “bug” expands on a Sideswiper style keyer in that is goes left and right, however the biggest difference is that the Vibroflex is a semi automatic keyer. When you push the key one way it will make a dit sound that will repeat at a set speed and the dah will be made when you press it the other. The dahs however, do not repeater so the tone will be transmitted for as long as you hold the key down. The Vibroflex was the most common form of speed keyer used before electronic keyers. Electronic Keyers The the advent of electronic keyers, the speed at which you can send morse code that increased dramatically. With electronic keyers, you can set the speed you want to send at and then like the Vibroflex, when you hold down one side it will send dits but when you hold down the other side it will send dahs. Unlike the Vibroflex though, when you hold down the dah side it will repeatedly send dahs instead of just one single tone. Electronic keyers are typically referred to as paddles because of their shape. There is also two kinds of electronic keyers, one with a single paddle, the other with two. With the single paddle it is much like the sideswiper in that there are contacts on both sides. However, unlike the sideswiper, one side is for dits and the other for dahs and both sides repeater. The other type of electronic keyer is double paddle style. This type uses a squeeze type methodology. One side is for dits the other for dahs. The biggest difference with this type of keyer is that you can hold down one side and squeeze the other side together and they keyer will alternate whether a dit or a dah is sent out. This comes in handy when you are doing like a “R” or a “K”. With the electronic keyer, you can press one side down the squeeze the other and it will do a dit dah did or a dah dit dah depending on which side is pressed down first. Do you use morse code? How fast can you send and receive? From My Listeners   Back in August I received an email from Fred Wilson:   Curtis     Just found your podcast last week, and I have been lessening to all I can find. I am new to Ham and looking to take my technical class license next month. I have got three guys from work going to take it with me. My dad was a ham back in the 70s and I can't believe I've waited this long to get started. And thanks to you I think I got a jump on it. Thanks for all the info. Even though a lot of it is over my head. LOL   Fred Wilson   At the time, he was not licensed as you can see. We talked back and forth a few times, talked about radios, how his studying was going, if he had taken the test yet, etc. Last Monday, Oct 17, 2016, I got this email:   Curtis   Well I did it, I couldn’t wait for my friends to take the test with me. I passed the technician class test this weekend. Didn’t know you got to take the general for free. I didn't study for it and was only two questions short of getting my general ticket. So now I’m studying for the general and extra. I’ll let you know when I get my call sign for technician . Thanks for the encouragement, I’ve learned a lot from your show. Fred Wilson73   He emailed me on Wednesday when he got his call sign, KG5PWA. My original call sign was KC5PWP. He almost ended up with the same suffix as I had and I told him so. His reply was:   Wow that is close. Well I'm already studying for my general an extra class hopefully by the end of next month I should be sending you a new call sign. I think the reason why I almost passed my general class without studying was because I listen to you every week. I've learned a lot from your show. THX 73Fred Wilson, KG5PWA   It is so awesome when I get emails like these. Once again, congratulations Fred on joining the ranks of amateur radio. Maybe one day we can talk on the air or in person!   Amateur Radio Club Spotlight   South Canadian Amateur Radio Society   Website: http://www.w5nor.org Facebook: http://www.w5nor.org/Facebook   SCARS is not a Canadian Club, we're just located in the South Canadian River area. The founding fathers didn't want to limit the scope of the club to a certain town, or village, so this name was chosen. 40 years later, we've expanded to have members from across the state, and country. With the Internet experience, we've even attracted regulars from around the globe. For more information on the South Canadian River area, please see the South Canadian River Facebook Group.   Meetings 2nd Saturday of each month (3rd Saturday in June) at Fire Station #7 near Westheimer Airport / Field. Coffee and donuts start at 9am, meeting starts at 9:30am. Informal Meetings - McDonalds at 1720 W. Lindsey St. Every day but Sunday, a cast of about a dozen meet for coffee and breakfast between about 9:00 am and 11:00 am   Repeaters 147.060 + PL 141.3 Norman, OK 443.700 + PL141.3 Norman, OK 144.399 APRS Digipeater Norman, OK   Nets SCARS hosts the N5HZX Memorial Net (In memory of N5HZX Fred Goodwin) every Wednesday evening at 8:00 PM (central time zone) on 28.445 MHz USB Each Tuesday, at 8:00 pm Central Time, SCARS hosts the Cleveland County ARES traffic net on 147.060 MHz +600 kHz offset, 141.3 Hz CTCSS tone, repeater Each Tuesday, at 8:30 pm Central Time, SCARS hosts the Weekly Gossip net on 147.060 MHz +600 kHz offset, 141.3 Hz CTCSS tone, repeater SCARS hosts the KD5JSD Memorial Net (In memory of KD5JSD John Sauer) every Monday evening at 8:00 PM (central time zone) on 50.200 MHz USB   Activities Field Day Technician and General Classes Central Oklahoma Radio Amateurs Ham Holiday Storm spotter Training OKC Memorial Marathon NPOTA Bike MS Event Jamboree On The Air National Weather Festival Christmas Party Training at every meeting Community Service   Upcoming Events   RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 27 NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Oct 28 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 28 CQ Worldwide DX Contest, SSB 0000Z, Oct 29 to 2400Z, Oct 30 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 2 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 2 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 2 and  0300Z-0400Z, Nov 3 UKEICC 80m Contest 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 2 NRAU 10m Activity Contest 1800Z-1900Z, Nov 3 (CW) and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 3 (SSB) and  2000Z-2100Z, Nov 3 (FM) and  2100Z-2200Z, Nov 3 (Dig) NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 4 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 4 IPARC Contest, CW 0600Z-1000Z, Nov 5 and  1400Z-1800Z, Nov 5 Ukrainian DX Contest 1200Z, Nov 5 to 1200Z, Nov 6 RSGB International Sprint Contest, SSB 1700Z-2100Z, Nov 5 ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, CW 2100Z, Nov 5 to 0300Z, Nov 7 IPARC Contest, SSB 0600Z-1000Z, Nov 6 and  1400Z-1800Z, Nov 6 EANET Sprint 0800Z-1200Z, Nov 6 High Speed Club CW Contest 0900Z-1100Z, Nov 6 and  1500Z-1700Z, Nov 6 DARC 10-Meter Digital Contest 1100Z-1700Z, Nov 6 ARS Spartan Sprint 0200Z-0400Z, Nov 8 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 9 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 9 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 9 and  0300Z-0400Z, Nov 10 RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 9   *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar   Hamfests   10/29/2016 Halloween Hamfest - Kirkwood, MO Hazard Hamfest - Hazard, KY Jacksonville FREE Hamfest - Jacksonville, FL Tri-City ARC Auction - Gales Ferry, CT   10/30/2016 Long Island Hamfest and Electronics Fair - Hicksville, NY USECA Swap & Shop Hamfest - Madison Heights, MI   11/05/2016 Enid ARC Hamfest - Enid, OK FARAFest - Bourne, MA GARC Hamfest - Georgetown, OH Georgia State Convention (Stone Mountain Hamfest) - Lawrenceville, GA HARKFEST - Congress, AZ LARA Tailgate - Tavares, FL Link McGarity WV4I Memorial Free Flea - West Palm Beach, FL MRC91 Radio Fest - Milwaukee, WI NARCfest 2016 - Nixa, MO TechFest - Lakewood, CO   11/06/2016 Davenport RAC Hamfest & Computer Show - Davenport, IA FCARC Swapfest - Appleton, WI WACOM HAMFEST 2016 - Washington, PA   *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar   News Time to File Your JOTA Station Report 10/19/2016 Now that Jamboree On The Air (JOTA) 2016 is history, the Boy Scouts are urging participants to file a JOTA Station Report, in order to determine how things went. “It's your perfect opportunity to share your stories, photos, and some numbers,” JOTA Coordinator Jim Wilson, K5ND, said. “The reports I've seen so far show some good turnout, particularly from Cub Scouts. We feel this is due to the new requirement for the Arrow of Light Award that asks Scouts to participate in JOTA-JOTI. This is also no doubt responsible for the big increase in JOTI registrations in the US, from roughly 100 last year to what looks like close to 500 this year.” Reports are due by November 1. Every station that files a report will be entered into a drawing for an Icom ID-51A Plus dualband handheld transceiver and will receive a 2016 Jamboree on the Air Certificate. Five runners up will receive an Icom America Ham Crew T shirt. Only Boy Scouts of America stations are eligible. “Worldwide we had 11,534 register for the event,” Wilson said, adding that a rough estimate indicated 800 US registrations and nearly 300 of those indicating Amateur Radio call signs. If that number holds, he said, it would indicate a dip in JOTA participation from 2015, when 346 turned out. “Some of that could have been due to the complexity of the registration system,” he allowed. “I assure you that the reporting system now is much simpler. Wilson said the US JOTA 2016 Report should be out in early December. “Thanks again for all your support to Radio Scouting and Jamboree on the Air,” he said. It’s estimated that more than 1 million Scouts in 150+ countries took part in JOTA 2016, engaging with other Scouts to talk about Amateur Radio and their Scouting experiences. Source: ARRL News Apparent ARISS Radio Failure Prompts Shift to Russian Service Module Ham Gear 10/20/2016The VHF handheld transceiver that the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program has used to connect students worldwide with astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) for more than 16 years has begun to display an error message and is unusable at this time.While the ARISS technical team evaluates the best path to restore operation from the ISS Columbus module, ARISS contacts will be supported using the Kenwood radio in the Russian Service Module.During this period, the packet digipeater will be unavailable. Switching to the 70 centimeter capability on board the Columbus module for some operations is being coordinated. ARISS said to expect further updates as it works to resolve the problem. A reminder: The deadline is November 1 for formal and informal education institutions and organizations to submit proposals to host an Amateur Radio contact with an ISS crew member. ARISS anticipates that contacts will take place between July 1 and December 31, 2017. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits determine contact dates.To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the ham radio contact into a well-developed education plan. — ARISS Bulletin Source: ARRL News Georgia Section Manager Changing on November 1   10/20/2016Georgia Section Manager Gene Clark, W4AYK, of Albany, has announced that he’s stepping down at the end of October, after serving since October 2009. David Benoist, AG4ZR, of Senoia, has been appointed as Georgia Section Manager, effective November 1, to complete the current term of office, which extends until September 30, 2017.When a Section Manager vacancy occurs between elections, the position is filled by appointment. Clark recommended to Field Services and Radiosport Manager Dave Patton, NN1N, that Benoist succeed him. Patton then consulted with Southeastern Division Director Doug Rehman, K4AC, before making the appointment.Benoist has served as Georgia Section Emergency Coordinator and as an Emergency Coordinator. Source: ARRL News Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH043 - CTCSS & DTMF, What is That?

    · 00:59:19 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Tones, we talk about the Mid-Atlantic Amateur Radio Club in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!     Tech Corner - Tones   http://www.everythinghamradio.com/2015/08/ctcss-do-you-hear-what-i-hear/   http://www.everythinghamradio.com/2015/08/dtmf-dual-tone-multi-frequency-tones/           Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Mid-Atlantic Amateur Radio Club   Website: http://www.marc-radio.org   Meetings Fourth Tuesday at 7p at the Newtown Public Library - Community Room, 201 Bishop Hollow Rd, Newtown Square, PA   Repeaters 145.130 - PL 131.8 Paoli Hospital - Linked to the 147.060 & 445.675 Repeaters 147.060 +PL 131.8 Newtown Square - Linked to the 145.130 & 445.675 Repeater 147.360 + PL 131.8 Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby - Linked to the 224.500 & 444.050 Repeaters 224.420 - PL 131.8 Bryn Mawr Hospital 224.500 - PL 131.8 Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby - Linked to the 147.360 & 444.050 Repeaters 444.050 + PL 131.8 Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby - Linked to the 147.360 & 224.500 Repeaters 445.675 - PL 131.8 Paoli Hospital - Linked to the 145.130 & 147.060 Repeaters   Nets MARC Club Net - Wednesdays at 8:30PM on the 145.130, 147.060, & 445.675 Repeaters(Linked).   Activities Field Day MARC Ham Fest - July 8, 2017 Boy Scouts Christmas Party Elmer Program License Testing Breakfast Eyeball QSO - Second Saturday at 0900 - Country Squire, 2560 W. Chester Pike, Broomall, PA Penn Wynne 5k Run 5 Mile Radnor Run Vietnam Veterans Run     Upcoming Events   NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 11 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 11 WAE DX Contest, RTTY 0000Z, Nov 12 to 2359Z, Nov 13 10-10 Int. Fall Contest, Digital 0001Z, Nov 12 to 2359Z, Nov 13 JIDX Phone Contest 0700Z, Nov 12 to 1300Z, Nov 13 SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 1200Z, Nov 12 to 2400Z, Nov 13 OK/OM DX Contest, CW 1200Z, Nov 12 to 1200Z, Nov 13 Kentucky QSO Party 1400Z, Nov 12 to 0200Z, Nov 13 CQ-WE Contest 1900Z-2300Z, Nov 12 (CW/Digital) and  0100Z-0500Z, Nov 13 (Phone) and  1900Z-2300Z, Nov 13 (Phone) and  0100Z-0500Z, Nov 14 (CW/Digital) Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 16 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 16 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 16 and  0300Z-0400Z, Nov 17 NAQCC CW Sprint 0130Z-0330Z, Nov 17 NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 18 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 18 YO International PSK31 Contest 1600Z-2200Z, Nov 18 ARRL EME Contest 0000Z, Nov 19 to 2359Z, Nov 20 SARL Field Day Contest 1000Z, Nov 19 to 1000Z, Nov 20 LZ DX Contest 1200Z, Nov 19 to 1200Z, Nov 20 All Austrian 160-Meter Contest 1600Z, Nov 19 to 0700Z, Nov 20 Feld Hell Sprint 1700Z-1859Z, Nov 19 RSGB 2nd 1.8 MHz Contest, CW 1900Z-2300Z, Nov 19 ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, SSB 2100Z, Nov 19 to 0300Z, Nov 21 Homebrew and Oldtime Equipment Party 1300-1500Z, Nov 20 (40m) and  1500-1700Z, Nov 20 (80m) Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0200Z-0400Z, Nov 21 SKCC Sprint 0000Z-0200Z, Nov 23 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 23 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 23 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 23 and  0300Z-0400Z, Nov 24       *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar     Hamfests   11/11/2016 Jackson County ARA Hamfest - Ocean Springs, MS   11/12/2016 Big Island of Hawaii International Swap Meet/HamFest - Kamuela, HI Flamingo Net / University of Miami ARC Free Flea - Coral Gables, FL GSARC "BEACHFEST 2016" - Conway, SC Indiana State Convention (Fort Wayne Hamfest & Computer Expo) - Fort Wayne, IN New Orleans Ham Radio & Computer Flea Marlet - Harahan, LA Oro Valley ARC Hamfest -  Marana, AZ Raytown ARC Hamfest - Kansas City, MO SPARCFest 2016 - Pinellas Park, FL   11/19/2016 Alabama State Convention (MARC Hamfest 2016) - Montgomery, AL Cy Harris Memorial Free Flea - Oakland Park, FL Upper Pinellas ARC Ham Fest - Palm Harbor, FL   11/20/2016 JARSFest 2016 - Benson, NC     *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar       News ARRL President Emeritus Jim Haynie, W5JBP, SK 11/02/2016 ARRL President Emeritus Jim Haynie, W5JBP, of Dallas, Texas, died on November 1. He was 73. His death followed a period of ill health. Haynie was elected as the 13th President of ARRL on January 21, 2000, succeeding Rod Stafford, W6ROD (ex-KB6ZV). “Jim was a remarkable individual who made a huge personal commitment to Amateur Radio and the ARRL,” said ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR. “He had a great sense of humor that was often quite helpful as we addressed some serious matters when Jim was President. His vision guided us to try new things that are still helping Amateur Radio and the League to this day.” A radio amateur for more than 40 years, Haynie was twice re-elected by the ARRL Board to the ARRL’s top volunteer office, serving until January 2006, when Joel Harrison, W5ZN, succeeded him. Prior to assuming the ARRL presidency, Haynie was ARRL West Gulf Division Director during two different periods — from 1987 until 1990 and from 1997 until 2000, and an ARRL Vice President from 1990 until 1992. During his 6 years as president, Haynie focused on promoting Amateur Radio in the classroom, and his ARRL Amateur Radio Education Project — which he dubbed the “Big Project” — was an initiative to offer a turnkey Amateur Radio curriculum as well as radio equipment to schools. His project eventually grew into the ARRL Education & Technology Program (ETP). A gregarious and accessible individual, Haynie was also skilled at promoting Amateur Radio as often as he could, frequently on the road to attend as many ham radio gatherings as he could squeeze into his schedule, including Dayton Hamvention each spring. Once, he was also a guest of Art Bell, W6OBB, on his Coast to Coast AM overnight radio talk show. On several occasions, Haynie traveled to Washington, DC, to meet with FCC and other government officials and with lawmakers on Capitol Hill to promote Amateur Radio issues and to communicate concerns. Those included the League’s position on deed restrictions or CC&Rs. During his tenure, the Amateur Radio Spectrum Protection Act and the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Consistency Act — an early bill to address the CC&R issue — were introduced in Congress. In 2003, Haynie testified on Capitol Hill on behalf of the Spectrum Protection Act. Not long after he became president, Haynie arranged for the gravely injured 13-year-old Willem van Tuijl — shot by pirates while cruising in the South Pacific with his parents Jacco, KH2TD, Jannie, KH2TE, van Tuijl — get medical treatment in the US. After the 9/11 terror attacks, Haynie rallied radio amateurs to assist, and he praised the actions of Amateur Radio volunteers who turned out in New York City and Washington, DC. “Radio amateurs in New York City and elsewhere around the country are doing everything they can to support the authorities in locating and assisting victims,” he said in the immediate aftermath of the attacks. A few years later, Haynie provided written testimony on Amateur Radio’s response in the Hurricane Katrina disaster to the US House Government Reform Committee. In 2007, after he had left the presidency, Dayton Hamvention® named Haynie as its Amateur of the Year. Hamvention said Haynie’s League leadership “helped define Amateur Radio’s role in emergency communication.” Among other highlights of Haynie’s tenure as the League’s president was the signing of a Statement of Affiliation between the Department of Homeland Security in 2003, which made ARRL a Citizen Corps affiliate. The following year, he headed an ARRL delegation to the White House to discuss concerns about broadband over power line technology, meeting with an official of the Office of Science and Technology Policy. In 2013, the ARRL West Gulf Division honored Haynie with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Service details have not yet been announced. RSGB Criticizes TV Broadcast Portraying Radio Amateur as “Nightmare Neighbour” 11/01/2016 The Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) has weighed in following the airing of a Channel 5 TV Nightmare Neighbour Next Door episode [the program may have been removed from the website — Ed.] that featured an Amateur Radio operator. In the program, neighbors of 75-year-old Armando Martins, M0PAM, of Kent, made unsubstantiated claims that RF radiating from his 30-foot vertical antenna was detrimental to their health. “Unfortunately, the RSGB was not invited to be part of Channel 5’s Nightmare Neighbour Next Door programme or to verify any facts,” the RSGB said. “We have, of course, contacted Channel 5 about our concerns and have highlighted the positive aspects of Amateur Radio. We have also offered our expertise and input for future programmes where Amateur Radio is mentioned.” Channel 5 broadcast the offending episode on October 27, and it drew criticism from radio amateurs across the UK, some of whom may have used a program complaint service form provided by telecommunications regulator Ofcom. Critics complained that the program was replete with false claims and note that Ofcom has never found any problems with Martins’ station. Martins, a veteran radio amateur, was put off the air in 2010 by the Canterbury City Council after moving into a council house — a form of public housing — and was not allowed to install his antenna in the back garden, although that was more of a zoning issue. He subsequently moved to Kent, where the health claims began. A radio amateur for more than 60 years, Martins was first licensed as CR6IL in Portuguese West Africa (Angola). “Our volunteers spend a lot of time helping radio amateurs with planning applications,” the RSGB said. “It is by putting forward facts during those processes that we can help to dispel myths about Amateur Radio and any impact on the public or environment.” The RSGB said it would let its members know if it receives a response from Channel 5.   National Parks on the Air Update With just 2 months left in the ARRL National Parks on the Air (NPOTA) program, the push for 1 million contacts from eligible NPS units remains strong. November 1 saw the 800,000th contact uploaded to Logbook of the World, breaking 25,000 contacts for the second straight week.   ARRL Media and Public Relations Manager Sean Kutzko, KX9X, and QST Managing Editor Becky Schoenfeld, W1BXY, were interviewed by NPS Ranger Bill Urbin during their September NPOTA activation of Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site (NS14). Video of that interview is available on the ARRL Facebook page.   Thirty-two activations are on tap for November 3-9, including Big Bend National Park in Texas, and Everglades National Park in Florida.   Details about these and other upcoming activations can be found on the NPOTA Activations calendar.   Keep up with the latest NPOTA news on Facebook. Follow NPOTA on Twitter (@ARRL_NPOTA).         Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH036 - Don't Skimp on the Coax

    · 01:06:00 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about     Tech Corner - Coax Coax is probably one of the main components of your station that you should NOT skimp on the cost of. You should always get the best coax that you can afford! You can have the best radio and the best antenna but have crappy coax and your neighbor could have a crappy radio and antenna but awesome coax, and your neighbor will nine times out of ten have a better signal than you do.   Let's do some math…   For easy math, let's say that your coax has a line loss of 3 dB per 100 feet and you have a 100 foot run, your radio has a transmitter power of 100 watts and your antenna has a 3 dB gain.   100(w) - 3 dB(coax loss) = 50(w) 50(w) + 3 dB(Antenna Gain) = 100(w)   In this example, you didn't gain anything but you also didn't loose anything. Let’s take it one step more now and say that you have 200 foot run now.   100(w) - 6 dB(200 ft coax loss) = 25(w)   *every 3 dB, your sign either doubles or halves; so at 3 dB you have 50 watts and for the next 3dB you are down to 25 watts   25(w) + 3 dB(antenna gain) = 50(w)   By doubling your coax length, you cut your radiated power in half.   In this example, we are also assuming that you have perfect 1:1 SWR on your antenna. If it is more than that, you have even less being radiated. You also have to take into account what frequency you are talking on. A coax that has a loss of 3 dB around 100 MHz or the 2 meter band, might have a 6 dB loss around 400 MHz or or the 70 cm bands.   Coax dB Loss per 100 Feet using common coax types: dB Loss / 100 feet Frequency Mhz Cable Type 1.0 10 50 100 200 400 900 1000 3000 5000 6A, 212 .26 .83 1.9 2.7 4.1 5.9 6.5 9.8 23.0 32.0 8 MINI, 8X   1.1 2.5 3.8 5.4 7.9 8.8 13.0 26.0   LMR -240 .24 .76 1.7 2.4 3.4 4.9 7.5 7.9 14.2 18.7 8, 8A, 10A, 213 (RG8/8A hard to find ) .15 .55 1.3 1.9 2.7 4.1 7.5 8.0 16.0 27.0 9913, 9086, 9096     0.9 1.4 1.8 2.6 4.2 4.5   13.0 4XL8IIA, FLEXI 4XL     0.9 1.4 1.8 2.6 4.2 4.5   13.0 LMR-400     .9 1.2   2.5 4.1 4.3     LMR-500     .7 1.0   2.0 3.2 3.4     LMR-600     .6 .8   1.4 2.5 2.7     8214   .60 1.2 1.7 2.7 4.2   7.8 14.2 22.0 9095     1.0 1.8 2.6 3.8 6.0 7.5     9, 9A, 9B, 214 .21 .66 1.5 2.3 3.3 5.0 7.8 8.8 18.0 27.0 11,11A,12,12A,13,13A, 216 .19 .66 1.6 2.3 3.3 4.8   7.8 16.5 26.5 14, 14A, 217 .12 .41 1.0 1.4 2.0 3.1   5.5 12.4 19.0 17,17A,18,18A, 218, 219 .06 .24 .62 .95 1.5 2.4   4.4 9.5 15.3 55B, 223 .30 1.2 3.2 4.8 7.0 10.0 14.3 16.5 30.5 46.0 58 .33 1.2 3.1 4.6 6.9 10.5 14.5 17.5 37.5 60.0 58A, 58C .44 1.4 3.3 4.9 7.4 12.0 20.0 24.0 54.0 83.0 59, 59B .33 1.1 2.4 3.4 4.9 7.0 11.0 12.0 26.5 42.0 62, 62A, 71A, 71B .25 .85 1.9 2.7 3.8 5.3 8.3 8.7 18.5 30.0 62B .31 .90 2.0 2.9 4.2 6.2   11.0 24.0 38.0 141,141A, 400, 142, 142A .30 .90 2.1 3.3 4.7 6.9   13.0 26.0 40.0 174 2.3 3.9 6.6 8.9 12.0 17.5 28.2 30.0 64.0 99.0 178B,196A 2.6 5.6 10.5 14.0 19.0 28.0   46.0 85.0 100 188A, 316 3.1 6.0 9.6 11.4 14.2 16.7   31.0 60.0 82.0 179B 3.0 5.3 8.5 10.0 12.5 16.0   24.0 44.0 64.0 393, 235   .6 1.4 2.1 3.1 4.5   7.5 14.0 21.0 402   1.2 2.7 3.9 5.5 8.0   13.0 26.0 26.0 405               22.0     LDF4-50A .06 .21 .47 .68 .98 1.4 2.2 2.3 4.3 5.9 LDF5-50A .03 .11 .25 .36 .53 .78 1.2 1.4 2.5 3.5 Note: These tables are typical specifications for comparison only. Values may not be exactly as quoted by a specific mfg. *http://www.hamuniverse.com/coaxdata.html Connectors   The other aspect of coax that you need to pay attention to is the end connectors that you use. While it is tempting to use the cheap $0.25 to $0.50 a piece PL-259 connectors that you can get at most hamfests, it is better to use a more high quality version of them. The cheap ones that you find are often very cheaply made and can be damaged easily while you are trying to solder it onto the coax. Often while you are soldering these ends on you can very easily get to much heat in the center point and melt the insulation before you are able to solder the shielding to the sides of the connector.   Check out this page,  K0BG.com - Coax and PL259 for more information about coax and connectors. It is a very nice article written by Alan Applegate, K0BG. He was the guest on episode 28, where we talked about mobile installations.     Are you looking for some new radio gear? Maybe you need a new computer for your shack? Did you loose a piece off you tower and you just cant find it without a metal detector? You can find all this and more at GigaParts.com. While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome! Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now! GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of... EHR10 ...at check out to receive 10% off the price of the case!     Amateur Radio Club Spotlight   Socorro Amateur Radio Association   Website: http://www.socorroara.org/ About SARA Amateur radio has been part of the landscape in Socorro since the 1930's. By the mid-1970's, informal meetings of members and their families were occurring and SARA made the transition to a formal association on May 1, 1976.  Although participation in the association has ebbed and flowed since, SARA has remained a vital element of both the amateur radio and Socorro communities since its formation.  Although a smaller southwest community, Socorro is very high tech.  The ARRL featured Socorro and SARA in the QST article, "Socorro, New Mexico -- Ham City, USA? (QST, December 1996, pp. 43-45)," an article by Dave Finley (N1IRZ) that highlighted the area's high per capita interest in amateur radio.   New Mexico Tech is a high quality, Socorro-based university offering bachelors degrees through doctorates in science, mathematics and engineering disciplines.  The NSF-funded National Radio Astronomy Observatory is located on the NMT campus and coordinates activities of the Very Large Array and Very Large Baseline Array.  Employees from diverse research endeavors ranging from the geophysics to defense make Socorro and SARA home.   Repeaters 146.680 - 100 or 123 input tone, 123 output tone - Socorro Peak 444.500 + D-Star Repeater   Netsp Weekly Socorro ARES Net - Wed 1930 - 146.680 Repeater Weekly Tri-County ARES Net - Thur 1930 - URFMSI System via the 146.680 Repeater New Mexico D-Star Net - Thur 2000 on DStar REF055A   Meetings SARA Club Meeting - Second Wed @ 1930(Except December) - Socorro County Annex, 198 Neel Ave. Burger King: Coffee every Saturday ~8:00 to 9:30 hrs at Burger King.   Capitol Bar on the Plaza - Weenie Wednesdays (on the patio in good weather) beginning in late afternoon. Twisted Chili - Friday Happy Hour beginning at 5:30 PM (on the patio in good weather).   Activities DX QRP Digital Modes Community Service Hamfests - Oct 15 8a-2p Field Day   Upcoming Events Contests EME Contest Objective: To work as many amateur stations as possible via the earth-moon-earth path on any authorized amateur frequency above 50 MHz. Dates - Three full weekend 48-hour periods (0000 UTC on Saturday through 2359 UTC Sunday). Dates for 2016 are: 2.3 GHz & Up - September 24-25, 50 to 1296 MHz - October 22-23 and November 19-20 Log Submission Deadline - All entries must be emailed or postmarked no later than 2359z Wednesday, December 21, 2016. NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 23 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 23 CQ Worldwide DX Contest, RTTY - 0000Z, Sep 24 to 2400Z, Sep 25 Maine QSO Party - 1200Z, Sep 24 to 1200Z, Sep 25 Texas QSO Party - 1400Z, Sep 24 to 0200Z, Sep 25 and 1400Z-2000Z, Sep 25 AGCW VHF/UHF Contest - 1400Z-1700Z, Sep 24 (144) and 1700Z-1800Z, Sep 24 (432) RSGB International Sprint Contest, CW - 1700Z-2100Z, Sep 24 UBA ON Contest, 6m - 0700Z-1000Z, Sep 25 Classic Exchange, Phone - 1300Z, Sep 25 to 0800Z, Sep 26 and 1300Z, Sep 27 to 0800Z, Sep 28 Peanut Power QRP Sprint - 2000Z-2200Z, Sep 25 220 MHz Fall Sprint - 1900 local - 2300 local, Sep 27 SKCC Sprint - 0000Z-0200Z, Sep 28 Phone Fray - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 28 CWops Mini-CWT Test - 1300Z-1400Z, Sep 28 and 1900Z-2000Z, Sep 28 and  0300Z-0400Z, Sep 29 UKEICC 80m Contest - 2000Z-2100Z, Sep 28 RSGB 80m Club Sprint, CW - 1900Z-2000Z, Sep 29 NCCC RTTY Sprint - 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 30 NCCC Sprint - 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 30 YLRL DX/NA YL Anniversary Contest - 1400Z, Sep 30 to 0200Z, Oct 2 TARA PSK Rumble Contest - 0000Z-2400Z, Oct 1 15-Meter SSTV Dash Contest - 0000Z, Oct 1 to 2359Z, Oct 2 Oceania DX Contest, Phone -  0800Z, Oct 1 to 0800Z, Oct 2 WAB HF Phone - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 TRC DX Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 GTC CW Cup - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1200Z, Oct 2 Russian WW Digital Contest - 1200Z, Oct 1 to 1159Z, Oct 2 International HELL-Contest - 1600Z-1800Z, Oct 1 (80m) and 0900Z-1100Z, Oct 2 (40m) California QSO Party - 1600Z, Oct 1 to 2200Z, Oct 2 FISTS Fall Slow Speed Sprint - 1700Z-2100Z, Oct 1 UBA ON Contest, SSB - 0600Z-1000Z, Oct 2 RSGB International DX Contest - 0700Z-1900Z, Oct 2   *Information taken from the ARRL and WA7BNM Contest Calendar Hamfests   09/23/2016 W4DXCC DX and Contest Convention - Pigeon Forge, TN   09/24/2016 41st Annual Elmira International HamFest - Horseheads, NY Bloomington ARC Hamfest  - Bloomington, IN CLARC ANNUAL HAMFEST - Alexandria, LA Covington Hamfest - Covington, GA DVRA 2016 Hamfest - West Windsor, NJ FreeGate 2016 - Greensboro, NC North Dakota State Convention (RRRA Hamfest) - West Fargo, ND ORC Regional Fall Swapfest - Cedarburg, WI Pasco County HamFest - Odessa, FL Pensacola Hamfest - Pensacola, FL RADIO EXPO 2016 - Belvidere, IL Reno Ham Swap - Verdi, NV Richmond KY Hamfest - Richmond, KY San Joaquin Valley Section Convention (Rally in the Valley) - Modesto, CA SMARTSFEST 2016 - Henderson, MN Washington State Convention (Spokane Hamfest) - Spokane Valley, WA   09/25/2016 Cleveland Hamfest and Computer Show - Berea, OH Ocean Monmouth County ARC Tailgate and Hamfest - Wall Township, NJ   10/01/2016 2016 Wichita Area Hamfest - Wichita, KS ARCOS SWAPMEET & COOKOUT - Shreveport, LA HamEXPO - Belton, TX Last Chance Tailgate - Plymouth, MN MBARC Fall Fest - Fishkill, NY Red Rose Repeater Association Hamfest - Brownstown, PA Rock Hill Hamfest - Rock Hill, SC San Diego Ham Fest - Lakeside, CA Valley Disaster Preparedness Fair - Granada Hills, CA VETTE CITY HAMFEST - Bowling Green, KY   10/02/2016 BARCfest - Longmont, CO Southeast Iowa Hamfest - West Liberty, IA     News   Amateur Radio Parity Act Passes in the US House of Representatives! 09/14/2016“The bill is passed without objection.” With those words, Amateur Radio history was made on September 12, when the US House of Representatives approved the Amateur Radio Parity Act, H.R. 1301 on a voice vote under a suspension of the rules. The focus of the campaign to enact the legislation into law now shifts to the US Senate. The House victory culminated many years of effort on ARRL’s part to gain legislation that would enable radio amateurs living in deed-restricted communities to erect antennas that support Amateur Radio communication. The measure calls on the FCC to amend its Part 97 rules “to prohibit the application to amateur stations of certain private land-use restrictions, and for other purposes.” While similar bills in past years gained some traction on Capitol Hill, it was not until the overwhelming grassroots support from the Amateur Radio community for H.R. 1301 shepherded by ARRL that a bill made it this far. The legislation faces significant obstacles to passage in the US Senate, however.“This is huge step in our effort to enact legislation that will allow radio amateurs who live in deed-restricted communities the ability to construct an effective outdoor antenna,” ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, said. “Thanks to everyone for their help in this effort thus far. Now we must turn our full attention to getting the bill passed in the Senate.”RARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, who chairs the ARRL Board’s Legislative Advocacy Committee, has been heavily involved in efforts to move H.R. 1301 forward. “This has been a multiyear effort that is finally seeing some light,” he said. “The passage of the bill in the House is a major accomplishment, due to the hard work of so many — from the rank-and-file member to the officers and directors.”Lisenco said it’s not a time to rest on our laurels. “We are only halfway there. The focus now shifts to our effort in the Senate,” he said. “We are beginning a massive e-mail campaign in which we need every member to write their two Senators using our simplified process. You will be hearing from President Roderick and from your Directors, asking you to go to our ‘Rally Congress’ page. Using your ZIP code, e-mails will be generated much like our recent letter campaign. You’ll fill in your name and address and press Enter. The e-mails will be sent directly to your Senators without you having to search through their websites.”Lisenco said getting these e-mails to members’ Senators is a critical part of the process. “Those numbers matter! Please help us help you by participating in this effort,” he said.As the amended bill provides, “Community associations should fairly administer private land-use regulations in the interest of their communities, while nevertheless permitting the installation and maintenance of effective outdoor Amateur Radio antennas. There exist antenna designs and installations that can be consistent with the aesthetics and physical characteristics of land and structures in community associations while accommodating communications in the Amateur Radio services.”During this week’s limited debate, the House bill’s sponsor, Rep Adam Kinzinger (R-IL), thanked ARRL and the Community Associations Institute (CAI) for reaching an agreement to move the bill forward “in a bipartisan and very positive manner.” He pointed out to his colleagues that Amateur Radio antennas are prohibited outright in some areas.“For some this is merely a nuisance,” Kinzinger said, “but for others — those that use their Amateur Radio license for life-saving emergency communications — a dangerous situation can be created by limiting their ability to establish effective communication for those in need.”Kinzinger said that in emergencies, hams can provide “a vital and life-saving function” when conventional communication systems are down. He also praised the Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS), a US Department of Defense-sponsored program, comprised largely of Amateur Radio volunteers, that also supports communication during emergencies and disasters.Cosponsor US Rep Joe Courtney (D-CT) also urged the bill’s passage. “This is not just a feel-good bill,” Courtney said, recounting how Hurricane Sandy brought down the power grid, and “we saw all the advanced communications we take for granted…completely fall by the wayside.” Ham radio volunteers provided real-time communication in the storm’s wake, he said, saying the legislation was a way “to rebalance things” for radio amateurs who choose to live in deed-restricted neighborhoods by enabling them to install “non-intrusive antennas.”Courtney noted that he spoke recently with FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, and said that Wheeler “strongly supports this legislation.”Leading up to the vote, Rep Paul Tonko (D-NY) also spoke in support of the legislation, calling it a commonsense approach that would build “fairness into the equation for Amateur Radio operators” in dealing with homeowners associations.The earlier U.S. Senate version of the Amateur Radio Parity Act, S. 1685, no longer is in play, and the Senate is expected to vote by unanimous consent on the version of H.R. 1301 that was adopted by the House on September 12.   New Section Manager Appointed in Northern New Jersey   09/16/2016 Steve Ostrove, K2SO, of Elizabeth, New Jersey, has been appointed as ARRL Northern New Jersey Section Manager, effective September 16. He takes the reins of the Northern New Jersey Field Organization after Richard Krohn, N2SMV, announced that he was stepping down. Krohn, of Manalapan, has served as the Northern New Jersey Section Manager since July 2008. ARRL Field Services and Radiosport Manager Dave Patton, NN1N, received Krohn’s resignation and recommendation for his replacement. He then consulted with ARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, before making the appointment. Ostrove will complete the current term of office that extends until June 30, 2017. Ostrove has served as Assistant Section Manager in Northern New Jersey since 2009, and was the Section Emergency Coordinator from 2001 through 2008. He is currently a District Emergency Coordinator, Official Emergency Station, and Official Relay Station.   SKYWARN Youth on the Air Net Debuts   09/14/2016 The SKYWARN Youth on the Air Net is on the air, encouraging young radio amateurs to get on the air and learn about the SKYWARN weather-spotting network and basic weather facts. The SKYWARN Youth Net meets on most Southwest Missouri SKYWARN repeaters Sunday evenings at 7:30 PM CT and is open to all hams via EchoLink. The net will first take check-ins from young hams aged 25 and younger. The net also will offer an opportunity for participation by unlicensed young people in ham radio households who may be interested in obtaining a ham ticket. “As this net grows and evolves, we hope to create and present brief educational segments,” said George Sfair, KJ6TQ. “We invite all young hams, their families, and the Amateur Radio community in general to check into this net. Young hams are the future of this hobby, and we encourage them to get involved, to get out on the air and talk, and to invite their friends to become hams as well.” The SKYWARN Youth Net is held on Missouri linked repeaters in Fordland/Springfield, 145.49 MHz (136.5 Hz tone); Joplin, 145.35 MHz (91.5 Hz tone); Walnut Grove, 147.33 MHz (162.2 Hz tone); Buffalo, 147.18 MHz (136.5 Hz tone), and Branson, 147.15 MHz (162.2 Hz tone), as well as on EchoLink node 291849 or NNWS-R. — Thanks to George Sfair, KJ6TQ   Source: ARRL News   Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM  

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  • ETH039 - Jamboree On The Air(JOTA)

    · 00:42:49 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the Jamboree On The Air, the Red River Radio Amateurs Amateur Radio Club, Upcoming events and hamfests for the next two weeks and Hurricane Matthew and other news. Tech Corner - Jamboree On The Air Jamboree-on-the-Air(http://www.scouting.org/jota.aspx), or JOTA, is the largest Scouting event in the world. It is held annually the third full weekend in October. JOTA uses amateur radio to link Scouts and hams around the world, around the nation, and in your own community. This jamboree requires no travel, other than to a nearby amateur radio operator's ham shack. Many times you can find the hams will come to you by setting up a station at your Scout camporee, at the park down the block, or perhaps at a ham shack already set up at your council’s camp.   Tell Me More Scouts of any age can participate, from Cub Scouts to Boy Scouts and Venturers, including girls. Once at the ham radio station, the communication typically involves talking on a microphone and listening on the station speakers. However, many forms of specialized communication may also be taking place, such as video communication, digital communication (much like sending a message on your smartphone but transmitted by radio), or communication through a satellite relay or an earth-based relay (called a repeater). The exchanges include such information as name, location (called QTH in ham speak), Scout rank, age, and hobbies. The stations you’ll be communicating with can be across town, across the country, or even around the world! The World Scout Bureau reported that nearly 1 million Scouts and almost 20,000 amateur radio operators participated in the 2015 JOTA, from more than 17,776 stations in 151 countries.   When Is It? Jamboree-on-the-Air is held the third weekend in October. There are no official hours, so you have the whole weekend to make JOTA contacts. The event officially starts Friday evening during the JOTA Jump Start and runs through Sunday evening.   Frequencies To Use HF SSB Voice Band WOSM Calling Frequencies Suggested Band Segment for US Stations Notes 80 m 3.940 & 3.690(1) 3.920 – 3.940 3.670 – 3.690 (1) (1) Extra segment 40 m 7.190 & 7.090 (2) 7.180 – 7.200 7.270 – 7.290 (2) 7.090 not available in Region 2 20 m 14.290 14.270 – 14.290 14.320 – 14.340   17 m 18.140 18.140 – 18.150   15 m 21.360 21.360 – 21.400   12 m 24.960 24.960 – 24.980   10 m 28.390 (3) 28.350 – 28.400 (3) (3) Includes Novices & Techs 6 m 50.160 50.160 – 50.200   HF CW Band WOSM Calling Frequencies Suggested Band Segment for US Stations Notes 80 m 3.570 (3) 3.560 – 3.570 (3) (3) Includes Novices & Techs 40 m 7.030 (3) 7.030 – 7.040 (3) (3) Includes Novices & Techs 20 m 14.060 14.050 – 14.060   17 m 18.080 18.070 – 18.080   15 m 21.140 (3) 21.130 – 21.140 (3) (3) Includes Novices & Techs 12 m 24.910 24.900 – 24.910   10 m 28.180 (3) 28.170 – 28.180 (3) (3) Includes Novices & Techs 6 m 50.160 50.150 – 50.160   HF PSK-31 http://bpsk31.com Call CQ JOTA. The chart below shows the commonly used frequencies for PSK-31. Band Frequency Notes 80 m 3.580   40 m 7.080 (4) (4) Region 2 (USA). 7.040 to 7.060 for Regions 1 & 3 30 m 10.142   20 m 14.070 (5) (5) Most activity for JOTA will be on 20 m 17 m 18.100   15 m 21.080 (6) (6) Most activity can be found at 21.070 12 m 24.920   10 m 28.120   2 Meter FM Simplex 147.450, 147.480, 147.510, 147.540* * Use 147.540 as Calling Channel. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO or auxiliary or control link. Avoid 146.520, the National FM Simplex Calling Frequency, as well as 146.550, which is commonly used by mobiles and RVers. 70 CM FM Simplex 446.000*, 445.950, 446.050, 446.100, 446.150 * Use 446.000 as Calling Channel. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO or auxiliary or control link. D-STAR http://www.dstarinfo.com REF033A has been allocated as a full-time JOTA/Radio Scouting D-STAR Reflector. After contact is established, stations should disconnect from REF033A and connect to one or other repeater or migrate to an unused Reflector. SIMPLEX Channels: 145.670*, 145.640, 145.610, 438.010. * 145.670  and 438.010 are commonly used as the National D-STAR Simplex Channels and should be used only as Calling Channels for JOTA. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO. DMR http://www.dmr-marc.net All wide area talkgroups are permitted for use for JOTA for establishing contacts. After contact is established, stations should utilize as few resources as possible. For international, national, and regional QSO's, stations should move their transmissions to one of the DMR-MARC UA talkgroups or to the DCI TAC-310 talkgroup.   For intrastate contacts, stations may use their area's statewide talkgroup (if applicable). The use of your repeater's local talkgroup (if applicable) is always permitted. A full list of repeaters and their available talkgroups can be found at http://www.dmr-marc.net/repeaters.html .   SIMPLEX Channels: 441.0000*, 446.5000, 446.0750, 433.4500, 145.7900*, 145.5100. All simplex frequencies operate on time-slot 1 and use color code 1. (*are commonly used as the National DMR Simplex Channels and should be used only as Calling Channels for JOTA. Always listen first to avoid interfering with another QSO.) IRLP http://irlp.net http://www.irlptopics.net Use Topic Channel Node 9091 as a Common Meeting Place or Calling Channel. After contact, disconnect from 9091 and one station should connect to another's local node. EchoLink http://www.echolink.org Software or apps available for Windows, Mac, iPhone/iPad, and Android. Dedicated Conference Node *JOTA-365* (node 480809). When contact is made on a Conference Node, it is recommended the two parties establish direct contact with each other to free up the Conference Node. APRS 144.39 http://aprs.org http://aprs.org/cqsrvr.html http://www.aprs-is.net/CQSrvr.aspx CQSRVR: CQ JOTA CQSRVR: CQ SCOUTS (other times of the year)   General Guidelines Jamboree-on-the Air is about getting young people to talk to each other using amateur radio. Arrange for the use of a club call sign, or apply for a special-event call sign in plenty of time. Prepare some simple diagrams and explanations showing how radio works and how signals can be transmitted around the world as well as to the nearest repeater. Arrange with the Scout leaders regarding venue, QSL cards, patches, participation certificates, other activities, physical arrangements, publicity, and details required for the JOTA report form on this website. Notify the national JOTA organizer of your event using the details on the registration form on this site. Go to Scout meetings beforehand to introduce the subject. Organize activities such as kit building, soldering practice, SSTV, FSTV, packet radio, and weather satellite reception. The simplest of things, such as a closed-circuit RTTY station, can generate a great deal of excitement. Offer to train Scouts for the Radio merit badge. Offer a Technician license preparation course for those interested in learning and doing more with ham radio. Ensure that no more than three Scouts are watching one Scout on the air. Keep Scouts involved and active or they will quickly grow bored. Ensure that the station is safe for young visitors. Observe your license conditions, especially regarding third-party traffic. Involve the Scouts in the contact. The goal is to involve as many Scouts as possible in making a contact. It is not to maximize the number of contacts or the distance of the contacts; it's about the experience for the Scouts. Try to use plain, understandable English where possible. When you do use Q-signals and other ham radio terms, take time to explain them to the Scouts. Don't try to work weak stations from remote locations. Go for stronger, more local stations that unpracticed ears can hear easily and understand. Local FM repeaters can be just as exciting for Scouts. Don't feel you have to keep the station on the air with no Scouts present.   Useful Internet Sites K2BSA Amateur Radio Association http://www.k2bsa.net BSA JOTA Information http://www.scouting.org/jota.aspx World Organization of the Scout Movement JOTA Information http://www.scout.org/jotajoti/ ARRL JOTA Information http://www.arrl.org/jamboree-on-the-air-jota Ultimate resources site for everything ham radio http://www.ac6v.com/   Discussion Groups Best all-around Radio Scouting discussion group http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ScoutRadio/ Worldwide coverage; however, be certain to post identical information at ScoutRadio at Yahoo http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JOTAskedbook Emphasis on discussion, announcements, and promoting getting "Scout Camps on the Air (SCOTA)" http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scoutcamps_ota/     Are you looking for some new radio gear? Maybe you need a new computer for your shack? Did you lose a piece off you tower and you just can't find it without a metal detector? You can find all this and more at GigaParts.com. While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome! Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now! GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of... EHR10 ...at checkout to receive 10% off the price of the case!     Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Red River Radio Amateurs   Website: http://rrra.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/W0ILO   Meetings Third Tuesday of each month at 7PM in the basement of the Cass County Annex, 1010 2nd Ave South, Fargo, ND 58103 . Please enter through the north doors adjacent to the 2nd Ave S parking lot.   Repeaters 145.350 - PL 123 Moorhead, MN 146.760 - PL 123 Grandin, ND 147.255 + PM 123 Wheatland, ND 444.875 + PM 123 Moorhead, MN   Nets Sundays at 9p - RRRA Repeater System Sundays at 8p - 146.520 Simplex   Activities Skywarn Class Hamfest Hospital Exercise Fargo Marathon Headwaters Rally ADA Tour de Cure Field Day MS TRAM Ride Ojibwe Forests Rally FM Rotary Ride 2016 Simulated Emergency Test Jingle Bell Run License Testing   Upcoming Events   + Classic Exchange, CW 1300Z, Sep 11 to 0800Z, Sep 12 and  1300Z, Sep 13 to 0800Z, Sep 14 + Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 14 + CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Sep 14 and  1900Z-2000Z, Sep 14 and  0300Z-0400Z, Sep 15 + RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 1900Z-2000Z, Sep 14 + NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 16 + NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 16 + AGB NEMIGA Contest 2100Z-2400Z, Sep 16 + ARRL 10 GHz and Up Contest 0600 local, Sep 17 to 2400 local, Sep 18 + SARL VHF/UHF Analogue/Digital Contest 1000Z, Sep 17 to 1000Z, Sep 18 + Scandinavian Activity Contest, CW 1200Z, Sep 17 to 1200Z, Sep 18 + All Africa International DX Contest 1200Z, Sep 17 to 1200Z, Sep 18 + SRT HF Contest SSB 1300Z, Sep 17 to 1300Z, Sep 18 + QRP Afield 1600Z-2200Z, Sep 17 + New Jersey QSO Party 1600Z, Sep 17 to 0359Z, Sep 18 and  1400Z-2000Z, Sep 18 + New Hampshire QSO Party 1600Z, Sep 17 to 0400Z, Sep 18 and  1600Z-2200Z, Sep 18 + Washington State Salmon Run 1600Z, Sep 17 to 0700Z, Sep 18 and  1600Z-2400Z, Sep 18 + Feld Hell Sprint 1800Z-1959Z, Sep 17 + North American Sprint, RTTY 0000Z-0400Z, Sep 18 + BARTG Sprint 75 1700Z-2100Z, Sep 18 + Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0100Z-0300Z, Sep 19 + 144 MHz Fall Sprint 1900 local - 2300 local, Sep 19 + Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 21 + CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Sep 21 and  1900Z-2000Z, Sep 21 and  0300Z-0400Z, Sep 22 + NAQCC CW Sprint 0030Z-0230Z, Sep 22 + NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Sep 23 + NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 23 + ARRL EME Contest 0000Z, Sep 24 to 2359Z, Sep 25 + CQ Worldwide DX Contest, RTTY 0000Z, Sep 24 to 2400Z, Sep 25 + Maine QSO Party 1200Z, Sep 24 to 1200Z, Sep 25 + Texas QSO Party 1400Z, Sep 24 to 0200Z, Sep 25 and  1400Z-2000Z, Sep 25 + AGCW VHF/UHF Contest 1400Z-1700Z, Sep 24 (144) and  1700Z-1800Z, Sep 24 (432) + RSGB International Sprint Contest, CW 1700Z-2100Z, Sep 24 + UBA ON Contest, 6m 0700Z-1000Z, Sep 25 + Classic Exchange, Phone 1300Z, Sep 25 to 0800Z, Sep 26 and  1300Z, Sep 27 to 0800Z, Sep 28 + Peanut Power QRP Sprint 2000Z-2200Z, Sep 25 *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar Hamfests   10/13/2016 Microwave Update 2016 Conference - St. Louis, MO   10/14/2016   Pacific Division Convention (PACIFICON) - San Ramon, CA   10/15/2016 Al Brock Memorial Hamfest/Tailgate - Rome, GA Anderson RC's 38th Annual Hamfest - Anderson, SC ARRL Day in the Park - Columbia, MS Coastal ARS Savannah Swapmeet - Savannah, GA Greeneville Hamfest - Greeneville, Tn Kingman Ham Fest - Kingman, AZ Muskegon Color Tour Hamfest - Muskegon, MI Socorro Hamfest -  Socorro, NM SouthSide ARC Hamfest - Belton, MO Swaptoberfest - Rickreall, OR   10/16/2016 2016 Kalamazoo HamFest and Amateur Radio Swap & Shop - Kalamazoo, MI Conneaut ARC Hamfest - Conneaut, OH Connecticut State Convention (Nutmeg Hamfest) - Meriden, CT FLEA at MIT - Cambridge, MA RF Hill ARC Hamfest - Sellersville, PA   10/21/2016 Arizona State Convention (CopaFest 2016) - Maricopa, AZ Florida State Convention (Melbourne Hamfest) - Melbourne, FL Texoma Hamarama - Ardmore, OK   10/22/2016 4th Annual TailgateFest - Hollywood, MD Hamfest Chattanooga 2016 - East Ridge, TN Shelbyville Tailgate 2016 - Shelbyville, IN Wiregrass ARC Fall Tailgate - Headland, AL Wisconsin ARES/RACES Conference - Wisconsin Rapids, WI   10/23/2016 Mason-Dixon Hamfest - Upperco, MD Massillon ARC Hamfest - Massillon, OH *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar   News “Overview of Army and Air Force MARS” Webinar Set for October 25 10/04/2016 Registration is open for the webinar “Overview of Army and Air Force MARS,” October 25 at 8 PM ET (0000 UTC on October 26). US Air Force MARS Chief Dave Stapchuk, KD9DXM, will discuss the history of the Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS) program and membership requirements for Amateur Radio operators. He also will highlight the Joint MARS Phone Patch network, which provides daily support to US armed forces. The phone patch network facilitates not only morale/welfare phone patches but routinely handles mission-related radio calls and occasionally assists US air crews with in-flight emergency phone patches when air traffic control cannot be reached. US Army MARS Program Manager Paul English, WD8DBY, will discuss the quarterly US Department of Defense (DOD) contingency communication exercises, which promote interoperability between the Amateur Radio community and the DOD. English will also discuss initiatives for promoting the use of 60 meters between Amateur Radio and the federal government as well as the types of information MARS operators will request from the Amateur Radio community during the upcoming quarterly DOD communications exercise (COMEX), October 30-November 1. Webinar registrants will receive a confirming e-mail that contains information about joining the webinar. Hurricane Watch Net Stands Down Following Record Activation for Hurricane Matthew 10/09/2016 After the longest activation in its history, the Hurricane Watch Net (HWN) secured operations for Hurricane Matthew on October 9 at 0400 UTC. HWN Manager Bobby Graves, KB5HAV, reports the net was in continuous operation for 6 days, 7 hours, gathering real-time ground-truth weather data and passing it along to the National Hurricane Center (NHC) via the Center’s WX4NHC. Various Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) nets also activated along the Eastern Seaboard over the past week. The first major hurricane of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season and, at one point, a Category 5 storm, Matthew has been downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone, as it’s poised to head out into the Atlantic. As of 0900 UTC, Matthew was still generating strong winds over eastern North Carolina, as it moves to the east-northeast just off the Outer Banks. The NHC reported that record-breaking flooding continues over portions of eastern North Carolina. The storm was some 30 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, with maximum sustained winds of 75 MPH, moving east at 14 MPH. The Hurricane Warning from Little River Inlet to south of Cape Fear has been discontinued, and the Hurricane Warning from Cape Fear to Surf City has been replaced with a Tropical Storm Warning, the NHC said. “Many have perished in Haiti and Cuba as a result of Matthew, and the death-toll rises still,” Graves noted. “Many residents in the Bahamas and the US East Coast states of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina have felt the impact of Matthew as well.” Graves was appreciative of the Amateur Radio volunteers who took part in the HWN activation as well as of those who accommodated the net's lengthy operation on 20 and 40 meters. “As always, having a clear frequency benefits our net control stations and [lets us copy] those in the affected areas,” he said. “It’s unfortunate we had to occupy these frequencies for an extended time, but, no two emergencies are alike. And Matthew was certainly unlike any storm anyone has ever seen before.” As Hurricane Matthew pulls away from the US East Coast, the Voice over Internet Protocol SKYWARN/Hurricane Net (VoIPWX) attracted a number of visitors, according to net managers. “On board Saturday afternoon, in addition to WX4NHC at the National Hurricane Center, stations representing a number of Federal Emergency Management Agency regional offices and the National Response Coordination Center monitored the net for actionable intelligence to be used to plan recovery operations,” said net Public Affairs Officer Lloyd Colston, KC5FM. The net also activated on October 3 for Hurricane Matthew. The net said its Georgia Reflector was linked to the WX-Talk conference, so net managers could help to relay relaying reports to local National Weather Service offices on NWSchat and the NHC. According to Chief of Operations Dennis Dura, K2DCD, the net established a link up the East Coast into North Carolina and continued to monitor for damage assessment in areas the hurricane had already passed. The net supported the NHC on the WX-Talk Conference, Node #7203 onEchoLink. IRLP Reflector 9219. IRLP Reflector 9553 was the backup. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Network (SATERN) on 14.265 MHz also was active for Matthew, handling outbound emergency, priority, or health-and-welfare traffic from hurricane-affected areas. Matthew was the first Category 5 Hurricane to form in the Atlantic Basin since Hurricane Felix in 2007.   Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH042 - Propagation

    · 01:02:32 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Propagation, in the Amateur Radio Club Spotlight we will be talking about the Valley Radio Club in Eugene, OR, We talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!     Tech Corner - Propagation VHF/UHF signals are all line of sight. Meaning that if there is something between you and what you are talking to, your signal may or may not be received by the receiving station. This could be a building, mountain, or even the curvature of the Earth.     The approximate distance (in miles) to the radio horizon can be calculated by multiplying the square root of the antenna height (in feet) by 1.415 times. For example, the distance to the radio horizon for an antenna 1,000 feet above the ground is just under 45 miles   Because of the way that radio waves travel through the air and get refracted more than light waves do, you will be able to talk on the radio for a little bit longer than you can see. Radio waves travel approximately 15% farther than light waves do. For example, if you and a friend start walking away from each other on a flat surface, you would loose sight of each other at about 5 miles apart but you will still be able to talk to each other for another 30% since both you and your friend have an extra 15% each.   Knife Edge Propagation   Much like signals being reflected off the ionosphere, sometimes a VHF signal can be heard in places that are not direct line of sight from each other. If two people live on opposites side of a ragged hill, they may still be able to talk to each other and here is why. VHF signals are transmitted in a vertical polarization, so when those vertical signal strike a sharp edge of a distant  object the bottom half of the way will drag along the ground and turn the wave downward. Once the wave gets a clear light it will again travel in a straight line and since it was turned downward, it will travel down the backside of the hill, allowing you to talk to your friend. This is called Knife-edge diffraction.     Tropospheric Scatter   Tropospheric scatter, or Tropospheric ducting as it is more commonly called, allows your signal to be caught in that layer of warm air and travel many miles before coming out of that layer and return back to the surface for reception. This occurs quite frequently over water where there is a layer of cool air along the surface level, and cool air in the upper ionosphere, but a layer of warm, moist air is held in between the two in the troposphere.   Multipath Propagation   This occurs when the receiving station receives a signal from the same transmitter at different times. The happens because when someone transmits a signal, the radio wave takes off at all different angles. Sometimes the signal can bounce off buildings, mountains, or other surfaces or even sometimes on HF, came in from the exact opposite from the direction that you would think it would, but we will talk about this in a minute.   When the same signal comes from different directions to the same receiver because of the signal bouncing off other surfaces, it could have taken that signal longer to get to the receiver and therefore cause distortions because the signals are not in phase with each other. It could also have the opposite effect and boost the signal strength if they are in phase. There are many things that can happen with radio frequencies to make them either constructive or destructive to the receiving station.   As I mentioned above, sometimes you can receive a HF signal from the opposite direction from where you might think it should come from. Let’s say that you are in Texas and you are talking to someone in Europe somewhere. The short path would be from the East and would typically be where you would think to point your beam antenna to receive that signal. However, if you get a bad signal when you beam is pointed East, sometimes you can turn your beam around 180 degrees or so and get the signal better, this is called the Long Path.         Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Valley Radio Club   Website: http://www.valleyradioclub.org/   The Valley Radio Club of Oregon (formerly Valley Radio Club of Eugene), located in Eugene, Oregon, was chartered in 1932, and is one of the oldest, continuously operated club stations in the United States. It has been affiliated with the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) since 1932, and associated with the American Red Cross since 1951.   Meetings 1st Friday at 7pm in the Red Cross Building at 862 Bethel Dr., Eugene, OR   Repeaters 146.720 - PL 100   Nets HF Net: Peak Radio Association Mondays at 7:30pm Pacific Time on 7.250 Mhz HF Net: Up the Crick Thursdays at 7:30pm Pacific Time on 25.450 Mhz   Activities Saturdays - Noon - 2p - Science Factory 2300 Leo Harris Pkwy, Eugene, OR. Get on the Air, Open Ham Station. DX Special Interest Group Testing Sessions - 2nd Wednesday at 7pm Technician Classes General Classes Assisting in Locating sources of RFI Field Day March of Dimes Community Service     Upcoming Events   NRAU 10m Activity Contest 1800Z-1900Z, Nov 3 (CW) and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 3 (SSB) and  2000Z-2100Z, Nov 3 (FM) and  2100Z-2200Z, Nov 3 (Dig) NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 4 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 4 IPARC Contest, CW 0600Z-1000Z, Nov 5 and  1400Z-1800Z, Nov 5 Ukrainian DX Contest 1200Z, Nov 5 to 1200Z, Nov 6 RSGB International Sprint Contest, SSB 1700Z-2100Z, Nov 5 ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, CW 2100Z, Nov 5 to 0300Z, Nov 7 IPARC Contest, SSB 0600Z-1000Z, Nov 6 and  1400Z-1800Z, Nov 6 EANET Sprint 0800Z-1200Z, Nov 6 High Speed Club CW Contest 0900Z-1100Z, Nov 6 and  1500Z-1700Z, Nov 6 DARC 10-Meter Digital Contest 1100Z-1700Z, Nov 6 ARS Spartan Sprint 0200Z-0400Z, Nov 8 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 9 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 9 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 9 and  0300Z-0400Z, Nov 10 RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 9 NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 11 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 11 WAE DX Contest, RTTY 0000Z, Nov 12 to 2359Z, Nov 13 10-10 Int. Fall Contest, Digital 0001Z, Nov 12 to 2359Z, Nov 13 JIDX Phone Contest 0700Z, Nov 12 to 1300Z, Nov 13 SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 1200Z, Nov 12 to 2400Z, Nov 13 OK/OM DX Contest, CW 1200Z, Nov 12 to 1200Z, Nov 13 Kentucky QSO Party 1400Z, Nov 12 to 0200Z, Nov 13 CQ-WE Contest 1900Z-2300Z, Nov 12 (CW/Digital) and  0100Z-0500Z, Nov 13 (Phone) and  1900Z-2300Z, Nov 13 (Phone) and  0100Z-0500Z, Nov 14 (CW/Digital) Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 16 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 16 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 16 and  0300Z-0400Z, Nov 17     *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar     Hamfests 11/05/2016 Enid ARC Hamfest - Enid, OK FARAFest - Bourne, MA GARC Hamfest - Georgetown, OH Georgia State Convention (Stone Mountain Hamfest) - Lawrenceville, GA HARKFEST - Congress, AZ LARA Tailgate - Tavares, FL Link McGarity WV4I Memorial Free Flea - West Palm Beach, FL MRC91 Radio Fest - Milwaukee, WI NARCfest 2016 - Nixa, MO TechFest - Lakewood, CO   11/06/2016 Davenport RAC Hamfest & Computer Show - Davenport, IA FCARC Swapfest - Appleton, WI WACOM HAMFEST 2016 - Washington, PA   11/11/2016 Jackson County ARA Hamfest - Ocean Springs, MS   11/12/2016 Big Island of Hawaii International Swap Meet/HamFest - Kamuela, HI Flamingo Net / University of Miami ARC Free Flea - Coral Gables, FL GSARC "BEACHFEST 2016" - Conway, SC Indiana State Convention (Fort Wayne Hamfest & Computer Expo) - Fort Wayne, IN New Orleans Ham Radio & Computer Flea Marlet - Harahan, LA Oro Valley ARC Hamfest -  Marana, AZ Raytown ARC Hamfest - Kansas City, MO SPARCFest 2016 - Pinellas Park, FL       *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar       News   Rule Making Petition to FCC Calls for Vanity Call Sign Rule Changes   10/27/2016The FCC is inviting comments on a Petition for Rule Making (RM-11775) from a Nevada radio amateur that seeks changes to the rules governing the Amateur Radio Vanity Call Sign Program. Christopher LaRue, W4ADL, of North Las Vegas, is proposing that any licensee obtaining a vanity call sign be required to keep it for the full license term. LaRue contends in his petition that excessive and frequent vanity call sign filings are hampering the ability of other qualified licensees to obtain vanity call signs in one of the more desirable 1 × 2 or 2 × 1 formats. LaRue said that since the FCC dropped the fee to file for a vanity call sign, some applicants are taking advantage by regularly obtaining new call signs, thereby keeping them out of circulation.“Some are changing call signs almost monthly, just to keep the newer code-free Extra class operators from obtaining a shorter call sign,” he said in his petition. “I even saw an older operator that said he does it all the time and has not even owned a radio in over 6 years. When I looked him up, he has had 16 different [call signs] in 18 months.”LaRue said his proposed minor rule change would require any licensee applying for and obtaining an Amateur Radio vanity call sign “be required to keep it for the duration of the license, which is currently 10 years.”He said this would “alleviate a lot of the stress on the ULS system and manpower requirements” at the FCC. “It will also keep inactive amateurs from changing call signs regularly, thereby tying up call signs for 2 years after dismissal of said call.”Interested parties may comment using the FCC Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS). Comments are due within 30 days of the October 26 posting date.   California Hams Looses the ability to go mobile thanks to a new law!   As of September 26, 2016, California Governor signed the bill no. 1785 which restricts the use of any mobile radio use that requires your hands to use in the state of California.     This is a hard hit to all amateur radio operators in California. From what i am reading from the text of the new bill, pretty much any electronic communication device is out unless you are a first responder.   The only way that I can see to get around this would be to use a headset with a foot switch, or using your radio using VOX. If you would like to read the full bill, click on the link below.   http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160AB1785     ARES/RACES Supports Office of Emergency Management during Presidential Debate10/27/2016ARES/RACES volunteers stepped up to support communication for the Clark County, Nevada, Office of Emergency Management (OEM), during the third US presidential debate in Las Vegas, Nevada, on October 19. Clark County OEM Chief John Steinbeck, asked ARES/RACES to activate and support the County’s Multi-Agency Coordination Center (MACC).Seven Clark County ARES/RACES members operated UHF and VHF voice as well as VHF packet and mesh VoIP from the MACC as well as from the Clark County IT Department communications van throughout the event. In addition, ARES/RACES members provided back-up monitoring of all event communications.Among the Amateur Radio volunteers supporting the effort were ARRL Nevada Section Traffic Manager Jim Bassett, W1RO; Nevada Southern District Emergency Coordinator Jay Peskin, KE7EGO; Jim Davis, KF7GCT; Steve Deveny, KF7WGL; Frank Kostelac, N7ZEV, and Jack Cook, N8RRL. Also providing support from the communications van was ARES/RACES member, Keith Aurich, KD7TOF, of the Clark County IT Department.In addition, more than a dozen Clark County ARES/RACES members remained on standby, monitoring communications from home and mobile stations, in case a wider activation was required.Clark County ARES/RACES Emergency Coordinator Bill Smith, W7HMV, praised the ARES/RACES members who volunteered their time, equipment, and skills to support the OEM for the event.The activation marked the first time that ARES/RACES members operated from the MACC’s new location, which, as yet, has no radio equipment installed. They were able to test and verify the capability to utilize existing external communication resources, using their own equipment from a new and potentially challenging venue. — Thanks to Jim Davis, KF7GCT   KC0W Regroups in Wake of Pacific Island Theft10/28/2016Tom Callas, KC0W, who was forced to abruptly cancel the rest of his “Cows Over the World” Pacific DXpeditions after his belongings were stolen in Kiribati, has been regrouping.“I will be in the Philippines from October 26-November 25, and the call sign will be 4I7COW,” Callas said on his QRZ.com profile. “This unique prefix has never been issued before, so it should generate some good interest.” Callas said he’s canceled his planned TG/KC0W DXpedition to Guatemala in favor of pending DXpeditions to Equatorial Guinea and Annobon, following his Philippines activity.He reports “fantastic progress” in acquiring the 3C and 3C0 licenses. Equatorial Guinea is number 43 on the ClubLog DXCC Most Wanted List. Annobon is number 35. He hopes to be on the air from Equatorial Guinea and Annobon for 50 or 60 days and said to stay tuned for more information.   Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH034 - The Parrot of Amateur Radio

    · 01:16:03 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to try something a little different than I have in the past. Since I have added some new responsibilities at home, I am now totally limited to working on my podcast at work. So I am pretty much limited to the solo head style of podcasting unless I can get lucky and get someone that wants to get up early on Saturday between 7 and 9:30 am. My interviews will probably be limited only the Amateur Radio Club Spotlights if I can get in contact with someone early enough. I want to extend a big THANK YOU to Fred Kemmerer who is the president of the club that I featured in this episode. I emailed their club email on Friday afternoon to just let them know that I was featureing them in my podcast episode and mentioned that if someone would be available on Saturday morning that we could possibly do an interview about their club. He was able to check the email in time and we were able to do the interview. Not only once, but twice because I failed to push the record button the first time!   Tech Corner - Repeaters What is a Repeater? A repeater is a piece of equipment that receives a signal and retransmits it at a higher power. A repeater is very useful for covering a large geographical area. Repeaters are used by not only ham radio operators but also by the government, businesses, or even just a small family needing better covering for their radios around a large farm.   There are a few types of repeaters: Simplex Repeater - A simplex repeater is located on a single frequency and uses a digital recorder. It will receive a signal, typically up to about 30 seconds. Once person A unkeys their radio, the simplex repeater will retransmit what it recorded. This type of repeater is typically used by an individual or a family that wants to talk on a smallish geographical area. Conventional Repeater - This type of repeater is what most of us use. When you transmit, the repeater will receive the signal on a frequency, then retransmit on a different frequency at a higher power level. For example, a 2 meter repeater may be on 145.490 for it's output frequency. When you key up your radio, if it's settings are correct, you will transmit on 144.890 or 600 kHz down. The repeater receives on that frequency and immediately retransmits what you are saying on it's output frequency of 145.490. There is only minimal delay or maybe half a second or so. Out of Band Repeater - There isn't many Out of Band repeaters anymore. They were also primarily used in government repeaters. For example, in California there was a system where it’s input was on the 46 MHz band and it's output was on the 154 MHz band.   Along with the different types of repeaters, there are a couple different types of repeaters that you may come into contact with. Analog Repeater - An analog repeater is still the majority of the repeaters that are out there. An analog repeater has the largest bandwidth of all the types of repeaters that we are going to talk about in this episode. Digital Repeaters - There are several types of digital repeaters now a days. There is DStar repeaters, System Fusion Repeaters, DMR Repeaters and even P.25 Repeaters that are used in government entities. Digipeaters - These are a type of repeaters that are different than a voice ones that you may be use to using. These type of repeaters are for computers to use in applications like packet and APRS.       Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Nashua Area Radio Club   Website: http://n1fd.org/ Club Callsign: N1FD Fred Kemmerer, AB1OC - President - Personal Blog Meetings Club Meetings on the first Tuesday of each Month. Our meetings include presentations from club members and local experts on a variety of topics related to Amateur Radio. The last club meeting, two daysN ago, Tuesday, September 6th at 7pm featured Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, CEO of the ARRL, as speaker. Tom was be joined by Dave Patton, NN1N – ARRL Manager, Field Services and Radiosport; Tom Frenaye, K1KI – ARRL New England Division Director; and Peter Strohrer, K1PJS – ARRL NH Section Leader. Tech Night - Second Tuesday of the Month. How-to technical topics. Nets Sunday Night Chat Net - 8:30 PM Eastern - 28.500 Range MHz on SSB Phone Youth Net - N1NMO Repeater Network - Starting around October 2016   Activities Hamfest - Boxboro Hamfest - Sep 9-11 Multiple National Parks On The Air Activations Our 2016 Field Day Operation - Typically run 7 or 8 A Operating as K2K New Hampshire in the Thirteen Colonies Special Event Our Winning Entries in the 2016 ARRL Rookie Roundup Contest Operating as N1FD/M in the 2016 New England QSO Party The N1FD/M Dayton and Back Counties Activation Tour Our 35th Anniversary Club Operating Event Picnic in the Park   Upcoming Events Contests September VHF Objective -  For amateurs in the US and Canada (and their possessions) to work as many amateur stations in as many different 2 degrees x 1 degree Maidenhead grid squares as possible using authorized frequencies above 50 MHz. Dates - The second full weekend of September. Begins 1800 UTC Saturday and runs through 0259 UTC Monday (September 10-12, 2016) Log Submission Deadline - All submissions must be emailed or postmarked no later than 0300 UTC Wednesday, October 12, 2016. Email logs to septembervhf@arrl.org 10 GHz and Up Objective -  The objective of 10 GHz and Up is for North American amateurs work as many amateur stations in as many different locations as possible in North America on bands from 10-GHz through Light. Amateurs are encouraged to operate from more than one location during this event. See the detailed rules for restrictions. Dates - Third full weekend of August and September (August 20-21, 2016 and September 17-18, 2016). Operations may take place for 24 hours total on each contest weekend. Each weekend begins at 6:00 AM local Saturday though 12:00 midnight local Sunday. Log Submission Deadline - Logs must be submitted no later than 0000 UTC Tuesday, October 18, 2016. Hamfests 09/09/2016 47th Annual Queen Wilhelmina Hamfest - Mena, AZ New England Division Convention - Boxborough, MA   09/10/2016 AK-SAR-BEN Amateur Radio Club Flea-Esta -  Springfield, NE GMARC September Trunk Swap -  Shelby Township, MI Kentucky State Convention (Greater Louisville Hamfest 2016) - Shepherdsville, KY Lubbock ARC's Third Annual Hamfest - Lubbock, TX Rush City Radio Rendezvous - Rush City, MN Virginia Section Convention (Virginia Beach Hamfest) - Virginia Beach, VA   09/11/2016 38th Annual Gloucester County ARC Hamfest - Mullica Hill, NJ BCARA SwapFest - Butler, PA Findlay Hamfest - Findlay, OH Lancaster NY Hamfest - Lancaster, NY Saratoga County NY Hamfest - Ballston Spa, NY   09/16/2016 The ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference - St. Petersburg, FL W9DXCC DX Convention & Banquet - Schaumburg, IL   09/17/2016 All-Arkansas Hamfest - Little Rock, AR Augusta Hamfest - Grovetown, GA Gadsden Hamfest -  Attalla, AL GRAHamfest 2016 - Wyoming, MI Illinois State Convention (Peoria Superfest) - Peoria, IL OH-KY-IN Hamfest -  Cincinnati, OH St. Croix Valley ARC Hamfest - Alexander, ME Tenth Annual Sacramento Valley Hamfest - Lincoln, CA   09/18/2016 Adrian Hamfest - Adrian, MI FLEA at MIT - Cambridge, MA Garden State ARA Hamfest - Tinton Falls, NJ     News ARRL CEO Urges New York City-Area Hams to Join Him as Marathon Volunteer 09/01/2016 ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF — a New York City Marathon volunteer since 1981 — is urging radio amateurs in the New York metropolitan area to join him on the race course this fall to, as he put it, “participate in one of the world’s most important public service events.” On Sunday, November 6, Amateur Radio volunteers will provide communication support for the 46th running of the TCS New York City Marathon. The Marathon starts near the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge on Staten Island and continues through Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx before finishing 26.2 miles later in Manhattan's Central Park. Amateur Radio volunteers provide emergency medical and logistics communication support throughout the course, working in concert with the New York Police Department and Fire Department of New York Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to aid the more than 50,000 athletes expected to take part this year. “Additional ham radio operators are still needed to staff some mile points along the course as well as some post-finish locations inside Central Park,” said TCS NYC Marathon Amateur Radio Communications Director Deborah Kerr, KC2GPV. Radio amateurs interested in serving the 2016 TCS New York City Marathon should register online. The New York City Marathon originated in 1970 as a low-budget event confined to Central Park. That first marathon attracted 127 entrants. In 1976 — the US Bicentennial Year — the marathon was expanded to encompass the city’s five boroughs. For many years, Steve Mendelsohn, W2ML (SK), served as the Marathon’s communications director, overseeing the approximately 400 ham radio volunteers supporting race communications. Inducted into the CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame a week before he died in 2012, Mendelsohn, had served as ARRL Hudson Division Director and as ARRL First Vice President. “I feel as though I have been given this amazing opportunity to continue Steve's legacy and continue to give other ham the opportunity to enjoy an event that I hope will continue in the years to come,” Kerr said. Ham Radio Outlet Refurbishes, Reopens Former AES Milwaukee Location 08/31/2016 Ham Radio Outlet (HRO) opened its latest Amateur Radio retail outlet at the site of the former Amateur Electronic Supply (AES) headquarters store at 5710 West Good Hope Road in Milwaukee on August 27. AES closed its Milwaukee, Las Vegas, Cleveland, and Orlando outlets on July 28, following a surprise announcement 4 weeks earlier that it was going out of business after 59 years as a ham radio equipment supplier. A couple of weeks later, HRO announced plans to make over the Milwaukee outlet and reopen it as its “superstore” — now HRO’s largest. Several former AES Milwaukee employees now are working for HRO, which undertook a rapid remodeling project to make the store over in its own brand. Dan Vanevenhoven, N9LVS, visited the HRO Milwaukee location on opening day, camera in hand, and he posted video of his brief tour on YouTube. “One of the first things that caught my eye was the radio demo area,” Vanevenhoven says in his video. “They’ve actually got radios that you can try out.” A row of eight carrels, each with a different piece of gear ready to use, stretches along part of one wall in the store. The Milwaukee store in 5000 square feet of Amateur Radio equipment, antennas, books, and accessories. A family-owned business, HRO is the world’s largest Amateur Radio dealership, with 14 locations from New England to the West Coast. It opened a new outlet in Plano, Texas, in early 2015 and relocated and expanded its Portland, Oregon, store, which opened in late July. HRO has planned the weekends of September 10, 17, 24 and October 1 for the grand opening of its Portland store, and October 1, 8, 15, and 22 for the grand opening of the new Milwaukee outlet. Source:ARRL News   Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just goto my Subscribe Page! Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH050 - Winter Field Day!

    · 01:23:15 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the cold season cousin of The ARRL Field Day, Winter Field Day and some of the challenges that come along with it, we talk about the Chesapeake Amateur Radio Service in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and hamfests over the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby! Donations Thank you to Brian Stanford for you $1 per episode pledge on Patreon! Thank you to Andrew Cornwall for you $10 donation! Thank you!! Downloads for December: 6,286 - best month to date! Year end total: 47,436! That's an average of 968 downloads per episode! If you ask me that is pretty awesome for the first year! Thank you to all of you who listen and thank you for sharing my podcast with your friends, please continue to do so and help me grow even more! Please let me know what you think about my podcast by taking my short survey. It really has given me some insight as to what y'all think, what I could change or do better even though I have only had 6 people take it so far. I would like to thank George Zafiropoulos, KJ6VU with Packtenna.com for donating a and Dan Romanchik, KB6NU for donating as give-a-way prizes for this episode. Prizes $100 gift certificate to Packtenna.com Any/all ebooks written by Dan, KB6NU on kb6nu.com N3FJP Logging Software Package by N3FJP Software Custom call sign desk plate made by me…:) How To Win? Being that this is the 50th episode of this podcast, I am going to do this a little different than I have in the past. The only thing that you need to do is to sign up for my email list. If you are already signed up for my email list, then you are already entered. Signing up is super easy, just fill out the form below and click Sign Me Up! Check your email and click on the confirmation link in the email. [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Tech Corner - Winter Field! Winter Field Day Association Website Winter field Day Association Facebook Page When? Winter Field Day runs for 24 hours during the last full weekend in January each year from 1900 UTC (2pm EST) Saturday to 1900 UTC (2pm EST) Sunday. For 2017, the dates are January 28th and 29th. Station set-up may commence no earlier than 1900 UTC (2pm EST) on Friday, January 27th. Station setup may consume no more than 12 hours total. How & when you schedule/spend those 12 hours is up to you. History During 2006 the suggestion for SPAR to sponsor a Winter Field Day was made and after discussions in the Forum, rules and a date were set. On January 13-14, 2007, the First Annual Winter Field Day was held and based on comments from the participants; this will indeed go down in the record books as the start of an annual tradition. It all started last June when Charles, N5PVL asked if SPAR would be interested in sponsoring a winter field day activity. There followed a discussion, proposed rules and modifications, all culminating in a vote in September approving SPAR's sponsorship. Next came a flurry of activities to get the word out on fairly short notice and finally, the actual contest in January. Walt (W5ALT), Charlie (KY5U) contributed greatly to the success of SPAR and WFD. However, due to medical issues activity within SPAR, their forum and support of WFD have declined. Walt did state in the forum that he was somewhat overloaded. Many amateur operators were upset that 2015 scores were not posted and we could not get a response out of SPAR. They also thought that WFD would just fade away. That is when several of us band together and formed Winter Field Day Association. The rules are the same and the date is still the last full weekend in January. A temporary committee has been setup to get things up and running. They are: Tom (WD8MBE), Bill (VE3CLQ), Erik (WX4ET), Dave (W3DET) and Ken (N8KC). For now, if there are any questions, suggestions, or complaints; please email them to wfda@winterfieldday.com   Winter Field Day 2015 VK3KQ/P Sunday Rules Entry Categories: Indoor: Operation from inside a remote, insulated, heated (or cooled, depending on your local weather), and weather-protected structure where an Amateur station is normally not available. (Park buildings/cabins, community center, EOC, senior center, club shack, etc). Winter Field Day in Fairdale Kentucky Outdoor: Operation from a location partly or fully exposed to the elements and at least 30 feet away from your normal station location and not using any part of a previously erected antenna system or ham station. A campground, park pavilion, canopy, picnic table, tent, pop-up camper, or a backyard shed/tent/deck, etc may be used. Operation from a non-insulated car/truck/van/boat (mobile or not) is considered "outdoor". Home: Operation from inside a home or inside another structure attached to a home that could or would be the usual location of an Amateur station (garage, sunroom, etc), generally using a previously erected antenna system. A "Home" entrant may still be eligible to claim the "alternate power" bonus if not using commercial power. Use of any pre-existing (on site) or permanently installed antenna system or station components renders your station a "Home" station. Entry Class: Your entry "class" is a number designated by the number of stations in your entry that are capable of simultaneous transmission. (Explained further in summary below) Exchange: Your WFD exchange will be a combination of your "class" and "category" and your ARRL section as described below, using an appropriate letter designator or phonetics (examples: 1I, 2H, 5I, 6O, 3H, 9I, etc) In short: Call sign, Class + Category, ARRL Section. (Example: K4YM this is KB8X, we are Two Hotel, Ohio ...or in CW: K4YM de KB8X TU 2H OH... KB8X this is K4YM, thank you, we are Twelve India, West Central Florida ..or in CW: KB8X TU 12I WCF) QSO Points: 1 point per Phone QSO, 2 points per CW and Digital QSO. Busted exchanges will be penalized by 1 additional point for each missed exchange or callsign. Duplicate contacts (same call, band and mode) will not be counted, but will not be penalized. Mode and Band Multipliers: Count 1 multiplier for each mode operated per band. For example, operating CW and Phone on 80, 40, 15 and 10 meters, CW and PSK31 on 20m, FM on 2meters and 440MHz would be a total multiplier of 12x. Power Output Multipliers: >100W = 1x 100W or less = 2x QRP = 4x(QRP defined below) Bonus Points: You may claim 1500 bonus points if no commercial power is used in powering your WFD sattion. (see "alternate power" definition below) Your "logging-only" computer may use any available power. You may claim 1500 bonus points if your operation is "Outdoors" (see definition below). You may claim 1500 bonus points if your operation is not a "Home" operation (remote). You may claim 1500 bonus points for making a QSO via Satellite (once only. see Satellite rule) Log submission deadline and contents Logs must be submitted to www.wfda@winterfieldday.com via email before 0000 UTC March 1st to be considered. Emailed logs should contain the following in the subject line.."WFD 2017 Log KD8XXX" with KD8XXX being the callsign you used for the event.If simply submitting a question about WFD, please put "WFD Questions" in the subject line to ensure your query gets to the right in-box. All logs must be in Cabrillo format and should contain the following information: Frequency, Modes in the log, Date and time, QSO data required: Entrants's Call, Class + Category, ARRL/RAC Section, and Bonus Points. Winter Field Day Rules Logging Programs that the WFDA recommends: N3FJP Log Program W3KM Log program N1MM Log program Now that we have all the official stuff out of the way, let's talk a little about some of the challenges of Winter Field Day over The ARRL Field Day. Weather Probably the most prominent thing that pops into my head is the weather and especially for those of you that are in the north! During the ARRL Field Day, those of us in the the south especially, have to deal with the blistering heat. Here in Texas it is typically in the upper 90’s or lower 100’s during Field Day in June. With Winter Field Day it isn't as bad here in the south as it is typically around 50 for the highs here in Texas, but for those of you up North, you might struggle to get above freezing, which presents a whole slew of different problems. When thinking about things that the cold could affect, the first thing I think about is how am I going to stay warm? If I am wanting to operate the outside class, I am going to need some way to get out of the elements, like a tent or some kind of shelter and a wind block. I am definitely going to have to have more layers of clothes, as well as some kind of gloves. Of course, that brings me to another thought, If I am wearing gloves, how is that going to affect my operating experience. Is it going to be harder to tune the radio? If it going to be harder to type or write my contacts in my log? The next question that you have to ask yourself is how is the cold going to affect your equipment. You radio and computers, it probably won't hurt much, but what about things like antennas or coax. If you are getting any snow or ice, how is it going to affect you antennas. If there is any ice build up, it could affect your SWR’s. What about grounding your antenna system. If you have a lot of snow, or the ground is frozen, it is going to be harder to drive the ground rod in the ground to get that proper grounding. On top of the antenna and grounding questions, what about your coax? I'm sure that if you have worked with coax in the cold you know that it is a pain to work with when it's cold. It doesn't want to lay flat, it doesn't want to uncoil, it's stiff. All this and more I'm sure!   West Mountain Radio I would like to welcome my first podcast sponsor, West Mountain Radio! For those of you that don't know who they are, they make some awesome equipment that I have had the pleasure of using over the past 15 or so years. They make several pieces of equipment that are so well built and are so useful. Things like the RIGBlaster, RIGrunner and the DC-to-Go Boxes. I talked a little bit about the RIGblaster in my last episode and I've talked about the RIGrunner several times in previous episode but today I wanted to tell y'all about their DC-to-Go Boxes. These are neat cases that you can put a battery in to protect your station’s floor from an unfortunate battery accident, however, they are so much more than that as well. These boxes have a Super PWRgate PG40 and a RIGrunner 4007U or 4008 built into them as well. The PWRgate provides you an uninterruptible power supply in case you lose AC power it will automatically switch to the battery in the box. This is a perfect solution for a repeater backup and/or event like the upcoming Winter Field Day! The RIGrunner 4008 provides you with 40 amps of D.C. Power plug over 8 slots while the 4007u gives you 40 amps across 7 slots but it has some extra feature like a digital load meter and USB charging port as well as a solid state push button on/off switch and an automatic shutoff for high or low voltages! Both of these are mounted to the side of the battery box. All you have to do is drop a battery inside and hook up the leads and you are ready to roll!! Here are the links for the premade versions of the DC-to-Go boxes. It you can also Custom make one to your own choices! DC-to-GO Battery Box w/RIGrunner & Super PWRgate (sku#58513-1381), $249.95 DC-to-GO Battery Box w/RR4007U & Super PWRgate (sku#58513-1577), $269.95 Custom make your own!   Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Chesapeake Amateur Radio Service Website: http://w4car.org/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/w4car/Twitter: https://twitter.com/w4car/Instagram: https://instagram.com/w4car/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaXNsBCvysELbYOsr7aVFUA/ Meetings 1st Monday of every month at 116 Reservation Road in the Great Bridge section of Chesapeake Repeaters 146.610 - PL 162.2 146.820 - PL 162.2 444.000 - PL 162.2 System Fusion Nets CARS Weekly Club Net - Sunday at 8pm - 146.820 Repeater CARES (ARES) Net - Wednesday at 8pm - 146.820 Repeater Activities Virginia QSO Party Field Day Battle of Great Bridge Special Event ARES Tour de Cure Shack Day - 3rd Sat of the Month the club shack is opened to all members and the general public.   Upcoming Events   QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Jan 6 PODXS 070 Club PSKFest 0000Z-2400Z, Jan 7 WW PMC Contest 1200Z, Jan 7 to 1200Z, Jan 8 SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 1200Z, Jan 7 to 2400Z, Jan 8 Original QRP Contest 1500Z, Jan 7 to 1500Z, Jan 8 Kid's Day Contest 1800Z-2359Z, Jan 7 ARRL RTTY Roundup 1800Z, Jan 7 to 2400Z, Jan 8 EUCW 160m Contest 2000Z-2300Z, Jan 7 and   0400Z-0700Z, Jan 8 DARC 10-Meter Contest 0900Z-1059Z, Jan 8 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Jan 11 AWA Linc Cundall Memorial CW Contest 2300Z, Jan 11 to 2300Z, Jan 12 and   2300Z, Jan 14 to 2300Z, Jan 15 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Jan 13 NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Jan 13 Old New Year Contest 0500Z-0900Z, Jan 14 UBA PSK63 Prefix Contest 1200Z, Jan 14 to 1200Z, Jan 15 North American QSO Party, CW 1800Z, Jan 14 to 0559Z, Jan 15 NRAU-Baltic Contest, SSB 0630Z-0830Z, Jan 15 NRAU-Baltic Contest, CW 0900Z-1100Z, Jan 15 Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0200Z-0400Z, Jan 16 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Jan 18 *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar   Hamfests 01/07/2017 FreezeFest - Locust Fork, AL LARC's Annual HAMFEST - White Pine, TN West Allis RAC's 45th Annual Midwinter Swapfest - Waukesha, WI 01/08/2017 New York City/Long Island Section Convention (Ham Radio University 2017) - Bethpage, NY 01/14/2017 Greenwood Hamfest - Greenwood, SC San Antonio Radio Fiesta - Schertz, TX TARCFest - Tampa, FL TechFest 2017 -  Lawrenceville, GA Thunderbird Hamfest 2017 - Phoenix, AZ Winston-Salem Firstfest - Winston-Salem, NC Winter Hamfest 2017 - Lovleland , CO 01/15/2017 Sunday Creek Amateur Radio Federation Hamfest - Nelsonville, OH   *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar   News New Amateur Radio FM Transponder CubeSat Now in Space 12/29/2016 The BY70-1 CubeSat launched on December 28 from the Taiyuan Space Launch Center in China, but in a lower orbit than intended. The satellite carries an Amateur Radio FM transponder. BY70-1 was intended to go into a 530-kilometer (approximately 329-mile) circular Sun-synchronous orbit, but it appears the orbit is 524 × 212 kilometers, which will give the spacecraft an orbital lifetime of just a month or two. Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, reported working Wyatt Dirks, AC0RA, through the FM transponder during the 1709 UTC pass on December 28. “Uplink requires precise frequency adjustment, and there’s a delay on the downlink, but the signal is strong,” Stoetzer said. BY70-1 is a 2U CubeSat project for education and Amateur Radio. It features 3-axis stabilization and deployable solar panels. In addition to the FM transponder, BY70-1 has a camera, and plans call for downloading images and telemetry via a 9600 bps BPSK downlink. The IARU Amateur Satellite Frequency Coordination pages list an uplink of 145.920 MHz, and a downlink of 436.200 MHz. AMSAT-UK has more information. FCC Denies Expert Linears’ Request for Waiver of 15 dB Rule, Petition Pending 12/27/2016 The FCC has denied a request by Expert Linears America LLC to waive §97.317(a)(2) of the Amateur Service rules limiting amplifier gain. Expert, of Magnolia, Texas, distributes linears manufactured by SPE in Italy. Its waiver request, filed in June, would have allowed Expert to import an amplifier capable of exceeding the current 15 dB gain limitation as it awaits FCC action on its April petition (RM-11767) to revise the same Amateur Service rules. That petition remains pending. Expert has asserted that there should be no gain limitation on amplifiers sold or used in the Amateur Service. Most commenters supported Expert’s waiver request, but a couple of commenters — including FlexRadio — demurred. “In light of the conflicting comments regarding the desirability of eliminating the 15 dB limitation, we conclude that waiving the limitation at this stage of the rulemaking proceeding would prejudice the rulemaking proceeding and prematurely dispose of commenters’ concerns,” the FCC said in denying the waiver. “Moreover, we agree with FlexRadio that granting Expert’s waiver request while the rulemaking petition remains pending would provide an unfair market advantage for one equipment model over other manufacturers’ RF power amplifiers that would still be limited by [the existing rules].” The FCC said it would rather give full consideration to “the pending issues” and apply the result of the rulemaking proceeding to all Amateur Radio Service equipment. The Commission said rule waivers “generally” are not warranted “merely to accommodate technical parameters that are based solely on harmonization with the manufacturer’s products available abroad.” The FCC said a minority of those commenting on the waiver request expressed concern that eliminating the 15 dB limitation would lead to an overall increase in power levels, “including transmissions that intentionally or unintentionally exceed the maximum power limit.” In its April rulemaking petition, Expert maintained that the 15 dB gain limitation is an unneeded holdover from the days when amplifiers were less efficient and the FCC was attempting to rein in the use of Amateur Service amplifiers by Citizens Band operators. Although the FCC had proposed in 2004 to delete the requirement that amplifiers be designed to use a minimum of 50 W of drive power — and subsequently did so — it did not further discuss the 15 dB limit in the subsequent Report and Order in that proceeding. Expert has pointed to its Model 1.3K FA amplifier as an example of a linear “inherently capable of considerably more than 15 dB of amplification,” which would make it a suitable match for low-power transceivers now on the market. National Parks on the Air Contact Tally Tops 1 Million! 12/21/2016 Participants in the ARRL’s National Parks on the Air (NPOTA) program have completed more than 1 million contacts! Activators operating from National Park Service units across the US and Chasers around the world pushed the contact tally over its goal this week. ARRL sponsored NPOTA to help the National Park Service celebrate its centennial. “National Parks on the Air has become one of the most popular events in the history of the League,” NPOTA Administrator Sean Kutzko, KX9X, said. “It’s been fun seeing so many hams take part.” Kutzko said the NPOTA Facebook group really helped drive participation, especially in the last 3 months, when it became clear that the 1 million-QSO goal was within reach. “Some 25,000 NPOTA contacts were uploaded to Logbook of The World (LoTW) every week since October,” he noted. “The entire group came together and simply willed the 1 million-contact mark to be broken. It was incredible to watch!” He said some real friendships developed among those who frequented the NPOTA Facebook page. Those taking part in NPOTA made nearly 20,000 visits to 460 of the 489 NPS units eligible for NPOTA credit, including portions of the National Trails System and the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Nearly 150 Chasers completed contacts with more than 400 of the 489 NPOTA units this year, while one Activator transmitted from more than 250 different NPS units in 2016. Kutzko said the activations effectively transported those National Park Service units via radio to all 50 states and more than 100 countries during 2016. Kutzko said NPOTA garnered interest from hams at all proficiency levels, but he was especially gratified to see how it encouraged less-experienced hams to acquire new skills, such as operating a portable station on battery power, learning CW, or discovering digital modes. “Pileups from some activations rivaled those during a major DXpedition — if only for a few hours at a time,” he added. Jim Clark Jr., an NPS Ranger at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Vermont, said NPOTA helped to generate greater awareness of his unit. “National Parks on the Air has afforded us the opportunity to connect with a much larger and more diverse audience than we could have ever imagined,” he told ARRL. “We are pleased and proud that the world of Amateur Radio helped us to celebrate 100 years of service to the nation.” Kutzko said being able to blend Amateur Radio with the history and scenery offered by the National Park Service was a wonderful gift. “We heard from countless amateurs who learned something about our country while operating from an NPS unit and experiencing ‘the other side’ of a pileup. There will be other on-air events from ARRL, but National Parks on the Air was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. I don’t think there will ever be anything quite like it in Amateur Radio again. I will miss it.” Until month’s end, NPOTA Activators will make a big push to get on the air from NPS units all across the country in a final sprint to the finish line. Get in on the action as NPOTA ends with a roar on December 31 at 2359 UTC! ------------------------- As of this recording there was 1,062,159 QSOs over 20,184 separate activations. It really surprised me when I went through the list of activation states and there was 16 parks that were not activated! Another thing that was really interesting to me was on the leaderboard page. The person that had the highest number of activations was Stuart H Thomas, KB1HQS. He has 500 activation points, the second place person is N4CD with 335. Stuart was a guest over on the Hamradio 360 podcast a couple months ago, click here to listen to that episode. He is on the cover of the 11th edition of the ARRL Operating Manual for Radio Amateurs and did a write up about tips, tricks  and techniques for portable operating in the book starts in page 1.76. He also has an article in the November 2016 QST on page 69. He is also featured in the 2017 ARRL Calendar in August.   Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH048 - Amateur Radio Emergency Services(ARES)

    · 01:02:46 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the Amateur Radio Emergency Services(ARES), we talk about the Bridgeland Amateur Radio Club in Logan, UT in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!     Tech Corner - Amateur Radio Emergency Services(ARES)   What is ARES? ARES is an organization started by the ARRL that consists of licensed amateurs who have voluntarily registered their qualifications and equipment for communications duty when disaster strikes. Every licensed amateur is eligible to apply for ARES membership. ARES is broken down into four levels: national, section, district and local. The national level emergency coordination is handled at the ARRL headquarters by the ARRL Field Services and Field Sport Manager or his/her designee. They are responsible for advising all ARES officials regarding their problems, maintaining contact with federal government and other national officials concerned with amateur emergency communications potential, and in general carrying out the ARRL’s policies regarding emergency communications. At the section level, the section emergency coordinator is an assistant to the section manager for emergency preparedness. The SEC is appointed by the section manager to handle all things dealing with emergency communications. Part of the SEC’s job is to support and help grow their sections participation in ARES functions. They are the person that is responsible for collecting all the district activity reports and making a consolidated report to the section manager and ARRL headquarters. They are also responsible to maintain a good work relationship with state and local governments, civil preparedness, Federal Emergency Management agencies, the Salvation Army, MWS, etc. In large sections, the SEC has the option of breaking down the geographical area in smaller, more management areas or districts. If this is done, the SEC would make recommendations for a district emergency coordinator. This person would be a go between between the local and section levels with much of the same duties as the SEC has but on a smaller scale. Lastly, we come to the local level. Each local area will have their own Emergency Coordinator that is appointed by the SEC. The local level EC is the most hands on of all the levels and is responsible for more as well. Parts of the local EC’s responsibilities are; Promoting and enhancing the activities of the ARES for the benefit of the public. Manage and coordinate training, organization, and emergency preparedness of interested amateurs in the area. Establish and maintain a good working relationship with local and state government officials. Develop detailed local operational plans with served agencies and partners in their jurisdiction. Establish a local communications network Establish an emergency communications plans And more… Training The majority of the training that you will receive when you join your local ARES team will be done at meetings and on the air during nets. However, there are a few things that you can take as well and depending on your local ARES group some may be required as well. NIMS - IS-100.b NIMS - IS-700.A ARRL - EC-001 - Introduction to Emergency Communications ARRL - EC-016 - Public Service and Emergency Communicationss Management for Radio Amateurs ARRL - EC-015 - ARRL Public Relations - This is a good course to take if you are the Public Information Officer for your club or ARES group. Skywarn Storm Spotter Training - If your ARES group doubles as you local Skywarn team, this training may also be required, typically once every two years. Along the same lines of training, what are you good at? Are you a good multitasker? Are you good under stress? Are you good at fixing things?  There is so much that goes on during a disaster and the planning before hand that has to be done, if something is your “cup of tea” make sure that someone knows about it. If you are a good multitasker and you do good under stress, you should volunteer to be net control. If you are a good organizer, maybe you can help with the emergency planning before a disaster hits, or help design a drill. Even though our main responsibility with ARES and as a ham in general is communictions, there is so much more that goes on, make sure you let your local EC know what you are good at, what you like to do, or what you would like to learn to do so that they know and can assign you to what you are good at or get you training before a disaster hits so that you can do what you like to do. Traffic Handling Traffic handling is a very important part of our job as communicators. During an ARES operation, messages are passed using the RadioGram format of the National Traffic System. It is important to use this format when passing traffic because it keeps a record of the message, it is more concise which makes its faster when done correctly, and it’s easier to copy because the receiving station knows the order of the information that they are receiving therefore resulting in fewer errors and less repeats. Traffic handling is required training for all ARES members. Planning Pre-disaster planning is also an important part of the ARES organization. Planning before a disaster happens allows the organization to identifying those who may need amateur radio communications. After they are identified, you need to find out what the nature of the information they will need to communicate and who they will need to communicate with. Once all this information is obtained, drills should be done to make sure that everything is done correctly before a disaster happens.   Further Reading ARRL - ARES ARRL ARES Manual ARRL Field Resource Manual       Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Bridgeland Amateur Radio Club   Website: http://barconline.org/ Meetings Second Saturday of each month (Jan – May & November) at 10:00 AM on the 3rd floor of the Cache County Sheriff’s office (1225 West 200 North, Logan, Utah). During other months, the club is active in activities that they consider as meetings   Repeaters 146.720(-) PL 103.5 Mt. Logan link 147.26, 449.625, 145.31 449.625(-) PL 103.5 Mt. Logan link 146.72, 145.31, 147.26 145.310(-) PL 103.5 Red Spur (west of Randolph) link 146.72, 147.26, 449.625 147.260(+) PL 103.5 Promontory link 146.72, 145.31, 449.625 146.640(-) No PL Logan Valley Floor 147.200(+) PL 103.5 Logan Valley Floor IRLP node 3381 Echolink node 495125 449.650(-) PL 100 Mt Pisgah (TV Translator Site) Intermountain Intertie Link Nets Weekly Bridgerland Amateur Radio Club net is held every Tuesday at 9pm local time on the 146.720 The BARC Ladies Net is every 2nd and 4th Tuesday at 8:00 p.m. on the BARC Repeater and Linked Systems (146.720). Northern Utah Technical Society (NUTS) D-Star Net - Sunday evening at 8:00 pm Mountain time. It is held on the 449.575 – NU7TS B, 447.975 – AC7O – B, 145.150 AC7O-C, 447.950 KF7VJO-B or 447.925 N7RDS-B repeaters and the D-Star Reflector 029C Beehive Utah Net - daily at 12:30pm local at 7.272 MHz Activities Field Day Swaptoberfest Top of Utah Marathon Bear 100 Rocket Recovery LOTOJA - Bicycle Race Little Red Riding Hood - Ladies Only Bicycle Race         Upcoming Events     NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Dec 16 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 16 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 16 Russian 160-Meter Contest 2000Z, Dec 16 to 2400Z, Dec 17 AGB-Party Contest 2100Z-2400Z, Dec 16 OK DX RTTY Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 17 RAC Winter Contest 0000Z-2359Z, Dec 17 Feld Hell Sprint 0000Z-2359Z, Dec 17 Padang DX Contest 1200Z-2359Z, Dec 17 Croatian CW Contest 1400Z, Dec 17 to 1400Z, Dec 18 Stew Perry Topband Challenge 1500Z, Dec 17 to 1500Z, Dec 18 ARRL Rookie Roundup, CW 1800Z-2359Z, Dec 18 Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0200Z-0400Z, Dec 19 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 21 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 21 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Dec 21 and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 21 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 22 NAQCC CW Sprint 0130Z-0330Z, Dec 22 NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Dec 23 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 23 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 23 RAEM Contest 0000Z-1159Z, Dec 25 DARC Christmas Contest 0830Z-1059Z, Dec 26 SKCC Sprint 0000Z-0200Z, Dec 28 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 28 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 28 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Dec 28 and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 28 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 29     *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar   Hamfests     12/17/2016 MARA Annual Christmas Hamfest - Minden, LA     *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar       News ARRL Vows Continued Pursuit of the Amateur Radio Parity Act in the 115th Congress   12/09/2016The Amateur Radio Parity Act, H.R. 1301, died an unbefitting death as the 114th Congress of the United States drew to a close today. After having passed the House of Representatives on a unanimous vote, the bill stalled in the Senate due to the intervention of only one member, Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL).Over the course of the past year, Sen. Nelson has received thousands of e-mails, letters, and phone calls from concerned constituents asking for his support of H.R. 1301. Numerous meetings were held with his senior staff in an effort to move the legislation forward. Negotiations, which led to an agreement with the national association of homeowner’s associations and publicly supported by CAI and ARRL, were brushed aside by Sen. Nelson as irrelevant.In a final meeting with the Senator’s staff earlier this week, it became clear that no matter what was said or done, the Senator opposed the bill and refused to allow it to move forward. Unfortunately, as the bill did not receive floor time, the only manner in which it could get passed in the Senate would be through a process that required unanimous consent, which means no one opposes the bill.The legislation will be reintroduced in both houses of Congress after the 115th Session begins in January. We have already been in contact with the sponsors of the bill to allow for an early introduction, which will give us more time to obtain success. We believe that we can get his bill adopted given the fact that we were inches away from crossing the goal line. We will continue to need the support of the membership, particularly in Florida, as we go forward through the next year.   Phil Anderson, VE3FAS, Named to Canadian Amateur Radio Hall of Fame   12/09/2016The Board of Trustees of the Canadian Amateur Radio Hall of Fame has announced the appointment of Phil Anderson, VE3FAS, of Amaranth, Ontario, to the Canadian Amateur Radio Hall of Fame for 2016. The Constitution for the Hall of Fame specifies that the appointment is made “for outstanding achievement and excellence of the highest degree, for serious and sustained service to Amateur Radio in Canada, or to Amateur Radio at large.” The Board of Trustees determined that Anderson is “most worthy of this honour.”Licensed in 1961, Anderson had a distinguished engineering career in defense research and space design, after which he became an instructor at Humber College. His Amateur Radio involvement includes 50 years of service with the National Traffic System, and he was awarded the prestigious Brass Pounders League Medallion for outstanding achievement in passing third-party traffic. He served the National Traffic System (NTS) Eastern Area and served as manager of the Eastern Canadian Net and Transcontinental Corps (TCC). He was also a QSL bureau volunteer for 20 years.Anderson will be formally inducted to the Hall of Fame at a club event in 2017. Thanks to Ed Frazer, VE7EF, Chair of the Board of Trustees, Canadian Amateur Radio Hall of Fame   Emergency Communication Exercise Uses “Hamsphere®” to Introduce Youth to Virtual Ham Radio   12/07/2016Fifty students in Dominica were introduced to ham radio on November 23, in the form of a simulated emergency drill conducted via the virtual Amateur Radio platform HamSphere. W1AW at ARRL Headquarters monitored the exercise. HamSphere is a virtual Amateur Radio transceiver, available for iOS and Android devices. Under supervision, selected youth teams competed for speed and accuracy in a hurricane emergency communication drill, dubbed “Haminica 2016,” while becoming familiar with the virtual version of Amateur Radio.Sponsoring the project was Dominica’s National Telecommunication Regulatory Commission (NTRC), and NTRC Executive Director Craig Nesty and Engineer George James, J73GJ, were on hand for the exercise. ARRL Emergency Preparedness Manager Mike Corey, KI1U, observed “Haminica 2016” at W1AW using the Hamsphere 3.0 platform. Well-known DXer Martti Laine, OH2BH — an enthusiastic Hamsphere supporter — and Brian Machesney, K1LI/J75Y, organized “Haminica 2016” and helped to conduct the Dominica exercise. While in Dominica, Laine celebrated his 70th birthday on the air as J70BH.The exercise scenario was a hurricane about to make landfall on the island. Laine said that, at one point, the group conducting the exercise had to evacuate the station on short notice.Laine said the NRTC is producing a video about the training exercise, and the event caught the attention of the national TV station, which reported the story in prime time.Source ARRL News       Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH038 - Can You Hear Me Now? The RST Reporting System

    · 00:50:26 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about the RST Reporting System, the Moore County Amateur Radio Society and we are going to announce the winner of the Nanuk 904 case provided by Gigaparts.com.   Tech Corner - RST Reporting System History of the RST Reporting System Many years ago, right around 1934 to be specific, an amateur radio operator by the name of Arthur W Braaten, W2BSR, made up the current reporting system that we use today. At the time there wasn’t a standardized system in place that amateurs could use to tell the transmitting station what their side of things sounded like. Of course, they could’ve just used the S-meters that was on their radio’s, if they had them that is. But that really doesn’t tell you a whole lot about how you sound. There has been times in my limited conversations on the HF bands, where I could hear the other station just fine. They were clear and very understandable, but they barely moved the S meter on my radio. If I had told the other station that they were an S1-S3, they might take it that I was having a hard time hearing them. This is the way that it normally is on FM modes. If you have a low S meter reading on the receiving side, then you will probably be very noisy and hard to make out. However, Single Side Band(SSB) and High Frequency(HF) is an entirely different beast. How Does it Work? RST stands for Readability, Strength and Tone. Each part of the RST components go towards a different aspect of your transmission. In the example above, you may notice that we were only given a 59 report, what about the missing part of the system? In voice communications, you only use the first two parts, Readability and Strength. The last part, Tone, is only when you are using CW. It describes the Tone of the CW characters that you hear. Let’s break it down a little further, shall we? Readability The “official” definition of Readability according to Wikipedia is: A qualitative assessment of how easy or difficult it is to correctly copy the information being sent during the transmission. When you are talking with CW, it refers to how easy or difficult it is to distinguish the characters of the message being received. In voice, it refers to how easy or difficult it is to understand what the transmitting station is saying. The Readability is measured on a scale of 1 to 5:   Strength The S in the RST Reporting System stands for Strength. Strength is the power of the signal coming in. This can be done simply by looking at the S meter on your radio and can be given by what the reading is. I have even heard people say “You are 59 plus 20 dB”. This comes from the signal being so strong that the S meter on the radio goes past S9. Quality HF receivers as calibrated in such a way that S9 is set to a signal of 50 microvolts with a change of 6dB per S unit. On VHF and above, receivers quality receivers are calibrated to that a S9 signal is 5 microvolts at the antenna connection. Both of these measurements require a 50 ohm antenna connection for best results The Strength part of this system is measured on a scale of 1 to 9:   Tone The T in the RST Reporting System stands for Tone. This part of the reporting system is only used when you are talking on CW or digital modes as it refers to the sounds of the tone itself. Tone is measured on a scale of 1 to 9:   I have read a few articles that state there some people are trying to get the Tone part of the RST system changed to Q for Quality. There reasoning is that the Tone part is a limited feature being that it is only used in CW or Digital modes, whereas if it was changed to Quality, it could be used on voice as well to tell about the quality of your signal. My question is, isn’t that basically the same as the Readability part? What do yall think? Leave your comments below QSL Reporting If you have ever sent or received a QSL card, you probably know that there is a RST box that needs to be filled out on it. This box is a must to fill out, and really important that you fill it out correctly. In online log books, like Logbook of the World, I think that this is a mandatory field as well. I have heard of some people who just put down a 599 in the box and move on, especially during contests. I understand that if you are the one running the event or contest and you have a few thousand QSL cards to send out that you might get lazy and just put a 599 report on the card to save you some hassle. Or maybe when you log the QSO you don’t put it in right then, so later on you just have to guess. Either way, as ham radio operators, our job is to pass information with the utmost accuracy during emergencies, so why should we be any different when there isn’t an emergency? One of the things that I have learned while being a 911 telecommunicator, is that if you don’t use it, you can, not have it when you need it. When I first started in this field over twelve years ago(wow, has it been that long), I learned a lot and generally used all that I learned on a regular basis. About four years after I started, I changed to a different dispatch and it was slower and was only fire, so some of my police things faded into the abyss of my mind. Now five years after that, I am back at a Sheriff’s Office and back to using those skill and am having to relearn some of them What all this boils down to is this, and this applies to everything in life not just in amateur radio: Learn how to do something the correct way and always do it that way. If you do it in your everyday life the correct way, then when you are in a time of heightened emotions, such as an emergency, your training will take over. My dad, KC5PWQ, always told me that “If something aint worth doing right, it aint worth doing at all!” So do like I did and take these words to heart and always do things the right way the first time. At the very least, it will save you have from having to do it over again because you did it wrong the first time. Conclusion To summarize what all we talked about in this post: Readability – How well you can understand Strength – How strong is the signal Tone – How clear is the sound of the CW/Digital Accurate Reporting – Do it the right way the first time And lastly, Your thoughts on changing Tone to Quality     Are you looking for some new radio gear? Maybe you need a new computer for your shack? Did you lose a piece off you tower and you just can't find it without a metal detector? You can find all this and more at GigaParts.com. While you are there, check out the Nanuk cases! These cases are awesome! They are made of hard exterior and a soft foam interior. Both the inside foam and the outside can be customized to meet your purposes! Why Nanuk? Because they are awesome! Check out all the options that are currently in stock at GigaParts right now! GigaParts has graciously given one of these cases as a giveaway. Tune in next week to find out how to enter to win it! Until then, head on over to GigaParts.com and check out their wide selection of cases. If you decide to buy one, enter the coupon code of... EHR10 ...at checkout to receive 10% off the price of the case!   Amateur Radio Club Spotlight Moore County Amateur Radio Society Website: http://mocars.org/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NC4ML/ Meetings The third Thursday of every month (except December) at the Moore County Health Department, 705 Pinehurst Ave, Carthage, at 7:00p. Doors usually open just after 6:00p for people to come and ragchew. Occasionally meetings are held at other locations when special interests are addressed.   Repeaters 147.240+ PL 91.5 tone - Carthage, NC   Nets 2 meter net is Sunday and Wednesday evenings at 8:00 on 147.240 Repeater The Sandhills 6 meter net is Monday evenings at 8:00 on 50.200 USB   Activities Winter Field Day Uwharrie Mountain Run Southern Pines Springfest Carthage Buggy Festival Badin Bomber Crash 1944 American Radio Relay League Field Day Moore County Fair Sardine Festival Uwharrie 100 Simulated Emergency Training Christmas Luncheon   Upcoming Events   + NRAU 10m Activity Contest 1700Z-1800Z, Oct 6 (CW) and  1800Z-1900Z, Oct 6 (SSB) and  1900Z-2000Z, Oct 6 (FM) and  2000Z-2100Z, Oct 6 (Dig) + SARL 80m QSO Party 1700Z-2000Z, Oct 6 + NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Oct 7 + NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 7 + Makrothen RTTY Contest 0000Z-0759Z, Oct 8 and  1600Z-2359Z, Oct 8 and  0800Z-1559Z, Oct 9 + Oceania DX Contest, CW 0800Z, Oct 8 to 0800Z, Oct 9 + Microwave Fall Sprint 0800 local - 1400 local, Oct 8 + SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 1200Z, Oct 8 to 2400Z, Oct 9 + Scandinavian Activity Contest, SSB 1200Z, Oct 8 to 1200Z, Oct 9 + QRP ARCI Fall QSO Party 1200Z, Oct 8 to 2359Z, Oct 9 + Pennsylvania QSO Party 1600Z, Oct 8 to 0500Z, Oct 9 and  1300Z-2200Z, Oct 9 + Arizona QSO Party 1600Z, Oct 8 to 0600Z, Oct 9 and  1400Z-2359Z, Oct 9 + FISTS Fall Unlimited Sprint 1700Z-2100Z, Oct 8 + PODXS 070 Club 160m Great Pumpkin Sprint 2000Z, Oct 8 to 2000Z, Oct 9 + North American SSB Sprint Contest 0000Z-0400Z, Oct 9 + UBA ON Contest, CW 0600Z-0900Z, Oct 9 + 10-10 Int. 10-10 Day Sprint 0001Z-2359Z, Oct 10 + NAQCC CW Sprint 0030Z-0230Z, Oct 12 + Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 12 + CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Oct 12 and  1900Z-2000Z, Oct 12 and  0300Z-0400Z, Oct 13 + RSGB 80m Club Sprint, CW 1900Z-2000Z, Oct 12 + NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Oct 14 + NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 14 + MCG Autumn Sprint 1500Z-1900Z, Oct 14 + JARTS WW RTTY Contest 0000Z, Oct 15 to 2400Z, Oct 16 + 10-10 Int. Fall Contest, CW 0001Z, Oct 15 to 2359Z, Oct 16 + Iowa QSO Party 1400Z-2300Z, Oct 15 + New York QSO Party 1400Z, Oct 15 to 0200Z, Oct 16 + Worked All Germany Contest 1500Z, Oct 15 to 1459Z, Oct 16 + South Dakota QSO Party 1800Z, Oct 15 to 1800Z, Oct 16 + Feld Hell Sprint 2000Z-2359Z, Oct 15 + Asia-Pacific Fall Sprint, CW 0000Z-0200Z, Oct 16 + UBA ON Contest, 2m 0600Z-1000Z, Oct 16 + Illinois QSO Party 1700Z, Oct 16 to 0100Z, Oct 17 + RSGB RoLo CW 1900Z-2030Z, Oct 16 + Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0100Z-0300Z, Oct 17 + ARRL School Club Roundup 1300Z, Oct 17 to 2359Z, Oct 21 + Telephone Pioneers QSO Party 1900Z, Oct 17 to 0300Z, Oct 18 + Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 19 + CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Oct 19 and  1900Z-2000Z, Oct 19 and  0300Z-0400Z, Oct 20   *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar Hamfests   10/07/2016 Florida State Convention (Melbourne Hamfest) - Melbourne, FL Pacific Northwest VHF Society Conference - Bend, OR   10/08/2016 Alpena Swap - Alpena, MI BARA Fall Hamfest - Township of Washington, NJ Helena Hamfest - Helena, AL Kitsap County ARC Hamfest 2016 - Bremerton, WA LaGrange Hamfest -  LaGrange, GA Parkersburg/Wood County Hamfest - Mineral Wells, WV Randy Griffin Memorial Ham Fest - Morrilton, AR SwaptoberFest 2016 - Logan, UT WCLARC's 39th Annual Hamfest - Leesville, LA   10/09/2016 CARAFest 2016 - West Friendship, MD HOSARC Hamfest - Queens, NY Maysville Hamfest - Maysville, NC SEWFARS Swapfest - Hubertus, WI   10/13/2016 Microwave Update 2016 Conference - St. Louis, MO   10/14/2016   Pacific Division Convention (PACIFICON) - San Ramon, CA   10/15/2016 Al Brock Memorial Hamfest/Tailgate - Rome, GA Anderson RC's 38th Annual Hamfest - Anderson, SC ARRL Day in the Park - Columbia, MS Coastal ARS Savannah Swapmeet - Savannah, GA Greeneville Hamfest - Greeneville, Tn Kingman Ham Fest - Kingman, AZ Muskegon Color Tour Hamfest - Muskegon, MI Socorro Hamfest -  Socorro, NM SouthSide ARC Hamfest - Belton, MO Swaptoberfest - Rickreall, OR   10/16/2016 2016 Kalamazoo HamFest and Amateur Radio Swap & Shop - Kalamazoo, MI Conneaut ARC Hamfest - Conneaut, OH Connecticut State Convention (Nutmeg Hamfest) - Meriden, CT FLEA at MIT - Cambridge, MA RF Hill ARC Hamfest - Sellersville, PA     News ARRL Foundation Invites Scholarship Applications for 2017-18 Academic Year 09/28/2016 The ARRL Foundation will begin accepting scholarship applications on October 1 from eligible radio amateurs planning to pursue post-secondary education in the 2017-2018 academic year. Completed applications must be received by January 31, 2017. Individuals and clubs support many of the more than 80 scholarships, ranging from $500 to $5,000, that are awarded annually. Applicants for all scholarships must be active radio amateurs and must complete and submit the online application. “The ARRL Foundation Board of Directors is very pleased to be entrusted with managing this program. The scholarship program is a wonderful way to encourage students to continue their Amateur Radio activities while assisting them with the costs of their higher education,” says ARRL Foundation Secretary and ARRL Development Manager Lauren Clarke, KB1YDD. “All ARRL Foundation scholarships are made possible by individuals or clubs, and we are grateful for their support.” The Foundation reported that 81 radio amateurs were the recipients of 2016-2017 academic year scholarships it administers. Awards totaled $120,150. Students planning to apply for 2017-18 academic year awards should first carefully review the eligibility requirements and scholarship descriptions. Although only one application per applicant is required, applicants may ask to be considered for as many of the scholarships for which they are eligible (some scholarships have geographic criteria or other requirements). Check off only the scholarships for which you would like to be considered. In addition to completing the online application, applicants must submit a PDF of their academic transcript from their most recently completed school year. Applications are due on January 31, 2017, by 11:59 PM ET. Applications without accompanying transcripts will not be considered. Awards winners typically are notified in mid-May by USPS mail and e-mail. Established in 1973 as an independent and separate IRS 501(c)(3) organization, the ARRL Foundation manages grant and scholarship programs to support the Amateur Radio community. All grants and scholarships are funded entirely by the generous contributions of radio amateurs, clubs and friends. Individuals, groups or clubs wishing to establish an ARRL Foundation Scholarship Fund should visitthe ARRL Foundation website. For more information about ARRL Foundation scholarships, e-mail the ARRL Foundation (foundation@arrl.org) or call 860-594-0348. More than 200 US Stations Signed Up for Scouting’s Jamboree on the Air 09/28/2016 So far, 219 US stations have registered to take part in Scouting’s 2016 Jamboree on the Air (JOTA), which will take place October 14-16. Registration remains open for the 59th annual event. Last year, 400 US stations registered. JOTA officials are asking JOTA 2016 participants not only to register for this year’s event, but to follow up with a post-JOTA report. “We expect to have several thousand stations around the world signed up by JOTA weekend,” JOTA Coordinator Jim Wilson, K5ND, said in a JOTA-JOTI (Jamboree on the Internet) update. “Make sure you register your station.” Designated Scouting frequencies are on the “Guidelines for Amateur Radio Operators“ page. “Twenty meters is probably the go-to band during the daytime. Try moving off the calling frequency and spreading out while making those QSOs.” Wilson said that in addition to the DX spotting websites, there’s a Scout station spotting cluster. He also suggested taking advantage of other communication modes, including the dedicated D-Star Scouting reflector 033A, as well as DMR, IRLP with topic channel 9091, and Echolink, with conference node JOTA-365. Doug Crompton, WA3DSP, and Elliott Liggett, W7QED, have set up Allstar node 41760 for JOTA/Scouting conversations, Wilson added. In addition to social media,ScoutLink is an excellent way to connect to Scouts around the world with only an Internet connection, he said. “Dave Edwards, KD2E, and Andy O’Brien, K3UK, have developed a Scout scheduling page,” Wilson said. “You can use this to post your frequency and to pick up on other stations as well.” More than 1 million Scouts in 150+ countries — at nearly 18,000 stations — are expected to take part in JOTA 2016, engaging with other Scouts to talk about Amateur Radio and their Scouting experiences. “JOTA is about conversations across town and around the world, rather than about contacts,” Wilson said. Further Reading: Jamboree on the Air(JOTA/JOTI) - ETH Blog Post on 09/10/2015   “Cows Over the World” DXpedition May Be at an End 09/28/2016 [UPDATED 2016-09-30 @ 1505 UTC] The one-man “Cows Over the World” DXpedition has ended — prematurely, abruptly, and on a sad note. Tom Callas, KC0W, reported that a theft this week in Kiribati has left him with nothing. He toldThe Daily DX that his Cows DXpedition is "permanently QRT." “Everything I own was stolen on 28 September from here in Kiribati,” Callas posted on his QRZ.com page. “They took all the radios, computers, amplifiers, antennas, coax, everything. They even took my clothing and shoes. I have literallynothing left. I type this with tears in my eyes.” The “Cows Over the World” DXpedition got under way last spring, when the Minnesota DXer fired up as KH8/KC0W from American Samoa. Other stops followed. After a short hiatus, Callas had announced plans last week to resume with his T30COW operation from Western Kiribati, but he said his intended “Top 25 Most Wanted” DXpeditions would not happen. He has been financing the round-robin DXpedition on his own. Callas was awaiting permission to operate from Tokelau and Nauru. All call signs in the all-CW DXpedition tour have included a “COW” suffix.Callas has told The Daily DX that “all logs” for his T30COW operation have been uploaded to ClubLog. He also expressed his appreciation on his QRZ.com profile page. “I have read the many supportive comments posted on both QRZ and eHam. A heartfelt thanks. Some guys have asked about financially donating to my plight. This is very generous, but I respectfully and humbly decline. Us people from the Midwest are like that. Either too proud (or too dumb) to accept money without actually working for it. Please donate your time helping a kid learn Morse code if you want to “donate” anything at all. “My bank wired me funds so I can now eat again (literally). No joke, they even stole all my food. I have cancelled all future DXing activity until I return back to the USA and purchase new equipment. Gud DX es Long Live CW from here in Western Kiribati, where it’s always 5NN (except for when local ‘QRM’ makes you go QRT really quick).” In addition to T30COW, his Cows DXpedition has also included operations as 5W0COW, T2COW, and YJ0COW. Announced plans of operating from the Solomons, Tokelau, Bangladesh and other locations now are off the table. In the past, Callas has operated from St Helena Island (ZD7X), Cambodia (XU7XXX), Haiti (HH5/KC0W), and Martinique (TO0O), and he has handed out more than 100,000 contacts overall, including those logged from his Pacific operations.   Conclusion Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ETH032 - What is Going on Lately?!

    · 00:35:22 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about some things that have been happening lately. We are going to learn what the Amateur Radio Emergency Services(ARES) is and talk about the Hellgate Amateur Radio club in the Amateur Radio Club Spotlight.   LA Flood   Brad Kieserman, the Vice President of Disaster Services Operations and Logistics for the American Red Cross, called the flooding disaster “the worst to hit the United States since Superstorm Sandy, and we anticipate it will cost at least $30 million – a number which may grow as we learn more about the scope and magnitude of the devastation.” According to estimates, more than 40,000 homes were damaged or destroyed, leaving tens of thousands of residents displaced. The flooding also left 13 people dead. As of early today, August 20, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was reporting that about 3100 evacuees remained in Red Cross shelters. The Louisiana Emergency Operations Center remains at full activation, and more than p2800 National Guard personnel have been conducting flood relief operations around the clock. In an August 20 (2116 UTC) status update on Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) operations in Louisiana, Assistant Section Manager Matt Anderson, KD5KNZ, said that Louisiana ARES is in the process of deactivating from the recent flood response, and the need for volunteers has ended “All ARES personnel should preleased by this evening,” said Anderson, who has been currently serving as the Incident Point of Contact in Baton Rouge. Amateur Radio volunteers from Alabama, Arkansas, and Mississippi volunteered to serve at multiple Red Cross chapters and shelters throughout the affected area. The calamity struck quickly and ferociously. In one part of Livingston Parish, more than 31 inches of rain fell in 15 hours. 6,900,000,000,000 (6.9 trillion) gallons of rain in one week   California RACES and CERT Volunteers Team Up to Assist Seniors during Blackout 08/18/2016 When the power went out on June 4 at both the Huntington Gardens and Five Points senior residences in Huntington Beach, California, Huntington Beach RACES (HBRACES) and Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) volunteers promptly activated to help. Each residential structure stands 14 stories tall. At Huntington Gardens, a generator supplied power to the hallways and elevators, but not to individual living units or telephones; residents had no way of calling 911 if an emergency occurred. At Five Points, which has no back-up generator, the facility was left in complete darkness. RACES Radio Officer Dr Steve Graboff, W6GOS, and his assistant, Steve Albert, KE6OCE, started a 2 meter net and logged in available communicators. Operators checked into the net were advised to proceed to the staging at Huntington Beach City Hall. “[T]he response to the call to activation by HBRACES was impressive,” Graboff said. “The professional communications skills displayed by the operators were outstanding. The quality of HBRACES training was clearly evident in all of our responders, including those deployed in the field and others who were assigned to the incident command post.” HBRACES communicators paired with a Huntington Beach CERT responder, and each team assigned to a floor of the two facilities to cover communication and emergency calls. This marked the first time Huntington Beach RACES and CERT members were deployed in pairs. The volunteers patrolled the floors of the buildings in the dark, looking and listening for people in need of help, or for anyone who might take advantage of the situation. Residents thus had direct communication with the Huntington Beach Fire and Police departments. Graboff said that having both organizations working together created a safer environment for the volunteers, since they were not alone. The Red Cross dispatched a canteen vehicle to support the volunteers with snacks and coffee. “RACES and CERT worked well together, and I believe this is a response model we will use again in the future,” Graboff said.Some 60 volunteers turned out, and several residents of the affected facilities thanked the RACES and CERT volunteers for being there. One resident said afterward that knowing the volunteers were in the hallway was the only thing that allowed her to sleep that night. The cause of the power failure was traced to a chain reaction fire/explosion in area underground utility vaults. — Thanks to Bob Zamalin, WA6VIP, via the ARRL ARES E-Letter Source: The ARRL News   What is the Amateur Radio Emergency Services(ARES)? ARES is an organization started by the ARRL that consists of licensed amateurs who have voluntarily registered their qualifications and equipment for communications duty when disaster strikes. Every licensed amateur is eligible to apply for ARES membership. There or four levels to the ARES organization: national, section, district, and local. The national level is handled by the ARRL membership and volunteer program manager. At the section level the section manager is the elected by members in his or her section. They, in turn, appoint a section emergency coordinator who is responsible for all ARES activities in his or her section. The section emergency coordinator also appoints district and local emergency coordinators. At the district level, the district emergency coordinators can be appointed to handle a large area such as several counties or a portion of the section emergency coordinators area. The local level is the most organized of all the levels, in most cases. The local level is the level that has the most interactions with the ARES mepmbership in the area and also with the local emergency management personnel. Assistant emergency coordinators can also be assigned to assist the section, district, for local emergency coordinator. They can be assigned specific tasks or just assist the emergency coordinator. Local ARES operations usually take the form of nets –HF, VHF/UHF repeater nets, RTTY, packet, were other special mode nets. If you are a member of your local ARES organization, make sure that you let your leadership know what your interest are so that they can better utilized your assistance. If you are great with working with computers, then you could be of use at the EOC. If you were well under pressure, then you could be a net control operator. Traffic handling is a very important part of our job as communicators. During an ARES operation, messages are passed using the RadioGram format of the National Traffic System. It is important to use this format when passing traffic because it keeps a record of the message, it is more concise which makes its faster when done correctly, and it’s easier to copy because the receiving station knows the order of the information that they are receiving therefore resulting in fewer errors and less repeats. Traffic handling is required training for all ARES members. Pre-disaster planning is also an important part of the ARES organization. Planning before a disaster happens allows the organization to identifying those who may need amateur radio communications. After they are identified, you need to find out what the nature of the information they will need to communicate and who they will need to communicate with. Once all this information is obtained, drills should be done to make sure that everything is done correctly before a disaster happens.     NPOTA   The 100th anniversary of the National Park Service -- known as Founders Day -- is August 25. NPS units across the country have planned special activities on that day. Many units also will include Amateur Radio and NPOTA https://npota.arrl.org/ activity during all of next week. One of these will be Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Vermont, where some ARRL staffers will team up with members of the West River Radio Club on Saturday, August 27, to help showcase the NPS unit and Amateur Radio to the general public. Unless you're visiting an NPS unit next week as part of the official Centennial celebration, stay close to your radio and see how many NPOTA units you can work! There are 39 Activations slated for the week of August 18-24, including Fort Frederica National Monument in Georgia, and the Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site in Virginia. Details https://npota.arrl.org/nps-events.php about these and other upcoming activations can be found on the NPOTA Activations calendar. Keep up with the latest NPOTA news on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/NPOTA/. Follow NPOTA on Twitterhttp://www.twitter.com/ (@ARRL_NPOTA).   Source: The ARRL Letter     FEMA Teaming with Amateur Radio Clubs to Present Preparedness Information:   September is National Preparedness Month. As part of its focus on educating and getting prepared, FEMA is offering a "Family Emergency Communications Plan," which helps families work out their communication strategies in the event of an emergency. ARRL is partnering with FEMA to offer this material to interested Amateur Radio clubs that are willing to present it in their localities during National Preparedness Month. While the FEMA http://www.fema.gov/ presentation focuses on the Family Communications Plan and doesn't specifically mention ham radio, the material offers Amateur Radio clubs a great opportunity to raise their visibility in their communities. A webinar with FEMA Region 1 Preparedness Liaison Sara Varela will take place on Tuesday, August 23, at 8 PM EDT (Wednesday, August 24, at 0000 UTC), to offer background and training for any club wishing to present FEMA's Family Emergency Communications Plan material in September. Registration https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9074175282463403523 is requested. Presentation of the FEMA material to local communities should take approximately 1 hour. It will include a PowerPoint presentation and links to worksheets that families can discuss and fill out together. Clubs are free to offer additional presentations on their activities following the program covering the FEMA material. Source: The ARRL Letter       Supporting Everything Ham Radio If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.         Amateur Radio Club Spotlight   Hellgate Amateur Radio Club Website: http://www.w7px.org/ History This club has a very interesting history. It started in 1930 as the Missoula Amateur Radio Club with 19 charter members. They have one member, Bob Williams W7IPB, that has been an active member of the club since 1957!! That is a long time! The club call sign was the call sign of a long outstanding member of the club, Phil Coulter. After he became a silent key, the club approached his daughter requesting that she allow the club to apply for it as the club call sign as a way to honor his memory. She agreed and the FCC granted the club the license in mid 1986. It has been the the club call sign ever since. In December 1983, WA1JXN/7 (now W7GJ) , Lance Collister became the first amateur radio operator in the world to communicate with an astronaut in space.  Lance communicated with W5LFL , Dr. Owen Garriot while the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-9, orbited the earth 250 nautical miles above the western Pacific.  The antenna, a home brew "moon bounce" two-meter array of 12 yagis. Meetings: Meetings are held on the second Monday of every month at the Missoula Fire House #4 at 3011 Latimer Street (near Murdoch's - the old Quality Supply) at 7 p.m. Testing starts at 5:30 p.m. The December meeting is a Christmas dinner at the Eagles Lodge on South Avenue. Saturday Breakfast - Saturday morning finds area hams jawing over coffee, eggs, pancakes and toast at the a local Restaurant. We will now meet at Paradise Falls at 7:00 a.m., 3621 Brooks Street in Missoula.   Repeaters and Nets Monthly Newsletters   Activities The Grizzly Triathlon The Riverbank Run Tour of the Swan River Valley (TOSRV) Field Day July 4 at the Fort - W7PX Special Event Missoula Marathon July Scouts Jamboree On The Air SKYWARN Recognition Day       Thanks for stopping by today. If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: [yikes-mailchimp form="2"] Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • ICQ Podcast Episode 244 - Friedrichshafen Ham Radio 2017 Round-Up

    · 01:41:53 · icqpodcast's Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast

    In this episode, Martin M1MRB/W9ICQ is joined by Chris Howard M0TCH, Dan Romanchik KB6NU and Ed Durrant DD5LP to discuss the latest Amateur / Ham Radio news. Colin M6BOY rounds up the news in brief, and this episode’s feature is Friedrichshafen Ham Radio 2017 Round-Up We would like to thank Philip Heckingbottom (VK6ADF) and our monthly and annual donors for keeping the podcast advert free. To donate, please visit - http://www.icqpodcast.com/donate YOTA 2017 Summer Event Lauren Richardson - 12 Completes Wainwright Challenge Differences in Amateur Radio CEPT Class 1 Licence Exam Ofcom Permitting 5.8 GHz Wi-Fi Youngsters Unimpressed with Traditional Ham Radio NCDXC to Start HF Elmering Program Fox-1 Satellite Operating Guide updates for 2017 US Radio Ham Receives Lifetime Recognition FT8 Amateur/Ham Radio Mode Software Support Pictures Received from ISS UK Amateur Radio Licence Guidance PyQSO Amateur Radio Logging Software

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  • 4x01 -LA CUARTA ESFERA - ¨EL REGRESO¨ - Visitantes de dormitorio - energías - parálisis del sueño - testimonios

    · 01:58:03 · L4E - LA CUARTA ESFERA (PROGRAMA)

    Comenzamos nuestra nueva temporada con novedades que tienen que ver con muchas de las peticiones que a lo largo de los ultimos meses nos habeis propuesto.Una de ella, es la vuelta al formato de 2 horas.Además conocereis a los nuevos integrantes del Equipo y podreis disfrutar por primera en una emision de radio, del sonido envolvente que hara que nos adentremos en los más profundo del misterio.Con nuevas secciones, casos de los oyentes, investigaciones de campo e infinidad de temas que como siempre compartiremos con todos vosotros.En riguroso directo, LA CUARTA ESFERA, enciende sus motores para viajar con todos vosotros en una aventura sin precedentes.¿Te atreves?Puedes contactar con nosotros en:Se une a nosotros: RADIO ONDA POLIGONO (107.3FM) - TOLEDOCADENA MELANCOLIA (92.2 FM) - LA SAFOR, VALENCIARadio Tui 107.4 Fm ( Sur de Galicia )Radio Ipalán 107.7 FM( La Gomera )Radio Paterna 94.0 FM ( Valencia )Radio Genil 96.2 Fm y 104.4 FM ( Granada )Radio Cadena 94.6 FM ( Canarias )Onda Aljarafe Radio 106.6 FMRadio Adaja 107.2 FM ( Avila )Radio Cúllar 107.8 FM (Granada)Radio Gredos 107.6 FM (Sierra de Gredos)Radio Las Cabezas 107.5 FM (Andalucia)Onda Calamonte 88.4 FM ( Badajoz )EdenexRadio Alquima (Canarias)Ahora3J Radio (Madrid)Radio Neria 107.8 FM ( Galicia )Radio Roncudo 106.1 FM ( Galicia )Radio Universal (Madrid)World Press Radio (Madrid)PrimeraFM (Albacete) 92.8 FMOye Radio FMRadio Timba Usa - ( New York)Radio Pontevedra Viva ( Galicia )ATRÉVETE A VIVIR EL MISTERIOATRÉVETE A SUBIR EN ¡LA CUARTA ESFERA!

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  • 3x35 - LA CUARTA ESFERA - ESPECIAL FIN EMPORADA 3

    · 01:00:05 · L4E - LA CUARTA ESFERA (PROGRAMA)

    DIRIGE Y PRESENTA Eduardo PereiraMadrugada del Viernes al Sabado de 00:00 a 01:00 horasNos despedimos en esta ocasion de todos los esfericos hasta el mes de AGOSTO, momento en el que volveremos a viajar con LA CUARTA ESFERA a los lugares mas enigmaticos.Volveremos con nuevos Colaboradores, nuevas historias y con un formato jamas visto en la Radio.Si quieres saber más, no te pierdas el Preestreno que tendra lugar la madrugada del 5 de Agosto de 00:00 a 01:00 horas.Queda abierta la seleccion de nuevos colaboradores.Si quieres formar parte de nuestro equipo o tienes alguna experiencia, historia o leyenda que quieras compartir.Ponte en contacto con nosotros a traves de nuestra web : http://www.lacuartaesfera.net/contacto/Puedes escucharnos en directo desde nuestra web o en las siguientes emisoras, además de en nuestra app que podrás descargar gratuitamente.Se une a nosotros: RADIO PONTEVEDRA VIVARadio Tui 107.4 Fm ( Sur de Galicia )Radio Ipalán 107.7 FM( La Gomera )Radio Paterna 94.0 FM ( Valencia )Radio Genil 96.2 Fm y 104.4 FM ( Granada )Radio Cadena 94.6 FM ( Canarias )Onda Aljarafe Radio 106.6 FMRadio Adaja 107.2 FM ( Avila )Radio Cúllar 107.8 FM (Granada)Radio Gredos 107.6 FM (Sierra de Gredos)Radio Las Cabezas 107.5 FM (Andalucia)Onda Calamonte 88.4 FM ( Badajoz )EdenexRadio Alquima (Canarias)Ahora3J Radio (Madrid)Radio Neria 107.8 FM ( Galicia )Radio Roncudo 106.1 FM ( Galicia )Radio Universal (Madrid)World Press Radio (Madrid)PrimeraFM (Albacete) 92.8 FMOye Radio FMRadio Timba Usa - ( New York)Radio Pontevedra Viva ( Galicia )ATRÉVETE A VIVIR EL MISTERIOATRÉVETE A SUBIR EN ¡LA CUARTA ESFERA!

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  • 4x11 - LA CUARTA ESFERA ¨LA LEY DEL UNIVERSO¨ El Nushu - Doppelganger - Las Leyes del Universo

    · 01:59:43 · L4E - LA CUARTA ESFERA (PROGRAMA)

    Dirige y Presenta : Eduardo PereiraLos doppelganger, conocidos también como gemelos malvados, son considerados como duplicados paranormales de algunas personas, que pueden manifestarse junto al sujeto original o lejos de él.Hablareis de ellos en una nueva sección que esta noche nos presentara Gema LópezNuestro Universo se rige por una serie de leyes que debemos conocer para poder aplicarlas en todos los ámbitos de nuestra vida. Que no conozcamos estas leyes no significa que estemos exentas de ellasEn su sección CONSCIENCIA 3.0, Elisa Sarompas nos explicara en que consisten estas leyes.En la antigua China, además del idioma estándar existían formas de comunicación exclusivas para los hombres. Vetadas totalmente a éstas, las mujeres inventaron el Nüshu, un lenguaje que está al borde la extinción.Ana Corcuera, nos llevara a través de su nueva sección REALIDAD INVERSA al origen de este arte, tan desconocido.Atrévete a vivir el Misterio…¡Atrévete a subir a LA CUARTA ESFERA!Puedes contactar con nosotros en:Redaccionla4esfera@gmail.comEscúchanos en :Radio Tui 107.4 Fm ( Sur de Galicia )Radio Ipalán 107.7 FM( La Gomera )Radio Paterna 94.0 FM ( Valencia )Radio Genil 96.2 Fm y 104.4 FM ( Granada )Radio Cadena 94.6 FM ( Canarias )Onda Aljarafe Radio 106.6 FMRadio Adaja 107.2 FM ( Avila )Radio Cúllar 107.8 FM (Granada)Radio Gredos 107.6 FM (Sierra de Gredos)Radio Las Cabezas 107.5 FM (Andalucia)Onda Calamonte 88.4 FM ( Badajoz )EdenexRadio Alquima (Canarias)Ahora3J Radio (Madrid)Radio Neria 107.8 FM ( Galicia )Radio Roncudo 106.1 FM ( Galicia )Radio Universal (Madrid)World Press Radio (Madrid)PrimeraFM (Albacete) 92.8 FMOye Radio FMRadio Timba Usa - ( New York)Radio Pontevedra Viva ( Galicia )Radio Onda Poligono 107.3 FM (Toledo)Cdena Melancolia 92.2 FM (Valencia)ATRÉVETE A VIVIR EL MISTERIOATRÉVETE A SUBIR EN ¡LA CUARTA ESFERA!

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  • 4X07 - LA CUARTA ESFERA - ¨AMOR¨ El amor - Javier Akerman - Testimonio Mexico

    · 02:03:27 · L4E - LA CUARTA ESFERA (PROGRAMA)

    Dirige y Presenta : Eduardo PereiraEn esta ocasión queremos hablar del sentimiento más importante y buscar respuestas a nuestra actitud ante el.Ademas contamos con un invitado muy especial Javier Akerman.aturópata colegiado en la Organización Colegial Naturopática FENACO, licenciado en psicología y teología. He escrito ocho libros cuyos beneficios económicos he donado para obras benéfico-sociales. Recibió la ordenación como Sacerdote (Patriarcado de Serbia) y en la actualidad es Presbítero de la Comunión Anglicana. ¿Te atreves?Puedes contactar con nosotros en:Redaccionla4esfera@gmail.comEscuchanos en :Radio Tui 107.4 Fm ( Sur de Galicia )Radio Ipalán 107.7 FM( La Gomera )Radio Paterna 94.0 FM ( Valencia )Radio Genil 96.2 Fm y 104.4 FM ( Granada )Radio Cadena 94.6 FM ( Canarias )Onda Aljarafe Radio 106.6 FMRadio Adaja 107.2 FM ( Avila )Radio Cúllar 107.8 FM (Granada)Radio Gredos 107.6 FM (Sierra de Gredos)Radio Las Cabezas 107.5 FM (Andalucia)Onda Calamonte 88.4 FM ( Badajoz )EdenexRadio Alquima (Canarias)Ahora3J Radio (Madrid)Radio Neria 107.8 FM ( Galicia )Radio Roncudo 106.1 FM ( Galicia )Radio Universal (Madrid)World Press Radio (Madrid)PrimeraFM (Albacete) 92.8 FMOye Radio FMRadio Timba Usa - ( New York)Radio Pontevedra Viva ( Galicia )Radio Onda Poligono 107.3 FM (Toledo)Cdena Melancolia 92.2 FM (Valencia)ATRÉVETE A VIVIR EL MISTERIOATRÉVETE A SUBIR EN ¡LA CUARTA ESFERA!

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  • 4x05 - LA CUARTA ESFERA - REENCARNACION¨ Caso Vallecas - Aparición de extremidades en Canadá - Reencarnacion

    · 02:01:05 · L4E - LA CUARTA ESFERA (PROGRAMA)

    Dirige y Presenta : Eduardo PereiraVolvemos con energía para compartir con vosotros un nuevo vuelo en el que hablaremos de los siguientes temas.La reencarnación en la cultura occidental no es una concepción admitida, y es considerada más como una moda budista ocasional. Pero a pesar de ello, sí que representa para otros una teoría esperanzadora. El pasado viernes, se estrenó la película “Verónica” del director Paco Plaza, una historia basada en hechos reales ocurridos en los años 90 en un conocido Barrio de Madrid.La policía lo bautizó como el Expediente Vallecas.Dieciséis pies humanos han sido hallados desde el 2007 en las costas de Canadá y en el estado de Washington. La mayor parte son pies derechos. Todos ellos tienen en común zapatillas deportivas o botas de excursionista de marcas muy conocidas.¿Que hay tras este misterioso hallazgo?Esta noche buscaremos respuesta a a todas nuestras dudas.En riguroso directo, LA CUARTA ESFERA, enciende sus motores para viajar con todos vosotros en la busqueda de respuestas.¿Te atreves?Puedes contactar con nosotros en:Redaccionla4esfera@gmail.comEscuchanos en :Radio Tui 107.4 Fm ( Sur de Galicia )Radio Ipalán 107.7 FM( La Gomera )Radio Paterna 94.0 FM ( Valencia )Radio Genil 96.2 Fm y 104.4 FM ( Granada )Radio Cadena 94.6 FM ( Canarias )Onda Aljarafe Radio 106.6 FMRadio Adaja 107.2 FM ( Avila )Radio Cúllar 107.8 FM (Granada)Radio Gredos 107.6 FM (Sierra de Gredos)Radio Las Cabezas 107.5 FM (Andalucia)Onda Calamonte 88.4 FM ( Badajoz )EdenexRadio Alquima (Canarias)Ahora3J Radio (Madrid)Radio Neria 107.8 FM ( Galicia )Radio Roncudo 106.1 FM ( Galicia )Radio Universal (Madrid)World Press Radio (Madrid)PrimeraFM (Albacete) 92.8 FMOye Radio FMRadio Timba Usa - ( New York)Radio Pontevedra Viva ( Galicia )Radio Onda Poligono 107.3 FM (Toledo)Cdena Melancolia 92.2 FM (Valencia)ATRÉVETE A VIVIR EL MISTERIOATRÉVETE A SUBIR EN ¡LA CUARTA ESFERA!

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