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  • 231: Dr. Sarah Ecker: Addressing Pelvic Health in Haiti

    · 00:41:48 · Healthy Wealthy & Smart

    On today’s episode of the podcast, Sarah Ecker PT, DPT, PRPC joins me to discuss the STAND (Sustainable Therapy And New Development) Haiti Project which is a nonprofit organization working to provide continual, orthopedic care to Haitian communities most in need. Sarah is a physical therapist specializing in pelvic health and has been traveling the country as a "Travel Therapist," working in some of the United States’ most impoverished communities. Sarah is STAND's Director of Pelvic Health and is continuing to help further the mission of STAND and ensure that women in Haiti have improved access to pelvic health and education. In this episode, we discuss: - What is the STAND Haiti Project and how you can get involved -How Sarah’s pelvic health specialty led to surprising insights while volunteering in Haiti -How language and cultural barriers impact your treatment -Advice for physical therapy volunteers traveling abroad -And so much more!   While volunteering in Haiti, Sarah began to realize that her pelvic health training was in need for this female population. She states, “Are the infections prevalent and common there? Sure, but also with chronic infection comes chronic tissue changes. We were definitely seeing a lot of prolapse, general pelvic floor dysfunction, different tissue changes, and incontinence. Things that are very common ailments I've seen in patients in the States. Just no one has ever really examined these women before. There is really very little, if any, gynecologist care or care surrounding pregnancy.”   After breaking through the language and cultural barriers, Sarah discovered that many Haitian women were not being treated for common pelvic health issues. She then set out to lead a team to focus specifically on pelvic health treatment. Sarah believes, “This is a population we can do something about. Once we started having that conversation and digging a little deeper with the women we were seeing that were in child bearing ages, it was really coming to the surface that they think this is normal, and this is okay, and this is something they have to live with.”   Empowering the Haitian women by educating them on pelvic health dysfunction was important to reaffirm their experiences. Sarah discovered, “I think this was a game changer when I said, ‘We see patients like this all the time in the United States. I treat these patients all the time. These are normal symptoms that happen with different life changes and experiences as a woman going through pregnancy and childbirth.’ Just to see the look on their faces when their like, ‘Oh, this is not just me. This is not my fault that I have these problems.’”   Once cultural barriers are broken and patient-therapist trust is built, educating patients can lead to breakthroughs. She stresses, “The most powerful, impactful thing you can do is to just start the conversation. It has to start with you because you’re the clinician and you have the information regardless of whether you have trepidation around even breaching the topic in cultures that stigmatize sex or pelvic health or embarrassing issues more than we do in our native countries… it's really just educating, disseminating the information, letting people know these are common problems and it’s not their fault and most importantly you can do something about it. That's the message that translates through any culture and any population.”   For more information about Sarah: Sarah Ecker, PT, DPT, PRPC received her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from New York University in 2011 after working for several years in the science, medicine, and technology department of a publishing company in the New York City area. She fell in love with pelvic health early on in her physical therapy career and worked in the NYC area at a specialized practice during which time she received her Pelvic Rehabilitation Practitioner Certificate from the Herman and Wallace Institute. For the last few years, Sarah has been traveling the country as a "Travel Therapist," working in some of our nation's most impoverished communities in just about every setting imaginable. Last year, Sarah discovered STAND: The Haiti Project, volunteered for 2 weeks in May, and instantly fell in love with the project, the people of Haiti, and the amazing co-founders of the organization, Morgan Denny and Justin Dunaway. Sarah is committed to continuing to help further the mission of STAND, and as STAND's Director of Pelvic Health will help to ensure that women in Haiti have improved access to pelvic health and education. When Sarah is not working and traveling, she enjoys- well... traveling, cycling, anything that gets her outdoors, playing guitar, spending time with family, and home-brewing delicious craft beer.   For more information on STAND: STAND (Sustainable Therapy And New Development) believes that freedom from pain and disability is a basic human right, not a privilege. In rural Haiti, only the highest socioeconomic class can afford medical care, but most people do not have access at all. This lack of access to the most basic care leads to widespread suffering from disabling pain and injury. These unaddressed ailments engender an environment where people lack the ability to work, farm, and care for themselves and their families. The social effects of this lack of care and community support are too often poverty, famine, and even death. By providing access to rehabilitative care, STAND aims to decrease disability and reverse its social effects on the populace. As a result, Haitians will be able to work, provide for their families, contribute to their communities, and ultimately enjoy a higher quality of life.   STAND: The Haiti Project is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization working to provide continual, orthopedic care to Haitian communities most in need. To accomplish this, STAND will equip local health workers with a rigorous orthopedic curriculum. A competent team of Haitian practitioners will be able to provide relief from disabling pain and injury at STAND facilities year-round, allowing people to return to productive, happy, and fulfilling lives. You can give a man a fish, or you can teach a man to fish. We do both.   During our trips to Haiti, we work to restore people's functional mobility by providing comprehensive evaluation and treatment for a variety of conditions and injuries. Many have experienced traumatic and injurious events with no assistance or counsel from trained medical providers. Others are children born with orthopedic or neurological conditions. Each and every one of these people deserves a safe environment in which they can access quality and professional care. STAND provides manual physical therapy, wound care, patient education, orthotics, and the fabrication of prosthetics to meet the diverse needs of its patient population. Volunteer teams consisting of physical therapists, orthotists, prosthetists, general medical staff, educators, and students work to deliver these services to the highest standard. STAND also provides outreach programs to local hospitals, schools, orphanages, and assisted living facilities.   Ultimately, our clinics will be staffed year-round by STAND trained Haitian clinicians.   Sarah welcomes your questions via email (sarahecker123@gmail.com) to find more information on the winter trip with the STAND Haiti Project! Make sure to connect with Sarah on LinkedIn!   Check out the episode with Dr. Justin Dunaway and Dr. Morgan Denny about the STAND Haiti Project here!   Thanks for listening and subscribing to the podcast! Make sure to connect with me on twitter and facebook to stay updated on all of the latest! Show your support for the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes!   Have a great week and stay Healthy Wealthy and Smart!   Xo Karen   P.S. Do you want to be a stand out podcast guest? Make sure to grab the tools from the FREE eBook on the home page! Check out my latest blog post on The Do's and Don'ts of Social Media!  

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  • Mansion Ingles Podcast October 2013 - Aprende gramática y vocabulario inglés

    · 00:39:10 · Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free

    Hello once again and welcome to another Mansion Ingles podcast. This is podcast number 66 recorded for October 2013. En el nivel básico practicamos las colacaciones de los verbos, y también un poco de vocabulario general. En el nivel intermedio estudiamos el uso de los verbos GET, GO y HAVE y también una selección de preguntas sobre la gramática. In the advanced section, we practise more advanced collocations, and there's business vocabulary as usual, and a translation exercise, all to help you improve your English and take it to the next level. En los podcasts mensuales hablamos de los temas, vocabulario y ejercicios que salen en nuestro cuaderno mensual. Así podéis practicar la pronunciación y repasar el material del cuaderno. Si quieres recibir gratis el cuaderno cada mes, ver la trascripción de este podcast o leer los anteriores, ve a mansioningles.com y sigue los enlaces en la página principal. Antes de empezar, quiero dar las gracias a todos nuestros seguidores en Facebook. Ya tenemos más de 30,000 fans y seguimos creciendo cada día. Si tienes alguna pregunta, comentario o duda sobre el inglés o simplemente quieres hacer ejercicios adicionales, puedes encontrarnos en facebook.com/mansioningles Ok, let's start then with el nivel básico to make a noise - hacer un ruido - hacer se puede traducir como to make o to do, pero cuando va con el sustantivo a noise, decimos make a noise. Repite: make a noise. Shhh...don't make a noise they're sleeping. Who was making all that noise last night? También decimos take photos Repite: take photos - How many photos did you take? I took hundreds of photos. Estoy seguro que sabes que en inglés decimos drive a car or drive a bus or a taxi. Pero cuando hablamos de las motos, las bicicletas y los animales decimos ride - R-I-D-E Repite: to ride a bike, ride a horse, ride a motorbike. Can you ride a motorbike? Have you ever ridden a horse? I would love to ride an elephant. I rode a camel in Egypt. ¿Cómo se traduce 'llevar gafas'? to wear glasses Repite; wear -wear glasses. I wear glasses - I've been wearing glasses for years. He's wearing a jacket - Are you wearing jeans? Luego tenemos la expresión to run for the bus. Repite: the bus - run for - run for the bus. I ran for the bus this morning. ¿Como se dice suerte en inglés? - luck - Repite: luck - Luck es un sustantivo. ¿Cuál es el adjetivo? - lucky. Repite: Lucky. I'm lucky! Are you lucky? Are you a lucky person? I am. I think I'm very lucky. El verbo to book significa reservar. For example you can book a room in a hotel. Repite: to book - to book a room. Can I book a room, please? I'd like to book a room. También puedes book a table in a restaurant. Repite: to book a table. Can I book a table, please? I'd like to book a table for two, please. If you book a room in a hotel, you stay in the hotel. Repite: stay in the hotel. Where are you staying. Are you staying in a hotel? ¿Cómo se dice mandar un correo electrónico en inglés? - to send an email. Repite: send an email. Did you send me an email? I'll send you an email. I'll send you an email next week. Very good! - ¡Muy bien! También en el nivel básico este mes hemos practicado un poco de vocabulario. Vamos a ver si te acuerdas de las palabras.   A dress, skirt, trousers, shirt, socks are all examples of.....clothes. Repite: clothes. I like your clothes. I need new clothes. What do you cut your food with? You cut your food with a...... knife - K-N-I-F-E. Repite: Knife. knife and fork - knife, fork and spoon. Can I have a knife, please? Spring, summer, autumn and winter are the four....seasons. Repite: seasons. What's your favourite season? I like spring and autumn. I think autumn is my favourite season. En el inglés americano, autumn se dice fall - F-A-L-L because the leaves, las ojas, caen de los arboles. What do you usually drink tea and coffee and hot chocolate from? You drink tea and coffee from a ....cup. Not a glass, a cup. You drink Coca Cola from a glass, you drink beer from a glass. You drink tea and coffee from a cup. Repite: cup - a cup - a coffee cup - a tea cup. A cup of coffee. A cup of tea. Now, what is the name of the part of the house where you cook? You cook in the ....kitchen. Repite: kitchen. Ten cuidado con la diferencia entre kitchen and chicken. Chicken is pollo.  Repite: kitchen - chicken - kitchen. We cook in the kitchen. The chicken's in the kitchen. What's the name for the room where you usually have a shower, clean your teeth or wash your face? It's the bathroom. Repite: bathroom. Excuse me, where's the bathroom?   Ok good, now moving on to the intermediate section, Listen: 'Have you ever been to this restaurant?’  - ‘No, this is the first time.’ 'Have you been' is the present perfect tense. Listen: Have you been to New York? Has estado una vez en Nueva York? Repite: Have you been to New York? Have you been here before? Have you ever eaten Japanese food? Listen: We don’t have to be at the meeting. 'Have to' is similar to 'must' for obligation. The difference is that 'must' is often external obligation (it comes from outside the speaker) and 'have to' can be the obligation you feel inside. For example, your boss says "Everyone must go to the meeting", so you feel you have to. The government says "you must pay your taxes" so we all have to pay our taxes. A mother tells her son that he 'must do his homework', so the son tells his friend "I can't play with you now because I have to do my homework. My mother says I have to do my homework." Another difference of course is that 'have to' can change to the past: "I had to do my homework" and to the future "I will have to do my homework" or "I'll have to do my homework". We cannot say, X"I will must do my homework."X That's wrong! Repeat: I'll have to work on Saturday. - I had to work late yesterday. Do we have to go to the meeting? Listen to a different example from the same exercise: "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Listen again. Which verb tenses do you hear? "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Did is the past of do, so didn't remember is past simple. What about the second verb tense? I "had parked". Had + past participle is the past perfect tense. I had is often contracted to I'd. Repeat: I'd parked - I'd parked my car. I didn't remember - I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. (No recordaba dónde había aparcado el coche.) Repeat again: I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. - I didn't remember where I'd left my bag. I didn't remember what I'd said to her - I didn't remember what I'd done with my keys. Escucha otro ejemplo y, como antes, piensa cuales son los tiempos verbales: I was sitting on the train when suddenly my mobile rang. I was sitting - past continuous - my mobile rang - past simple. The sitting is the longer action. I was sitting before my mobile rang. I was sitting when my mobile rang, and I was sitting after my mobile rang. Repeat: I was sitting - I was sitting on the train - I was sitting on the train when my mobile rang. I was watching TV when I heard a noise. I was reading when you arrived. I was sleeping when you phoned. Here's one more example from the same exercise. Listen: Exercising before breakfast is the best time if you want to burn calories. Why is 'exercising' a gerund in this sentence? Why is it verb + ing? Well, it's because we often use a gerund as the subject of the sentence. Repeat: Exercising is good for you. Smoking is bad for your health. Jogging is a popular pastime. Reading is something I don't do very often. In the next exercise in this month's 'cuaderno', we looked at some expressions with the verbs get, go and have. Listen and repeat the sentences to practise pronunciation. Listen: How many e-mails do you usually get? Repeat: usually get - do you usually get - How many? How many emails? - How many e-mails do you usually get? Listen: Does she usually get drunk? Repeat: get drunk - usually - usually get drunk - Does she? - Does she usually get drunk? Listen: Did you have a shower? Repeat: have a - have a shower - Did you? - Did you have a shower? Listen: Did you go away for the summer? Repeat: the summer - for the summer - go away - go away for the summer - Did you - Did you go away for the summer? Listen: Did you go anywhere nice? Repeat: nice - anywhere - anywhere nice - Did you go? Did you go anywhere nice? Listen: What time did you get home? Repeat: get home - did you - did you get home - What time? - What time did you get home? Listen: Do you always get up early? Repeat: early - get up early (nota como se junta el sonido final de /up/ con el sonido vocal al principio de /early/ - up early. Repeat: up early - get up early - Do you always? - Do you always get up early? Listen: Did you go out on Saturday? Repeat: on Saturday - go out - go out on Saturday - Did you go out on Saturday? Listen: Where did you did you get your phone? Repeat: your phone - get your phone - Where did you? - Where did you get? Where did you get your phone? Listen: Where did you go for lunch? Repeat: lunch - for -  for lunch - go for lunch - Where did you? - Where did you go for lunch? Listen: Who did you have dinner with yesterday? Repeat: have dinner with - have dinner with yesterday - Who did you? - Who did you have dinner with yesterday? In the advanced section this month, we looked at some more collocations. The first of which was to make the best of something which means to do as well as possible with something that is not too promising. Repeat: I'll make the best of it. I don't like it, but I'll make the best of it. we can also say 'make the most of it'. Repeat: make the most of it. Make the most of a bad situation. Make the most of a bad job. Make the most of your time in the UK. (¡aprovechadlo!) Now, if you draw (someone’s) attention to something, you attract someone to notice or focus on someone or something. Repeat: draw your attention to - let me draw your attention to this wonderful painting. My attention was drawn to a small insect on the floor. If you jump for joy you are extremely happy. Repeat: I jumped for joy when I got my exam results. When she agreed to have dinner with me I jumped for joy. The children jumped for joy when we got to Disneyland. To draw out something means to make it longer than it needs to be. Repeat: to draw out a meeting. It wasn't necessary to draw out the meeting for so long. Why does he have to draw it out so much? Repeat: to draw out something. If you make allowances (for something) you take certain facts or circumstances into consideration. Repeat: to make allowances for. When we go to the UK we should make allowances for the weather. You have to make allowances for the age of the property. If you jump or are thrown in at the deep end, you start doing something new and difficult without help or preparation. Repeat: jump in at the deep end / thrown in at the deep end. I was thrown in at the deep end when I worked in a professional kitchen for the first time. You should jump in at the deep end and buy your first computer. Repeat: jump in at the deep end - I was thrown in at the deep end. stand a chance (of doing something) is another popular collocation. It means there's a possibility. You have a chance that something will happen. Repeat: stand a chance - Do you think I stand a chance? Do I stand a chance of winning? No, I don't think you stand a chance to be honest! You don't stand a chance of getting that job. Our last expression was to jump the gun which means to start before the starting signal. Guns used to be used to start a race. If you start before the gun goes 'bang' you jump the gun. Repeat: jump the gun. Don't jump the gun. Be patient! You're always jumping the gun. He apologised for jumping the gun.   In the Business English section this month we looked at some more business English vocabulary, and the first expression was to become head of something. This means to be in charge, to manage (ser el jefe). Repeat: She's head of sales. He's head of design. She became head of the company in March. Who's head of the department? Let's discuss means vamos hablar de.... Repeat: let's discuss the sales figures. Let's discuss your role in the company. Let's discuss the release date of the new product. outsourcing is subcontracting to an outside company. In Spanish, I think it's subcontratación o la externalización of a product or service. Repeat: outsourcing. Many companies are outsourcing their manufacturing. It's cheaper to outsource the work. Finally, the phrasal verb to run on means to continue without stopping or go on longer than expected. Repeat. Run on. What's the past of run? - ran. Repeat: the meeting ran on. - The meeting ran on for nearly three hours. - The story ran on for months. ¡Muy bien! - Very good! We also gave you some more sentences to translate in this month's cuaderno. First, you had to translate from English to Spanish. So,  I'll say the English sentences and you say the Spanish translation before I do. Then, repeat the English sentence after me to practise pronunciation. Are you ready? They didn’t want to stay here. - No querían quedarse aquí. Repite: They didn’t want to stay here. - stay here - to stay here - They didn’t want - They didn’t want to stay here. Unemployment is increasing / rising / going up. - El paro está subiendo. Repite: Unemployment - Unemployment is increasing - rising - Unemployment is rising - going up - Unemployment is going up. Don’t talk to me about economics. - No me hables de economía. Repite: economics - talk to me - Don't talk to me - Don’t talk to me about economics. The economy is beyond our control.  - La economía está más allá de nuestro control. Repite: the economy - beyond our control - The economy is beyond our control. How many beers do we have left? - ¿Cuántas cervezas nos quedan? Repite: left - have left - How many? How many beers? How many beers do we have left? How many beers do we have left? Good, now I'll read some Spanish sentences and you translate to English before I do. Then repeat the sentences after me to practise your pronunciation. OK? ¿Quieres decir que ésta es la última? - Do you mean this is the last one? Repeat: the last one - this is the last one. Do you mean? - Do you mean this is the last one? Habrá más vino. - There’ll be more wine. Repeat: more wine - There will - there'll - there will be - there'll be - There’ll be more wine. Corrieron a la farmacia. - They ran to the pharmacy/chemist (UK) /drugstore (US) Repeat: They ran to - They ran to the pharmacy - They ran to the chemist - They ran to the drugstore. ¿Por qué no querían quedarse? - Why didn’t they want to stay? Repeat: want to stay - Why didn't they? - Why didn’t they want to stay? Dijeron que tenían muchas cosas que hacer. - They said they had a lot of things to do. Repeat: things to do - a lot of - a lot of things to do - They said they had - They said they had a lot of things to do. - They said they had a lot of things to do. Well, I've got a lot of things to do also, so unfortunately that's the end of this podcast, but we'll be back with you next month as usual with another podcast based on our monthly newsletter, our cuaderno de inglés mensual. Remember, you can listen to all our previous podcasts at mansioningles.com and of course on iTunes. Si te gustan nuestros podcasts, puedes ayudarnos con una corta reseña en iTunes contribuyendo así a que más personas puedan conocernos y escucharnos. Gracias a todos los que ya han escrito algún comentario. Thank you to all of you who are writing reviews. Thank you very much for listening to this podcast, and for being part of the community of La Mansión del Inglés. Remember, If you want to contact us you can find us on Facebook. Just search Facebook for La Mansión del Inglés where you can ask questions, make comments and do exercises and practise your listening. Or you can send me an email to: mansionteachers@yahoo.es. You can also follow us on Twitter where we tweet useful links to improve your English, English slang vocabulary, quotations and much more. Our Twitter name is MansionTwit. Puedes ver el cuaderno mensual de este mes, y todos los cuadernos anteriores en www.cuadernodeingles.com/ Until next month then, keep practising and taking your English to the next level! Take care and bye for now!   The music in this month’s podcast is by Revolution Void, the album is The Politics of Desire and the track is called Outer Orbit.                                              Mansion Ingles Podcast October 2013 - Aprende gramática y vocabulario inglés   Hello once again and welcome to another Mansion Ingles podcast. This is podcast number 66 recorded for October 2013.   En el nivel básico practicamos las colacaciones de los verbos, y también un poco de vocabulario general. En el nivel intermedio estudiamos el uso de los verbos GET, GO y HAVE y también una selección de preguntas sobre la gramática. In the advanced section, we practise more advanced collocations, and there's business vocabulary as usual, and a translation exercise, all to help you improve your English and take it to the next level.   En los podcasts mensuales hablamos de los temas, vocabulario y ejercicios que salen en nuestro cuaderno mensual. Así podéis practicar la pronunciación y repasar el material del cuaderno. Si quieres recibir gratis el cuaderno cada mes, ver la trascripción de este podcast o leer los anteriores, ve a mansioningles.com y sigue los enlaces en la página principal.   Antes de empezar, quiero dar las gracias a todos nuestros seguidores en Facebook. Ya tenemos más de 30,000 fans y seguimos creciendo cada día. Si tienes alguna pregunta, comentario o duda sobre el inglés o simplemente quieres hacer ejercicios adicionales, puedes encontrarnos en facebook.com/mansioningles   Ok, let's start then with el nivel básico to make a noise - hacer un ruido - hacer se puede traducir como to make o to do, pero cuando va con el sustantivo a noise, decimos make a noise. Repite: make a noise. Shhh...don't make a noise they're sleeping. Who was making all that noise last night?   También decimos take photos Repite: take photos - How many photos did you take? I took hundreds of photos.   Estoy seguro que sabes que en inglés decimos drive a car or drive a bus or a taxi. Pero cuando hablamos de las motos, las bicicletas y los animales decimos ride - R-I-D-E Repite: to ride a bike, ride a horse, ride a motorbike. Can you ride a motorbike? Have you ever ridden a horse? I would love to ride an elephant. I rode a camel in Egypt.   ¿Cómo se traduce 'llevar gafas'? to wear glasses Repite; wear -wear glasses. I wear glasses - I've been wearing glasses for years. He's wearing a jacket - Are you wearing jeans? Luego tenemos la expresión to run for the bus. Repite: the bus - run for - run for the bus. I ran for the bus this morning.   ¿Como se dice suerte en inglés? - luck - Repite: luck - Luck es un sustantivo. ¿Cuál es el adjetivo? - lucky. Repite: Lucky. I'm lucky! Are you lucky? Are you a lucky person? I am. I think I'm very lucky.   El verbo to book significa reservar. For example you can book a room in a hotel. Repite: to book - to book a room. Can I book a room, please? I'd like to book a room. También puedes book a table in a restaurant. Repite: to book a table. Can I book a table, please? I'd like to book a table for two, please.   If you book a room in a hotel, you stay in the hotel. Repite: stay in the hotel. Where are you staying. Are you staying in a hotel?   ¿Cómo se dice mandar un correo electrónico en inglés? - to send an email. Repite: send an email. Did you send me an email? I'll send you an email. I'll send you an email next week.   Very good! - ¡Muy bien!   También en el nivel básico este mes hemos practicado un poco de vocabulario. Vamos a ver si te acuerdas de las palabras.     A dress, skirt, trousers, shirt, socks are all examples of.....clothes. Repite: clothes. I like your clothes. I need new clothes.   What do you cut your food with? You cut your food with a...... knife - K-N-I-F-E. Repite: Knife. knife and fork - knife, fork and spoon. Can I have a knife, please?   Spring, summer, autumn and winter are the four....seasons. Repite: seasons. What's your favourite season? I like spring and autumn. I think autumn is my favourite season. En el inglés americano, autumn se dice fall - F-A-L-L because the leaves, las ojas, caen de los arboles.   What do you usually drink tea and coffee and hot chocolate from? You drink tea and coffee from a ....cup. Not a glass, a cup. You drink Coca Cola from a glass, you drink beer from a glass. You drink tea and coffee from a cup. Repite: cup - a cup - a coffee cup - a tea cup. A cup of coffee. A cup of tea.   Now, what is the name of the part of the house where you cook? You cook in the ....kitchen. Repite: kitchen. Ten cuidado con la diferencia entre kitchen and chicken. Chicken is pollo.  Repite: kitchen - chicken - kitchen. We cook in the kitchen. The chicken's in the kitchen.   What's the name for the room where you usually have a shower, clean your teeth or wash your face? It's the bathroom. Repite: bathroom. Excuse me, where's the bathroom?     Ok good, now moving on to the intermediate section,   Listen: 'Have you ever been to this restaurant?’  - ‘No, this is the first time.’   'Have you been' is the present perfect tense. Listen: Have you been to New York? Has estado una vez en Nueva York? Repite: Have you been to New York? Have you been here before? Have you ever eaten Japanese food?   Listen: We don’t have to be at the meeting. 'Have to' is similar to 'must' for obligation. The difference is that 'must' is often external obligation (it comes from outside the speaker) and 'have to' can be the obligation you feel inside. For example, your boss says "Everyone must go to the meeting", so you feel you have to. The government says "you must pay your taxes" so we all have to pay our taxes. A mother tells her son that he 'must do his homework', so the son tells his friend "I can't play with you now because I have to do my homework. My mother says I have to do my homework."   Another difference of course is that 'have to' can change to the past: "I had to do my homework" and to the future "I will have to do my homework" or "I'll have to do my homework". We cannot say, X"I will must do my homework."X That's wrong!   Repeat: I'll have to work on Saturday. - I had to work late yesterday. Do we have to go to the meeting?   Listen to a different example from the same exercise: "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Listen again. Which verb tenses do you hear? "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Did is the past of do, so didn't remember is past simple. What about the second verb tense? I "had parked". Had + past participle is the past perfect tense. I had is often contracted to I'd. Repeat: I'd parked - I'd parked my car. I didn't remember - I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. (No recordaba dónde había aparcado el coche.) Repeat again: I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. - I didn't remember where I'd left my bag. I didn't remember what I'd said to her - I didn't remember what I'd done with my keys.   Escucha otro ejemplo y, como antes, piensa cuales son los tiempos verbales: I was sitting on the train when suddenly my mobile rang.   I was sitting - past continuous - my mobile rang - past simple. The sitting is the longer action. I was sitting before my mobile rang. I was sitting when my mobile rang, and I was sitting after my mobile rang. Repeat: I was sitting - I was sitting on the train - I was sitting on the train when my mobile rang. I was watching TV when I heard a noise. I was reading when you arrived. I was sleeping when you phoned.   Here's one more example from the same exercise. Listen: Exercising before breakfast is the best time if you want to burn calories. Why is 'exercising' a gerund in this sentence? Why is it verb + ing? Well, it's because we often use a gerund as the subject of the sentence. Repeat: Exercising is good for you. Smoking is bad for your health. Jogging is a popular pastime. Reading is something I don't do very often.   In the next exercise in this month's 'cuaderno', we looked at some expressions with the verbs get, go and have. Listen and repeat the sentences to practise pronunciation. Listen:                                                                 How many e-mails do you usually get? Repeat: usually get - do you usually get - How many? How many emails? - How many e-mails do you usually get?   Listen: Does she usually get drunk? Repeat: get drunk - usually - usually get drunk - Does she? - Does she usually get drunk?   Listen: Did you have a shower? Repeat: have a - have a shower - Did you? - Did you have a shower?   Listen: Did you go away for the summer? Repeat: the summer - for the summer - go away - go away for the summer - Did you - Did you go away for the summer?   Listen: Did you go anywhere nice? Repeat: nice - anywhere - anywhere nice - Did you go? Did you go anywhere nice?   Listen: What time did you get home? Repeat: get home - did you - did you get home - What time? - What time did you get home?   Listen: Do you always get up early? Repeat: early - get up early (nota como se junta el sonido final de /up/ con el sonido vocal al principio de /early/ - up early. Repeat: up early - get up early - Do you always? - Do you always get up early?   Listen: Did you go out on Saturday? Repeat: on Saturday - go out - go out on Saturday - Did you go out on Saturday?   Listen: Where did you did you get your phone? Repeat: your phone - get your phone - Where did you? - Where did you get? Where did you get your phone?   Listen: Where did you go for lunch? Repeat: lunch - for -  for lunch - go for lunch - Where did you? - Where did you go for lunch?   Listen: Who did you have dinner with yesterday? Repeat: have dinner with - have dinner with yesterday - Who did you? - Who did you have dinner with yesterday?   Siempre me ha gustado la idea de aprender inglés con videos. Por eso te recomendamos ABA English. Los videos de ABA English son muy profesionales y están muy bien hechos.    Además de las 144 clases gratuitas de gramática en vídeo, también tienes la posibilidad de probar la primera unidad de tu nivel (hay 6 niveles distintos) y realizar todas las secciones de esta unidad para probar su metodología única de aprendizaje.    Tú aprendes inglés viendo películas cortas con subtítulos, que ya es un método muy eficaz para aprender inglés,  pero también actúas en estas películas! Es muy divertido! En la misma unidad realizas ejercicios de speaking y role play actuando en el diálogo del cortometraje que has visto!   Los cortometrajes, con situaciones de la vida real, son la base de cada unidad del curso de inglés. Llevan incorporada la tecnología de reconocimiento de voz propia.  Echa un vistazo a los videos de ABA English.com. Puedes empezar los cursos gratis sin coste alguno y además con apoyo en español. Al empezar, tienes que facilitar una dirección de email y contestar algunas preguntas básicas, pero no es necesario que realices ningún pago. Pienso que si una empresa ofrece un producto gratis para probarlo es porque es bueno y la empresa cree en sus productos.   ¡Regístrate hoy y aprende inglés gratis con video, en casa y a tu ritmo. ABA English.com! Pruébalo no tienes nada de perder. In the advanced section this month, we looked at some more collocations. The first of which was to make the best of something which means to do as well as possible with something that is not too promising. Repeat: I'll make the best of it. I don't like it, but I'll make the best of it. we can also say 'make the most of it'. Repeat: make the most of it. Make the most of a bad situation. Make the most of a bad job. Make the most of your time in the UK. (¡aprovechadlo!)   Now, if you draw (someone’s) attention to something, you attract someone to notice or focus on someone or something. Repeat: draw your attention to - let me draw your attention to this wonderful painting. My attention was drawn to a small insect on the floor.   If you jump for joy you are extremely happy. Repeat: I jumped for joy when I got my exam results. When she agreed to have dinner with me I jumped for joy. The children jumped for joy when we got to Disneyland.   To draw out something means to make it longer than it needs to be. Repeat: to draw out a meeting. It wasn't necessary to draw out the meeting for so long. Why does he have to draw it out so much? Repeat: to draw out something.   If you make allowances (for something) you take certain facts or circumstances into consideration. Repeat: to make allowances for. When we go to the UK we should make allowances for the weather. You have to make allowances for the age of the property.   If you jump or are thrown in at the deep end, you start doing something new and difficult without help or preparation. Repeat: jump in at the deep end / thrown in at the deep end. I was thrown in at the deep end when I worked in a professional kitchen for the first time. You should jump in at the deep end and buy your first computer. Repeat: jump in at the deep end - I was thrown in at the deep end.   stand a chance (of doing something) is another popular collocation. It means there's a possibility. You have a chance that something will happen. Repeat: stand a chance - Do you think I stand a chance? Do I stand a chance of winning? No, I don't think you stand a chance to be honest! You don't stand a chance of getting that job.   Our last expression was to jump the gun which means to start before the starting signal. Guns used to be used to start a race. If you start before the gun goes 'bang' you jump the gun. Repeat: jump the gun. Don't jump the gun. Be patient! You're always jumping the gun. He apologised for jumping the gun.     In the Business English section this month we looked at some more business English vocabulary, and the first expression was to become head of something. This means to be in charge, to manage (ser el jefe). Repeat: She's head of sales. He's head of design. She became head of the company in March. Who's head of the department?   Let's discuss means vamos hablar de.... Repeat: let's discuss the sales figures. Let's discuss your role in the company. Let's discuss the release date of the new product.   outsourcing is subcontracting to an outside company. In Spanish, I think it's subcontratación o la externalización of a product or service. Repeat: outsourcing. Many companies are outsourcing their manufacturing. It's cheaper to outsource the work.   Finally, the phrasal verb to run on means to continue without stopping or go on longer than expected. Repeat. Run on. What's the past of run? - ran. Repeat: the meeting ran on. - The meeting ran on for nearly three hours. - The story ran on for months.   ¡Muy bien! - Very good!   We also gave you some more sentences to translate in this month's cuaderno. First, you had to translate from English to Spanish. So,  I'll say the English sentences and you say the Spanish translation before I do. Then, repeat the English sentence after me to practise pronunciation. Are you ready?   They didn’t want to stay here. - No querían quedarse aquí. Repite: They didn’t want to stay here. - stay here - to stay here - They didn’t want - They didn’t want to stay here.   Unemployment is increasing / rising / going up. - El paro está subiendo. Repite: Unemployment - Unemployment is increasing - rising - Unemployment is rising - going up - Unemployment is going up.   Don’t talk to me about economics. - No me hables de economía. Repite: economics - talk to me - Don't talk to me - Don’t talk to me about economics.   The economy is beyond our control.  - La economía está más allá de nuestro control. Repite: the economy - beyond our control - The economy is beyond our control.   How many beers do we have left? - ¿Cuántas cervezas nos quedan? Repite: left - have left - How many? How many beers? How many beers do we have left? How many beers do we have left?   Good, now I'll read some Spanish sentences and you translate to English before I do. Then repeat the sentences after me to practise your pronunciation. OK? ¿Quieres decir que ésta es la última? - Do you mean this is the last one? Repeat: the last one - this is the last one. Do you mean? - Do you mean this is the last one?   Habrá más vino. - There’ll be more wine. Repeat: more wine - There will - there'll - there will be - there'll be - There’ll be more wine.   Corrieron a la farmacia. - They ran to the pharmacy/chemist (UK) /drugstore (US) Repeat: They ran to - They ran to the pharmacy - They ran to the chemist - They ran to the drugstore.   ¿Por qué no querían quedarse? - Why didn’t they want to stay? Repeat: want to stay - Why didn't they? - Why didn’t they want to stay?   Dijeron que tenían muchas cosas que hacer. - They said they had a lot of things to do. Repeat: things to do - a lot of - a lot of things to do - They said they had - They said they had a lot of things to do. - They said they had a lot of things to do.   Well, I've got a lot of things to do also, so unfortunately that's the end of this podcast, but we'll be back with you next month as usual with another podcast based on our monthly newsletter, our cuaderno de inglés mensual. Remember, you can listen to all our previous podcasts at mansioningles.com and of course on iTunes.   Si te gustan nuestros podcasts, puedes ayudarnos con una corta reseña en iTunes contribuyendo así a que más personas puedan conocernos y escucharnos. Gracias a todos los que ya han escrito algún comentario. Thank you to all of you who are writing reviews.   Thank you very much for listening to this podcast, and for being part of the community of La Mansión del Inglés.   Remember, If you want to contact us you can find us on Facebook. Just search Facebook for La Mansión del Inglés where you can ask questions, make comments and do exercises and practise your listening. Or you can send me an email to: mansionteachers@yahoo.es. You can also follow us on Twitter where we tweet useful links to improve your English, English slang vocabulary, quotations and much more. Our Twitter name is MansionTwit.   Puedes ver el cuaderno mensual de este mes, y todos los cuadernos anteriores en www.cuadernodeingles.com/   Until next month then, keep practising and taking your English to the next level! Take care and bye for now!   The music in this month’s podcast is by Revolution Void, the album is The Politics of Desire and the track is called Outer Orbit.                                            

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  • Amy Smith: Build Your Confidence & Honor Your Own Self-Worth

    · 00:40:53 · The Bold Life Movement with Kimberly Rich

    Amy smith is a highly experienced life coach dripping with authenticity and style. At The Joy Junkie, she endeavors to help her clients gain self-confidence, stand up for themselves and live a more joyful life. “The nucleus of everything that I do is helping people stand up for themselves without being assholes.” It’s two-fold really: it’s the internal component of believing in your own self-worth, believing you’re valuable enough to speak up for your thoughts, opinions, stances and beliefs, and the external component of what that looks like. How does it sound to establish a boundary? Without a doubt, Amy has found that the most common reason that people struggle to stand up for themselves is because they are afraid of what other people are going to think. People's’ fears are shrouded in a number of topics: they’re not going to accept me, love me, they’re going to think I’m stupid, etc. “It’s all about what someone else might put a brand on you as. ‘If they think something about me, then that must be true,’ and somehow that that will equate, or negate, your own self-worth.” “What I see people do most of the time is people-please, and silence who they really are, what they really think, and what they really feel.” Amy believes there is a huge fallacy around what it means to stand up for you and stand up for your convictions. In many situations we silence ourselves, because we have convinced ourselves that speaking up is rude or aggressive. As a basic jumping off point, one of the things that you can start doing as a sort of check-and-balance in the different relationships in your life, is to always ask yourself: is my silence making me a liar? Is my silence giving me a false sense of compliance? Amy helps her clients realize: “I don’t have to be a dick. I can decline that sort of conversation with the utmost kindness and grace.” Amy has another tool, which she calls, “If this, then that,” and it’s where we take a circumstance and we create a truth from it. The idea is to take the negative stories we tell ourselves, such as, “If I don’t get this job, then I’m a failure,” and remove their charge: “If I don’t get this job, then I didn’t get the job.” She also has a quick and dirty tip for building confidence: “One of the fastest avenues to confidence is to start really doing things that you’re proud of.” Start looking at what you need to do today, or how you can conduct yourself today, that you will actually be proud. We need little wins that create a compound effect. One of the biggest shifts that Amy believes we can make to alter our relationship to confidence is unpacking our concept around self-worth. The idea is conceptual. Currently, most of us evaluate our self-worth based on accomplishment, adoration or accolades from other people. It’s not just something that we have. Amy advocates that that worth is inherent. It is something that we already have. “What if you were already worthy, you were already valuable and enough as is, and everything else in life were simply experiences?” Through her own experiences, Amy has developed a new management system: the way in which she manages self-talk and hardship. One major piece is her allies, what she likes to call her soul tribe. She knows that, when something happens in her life, she will need to tell that story to a few people in her soul tribe to process it. There’s another element: core value system. Amy teaches that your core values are elements that you need in your world in order for it to be fulfilled. “Am I honoring the things that I know bring me joy?” If you head over to Amy’s website, TheJoyJunkie.com, you’ll see a free e-workbook and audiobook called Stand Up For Yourself Without Being a Dick. It’s nine different, very actionable challenges that are designed to help you catapult your self-love and self-confidence. Amy and The Joy Junkie stand for everything that I stand for here at The Bold Life Movement, so I’m really excited to share her message with everyone. Listen, enjoy and check out The Joy Junkie!   SOME QUESTIONS I ASK: What are some of the top reasons that Amy hears people struggling to stand up for themselves? How to be more assertive if you’ve created this pattern of people-pleasing in your life? Does Amy have tools she gives her clients to help them cultivate more confidence? How is Amy implementing some of the stuff she learned through her own personal development path to get back to her baseline joy, when it seems like stuff is going wrong? What are tools that she uses? What did the process of becoming a coach look like for Amy? IN THIS EPISODE, YOU WILL LEARN: How to stand up for yourself without being a dick A better way to evaluate your own self-worth Tools for building confidence Amy’s new ways in which Amy manages self-talk and hardship Plus much more… DON’T STOP HERE… Connect with Amy Smith: The Joy Junkie | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest | YouTube Listen to The Joy Junkie Show Go get Stand Up For Yourself Without Being a Dick ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: The Bold Life Business School [Group Program] - Coming September 2016

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  • Defenses to DUI / DWI Cases: Drunk Driving, Drugs, and the Law

    · 00:55:40 · The Legal Seagull: Law | Litigation | Self-Help | Legal History

    Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs (DUI) is illegal in all 50 states. Some states refer to this as driving while impaired or driving while intoxicated (DWI). I interviewed Deputy Public Defender Omid Haghighat about the ins and outs of a DUI / DWI case, including potential defenses. Although we covered many common DUI / DWI issues (that may be applicable in your state), parts of this podcast pertain specifically to California law. Please read The Legal Seagull’s disclaimer before proceeding with this podcast.* Here is a transcript of the interview, slightly edited for reader comprehension and enjoyment: Types of DUI / DWI charges NL: Omid, welcome to the show. OH: Glad to be here. NL: What are the different types of DUIs? We all know about the 0.08% blood alcohol content level. A lot of people tend to think that’s pretty much the prime ingredient in most DUI convictions. What are the different types? OH: In any alcohol DUI charge basically you’re dealing with two charges. You’re dealing with one that says that you were driving and you had a blood alcohol level of over 0.08%. You have another charge that says you were driving and you were too impaired by either drugs, or alcohol, or a combination of both, to drive safely. It’s a little more complicated than that, but those are essentially the two types of charges. Let’s assume that we’re just talking about alcohol right now. Let’s say someone is driving, they get pulled over, they do a breath test ultimately, and they have a 0.14% blood alcohol level, according to the breath test machine. They can be charged with both driving with over a 0.08%, and being too impaired by alcohol to drive safely. If we’re talking about your blood alcohol level we’re talking about having tested it with either a breath test machine, or a blood test. So insofar as you’re using some scientific method to test your blood alcohol level, those are scientific. When it comes to being too impaired, or rather driving under the influence without the requirement of a blood alcohol level, there are a number of tests that officers use that are not testing your blood, or your breath, but in fact are testing your ability to do certain field sobriety tests, or otherwise. This is all regulated by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Some of the tests that they have designed are said to be scientifically validated. So insofar as those tests are done correctly, and are scientifically validated, many prosecutors and officers will say that those are scientific tests as well.   Getting pulled over: the initial stop NL: So we’re going to get into this whole area of the field sobriety tests, which is one of the things that most people know about, the whole “touch your nose,” “recite the alphabet backwards,” “try and walk in a straight line,” we’ll get to that. But it sounds like there might be some dispute over whether these tests are all valid, or that they successfully measure impairment. Let’s walk through the entire process. Let’s start with the time when someone is driving a car, they’ve left a bar, or their home, wherever it is that they’ve been having a good time, and they get pulled over. Now, there’s one of two ways this could happen. One is that they get pulled over the way everyone is probably used to getting pulled over, and then there’s the DUI stop. So why don’t we start with that. Take us through it. What happens at that point? OH: Well I just want to add that sometimes it’s not that they’re pulled over, but sometimes they get into a car accident. Then, when the police officers arrive and do a little investigation they start to realize that maybe one of the individuals in the car was under the influence. So that’s another way that essentially someone can have an officer initiate a DUI investigation. NL: Let’s start first with the whole DUI stop. The type that many of us in L.A. are used to, where you’re driving and all of a sudden you see a sign that there’s a sobriety checkpoint. What are your rights essentially when you see a sobriety checkpoint ahead? Is it illegal to turn your vehicle around to try to avoid it? I’m not suggesting that anyone should do that, but only to see what are the rights that are available to you as of the time that happens. OH: Well as far as I know, a DUI checkpoint isn’t like a black hole. If you come within the vicinity you aren’t required to be sucked into its oblivion. If you do turn around, however, an officer can see that, and oftentimes they do have officers in the outskirts of those checkpoints looking for people who are turning around. If the officers do see you turning around, that can raise their suspicions, and they can attempt to pursue you, and see if you commit a Vehicle Code violation, and then pull you over and initiate a DUI investigation. Otherwise, if you drive into the DUI stop—you’re there—and you have to comply with the officer’s requirements.   Suspicion of alcohol / drugs: Police officer initiates DUI / DWI investigation NL: Now once you’re either pulled over, or you come to a DUI checkpoint, or it’s an accident, there comes a point when the police officer suspects you’ve been drinking, or at least claims to have suspected that you were drinking. What types of questions are they allowed to ask at that point in the investigation? OH: Well an officer can ask you anything. This is assuming that you’ve come into a legal checkpoint, or if you’ve legally been pulled over. An officer can ask you anything. The kind of questions they’ll ask is: “Where are you coming from?” “Have you had anything to drink tonight?” OH: The “Where are you coming from” is a question meant to see if you’re coming from a bar, and that will make them suspicious. But essentially they’ll ask these questions of anyone if they’re slightly suspicious of a DUI, but they don’t really begin to trigger their DUI investigation, I think, until they see what I consider the Holy Trinity of objective symptoms of drinking. NL: What’s the Holy Trinity? OH: I call it the Holy Trinity, they’ll put this in the report: They either smelled an alcoholic beverage on your breath; They’ll notice that you had bloodshot, red, watery eyes; or That you had slurred speech in responding to any of their questions. NL: I have read, without exaggerating, about 5,000 to 10,000 police reports in my career thus far. I strongly believe that there must be some bank that they draw these from, or that they’re copy-pasted, because I cannot tell you how many times I’ve seen this described the exact same way. “I detected a strong odor of alcohol emanating from his person.” Do you have any idea how this happens, that all these police officers tend to describe this in the exact same way? OH: I have some opinions. I’ve seen this happen, and I think there are two reasons for it. You’re never going to see a police report without these three things, because no officer is going to do a DUI investigation over someone that doesn’t seem like they’ve been drinking alcohol, so you’ll never see that police report. But on the other token, officers need to justify the DUI investigation, otherwise the results of their DUI investigation can be suppressed in what is called a suppression motion. That’s a Fourth Amendment violation motion. Because they can be said to have no reasons to prolong what should have been a routine traffic stop, and initiate a DUI investigation. So it depends on how cynical you are, really. Reasonable suspicion to pull you over… Probable cause to arrest you NL: This gets us to one of the main points here. So a police officer needs probable cause, is it, or reasonable suspicion of alcoholic impairment before they resume with any type of investigation, or asking you to submit to testing? OH: If a police officer pulls you over, all he needs is some reasonable suspicion to pull you over, that you committed some Vehicle Code violation, or that you might be under the influence. Let’s just talk about that. What does it take to be pulled over? Some people get pulled over for very obvious “under the influence” reasons. They are straddling lanes, maybe they’re in between two lanes. Maybe they’re swerving within their own lane. Maybe they’re drifting into another lane. Some of them are speeding, or maybe some of them are just driving erratically. People can be stopped for other reasons. I’ve had many DUI cases where someone was stopped because they had no seatbelt, they had an expired registration, their tail light was out. I even had an individual pulled over because his trailer hitch covered a tiny portion of his license plate number. So once they get pulled over all that’s required is reasonable suspicion. If the officer approaches the vehicle, and he smells the alcoholic breath, sees red, watery eyes, and he hears slurred speech, that can be enough for him to have further reasonable suspicion that you may be under the influence, and he can initiate a DUI investigation. They have that right. Now they don’t necessarily need probable cause until they arrest you. You’re not technically arrested, according to the police, until the end of a DUI investigation. So while they do need probable cause to arrest you, and take you to the station, the entire process, including the field sobriety test, the questions that they ask you, and even the preliminary alcohol screening breath test that they give you on the field, that’s all part of them establishing whether or not they have probable cause to arrest you, and take you to the station. Exercising the Fifth Amendment right to remain silent vs. talking to the police NL: One of our past episodes of The Legal Seagull, Episode 2, You Have the Right to Remain Silent, was about Fifth Amendment rights, the right to avoid self incrimination by not speaking to the police under many circumstances. Do you have the right at the time you’re pulled over to refuse to talk to a police officer? OH: Absolutely. You obviously don’t want to be a jerk about it, because you’re not going to help your case. No one got out of a traffic stop, whether or not it’s a DUI, or just getting pulled over for a ticket, by being a jerk to the police officer, I can tell you that for sure. But you’re very much within your rights to say, “Excuse me officer, if you don’t mind, I’m going to decline to answer any of your questions.” If the officer thinks that you smell like alcohol, or that you’ve got slurred speech, then he can still initiate his investigation, despite you saying anything. You can remain silent, but that doesn’t mean that he can’t continue his DUI investigation. NL: Even if you don’t smell like alcohol though, and you were to say to the police officer when he or she asks where you’re coming from, “Officer, I’m exercising my Fifth Amendment rights not to incriminate myself.” Couldn’t the mere refusal to answer a simple question like that be the basis for an officer’s reasonable suspicion that you must have been drinking? OH: Not in court. If an officer puts in his police report that he pulled someone over because they weren’t wearing their seatbelt, it was late at night so he asked them, “Have you had any drinks?” Then the individual responded that, “You know, Officer, I’m not going to answer those questions, I don’t want to incriminate myself.” Without the other facts, the Holy Trinity, if you will; the breath, the slurred speech, the bloodshot eyes. If he was to initiate a DUI investigation, and take you back to the police station, and let’s say he takes your blood, and you have a 0.15% blood alcohol level, very likely in court that wouldn’t stand up. Because essentially he had no reason, he had no articulable facts to believe that you were under the influence of alcohol. He can’t use your Fifth Amendment right to remain silent as reason that you’re guilty. NL: The most popular question that’s asked is, “Have you been drinking tonight?” to which it seems like everyone always responds, “I had two beers with dinner, Officer.” At that point, what happens next? OH: Well, it really depends. Look, the officer has a great deal of authority in that moment. A lot of the better trained officers kind of look into your objective symptoms, just by standing right in front of you, and decide, you know what, I don’t think this person is under the influence of alcohol, and they can let you go. What we can assume for your hypothetical is that the officer is absolutely hell-bent on doing a DUI investigation on you, and whether or not he’s allowed to based on that. So if you do admit that you’ve had drinks, even absent the objective symptoms, that may be enough for him to initiate his DUI investigation. Field sobriety tests: scientifically reliable and valid? NL: Now let’s talk about these field sobriety tests, as we discussed earlier. What is the state of the legality of these types of tests, and their admissibility into court in California? I imagine that this might be similar in other states, but as you answer this I’m aware, and the audience should be aware, that you’re speaking about California law. OH: Well, they’re certainly legal. These are tools in the officer’s tool belt with which for them to decide whether or not you may be under the influence of either alcohol, or drugs, or both. It’s all for developing probable cause that you’re under the influence. They’re absolutely legal, and it really depends on who you ask whether or not they are useful. NL: Can they be refused? OH: That’s a good question. An officer will never tell you that these tests are voluntary. However, you may absolutely refuse them in California without any consequence. But just know that if you refuse those field sobriety tests, and the officer does believe that you might be under the influence, you’re pretty much asking for a trip to the police station. NL: Let’s assume, for purposes of this discussion, that in the first scenario, you agree to do these field sobriety tests. What are the different types of tests, and what is their reliability, or scientific basis if you will? Horizontal gaze nystagmus test OH: There is an entity called the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. They essentially are the ones who are behind a lot of the rules, and regulations, and a lot of the uniform field sobriety tests that happen around the nation, amongst other things. They have spent lots of money, and there has been lots of money poured into them, to scientifically validate certain studies. While there may be many field sobriety tests that people talk about, there’s actually only three scientifically valid field sobriety tests. The first one is a mouthful. It’s called the horizontal gaze nystagmus test. It’s essentially a test, without getting into too great of detail, where the officer is testing to see if you’re under the influence by looking at the behavior of your eyes as they track a stimulus; sometimes a pen light, sometimes just a pen, that the officer is holding out in front of your face. What the officer will essentially do is he’ll instruct you to stand up straight, put your arms at your side. He’ll hold the stimulus about 12 to 15 inches from the bridge of your nose, and he’ll move it from left to right. He’ll essentially be looking for nystagmus, which is a jerking motion in your eyes. There are a couple of clues that the officers actually look for. In fact, there are six clues that they look for. The science has shown that this is, actually, if done properly, one of the best field sobriety tests for predicting whether or not someone is under the influence. There are actually scientific studies which lawyers are often trying to keep out of court that say that if it’s done properly, you may even be able to assign a blood alcohol level to certain results of this Horizontal gaze nystagmus test. The problem arises, however, because a lot of officers don’t know how to do it correctly. It requires precision. It requires precision with how far the instrument is held from your face, how far to the side you hold the stimulus, and so on and so forth. One thing that is ripe for cross examination in trial is whether or not the officer conducted the test properly. The science is clear: If they do not conduct the test properly then the results are drawn into question. Walk-and-turn test OH: The next test is the walk-and-turn. The officer has no obligation to give you these tests in any order. But the walk-and-turn is probably the most commonly known field sobriety test. The walk-and-turn test, the officer instructs you to stand with your feet one in front of the other, touching heel to toe, keeping your arms at your side. Then they tell you to count nine steps, tell you to do a turn. They instruct you on how to do the turn, and then to walk nine steps back. They are also looking for a number of clues. Those clues include whether or not you actually were able to touch your heel to toe on every step, whether or not you actually kept your arms at your side. Whether or not you stumbled, or whether or not you were falling from side to side. How you performed the turn, and in general, whether or not you were able to listen to the instructions. The point of these field sobriety tests is that they are simulated, divided attention tasks. The idea is that driving is a divided attention task. You’re looking forward while you’re pressing the gas, while you’re also focusing on traffic around you, and trying to look at where you’re going . . . The idea is that mental impairment, when you’re under the influence, begins to manifest before physical impairment. These tests are divided attention tasks that measure both mental impairment, and physical impairment. In the case of the walk-and-turn, they are essentially seeing: can you follow instructions, and do as the officer told you? (mental impairment). But also, be able to maintain a straight line, and turn without falling over yourself? (physical impairment). One-leg stand test OH: The final scientifically validated test is the one-leg stand test. I think this test is really unfair . . . Depending on your physical fitness level, depending on whether or not you’ve had any injuries, this test could be very difficult to perform, even for a sober person. Essentially, one-leg stand is, you’re asked to stand with your feet together, your hands at your side, and you’re asked to lift your leg up at least six inches, and point your toe forward. Some officers will ask you to count to 10, some officers will ask you to count to 20. They instruct you if you put your foot down to just lift it back up and resume counting. Then, after that’s done, they’ll ask you to do it with your other foot. The idea is that they’re looking to see: Can you follow instructions, are you using your hands, despite the officer instructing you not to? Are you swaying from side to side? Are you able to count while holding your leg up, and pointing your toe forward, a divided attention task. There are a number of clues, and those clues have to be marked down, and noted properly, because that’s the only way this test has been scientifically validated. Those are the three scientifically validated tests. Again, there are many things that can make these tests unuseful in a court of law, or for the officer. For example, if the test is not done in the right circumstances. If it’s not done on level pavement. I had a case where the officer had my client do a field sobriety test on a hill. Of course, he didn’t write that in his police report, but when he wrote the location of where he did the test, I looked it up on Google Maps and I saw that it was a hill. I showed him the map on the stand and asked him, “Isn’t this a hill?” Needless to say, that officer was a little red in the face, because it was a hill, and that absolutely affects your ability to do these tests properly. In addition, whether or not you’ve had an injury can affect whether or not you do these tests properly, and whether or not the results are actually valid. Especially if you’ve had a head injury, like in the example of getting in a car accident. Obviously, if there’s a car accident, and there’s a suspicion of drunk driving the field sobriety tests are done, and that head injury can cause you to fail all the tests even if you are sober. If the officer does these tests correctly, and in the correct circumstances, then what the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says is that these three tests are scientifically validated to show if someone is too impaired by either a drug or alcohol. These are tools that the officer uses to form an opinion. Now if the officer can say, or an expert can say, that they are scientifically validated, that just helps the jury consider the officer’s opinion with respect to those tests. It doesn’t change whether or not they’re allowed to be heard in court. With that said, it doesn’t need to be a scientific test to inform an officer’s opinion. But if it’s not a scientific test, then defense attorneys oftentimes will use that to say, “Well, if this test isn’t scientific, why are we using it to convict a man of a crime?” The “recite the alphabet backwards” test NL: So where does this leave the other tests? What about the recite the alphabet backwards test? Any scientific validity for that? OH: Absolutely not. I think that’s one of the most unfair tests that you can have, because some people don’t even know the alphabet. No, but seriously, it’s a difficult test for a sober person to do. Try it right now. Try to recite the alphabet backwards. You’ll probably do it slowly, and the officer will probably be able to write things that make you look like you’re doing it slowly, and then say in court that you were probably under the influence of a drug or alcohol. Romberg test OH: There’s another test that’s commonly used called the Romberg test. You stand with your feet together, hands at your side. You close your eyes, and you tilt your head back, and count to 30. What the officer will tell you is that you want to estimate 30, and then tell the officer when you believe you’ve reached 30. The officer has a stopwatch right there, and he’s also finding out what 30 seconds actually is. The idea is, depending on what your jurisdiction is, or what the officer is using in his consideration, if you complete the test at plus or minus five seconds of 30 seconds. Sometimes, some officers believe 10 seconds of 30 seconds, then you’re within an acceptable range. But if you, for example, tell the officer 45 seconds have gone by, but really you think it’s 30, probably you’re under the influence of some depressant. However, if you’re on, for example, a stimulant, like if you’ve done lots of cocaine, and then you get pulled over, you’ll probably count 5 seconds, and then you’ll be like that was 30 seconds. Then the officer will just look at you funny and be like, “This guy is probably under the influence of a stimulant.” So, the test, while it’s not scientifically validated, can help inform them of the type of drug that they’re on, even if it doesn’t mean that they’re scientifically validated. Finger-to-nose test NL: What about the “touch your nose and stick your tongue out,” or whatever it is? OH: The “touch your nose” is commonly used . . . it’s another divided attention task, because you’re switching arm to arm, and attempting to touch your nose with your eyes closed, and your head tilted back. Again, if it’s not scientifically validated it doesn’t mean the officer can’t use it to form his opinion, and it’s doesn’t mean the officer can’t testify to it in trial, it’s just a matter of what weight the jury gives it at the end of its determination. Breathalyzer (preliminary alcohol screening test) OH: In California, unless you’re on DUI probation, you don’t have to do the preliminary alcohol screening device breath test at the scene of the incident, whether it’s being pulled over, or a car accident. The officer in fact has to admonish you that the test is voluntary, whereas, as I said before, they don’t admonish this for the field sobriety test. Now understanding that, if you don’t do the preliminary alcohol screening device the officer is likely going to take you to the police station, and ask you to do one of the required by law, at least in California, breath or blood tests. It’s completely up to you whether or not you want to do it. Some people make that choice, some people choose otherwise. Now, the preliminary alcohol screening device is probably the size, depending on the actual device, a little bigger than your fist, maybe a little bigger with its battery pack than that. The officer has it in his vehicle. It’s considered a field sobriety test by officers, meaning that it’s not considered a chemical test. However, the technology that it employs to determine your blood alcohol level is the same as the machine at the station, which is much bigger, much heavier, and a little more technical. The idea behind a breath test is actually interesting. Because the idea is you’re breathing into a machine, and it’s determining how much alcohol you have in your blood. Without getting too detailed into the science of it, essentially these little alveolar sacs in your lungs can emit some level of alcohol from your bloodstream. There’s a partition ratio, essentially a ratio of the amount of alcohol that’s emitted into your lungs, compared to how much alcohol . . . in your blood . . . . . . When you breathe into the machine, that tiny amount of alcohol that’s in your deep lung air gets multiplied by, sometimes the number is 2,100, and that’s how they determine how much alcohol is in your blood. That’s essentially the idea of the machines. . . . Breathalyzers for marijuana NL: Can [these breathalyzers] also detect marijuana, other drugs, or just alcohol? OH: Those devices are essentially designed to test ethyl alcohol. That’s a chemical in alcohol. What happens is when you breathe into these machines there’s a fuel cell inside of the machine, and it responds to a number of chemicals, one of which is ethyl alcohol. It creates a charge, and the strength of that charge then indicates through a complicated algorithm, what your blood alcohol level is. NL: I’ve been hearing about field tests now that are done to detect marijuana. Do you have any idea how those work? OH: Yes. Essentially, what they do is they have a bag of Funyuns, and they hold it in front of you. If you cannot resist the Funyuns then they have determined that you are under the influence of marijuana. Actually, it’s not like that at all. This is a brand new approach—certain law enforcement agencies are testing it out. There has been to date no way to test whether or not someone has marijuana in their system. In the field, they’re applying this swab . . . they swab your cheek, and they test the cheek cells, and they determine whether or not you may have marijuana in your system. Not a lot of law enforcement agencies use this, and as of now it’s nothing more than a tool for determining probable cause, whether or not you might be under the influence of marijuana. The ultimate tool is the blood test, sometimes the urine test. NL: Before today you had told me some really interesting things about the marijuana test, how it might be a little bit less than scientific in determining impairment. OH: Yes. Absolutely. The marijuana test is a very frustrating test for me as a criminal defense attorney. It essentially can’t show a lot depending on the test results, other than this is a chronic smoker who may or may not be high at the time of being tested. When your blood is tested for marijuana, it’s tested for two things . . . an active THC ingredient, and an inactive THC ingredient. [The inactive THC ingredient is] called carboxy-THC, it’s a metabolite. The metabolite is like ashes to the fire. It can show that you have smoked maybe as recently as that same day, or two or three weeks prior. It’s a number that’s measured in nanograms per milliliter. Certain law enforcement agencies will look at that in determining whether or not someone might have been under the influence of marijuana. Then there’s the active ingredient . . . most laboratories will only test the number of that active ingredient from 2 to 25 nanograms per milliliter. That active ingredient can show particularly if you have marijuana in your system, but not that you’re under the influence of marijuana. I want to make that distinction clear. Because just like alcohol, you can have alcohol in your system, but not be too impaired to drive, which is essentially the legal standard in California. What that means is there is no way to look right now, according to the scientific evidence, at the amount of active THC in your blood, and determine that you’re too high to drive essentially. What means, again, for people who are chronic smokers can be pretty bad. Let me give you some scenarios. Let’s say you’re a medical marijuana patient, which is legal in California, and you smoke marijuana every day. Let’s say you smoke on Wednesday night to go to sleep because you need it to go to sleep. You wake up the next day, you feel fine, and you drive to the store, and for some reason you’re pulled over. Maybe because you’ve had marijuana in your car, from purchasing it from the dispensary, your car smells like marijuana. The officer says: “Have you had anything to smoke,” and you say, “No.” Let’s say the officer sees some other things that he thinks might be indicative of you being under the influence of marijuana. Understand that in this hypothetical, you’re not under the influence of marijuana—the last time you smoked was the night before. He can take you to the station, he can do a blood test. Essentially what can happen for a chronic smoker is a very high result of the marijuana metabolite, the inactive ingredient, and a tiny, yet measurable active THC in your system. The reason for that is that if you’re a chronic smoker the scientific studies have shown that chronic smokers can have a tiny amount of active THC in their blood constantly, because it kind of hides in their little fat cells, and is constantly being released. You may be charged with driving under the influence, and you may have to go to trial in order to prove your innocence because you’re a chronic smoker. That’s just the state of marijuana science right now when it comes to driving under the influence. There is no per se limit in California; however, other states do have a per se limit. I know Colorado does, I know Nevada does. In fact, Nevada has one of the scariest per se limits, and I’ll explain why. Because they have a per se limit for the active THC, but they also have a per se limit for the inactive THC. What that means is if you are a chronic smoker, and you smoke on Wednesday night, and then on Thursday you don’t smoke, and then on Friday you drive from California, where you were legally allowed to smoke, to Las Vegas. If you are pulled over and the officer suspects that you may be under the influence of marijuana, even though you are not, he can make you do a blood test, and you can be charged and convicted with a marijuana DUI because of the inactive THC that has been in your system from the marijuana you had been smoking even up to weeks prior. It’s a scary thought. Prescription medications NL: What is the deal with people who are chronic pain patients, either cancer, or any other disease, and they have a prescription for narcotic pain medications like oxycodone, Norco, Dilaudid—very powerful narcotics that in some ways impair your ability to drive . . . ? OH: Well, California is clear, and I imagine this would be the case in the rest of the nation. Just because you have a prescription to take a certain medication . . . doesn’t mean you have an absolute defense to driving under the influence of that drug. In fact, many of these medications are very clear: “Do not operate heavy machinery or drive.” Chemical sample at the police station: blood vs. saliva test NL: Let’s assume that all this has happened already. You’ve been pulled over, talked with the police officer, done the field sobriety test, the breath test, and the officer has decided not to let you go, he has decided it’s time to take you to the police station. What happens when you get there? What else can they do to you there, and what are your rights in the police station? OH: If the officer determines there is probable cause to believe you are under the influence of a drug or alcohol, he can take you to the police station . . . You need to provide a chemical sample. That could be in the form of a breath test, or if you like, you can do a blood test. If they suspect you of drugs and alcohol, or just drugs, they very likely will require you to do a blood test. Blood test NL: Is there a difference one way or the other over the accuracy, or how quickly it will show up in your blood, versus your saliva or urine? OH: No. The idea behind the breath test is it is measuring the current blood alcohol content. One of the main real advantages of taking a blood test is that you can retest that blood at a later date if the law enforcement agency saves a sample of that blood. In California, they are required to do so at your request, and oftentimes many police stations will do so automatically. This matters, because . . . [t]hey are taking your blood, and oftentimes what they’ll do is they’ll put a preservative in your blood to make sure that the blood alcohol level doesn’t diminish. They’ll put the preservative in your blood, and then they’ll test it at a laboratory. In fact, in Orange County, a lot of DUI convictions had to be overturned because they found that the laboratory that was testing blood for alcohol was doing so incorrectly, and with incorrect measurements by mistake. You’re really trusting this law enforcement laboratory to tell you if you’re under the influence of alcohol. So, it’s great to be able to have an independent laboratory test your blood, and test if there’s any irregularities that may show that this blood alcohol level is, for example, an anomaly. The flip side is if you take the blood test, you’re spending the night at the station, because they can’t determine whether or not you are too impaired, or your blood alcohol level in general right away, so you have to stay the night, if that’s okay with you. I’m sure it’s not. Breath test OH: The breath test is a really simple test. You essentially blow into it twice. The reason you have to blow into it twice—I might have explained it before—is they need to ensure that the result is not an anomaly. Actually, in California, there are special regulations as to how the breath test needs to be administered, and how the machine needs to be maintained and calibrated. The reason it’s required for them to give you two tests is: Let’s say there’s some spit, or maybe you have a cavity that has been holding some of that alcohol you drank an hour before. The reason there can be an anomaly in a chemical breath test is because you may have some alcohol in your spit. You may in fact have some reflux disorder that causes alcohol from your stomach to come up through your throat, and then enter the machine, and essentially give too high of a reading, a falsely high reading. You have to blow twice, and you have to wait two minutes in between each blow. In California, if the results are more than 0.02 points away from each other, then that test is said to be essentially invalid. Refusing a chemical test NL: Do you have the right to refuse a chemical test, or a blood test, at least in California? OH: This is the point where you start to have no choice. Before you didn’t have to answer the officer’s questions, you didn’t have to do the field sobriety test, and you didn’t even have to do the preliminary alcohol screening device. But once you’re at the station, the officer asks you, “Do you want to give a blood or breath test?” In California, and I’m sure many other jurisdictions, if you refuse to give that test that results in an automatic one-year suspension of your driver’s license. So, you essentially don’t have a choice. In fact, in California if you’re charged with a DUI, and they found that you did willfully . . . you can have a mandatory jail enhancement as well. In order to refuse—it’s actually quite interesting. They have to fully advise you of your rights before you can be said to have refused. They have to tell you that you have choice between a blood or a breath test. Unless they suspect drugs, then you only have a choice of a blood test. They have to tell you that you don’t have the right to an attorney at this point, and that if you don’t submit to the test if can be used against you in court. They have to tell you that not submitting yourself to the test can result in a mandatory fine, or imprisonment. They have to tell you that not submitting to a test can result in a one-year license suspension. This is just in California. But the idea of fully advising someone of their rights to refuse is, I think, nationwide. If you are not advised of all these things, then you can’t be said to have willfully refused . . . Potential defenses to a DUI charge NL: Let’s assume you’ve had your breathalyzer test, spoken with the police officer, maybe even had some field sobriety tests, and the police officer has determined there is a good reason to bring you down to the police station to do further testing. What is the evidence that can be used against you in court? OH: In court if you truly believe that either you’re not too impaired to drive, or that you don’t think the state of the evidence should be able to convict you of such a crime, and you decide to take this to trial, essentially you have two hurdles in California to overcome. Like I said before, there are two charges for every DUI that includes a blood alcohol level. There is: Were you driving under the influence? Or Were you driving with a blood alcohol level of 0.08% or higher? Defining the term “under the influence” OH: For the purposes of the jury, “under the influence” doesn’t mean “I could feel the effects of the alcohol,” it actually has a very specific legal definition. In California, the definition [according to California Criminal Jury Instruction 2110] is that: “A person is under the influence if, as a result of drinking an alcoholic beverage . . . and/or taking a drug . . . his or her mental or physical abilities are so impaired that he or she is no longer able to drive a vehicle with the caution a sober person, using ordinary care, under similar circumstances.” Essentially, that’s the standard that the jury has to decide whether or not you’re too impaired. At court, all the evidence we talked about today is going to be used against you. Every single piece from the reason you were pulled over, to the smell of an alcoholic beverage on your breath, slurred speech, and the bloodshot eyes, to the results of the field sobriety test, the preliminary alcohol screening test, and finally, the results of your breath and/or blood test. Per se limit: 0.08% BAC It’s important to note, and this has happened to me and my colleagues often. You only need to be convicted at a jury trial of one of those to be convicted of a DUI. What that means is: You can give a blood test, and it could come back with your blood alcohol level being 0.15%, but for some reason your tolerance is such that you’re able to be 0.15% and not be a danger to society, or to the community because you’re able to drive so safely, and your brain is able to operate so well. If that’s the case, you can still be convicted of the DUI because your blood alcohol level was over 0.08%, even though the jury finds that you’re innocent of driving under the influence. It’s wild, and it does happen. Jurors do come back with that verdict, and unfortunately you still get convicted. The reason for that is because I think that the scientific evidence is important. The blood alcohol level is important because a lot of what is being used to prove that you’re driving under the influence, as opposed to driving with 0.08% or over, is subjective to the officer doing the tests. While the officers will never admit on the stand that they are being subjective, they really are. Every officer performs these tests differently; every officer has a different idea of what these tests are showing. It can be quite abstract for a juror to wrap their head around when they’re listening to an officer spout off all the different clues that were exhibited in the horizontal gaze nystagmus test. Throughout many of my trials the moment the word horizontal gaze nystagmus test is uttered at least one person starts to fall asleep, if not more. So it’s not only difficult for them to grasp, it’s also very boring stuff, so that’s why a lot of jurors will hang their hats on the 0.08% or higher. Challenging DUI / DWI test results at trial With that said, at every stage there is a way to discuss potential weaknesses of these objective symptoms, or the field sobriety test. But specifically, there’s also a way to show that the machines themselves are not operating correctly. Were machines properly calibrated and used? As for the preliminary alcohol screening device, and the same for the breath test at the station, there’s a number of ways that defense attorneys bring up in court to challenge these devices. One of them is that they’re simply not accurate. The idea is let’s say you are a 0.05% blood alcohol level, that is your actual blood alcohol level, and you blow into a machine that is not properly calibrated, it can give an incorrect result. It may report 0.09% blood alcohol level. In California, and I’m sure many other places, under Title 17 there’s a requirement that they calibrate these machines either, I think, every ten days, or 150 uses, something along those lines. So they are required to calibrate them quite often or rather accuracy-check them quite often. If they’ve gone for more than ten days at a time, or 150 uses without being accuracy-checked or calibrated, that could be something attorneys use in court to discuss why the results may be unreliable. In general, there’s a jury instruction that if the machine, its maintenance, or its operation are not compliant with the California Title 17 requirements then you can question the results of that machine. Non-compliant testing procedures OH: . . . [A]nother way these tests can be challenged is if there’s no 15-minute observation period from the time the officer sees you to the time you give a breath sample, then they are not being compliant with Title 17 . . . as we discussed before, you may have acid reflux, you may have just vomited, you may have had an alcoholic drink in the middle, in the interim 15 minutes. If that’s the case, then you can’t be sure that mouth alcohol isn’t providing a false reading in that breath test. That’s another requirement that California has, and I think other places follow suit. In addition to that, each test has to be done two minutes apart. There needs to be a certain volume of air that is blown into the machine. There are many, many things that criminal defense lawyers will try to look for to see if the tests are being done properly, and that’s just the tip of the iceberg for the breath test. The rising alcohol defense OH: Another defense that a lot of attorneys will use in court, and it’s quite interesting, is the rising blood alcohol defense. [Let’s say] you go to a bar, you haven’t had anything to drink. Let’s say you just down two shots of whiskey. Then your friend is like, “We’ve got to go to this next bar across town.” You’re thinking, “Well, I just had two drinks, but I feel absolutely fine.” Then you get in the car, and you get pulled over. The officer smells alcohol, looks at your eyes, maybe hears something in your speech, and decides to begin a DUI investigation. You give a preliminary breath test, and the results are something like, let’s say 0.08%. Then, you go to the station, and you give another breath tests, and the results are 0.10%. . . . [T]he criminal defense attorney will likely hire an expert . . . in how your body metabolizes alcohol. What an expert can oftentimes effectively argue is that from the moment you took those drinks, to the time of driving, your body was metabolizing the alcohol, and so your blood alcohol content was rising. When you got pulled over, you may have been somewhere at 0.07% or 0.06%. But the from the time you began the DUI investigation, which could sometimes take 20 to 30 minutes, to when you gave the preliminary alcohol screening device, you were no longer driving, but your body was metabolizing that alcohol. When you gave the breath test at the field, it became 0.08%. Then your body was still metabolizing that alcohol on the way to the station, which is shown by the fact that when you go to the station—without having any drinks in the meantime—your blood alcohol level is now 0.10%. There is a blood alcohol curve that even the People and the prosecutor’s experts will draw, that shows the way that you somehow metabolized that alcohol. Sometimes criminal defense attorneys can secure acquittals by drawing doubt as to whether or not you ever had a 0.08% blood alcohol level while driving, or if that level was only achieved while you were outside the car being investigated. Now, of course, a lot of people don’t like this defense because the person is still drinking and driving. But the law is clear: Were you driving with a blood alcohol level of 0.08% or higher? Despite all the challenges attorneys make, despite all the defenses they have, and how charming (not myself obviously) but other criminal defense attorneys can be in the courtroom, if the evidence is there—the jury will convict. Jurors for the most part, after being properly selected, really are able to sift through all of that and just see if there’s enough evidence. That’s what it’s all about. If someone is acquitted at a DUI trial, it’s generally because the state of the evidence is just not good enough to convict a man of a crime. That’s really what we’re dealing with. There needs to be proof beyond a reasonable doubt. I think that’s one of the great things about America is that we require this great amount of proof before we take away someone’s liberty. . . . NL: Omid, thank you very much for taking the time to come on the show. It was great having you. A lot of very valuable information. OH: Absolutely. I was happy to be here. I love your show, I’m an avid listener. –END OF INTERVIEW— Did you enjoy this podcast transcript?  Don’t forget to subscribe to The Legal Seagull Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, or Soundcloud! *  This is not legal advice, is not a substitute for the services of an attorney, and may or may not apply to the laws and procedures in your jurisdiction. We do not recommend that you represent yourself for a DUI / DWI or any other criminal charge.

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  • STAND UP COMEDY HOW TO START [EP.127]

    · 00:42:55 · School Of Laughs

      Today we celebrate our 100,000th download with a special episode stand up comedy how to start from scratch. This is a great episode if you have yet to get started because you just feel it's all overwhelming. I bring in my co-host Gavin Miller to walk through a few “first steps” I recommend to new comedians. Gavin, by the way, just saw his baby girl take her first steps this past week. And, before Gavin took his paternity leave, he had started to dip his toes in the stand-up world. All that changed with the baby. But now he has a little time to start back into it. Starting comedy form scratch isn’t easy. But it doesn’t have to be difficult. Waiting for the right time to begin is a mistake. Because the right time was yesterday. The first step is grabbing a notebook and start accumulating the “seeds” of stories and jokes you will one day tell onstage. The major points of the STAND UP COMEDY HOW TO START episode are: Realistic expectations as a beginning comedian Deciding what to give up in order to pursue comedy How long it may take to get traction doing stand-up Deciding when to “buy” and “sell” your comedy career The types of comedians you want to hang out with offstage Specifically, we talk about: Taking an inventory of your life experiences Finding a writing place where you can be isolated and focussed Taking stock of the stories you like to tell at parties The importance of putting yourself in the stories and jokes you tell Gavin’s “leg up” experience from his childhood Using other people in your stories to say the controversial things How a lot of stories can help you avoid writer’s block Gavin’s most recent embarrassing moment Asking friends what stories you tell that hey think are funny Making notes when you make people laugh in conversation Changing the stories and altering facts to make it comedy Avoiding judging your writing AS YOU WRITE Silencing the critical voice in your head The benefits of writing first thing the morning, while driving and before bed Deciding what to give up in order to pursue comedy Why Gavin was folding another man’s underwear The pro’s and con’s of the open mic scene How many shows it takes to “get your feet wet” in stand-up Why now is the best time ever for you to start stand-up comedy If you would like to get more specific information on getting started stand-up comedy, I recommend the following blogs and podcast episodes: Overcoming Stage Fright New Comedian Questions Top Mistakes New Comedians Make How to Write a Joke If you would like to take an online stand-up comedy writing course to help you get things started in the right direction, please click HERE This episode is brought to you by PATREON SPONSOR JOHN CHARLTON, and by Audible. Visit www.audibletrial.com/schooloflaughs for a free audio download and 3o day trial! OUR SPONSORS   "Club 52" is a 52 week, email based stand-up program. It will include a weekly challenge designed to help you become a better comedian. This year long program will feature an email every Friday from me. I will ask you to take a serious look at some of your business practices, writing processes, performance techniques, branding, marketing and a whole lot more. The program starts the week you join and continues for 52 weeks as long as you are still supporting the podcast through Patreon at the $7 a month level. Questions? Email me (Rik) at SchoolOfLaughs@gmail.com. Or call 1-888-895-8549. Or, if you are ready, head on over to www.Patreon.com/SchoolOfLaughs to get started.  

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  • MdS 97 - Minuto de Stand Up Comedy

    · 01:52:55 · Minuto de Silêncio

    Faça sua inscrição porque o Minuto de Silêncio Podcast vai te dar um curso de stand up comedy inteiramente de graça!Se junto aos alunos Cacofonias e Roberto para um bate-papo com os professores da comédia Ulisses Mattos, especialista em stand up underground; Ed Gama, showman e imitador oficial do Faustão; Daniel Curi, que jura que não faz stand up só por causa da Parafernalha; Ju Querido, representante do humor feminino e nosso reitor, o homem mais velho do stand up nacional, Paulo Carvalho!Neste episódio vocês vão:1 – Descobrir o que é de fato um stand up;2 – Aprender o que vale e o que não vale num show de stand up;3 – Saber como começar sua carreira como stand up comedy;4 – Conhecer a melhor forma de abrir um show;5 – Ouvir recomendações de comediantes de stand up;6 – Descobrir se mulheres sofrem preconceito no mundo stand up;7 – Saber que tipo de piadas não fazer num show;8 – E ouvir, claro, um pouco sobre os limites do humor;9 – Além de aprender a fechar um show;10 – Ouvir a leitura de comentários do episódio anterior.

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  • 181: STAND: The Haiti Project w/ Drs. Justin Dunaway & Morgan Denny

    · 00:51:35 · Healthy Wealthy & Smart

    In this episode I speak to physical therapists Dr. Justin Dunaway and Dr. Morgan Denny co-founders of STAND: Haiti.  STAND was founded in late 2014 in order to create a growing system of rehabilitative medicine in northwest Haiti. With a focus on education and creating local clinicians, STAND brings medical practitioners, including PTs, prosthetists, orthotists, and general medical practitioners, to Port-de-Paix, Haiti to provide treatment for the people in this region. STAND is currently in the process of creating a curriculum specific to the needs of NW Haiti that will become part of the local nursing schools’ educational programming. These lectures on orthopedic rehab medicine will be based on STAND director’ five years of experience treating patients in the country and created in conjunction with Youngstown State University’s PT faculty. In this episode we talk about: *Their latest trip to Haiti. *Their successful Kickstarter campaign to create a short film about the STAND experience in Haiti. *The history of STAND. *What the volunteer experience is like. *Some really extreme patient stories and what the patients sometimes have to do to get to the STAND clinic.  *What they need in the form of donations and volunteers. As you will see in this episode their passion for physical therapy and their work in Haiti is infectious!  If you are in the medical field I hope this interview will inspire you to volunteer with STAND.  If you can't volunteer please consider making a donation.  Thank you for listening and stay Healthy Wealthy & Smart! Karen

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  • Episode 9: Stand Up! With Jim Biancolo

    · 00:35:21 · App Story

    Jim Biancolo, half of Raised Square, joins me to talk about creating their first app, Stand Up!, a work break timer for reminding us all that we need to occasionally get up from the desk and move around. Raised Square was founded in 2014 by Mark and Jim, two guys who wanted a place to build things that they like to use. Mark, a self described Brit living in the USA, found computers so early in life he started on an Atari 800 XL. Later he went on to study them at University. He started working in tech after graduation and has spent most of his life building web stuff. He is now enjoying building stuff for the computers in our pockets and is a baseball and cycling enthusiast. Jim found computers later in life, and spent the last 20 years making up for lost time. He's happy to pick up the UX end of things for Raised Square. In his spare time, he enjoy's watching movies, and carries a Netflix queue that's around three years deep. He is self described as just enough of a movie nerd to know he watches around 80 movies a year. Stand Up! The Work Break Timer, because sadly we need reminding we should get up and move around. Stand Up! is a fun, flexible work break timer. By now you know that sitting down is slowly killing you, and Raised Square wants to help you live longer. It's as simple as standing up! It's also great for RSI sufferers, or anyone that needs to take regular breaks. Stand Up! is free and fully functional! It comes with one alert tone, and one In-App Purchase unlocks the rest. It is completely customizable to your work schedule so you can truly set it and forget it. You can also customize the color theme of the UI. The header shows you at a glance how you're doing, and how long to your next alert. You can even limit alerts to your office location so it doesn't bug you when you go out to lunch. The Stand Up! and Raised Square story is closely intertwined, as their practice project turned into their business product. When Jim & Mark started, they were looking for a simple idea they could create relatively quickly to give themselves experience building for the App Store. When they couldn't find a work break reminder app that did everything they wanted, they decided that seemed like a good candidate. Initially thinking it would only take a few weeks to build something they'd be proud of, they ended up spending about a year perfecting it. In the course of the building the project they experienced lots of learning, lots of abandoned designs, and lots of life intervention (including Mark having a baby!), but in the end they created something they're very proud of, and are now focused on turning it into a sustainable business model. Contact Links: Stand Up! Website Jim Biancolo on Twitter Mark Wright on Twitter Vic on Twitter App Story on Twitter Support Jim, Mark, & the show by using this link to get the Stand Up! on the App Store: Stand Up! The Work Break Timer on the App Store Additional links: Raised Square The Guru's Guide to Transact-SQL - Jim's recommended relational Database book If you're an indie developer and you'd like to tell your app's story on the show, click here. If you are enjoying App Story, please consider reviewing/rating it in iTunes. I'd also love to hear your feedback and to know how you found the show. Please feel free to use the twitter links and let me know! Thanks so much for your support!

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  • Mansion Ingles Podcast September2013 - Aprender gramática, pronunciación y vocabulario inglés

    · 00:40:52 · Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free

    Aprender ingles y mejora tú gramatica, vocabulario y pronunciacion con lecciones, ejemplos y ejercicios. Learn English with La Mansion del Ingles. Lessons to improve your grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. Hello once again and welcome to another Mansion Ingles podcast. This is podcast number 65 recorded for September 2013. Este mes, en el nivel básico practicamos algunas frases con el gerundio, y también tenemos vocabulario de los grupos de palabras - word families. En el nivel intermedio tenemos más ejemplos del uso de could, can y be able to y por vocabulario tenemos más confusing words; las palabras que se puede confundir. In the advanced section, we practise more advanced collocations, and there's business vocabulary as usual, and a translation exercise, all to help you improve your English and take it to the next level. En los podcasts mensuales hablamos de los temas, vocabulario y ejercicios que salen en nuestro cuaderno mensual. Así podáis practicar la pronunciación y repasar el material del cuaderno. Si quieres recibir gratis el cuaderno cada mes, ver la trascripción de este podcast o leer los anteriores, vete a mansioningles.com y sigue los enlaces en la página principal. Many thanks to Humberto Cordero for your email. Humberto vive en Chile y es aficionado a nuestros podcasts. Dice que ha aprendido mucho con La Mansión del Inglés y quiero decir muchas gracias a Humberto por su email y sus amables palabras.   Ok, let's start then with el nivel básico y las frases que llevan el gerundio, es decir el verbo con I-N-G. ¿Cómo se dice el verbo ver en inglés? - to see. ¿Y cuál es el gerundio del verbo see? - seeing. Repite; seeing también puede ser watch. La diferencía entre see y watch es que "watch" es mirar cosas o personas en movimiento. Entonces decimos watch a football match, watch TV etc. Puedes watch a film or see a film - ver una pelicular., pero si quieres preguntar a alguien si ha visto una peli, se pregunta con el see. Have you seen any good films recently? Did you see the film yesterday? Pero si estás mirando una pelicular ahora mismo, se dice watch. I'm watching a film. Repite: I'm watching a film. What film are you watching? Do you like watching horror films? (Nota que decimos horror films y no terror films.) ¿Cómo se dice escuchar en inglés? To listen. Repite: to listen. I'm listening to music. Nota la preposición TO con el verbo to listen. To listen TO something. Repite: listen to music. Listen to the radio. I'm listening to the radio. - I'm listening to a podcast - Do you like listening to rap music? ¿Cómo se dice jugar en inglés? - to play. ¿Entonces, qué es el gerundio del verbo play? - playing - Repite: playing. Do you like playing cards? Do you like playing tennis? I like playing football. Se puede traducir el verbo hacer a make o do. Pero cuando preguntamos por las actividades y los deportes, usamos el verbo to do. Escucha: What do you like doing at the weekend? Tenemos dos verbos DO en este ejemplo. El primero es el verbo auxiliar do que necesitamos para hacer la pregunata en el timepo presente simple. Repite: What do you.....? What do you like doing? What do you like doing in the summer? Do you like going to the beach? Do you like doing sport? What do you like doing? ¿Cómo se dice nadar en inglés? to swim. ¿Y el gerundio? swimming. Repite: swimming. Do you like swimming? Do you like swimming in the sea? ¿Cómo se dice salir en inglés? to go out. ¿Y cuál es el gerundio? going out. Repite: going out. Do you like going out?  Do you like going out at night? Do you like going out to restaurants? Do you like going out with friends? Of course you do! I love going out. ¿Cómo se dice viajar? - to travel. ¿Y Cuál es el gerundio? travelling. Repite: travelling. Do you like travelling? Do you like travelling by train. Otro verbo que puedes emplear aquí en vez de like es enjoy (disfrutar). La gramática con el gerundio es lo mismo. Escucha: Do you enjoy travelling? Repite: Do you enjoy travelling? Do you enjoy travelling by train? Do you enjoy travelling by plane? I love travelling by plane, but I don't enjoy being in airports very much. ¿Cómo se dice levantarte en inglés - to get up. ¿Y cuál es el gerundio? - getting up. Repite: getting up. Do you like getting up early? I hate getting up early. I like getting up late. Especially at weekends. Very good! ¡Muy bien! Ahora, continuamos con las familas, los grupos de palabras - Word families. Creo que te he dicho una vez que es un buen idea aprender el vocabulario en grupos, en familias. Es más fácil recordarlas. Escucha algunas palabras en grupos y repitelas. twenty - thirty - forty - fifty - sixty - seventy - eighty - ninety teach - teacher - football - footballer - compose -composer       - clean - cleaner - sing - singer - law - lawyer - drive - driver - write - writer January - February - March - April - May - June       - July - August -  September - October - November - December have - had - buy - bought - read - read - write - wrote - speak - spoke - see - saw - get - got - make - made - say - said - drink - drank Spain - Spanish - France - French - Italy - Italian - Germany - German - Britain - British - Mexico - Mexican - Greece - Greek Ok good, now moving on to the intermediate section, we practised some more examples of 'can', 'could' and 'be able to'. 'Can' and 'could' are modal auxiliary verbs. 'Be able to' is NOT an auxiliary verb (it uses the verb to be as a main verb). Muchas veces en inglés empleamos to be able to or to be allowed to en lugar de "can". Solo podemos formar el can en el pasado - Es el 'could'. 'Can' en el pasado es 'could'. Si queremos poner 'can' en otros tiempos, hay que usar el 'to be able to' or 'to be allowed to'. Listen and repeat some more examples with can, could, be able to and be allowed to. I can drive. Repeat: I can drive. - I could drive when I was 18. - Repeat: I could drive when I was 18. - I'm not allowed to drive a bus. Repeat: I'm not allowed to drive a bus I couldn't drive when I was 16. Repeat: I couldn't drive when I was 16. I've been able to drive since I was 18. Fíjate en la contracción. Listen: I have been able - I've been able. Repeat: I've been able - I've been able to drive. - I've been able to drive since I was 18. Will you be able to drive? Repeat: Will you be able to drive? He can play the guitar. Repeat: He can play the guitar. He could play the guitar when he was 10. Repeat: when he was 10 - play the guitar - He could play the guitar - He could play the guitar when he was 10. Listen: We won't be able to go to the wedding. Repeat: go to the wedding - Won't be able to - We won't be able to go to the wedding. She's not allowed to see him. Repeat: She's not allowed to see him. She can speak to him. Repeat: She can speak to him. But she's not allowed to see him. Moving on to vocabulary in the intermediate section and we had some confusing words: We had keen, fond, appeal, fascinated, fancy and interested. Listen and repeat some examples: I don’t fancy going out tonight. Fancy is more used in British English for the meaning of gustar or apetecer. Do you fancy going out? Repeat: Do you fancy going out? Do you fancy some pizza? What do you fancy doing tonight? Do you fancy seeing a film? What do you fancy? (¿Qué te apetece? o ¿Qué quieres tomar?) What do you fancy? - Repeat: What do you fancy? What do you fancy to drink? If you fancy someone you are attracted to them sexually. I fancy that girl over there in the red dress. She's gorgeous! I really fancied you when we were at school together. the verb appeal also means gustar, atraer. That house really appeals to me. Esa casa me gusta de verdad. Nota que appeal lleva la preposición to. Hay verbos que están casi siempre acompañados con una preposición fija. Se llaman dependent prepositions y en el caso de appeal, su dependent preposition es el 'to'. Appeal to - Repeat: It appeals to me. That holiday in Italy appeals to me. It doesn't appeal to me. A camping holiday doesn't appeal to me. I've been camping before, when I was younger, but now I'm older I prefer hotels. I want a comfortable bed. Sleeping in a tent just doesn't appeal to me anymore. What's the dependent preposition of interested? I'm interested.....? Listen: I'm very interested in astronomy. What are you interested in? Repeat: What are you interested in? Are you interested in golf? I'm not interested in golf at all. It doesn't appeal to me. When keen is used in the sense of aficionado, it also has a dependent preposition. Do you know it? It's keen on. I'm keen on tennis. I'm keen on cooking. I'm fond of it, I have a liking for it. Repeat: I'm keen on cooking. I'm very keen on Chinese food. I'm not keen on seafood. 'Fond of' is similar to 'keen on'. Repeat: fond of. I'm fond of fish. Repeat: I'm fond of fish. I'm fond of fish, but shellfish doesn't appeal to me. Are you keen on seafood? What sports are you keen on? I'm keen on motor racing, boxing and I'm quite keen on football too. I'm not very fond of golf, though. Listen: I’m fascinated by astronomy. Repeat: fascinated by. You can also say fascinated with. Repeat: I'm fascinated with this new watch you bought me. What fascinates you? Are you fascinated by technology? Siempre me ha gustado la idea de aprender inglés con video. Por eso te recomendamos ABA English. Los videos de ABA English son muy profesionales y están muy bien hechos. Además de las 144 clases gratuitas de gramática en vídeo, también tienes la posibilidad de probar la primera unidad de tu nivel (hay 6 niveles distintos) y realizar todas las secciones de esta unidad para probar su metodología única de aprendizaje.  Tú aprendes inglés viendo películas cortas con subtítulos, que ya es un método muy eficaz para aprender inglés,  pero también actúas en estas películas! Es muy divertido! En la misma unidad realizas ejercicios de speaking y role play actuando en el diálogo del cortometraje que has visto! Los cortometrajes, con situaciones de la vida real, son, entonces, la base de cada unidad del curso de inglés. Llevan incorporada la tecnología de reconocimiento de voz propia.  Echa un vistazo a los videos de ABA English.com. Puedes empezar los cursos gratis sin coste algúno y además con apoyo en español Al empezar, tienes que facilitar una dirrecion de email, y contestar algunas preguntas básicas, pero no es necesario que realices ningún pago, y yo siempre pienso que si una empresa te ofrecen un producto gratis para probarlo, es por que es bueno y que la empresa crean en sus productos. ¡Registrate hoy y aprende inglés gratis con video, en casa y a tu ritmo. ABA English.com! Pruébalo no tienes nada de perder. In the advanced section this month, we looked at some more collocations. The first of which was to draw the curtains. To draw the curtains means to close the curtains. Repeat: draw the curtains. Could you draw the curtains please? Shall I draw the curtains? It's getting dark. Another collocation with draw is to draw the line (at something) which means to set a limit at something, to decide when a limit has been reached or to separate one thing from another. For example, It's not clear where this writer draws the line between fact and fiction. Repeat: to draw the line. It all depends where you draw the line. I think we should draw the line at stealing, don't you? Of course, one meaning of draw is dibujar. To draw a picture, draw some trees and a house on paper, You can also draw a weapon, a gun. Jesse James drew his gun and shot the man dead in the street. You can also draw a game or a match (empatar). Madrid drew 1-1 with Chelsea in the Champions League. The match was a draw. A Lawyer can draw up a contract. The phrasal verb to draw up means redactar. Repeat: to draw up. Draw up a contract and I'll sign it. If you jump to a conclusion you quickly judge or decide something without having all the facts. You guess the facts about a situation without having enough information. Repeat: to jump to a conclusion. Don't jump to conclusions. Listen to me first. You're always jumping to conclusions. If something stands to reason, it's obvious, it's what you would expect. Repeat: It stands to reason. It stands to reason he lost his job. It stands to reason they bought a bigger house. To stand trial means to be the accused person in a trial before a judge. To be on trial. Repeat: to stand trial. He's standing trial for murder. The Spanish politician had to stand trial for tax evasion. Another common phrase with stand is to stand for president or stand for office. Repeat: He's standing for president in the next election. Why don't you stand for governor? If you make ends meet, you have enough money to pay for your expenses. To make ends meet. It's usually used when people don't have a lot of money, but they just manage to get by. They succeed in paying for the things they need. Repeat: to make ends meet. - I also work at nights to make ends meet. - I work overtime to make ends meet. - I had to get a second job to make ends meet. Another strong collocation is to make an impression (causar(le) una impresión). Repeat: to make an impression. She made an impression on me. You can make a good impression or a bad impression. He made a very good impression on all of us. The collocation have the impression or have an impression means to suspect or sense something. Repeat: to have the impression - I have the impression that she's a bit irresponsible. - I have the impression you don't trust me. Listen to the collocations and expressions again and repeat them after me: draw the curtains jump to a conclusion stand to reason make ends meet stand for president  make an impression draw the line (at something) stand trial In the Business English section we looked at some more business English vocabulary, and the first expression was to run out of something. This phrasal verb means agotar, quedarse sin algo. Repeat: to run out of. We've run out of paper. Oh no, I've run out of coffee! Can you buy some more wine, we've run out. I hate running out of beer. Another expression with run is to run short on something. Quedarse corto de algo. Repeat: to run short of - We're running short of sugar. We're running short of ink for the photocopier. Can we finish the meeting now? We're running short of time. If you come up with something, you think of something or develop something. Repeat: to come up with. He often comes up with very creative solutions. She comes up with some very good ideas. It's important not to lose sight of the main point. to lose sight - perder la vista. Don't lose sight of the main objective. Repeat: Don't lose sight of the main objective. - I think we're losing sight of our goals here. If you take drastic measures you do severe, radical or extreme things in order to reach an objective. Repeat: take drastic measures. - He took drastic measures. - We must take drastic measures to stop this fall in revenue. There are several ways to say that something has gone down - que algo ha bajado. You can say dropped, decreased, fallen and reduced. Repeat: Sales have gone down - profits have fallen - sales have decreased - profits have been reduced - sales have dropped. ¡Muy bien! - Very good! We also gave you some more sentences to translate in this month's cuaderno. First, you had to translate from English to Spanish. So,  I'll say the English sentences and you say the Spanish translation before I do. Then, repeat the English sentence after me to practise pronunciation. Ready? People are buying less. - La gente está comprando menos. Repite: People are buying less. This headache is terrible. - Este dolor de cabeza es terrible. Repeat: This headache is terrible. The pages are torn. - Las páginas están rotas. Repeat: The pages are torn. They’ve gone/they’ve left - Se han marchado. Repeat: They’ve gone/they’ve left Do you believe everything they tell you? - ¿Crees todo lo que te dicen? Repeat: Do you believe - Do you believe everything - they tell you? - Do you believe everything they tell you? Good, now I'll read some Spanish sentences and you translate to English before I do. Then repeat the sentences after me to practise your pronunciation. OK? ¿Quién está autorizado para firmarlo? - Who’s authorized to sign it? Repeat: sign - sign it - to sign it - authorized - authorized to sign it - Who’s authorized to sign it? Su piso es muy impresionante. - Your/his/her flat (UK) / apartment (US) is very impressive. Repeat: impressive - is very impressive - Your flat is very impressive. - His flat is very impressive. - Her flat is very impressive.- Your apartment is very impressive. ¿Por qué no está él aquí? - Why isn’t he here? Repeat: Why isn’t he here? Le voy a pedir perdón. - I’m going to apologise to him. Repeat: apologise to him. - I’m going to - I’m going to apologise to him. Jamás he dicho semejante cosa. - I’ve never said such a thing. Repeat: such a - such a thing. - I’ve never said - I’ve never said such a thing. Well, that's all we have time for on this podcast, but we'll be back with you next month as usual with another podcast based on our monthly newsletter, our cuaderno de inglés mensual. Remember, you can listen to all our previous podcasts at mansioningles.com and of course on iTunes. Si te gusta este podcast, puedes hacernos un gran favor y escribe una corta reseña en iTunes. Si escribes una reseña en iTunes más personas pueden escucharnos porque subimos en el 'ranking' de iTunes. y también puedes darnos algunas estrellas, si te gusta nuestros podcasts. Muchas gracias a Marlen80 que dice "Me encanta! Tanto para principiantes como para avanzados. Es muy bueno el contenido". Thank you Marlen80, we appreciate it. And thank you also to nachoycris que dicen "Muy bueno y nada pesado. Sobre todo muy practico." Gracias. Thank you to all of you who are writing reviews. Thank you very much for listening to this podcast, and for being part of the community of La Mansión del Inglés. Remember, If you want to contact us you can find us on Facebook. Just search Facebook for La Mansión del Inglés and join our growing community of more than 26,000 fans. Or send me an email to: mansionteachers@yahoo.es. You can also follow us on Twitter. Our Twitter name is MansionTwit. Puedes ver el cuaderno mensual de este mes, y todos los cuadernos anteriores en www.cuadernodeingles.com/ Until next month then, keep practising and taking your English to the next level! Take care and bye for now! The music in this month’s podcast is by Revolution Void, the album is The Politics of Desire and the track is called Outer Orbit.          

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  • Marc Maron & Randy Bryce

    · 04:02:09 · David Feldman Show

    Howie Klein, Professor Corey Brettschneider and Dr. Jay Sutay. Marc Maron stars in the new critically acclaimed Netflix series "Glow." Randy "Iron Stache" Bryce is running for Wisconsin's first congressional district intent on defeating Speaker Paul Ryan. Howie Klein on Randy Bryce and the fight for Medicare For All. Professor Corey Brettschneider explains how Donald Trump Junior violated campaign finance law by taking that meeting last year with those Russians. Marc is the author of two books: The Jerusalem Syndrome: My Life as a Reluctant Messiah, based on his solo show and is available for purchase on Amazon.com, and a collection of essays titled Attempting Normal, which was released by Spiegel and Grau in 2013. His first four albums, Not Sold Out, Tickets Still Available, Final Engagement, and This Has To Be Funny are comedy classics. Marc released his stand-up special Thinky Pain on Netflixin 2013 and as an album in 2014.  His most recent special, More Later, premiered on Epix in December 2015 and is also available on Hulu and Amazon Prime. Randy Bryce is a U.S. Army veteran, cancer survivor, and union ironworker. He joined the race for Wisconsin’s 1st Congressional District because his values are our neighbors’ values, and Washington has gotten way off track. Randy was raised in southeastern Wisconsin, and went to public schools. After graduation, he enlisted in the U.S. Army, and was posted to Honduras, where he earned the Army Achievement Medal. Randy’s father was a police officer, and his mother worked in a doctor’s office. His brother is also a police officer, and his sister is a public school teacher. After returning stateside, Randy was diagnosed with testicular cancer. He didn’t believe he could ever have children, and now calls his only son Ben, his “miracle child.” Ben is a public school student like his dad was. Randy found his way to an apprenticeship as an iron worker, and has now been helping to build America for more than 20 years. He’s been active in Ironworkers Local 8, serving as political coordinator for the union, and until recently as a member of the Milwaukee Area Labor Council board of directors. “My mother has multiple sclerosis, my father is in assisted living, and I survived cancer in my 20s to have a miracle child in my 40s,” said Bryce. “What Paul Ryan and the Republicans are doing to take health care away from millions of us, to make it cost more and cover less, and to allow the protections we’ve gained to be stripped away – it’s just unacceptable.” Randy currently serves as President of the Wisconsin Veterans Chamber of Commerce board of directors, and as Chair of the Democratic Party of Wisconsin Veterans Caucus. He resides in Caledonia. Howie Klein is an American writer, concert promoter, disc jockey, music producer, record label founder, record label executive, progressive political activist, and adjunct professor of music. He is perhaps best known for his role as President of Reprise Records from 1989 to 2001. He appears occasionally as himself in music-related film documentaries and has received accolades for his stance against censorship and for his advocacy of free speech protection. Corey Brettschneider is professor of political science at Brown University, where he teaches courses in constitutional law and political theory. He is currently also a visiting professor at the University of Chicago Law School. Brettschneider was a visiting professor at Fordham Law School, a Rockefeller faculty fellow at the Princeton University Center for Human Values, a visiting associate professor at Harvard Law School, and a faculty fellow at Harvard's Safra Center for Ethics. Brettschneider received a PhD in politics from Princeton University and a JD from Stanford University. He is the author of When the State Speaks, What Should it Say? How Democracies Can Protect Expression and Promote Equality (Princeton University Press, 2012) and Democratic Rights: The Substance of Self-Government (Princeton University Press, 2007). These books have been the subject of several journal symposia, including one most recently published in the Brooklyn Law Review. Brettschneider is also the author of a casebook, Constitutional Law and American Democracy: Cases and Readings (Aspen Publishers/Wolters Kluwer Law and Business, 2011). His articles include "Sovereign and State: A Democratic Theory of Sovereign Immunity," forthcoming in Texas Law Review; "Value Democracy as the Basis for Viewpoint Neutrality," in Northwestern Law Review (2013); "A Transformative Theory of Religious Freedom," in Political Theory (2010); "When the State Speaks, What Should it Say? Democratic Persuasion and the Freedom of Expression," in Perspectives on Politics (2010); and "The Politics of the Personal: A Liberal Approach," in the American Political Science Review (2007). Dr. Jay Sutay, the self-proclaimed “Hardest Working Pediatrician in Comedy”, is a frustrated pediatrician from South Windsor, CT, who brings his tales from the exam rooms, his experience working with kids and their parents, as well as his own tribulations as the father of two daughters to his stand up comedy. His cutting and sometimes incisive commentary about society, parenting and raising kids, has left audiences laughing.   Dr. Jay Sutay began doing stand up comedy in 1983 while attending Fairfield University. He was a regular at Open Mic Night at the Treehouse Comedy Club when it was still located in the basement of the New England Motor Lodge in Westport. While in college, Jay had narrowed his career choices to two. Medicine or Stand up Comedy. A chance encounter with comedian, Jay Leno, on October 31, 1983 sealed Jay’s career path. Leno’s advice was to go to medical school and become a doctor. Insisting that after medical training, at the very least, Jay would have a job. Sage advice. Comedy offers no guarantees.   After graduating from F.U. in 1985, Jay took a year off to mull over his options. Realizing that pizza making by day, and stand up comedy by night was probably not the best use of his college education, medical school seemed the likely option. Jay completed his medical school training at The University of Connecticut School of Medicine, and delivered the valedictory address at his graduation in 1990 (clearly selected as the speaker not because he was the top student in the class, but because he was the funniest). After completing his residency in Pediatrics at Hartford Hospital, he has been in private pediatrics practice in South Windsor, CT since 1993. He has been named a Connecticut Top Doc by Connecticut Magazine each year since 2006. Dr. Sutay is Board certified in Pediatrics, but has no documentation that he is a comic, or for that matter, funny.   After 20 years away from comedy, Dr. Sutay resurrected his long dormant stand up act in December 2006 by taking the stage at Hartford’s Brew Ha Ha Comedy Club. According to those in attendance, he did not suck. Since that night, Dr. Jay has performed at clubs throughout the northeast, and clubs and casinos as far away as Nevada, California, and the Bahamas. Dr. Jay was a finalist in the Pro Division of both the 2012 Funniest Comic in New England Contest, and the 2014 Funniest Comic on the East Coast Contest held at Mohegan Sun Casino. He was named one of Hartford’s Best Local Comics in the Hartford Courant’s CT Now 2015 Reader’s Poll.  Dr. Jay was a regular contributor to The Miserable Men Show on Sirius/XM Radio, and can be heard monthly on “The Dad Podcast”. Dr. Sutay has consistently been named a “Top Doc” in Pediatrics by Connecticut Magazine. In addition, he has performed his stand up comedy for medical and pharmaceutical groups, and at many charity benefits including: Golf Fore the Kids, Autism Speaks, Cherish the Children Foundation, Crayons for Cancer, Griffin’s Friends, Stand Up 2 Cancer, The Leukemia Lymphoma Society, The Alzheimer’s Association, The Fidelco Guide Dog Foundation, and Stand Up to CF. Listen to entire episode here: https://goo.gl/xxgnjP Tell us what you think in the comment section below. More David @ http://www.DavidFeldmanShow.com About the show: http://bit.ly/2rqp5un Tune in every Tuesday and Friday for brand new episodes of our show featuring a diverse mixture of comedians, actors, professors, comedy writers and journalists talking about your world. Check out our new You Tube channel. More about David: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0271017/?ref_=nv_sr_1 David writes for Triumph The Insult Comic Dog's series on Hulu and Maya and Marty on NBC. David has also won three Prime Time Emmys for comedy writing, as well as four Writers Guild Awards. He has also written on ABC's Roseanne, HBO's Dennis Miller Live, HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher, Comedy Central's The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Academy Awards, The Emmys, and countless roasts on Comedy Central. Get Social With David: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/davidfeldmancomedy?ref=hl Twitter: https://twitter.com/David_Feldman_ Subscribe to his audio podcast: iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/david-feldman-show/id321997239 Become a subscriber to our podcast! When you join for only a $5 monthly subscription donation you’ll gain access to the David Feldman Premium Content, featuring bonus material from the funniest comedians who have been guests on the show. We accept all major credit cards. Join today and help support the show!

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  • 4.08 Papa CJ - What Corporates could learn from Stand-Up

    · Play to Potential Podcast

    NUGGET CONTEXTA stand up comedian is also a brand that provides services worldwide. So what can the world of business learn from the world of stand up comedy? Papa CJ draws parallels between these two seemingly starkly different realms. Watch out for the anecdote on heckling and its comparison with dealing with feedback. GUESTMy fourth guest on the Play to Potential Podcast series is Papa CJ. Papa CJ is a world-renowned stand-up comedian. He has won awards for both Asia’s and India’s Best Stand-up Comedian. Forbes Magazine called him ‘the global face of Indian stand-up’ and Toastmaster International called him one of the most influential comedians around the world.He has performed over 2000 shows across five continents. His work has been broadcast on NBC, BBC, Comedy Central, Showtime, MTV, Paramount, The Comedy Channel, ITV and a host of other international networks. He taped a Showtime USA Stand-up Comedy Special with Russell Peters in Amsterdam and in the American TV show Last Comic Standing, he was adjudged one of the top ten acts from over 3000 contestants across the world.Papa CJ holds an MBA degree from the University of Oxford. He frequently works with companies and educational institutions as a motivational speaker and executive coach. He has coached executives from over 50 blue-chip companies all over the world including Nike, Google & UBS in Europe, Deutsche Bank, Accenture & E&Y in USA, Universal Music and BBC in the UK and Unilever and HSBC in Asia.Papa CJ is a former management consultant and a qualified Laughter Yoga Leader. He is also an enthusiastic golfer however his passion is far greater than his talent!We spoke about how he got into Stand-up comedy, what it takes to succeed as a stand up comedian and some perspectives around how people should think about transitioning from a corporate world to a creative world where the economics can often be quite differentHOSTDeepak is a Leadership Advisor and an Executive Coach. He works with leaders to improve their effectiveness and in helping them make better decisions specifically around organisational and career transitions. He currently runs Transition Insight (www.transitioninsight.com) and works with leaders to handle phases of transition thoughtfully. He has worked as an Operations Consultant with KPMG in UK, Strategy Consultant with McKinsey in the US and as a Leadership Consultant with EgonZehnder (a Swiss Leadership Advisory firm) where he helped companies recruit CEOs, CXOs and Board Members and worked on Leadership Development. Deepak is a certified CEO Coach and is an alumnus of IIT Madras, IIM Ahmedabad and London Business School. His detailed profile can be found at https://in.linkedin.com/in/djayaramanDISCLAIMERAll content and opinions expressed in the podcast are that of the guests and are not necessarily the opinions of Deepak Jayaraman and Transition Insight Private Limited. The primary purpose of this podcast is for people to learn and make thoughtful career and leadership choices. Views expressed in comments to blog are the personal opinions of the author of the comment. They do not necessarily reflect the views of The Company or the author of the blog. Participants are responsible for the content of their comments and all comments that are posted are in the public domain.The Company reserves the right to monitor, edit, and/or publish any submitted comments. Not all comments may be published. Any third party comments published are third party information and The Company takes no responsibility and disclaims all liability The Company reserves the right, but is not obligated to monitor and delete any comments or postings at any time without notice.

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  • 4.04 Papa CJ - Stand-Up: Unknown Unknowns

    · Play to Potential Podcast

    NUGGET CONTEXTThink you need to know all about a career before you dive right in? Not necessarily! Papa CJ talks about how the world of stand up was a blank slate for him and all he had was his excitement and eagerness to pursue it. Sometimes all it needs is the drive and the resilience. Hint: Look out for what makes stand-up comedy the one profession where ‘failure is the only way to succeed’ according to Papa CJ. GUESTMy fourth guest on the Play to Potential Podcast series is Papa CJ. Papa CJ is a world-renowned stand-up comedian. He has won awards for both Asia’s and India’s Best Stand-up Comedian. Forbes Magazine called him ‘the global face of Indian stand-up’ and Toastmaster International called him one of the most influential comedians around the world.He has performed over 2000 shows across five continents. His work has been broadcast on NBC, BBC, Comedy Central, Showtime, MTV, Paramount, The Comedy Channel, ITV and a host of other international networks. He taped a Showtime USA Stand-up Comedy Special with Russell Peters in Amsterdam and in the American TV show Last Comic Standing, he was adjudged one of the top ten acts from over 3000 contestants across the world.Papa CJ holds an MBA degree from the University of Oxford. He frequently works with companies and educational institutions as a motivational speaker and executive coach. He has coached executives from over 50 blue-chip companies all over the world including Nike, Google & UBS in Europe, Deutsche Bank, Accenture & E&Y in USA, Universal Music and BBC in the UK and Unilever and HSBC in Asia.Papa CJ is a former management consultant and a qualified Laughter Yoga Leader. He is also an enthusiastic golfer however his passion is far greater than his talent!We spoke about how he got into Stand-up comedy, what it takes to succeed as a stand up comedian and some perspectives around how people should think about transitioning from a corporate world to a creative world where the economics can often be quite differentHOSTDeepak is a Leadership Advisor and an Executive Coach. He works with leaders to improve their effectiveness and in helping them make better decisions specifically around organisational and career transitions. He currently runs Transition Insight (www.transitioninsight.com) and works with leaders to handle phases of transition thoughtfully. He has worked as an Operations Consultant with KPMG in UK, Strategy Consultant with McKinsey in the US and as a Leadership Consultant with EgonZehnder (a Swiss Leadership Advisory firm) where he helped companies recruit CEOs, CXOs and Board Members and worked on Leadership Development. Deepak is a certified CEO Coach and is an alumnus of IIT Madras, IIM Ahmedabad and London Business School. His detailed profile can be found at https://in.linkedin.com/in/djayaramanDISCLAIMERAll content and opinions expressed in the podcast are that of the guests and are not necessarily the opinions of Deepak Jayaraman and Transition Insight Private Limited. The primary purpose of this podcast is for people to learn and make thoughtful career and leadership choices. Views expressed in comments to blog are the personal opinions of the author of the comment. They do not necessarily reflect the views of The Company or the author of the blog. Participants are responsible for the content of their comments and all comments that are posted are in the public domain.The Company reserves the right to monitor, edit, and/or publish any submitted comments. Not all comments may be published. Any third party comments published are third party information and The Company takes no responsibility and disclaims all liability The Company reserves the right, but is not obligated to monitor and delete any comments or postings at any time without notice.

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  • Reducing Violence Through Media Training and Cultural Awareness

    · The Center for Court Innovation - Podcasts

    This podcast is part of a series highlighting innovative approaches to reducing violence and improving health outcomes among at-risk minority youth at the nine demonstration sites of the Minority Youth Violence Prevention Initiative. One of these demonstrations sites is the Stand Up Participate program in Hennepin County, Minnesota, an initiative led by the community-based organization Asian Media Access, Inc. in partnership with local public health, law enforcement agencies, and other community-based groups that seeks to reduce youth violence by helping young people acquire skills for self-sufficiency, improve self-esteem, and develop cultural pride. Ange Hwang, executive director of Asian Media Access,  and Tyree Lawrence, executive director of the community-based LVY Foundation, joined this week's podcast to discuss the philosphy behind Stand Up Participate's curriculum, which includes audio/visual technology training, culturally based family engagement programming, health education, and organized activities with police and community members that seek to improve communication and mutual understanding.RAPHAEL POPE-SUSSMAN: Hi. This is Raphael Pope-Sussman of the Center for Court Innovation. This podcast is part of the series we are doing with people seeking to curb violence and improve access to public health for at-risk minority youth as part of the Minority Youth Violence Prevention Initiative. The Initiative is a partnership of the Office of Minority Health at the US Department of Health and Human Services and the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services at the US Department of Justice that encourages collaboration among public health organizations, law enforcement agencies, and community-based groups. Our podcast series highlights innovative approaches at the 9 demonstration sites that have received funding under the program. This week, we're looking at the Stand Up, Participate Program in Hennepin County Minnesota. Stand Up, Participate is an initiative led by the community-based organization, Asian in Media Access in partnership with local public health and law enforcement agencies as well as other community-based groups like the LVY Foundation. Stand Up, Participate seeks to prevent youth violence by helping young people acquire skills for self-sufficiency, improve self-esteem, and develop cultural pride. I'm speaking today with Ange Hwang, executive director of Asian Media Access, and Tyree Lawrence, executive director of the LVY Foundation. Ange, Tyree, thank you for speaking with me today and welcome. HWANG: Thank you. LAWRENCE: Thank you. POPE-SUSSMAN: For starters, can you describe Stand Up, Participate? HWANG: Sure. This is Ange from Asian Media Access. Stand Up, Participate has been focusing to use bi-cultural healthy living as a concept to encourage particularly Asian American community and African American community so we will hope is by working through cultural pride and really giving you there a control sometimes. Sometimes that will be something they'd be proud of so they will be more willing to participate and to change their behaviors. So they would decrease the at-risk behaviors and really be able to participate back to the communities. We are doing that through couple different venues. In Asian Media Access focusing on multimedia training so the youth will build on self-esteem. We focusing on the cultural classes such as Asian dances so the youth can be able to regain the culture pride. Tyree will do a little bit different than us and I will have him to talk a little bit more. LAWRENCE: Yes, our part of the Stand Up and Participate movement really focuses on entrepreneurship and economic development. A lot of the young men, the African American young men in particular, are often challenged with some of the caveats they face in society and certain stigmas, if you will. We leverage the ability for them to tap into their own personal potential and their talents and then take it to another level by allowing them to explore those talents in a way that ends up in a form of business or some type of trade or skill set so that they can really find alternatives to whatever lifestyle may be prohibiting them from just living life in general and just being, quote unquote, normal. HWANG: Yeah. I think Tyree's strategy is touching a very important part is to really giving youth a choice, giving them a power to choose some of the skills they like to acquire such as entrepreneurship and such as multimedia. After they do that, they're really building their own team to get away from other negative influence around them to really be able to focus and really starting to become a contributing citizen. Then we bring in our partners, particularly at the public health and the police departments, to providing such as mentorship such as talking about how we can improve relationship together with the police department and also having them to even just take them to shop. We have one activity, back to school shopping with the cops. The cops pick up 30 at-risk youth and then we got Target Foundation to support. Each youth has $100 spending money so the cop guide them through Target to purchase all the school equipment. By doing this type of activity and empower the youth to have a choices and power and control, they feel they can choose a better route for themself. I feel this strategy is very effective. POPE-SUSSMAN: How is funding from the Minority Youth Violence Prevention Initiative enable Stand Up, Participate to work with its target population and expand services? HWANG: The funding for us has been so helpful particularly being able to do a lot of trainings and recruiting support groups with this youth and we can do a lot of creative and innovative outreach. I would like to particularly emphasizing that by culture healthy living, we have been utilizing, as a central theme, for all the activities particularly, for example, our Asian youth. We try to encourage them to exercise more, so Asian dances and martial arts. That's really tied them back to their culture roots. We really attract more youth to the program with this type of activity instead of trying to utilizing mainstream activities. We design the project with that bi-cultural activity in mind. That would help more and more of those at-risk youth of color would be willing to come into the program because it's coming from their culture and it's built on their strengths. This funding source is so important. Tyree, want to add more? LAWRENCE: Definitely. We will also parallel. It's a huge mechanism that's been able to help us as far as promoting the abilities and the talents of these individuals who may not, otherwise, be on a platform. For instance, being able to get in front of a corporation like 3M and show the many attributes that parallel what they're currently teaching their employees has been phenomenal. We wouldn't have been able to develop this type of platform had it not been for the funding. HWANG: Yeah. I think, particularly I would really want to piggy back what Tyree had said. If not had the funding, we won't be able to develop. I think this is really the key because a lot of times we see a lot of funding, maybe supporting a police academy and police academy to outreach to other youth and then recruit. But we do actually opposite way. We starting with the community. We have the community build that support group. Then outreach back to the police, back to the public health in seeking for support, seeking for training, and seeking to improve that relationship. POPE-SUSSMAN: How have the youth been responding to the programming so far? LAWRENCE: The youth have been actually responding quite positively to what we're trying to do as far as encouraging a more self-initiated healthier lifestyle. We're taking strife in the youth group that I deal with and are they ready to sit down across from police officers and have these wholehearted discussions? I would say we haven't reached that point just yet but what they are open to are more creative and innovative ways of having their side be understood, per se, by police officers so that there can be a more creative dialogue and hopefully we progress to something like that in the near future. Our attempts have been, I don't want to say difficult, but not as easy as I had anticipated when starting this project.   HWANG: But that is exactly we need to hear, Tyree, because we are dealing with at-risk youth who has a distrust to the police. We having this baggage in our community for a long time and if not coming from the community, sometimes it's very hard for this group of at-risk youth to be able to accept this type of activities. Why bother to communicate with the police? We are doing just fine. So that's a lot of that type of thinking coming from our youth. That's why we doing this from community perspective that the community feel the police really want to reach out. They really would like to build that bridge between both. POPE-SUSSMAN: How are you measuring outcomes? HWANG: We have a very dedicated evaluator working with us from the University of Minnesota has been helping us to do two major data collecting efforts. One is doing the youth survey, pre- and post-. We really focusing a lot on those relationship and we got a lot of high mark. For example, the question we ask is "Do you always feel there's a caring adult in the program?" We'll always have more than 95%, pre- and post-, have a very high comparison. We do well on that area. The other part is the teacher survey because we want to prove our methods work particularly at the academic outcome level. We have all the youth to take survey back to their teacher, have their teacher directly mail to us in talking about, "Did you feel this youth change in their behavior? Do they turn in the homework now? Do they participate at the class? Do they be able to work well with the classmates in the school?" All these are very positive feedback. We just conclude our first year's evaluations and we come back was 85-90% all the mark from the teacher regarding ... We have about 170 survey back so regarding those 170 youth we serve, they are hitting the high mark and teacher give them a lot of improvement particularly they notice throughout the year. LAWRENCE: I'd also like to add the very unique part of that survey, it was very interesting when we started out as a team. We were very intentional about our efforts to reach out to the youth that we, quote unquote, were using at-risk so that they understand what do they feel are great outcomes of this. It wasn't just what society or even what we thought was a good outcome and measuring that against also what the teachers are saying but we wanted to know for them, what would be success in your eyes? That is a very special part of the survey that has been, in my opinion, very innovative in the ability for them to voice on the survey we're producing our own business. We are acquiring trade skills toward having the job opportunities. We are meeting CEOs and executive where we normally wouldn't have been exposed to this types of thing. Those are massively impressive outputs to these youths in so many different facets and that's just a small component of the survey but in their mind, it's the main thing. HWANG: Definitely. This really tie back into that relationship evaluation, the evaluation is designed really talking about how we can utilizing relationship, building this relationship to motivate the youth to change. It's not just to say you come to our program, you learn the skills. But the skill is part of their life, can change their life to better so we will be able to have the skills so that youth can earn more money for their family, for example, or to even just simple Asian dance. One of my at-risk male dancers won the first place this year at the Hmong New Year’s and they've been so proud of themself and used to become acting with the Hmong gang. Now they are out there on the stage with 20,000 people cheering for them to get this first place at the Hmong Dance Competition. It means so much to them. They're really also pointing out a different direction so in the evaluation, they would say they love dance. They love the opportunity we create for them particularly improve the point. If we can build the relationship with these youth, we will be able to really encourage them to choose to use different arts to relieve their anger, to express themself on the stage, to be proud of themself, to speak up, then we can have some alternative. Then we hope those messages will be able to create a long-term impact to create a better system for us. POPE-SUSSMAN: Well thank you so much. LAWRENCE: Thank you. HWANG: Thank you so much. POPE-SUSSMAN: This has been Raphael Pope-Sussman of the Center for Court Innovation and I've been speaking with Ange Hwang, executive director of Asian Media Access, Tyree Lawrence, executive of the LVY Foundation. For more information for on the Center for Court Innovation, visit www.courtinnovation.org.      

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  • 4.05 Papa CJ - Stand-Up: What it takes

    · Play to Potential Podcast

    NUGGET CONTEXT“Find the balance to feed your stomach and feed your soul”: that’s the mantra for delivering to your potential, according to Papa CJ. In this nugget he talks about the qualities of being a good stand-up comedian and how these requirements actually transcend profession and time. Listen on to find tips to harness the true power of your potential. GUESTMy fourth guest on the Play to Potential Podcast series is Papa CJ. Papa CJ is a world-renowned stand-up comedian. He has won awards for both Asia’s and India’s Best Stand-up Comedian. Forbes Magazine called him ‘the global face of Indian stand-up’ and Toastmaster International called him one of the most influential comedians around the world.He has performed over 2000 shows across five continents. His work has been broadcast on NBC, BBC, Comedy Central, Showtime, MTV, Paramount, The Comedy Channel, ITV and a host of other international networks. He taped a Showtime USA Stand-up Comedy Special with Russell Peters in Amsterdam and in the American TV show Last Comic Standing, he was adjudged one of the top ten acts from over 3000 contestants across the world.Papa CJ holds an MBA degree from the University of Oxford. He frequently works with companies and educational institutions as a motivational speaker and executive coach. He has coached executives from over 50 blue-chip companies all over the world including Nike, Google & UBS in Europe, Deutsche Bank, Accenture & E&Y in USA, Universal Music and BBC in the UK and Unilever and HSBC in Asia.Papa CJ is a former management consultant and a qualified Laughter Yoga Leader. He is also an enthusiastic golfer however his passion is far greater than his talent!We spoke about how he got into Stand-up comedy, what it takes to succeed as a stand up comedian and some perspectives around how people should think about transitioning from a corporate world to a creative world where the economics can often be quite differentHOSTDeepak is a Leadership Advisor and an Executive Coach. He works with leaders to improve their effectiveness and in helping them make better decisions specifically around organisational and career transitions. He currently runs Transition Insight (www.transitioninsight.com) and works with leaders to handle phases of transition thoughtfully. He has worked as an Operations Consultant with KPMG in UK, Strategy Consultant with McKinsey in the US and as a Leadership Consultant with EgonZehnder (a Swiss Leadership Advisory firm) where he helped companies recruit CEOs, CXOs and Board Members and worked on Leadership Development. Deepak is a certified CEO Coach and is an alumnus of IIT Madras, IIM Ahmedabad and London Business School. His detailed profile can be found at https://in.linkedin.com/in/djayaramanDISCLAIMERAll content and opinions expressed in the podcast are that of the guests and are not necessarily the opinions of Deepak Jayaraman and Transition Insight Private Limited. The primary purpose of this podcast is for people to learn and make thoughtful career and leadership choices. Views expressed in comments to blog are the personal opinions of the author of the comment. They do not necessarily reflect the views of The Company or the author of the blog. Participants are responsible for the content of their comments and all comments that are posted are in the public domain.The Company reserves the right to monitor, edit, and/or publish any submitted comments. Not all comments may be published. Any third party comments published are third party information and The Company takes no responsibility and disclaims all liability The Company reserves the right, but is not obligated to monitor and delete any comments or postings at any time without notice.

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  • 4.03 Papa CJ - Plunging into Stand-Up

    · Play to Potential Podcast

    NUGGET CONTEXT“If you want to walk on water, you have to get out of the boat.” Hear how Papa CJ took the plunge into the gruelling yet satisfying world of stand-up comedy. A mix of conviction, grit, pragmatism, sacrifice and passion helped him make this journey. This nugget gives us an insight into planning and being prepared for transitions. GUESTMy fourth guest on the Play to Potential Podcast series is Papa CJ. Papa CJ is a world-renowned stand-up comedian. He has won awards for both Asia’s and India’s Best Stand-up Comedian. Forbes Magazine called him ‘the global face of Indian stand-up’ and Toastmaster International called him one of the most influential comedians around the world.He has performed over 2000 shows across five continents. His work has been broadcast on NBC, BBC, Comedy Central, Showtime, MTV, Paramount, The Comedy Channel, ITV and a host of other international networks. He taped a Showtime USA Stand-up Comedy Special with Russell Peters in Amsterdam and in the American TV show Last Comic Standing, he was adjudged one of the top ten acts from over 3000 contestants across the world.Papa CJ holds an MBA degree from the University of Oxford. He frequently works with companies and educational institutions as a motivational speaker and executive coach. He has coached executives from over 50 blue-chip companies all over the world including Nike, Google & UBS in Europe, Deutsche Bank, Accenture & E&Y in USA, Universal Music and BBC in the UK and Unilever and HSBC in Asia.Papa CJ is a former management consultant and a qualified Laughter Yoga Leader. He is also an enthusiastic golfer however his passion is far greater than his talent!We spoke about how he got into Stand-up comedy, what it takes to succeed as a stand up comedian and some perspectives around how people should think about transitioning from a corporate world to a creative world where the economics can often be quite differentHOSTDeepak is a Leadership Advisor and an Executive Coach. He works with leaders to improve their effectiveness and in helping them make better decisions specifically around organisational and career transitions. He currently runs Transition Insight (www.transitioninsight.com) and works with leaders to handle phases of transition thoughtfully. He has worked as an Operations Consultant with KPMG in UK, Strategy Consultant with McKinsey in the US and as a Leadership Consultant with EgonZehnder (a Swiss Leadership Advisory firm) where he helped companies recruit CEOs, CXOs and Board Members and worked on Leadership Development. Deepak is a certified CEO Coach and is an alumnus of IIT Madras, IIM Ahmedabad and London Business School. His detailed profile can be found at https://in.linkedin.com/in/djayaramanDISCLAIMERAll content and opinions expressed in the podcast are that of the guests and are not necessarily the opinions of Deepak Jayaraman and Transition Insight Private Limited. The primary purpose of this podcast is for people to learn and make thoughtful career and leadership choices. Views expressed in comments to blog are the personal opinions of the author of the comment. They do not necessarily reflect the views of The Company or the author of the blog. Participants are responsible for the content of their comments and all comments that are posted are in the public domain.The Company reserves the right to monitor, edit, and/or publish any submitted comments. Not all comments may be published. Any third party comments published are third party information and The Company takes no responsibility and disclaims all liability The Company reserves the right, but is not obligated to monitor and delete any comments or postings at any time without notice.

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  • Visualize Communication Success with Justin Ledford

    · 00:51:31 · Speaking with TJ Walker - How great leaders communicate through the media, public speeches, presentations and the spoken word

    Visualize Communication Success with Justin Ledford Justin's book http://visionstothetop.com/ More from Justin www.JustinLedford.net   Thanks for listening to Speaking with TJ Walker. The show about public speaking, media training, presentation skills, crisis communications, and presentation training. Please send any speaking-related questions you have directly to TJ at tj@mediatrainingworldwide.com and he will answer them in future episodes.   Please connect with us at Media Training Worldwide and post your questions here http://www.mediatrainingworldwide.com/blog/   On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tjwalkerinteractive Twitter: https://twitter.com/tjwalker Linkedin: T.J. 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Below is a transcript of the interview yeah 0:05 speaking the show about effective speaking in public to the media at work 0:15 and in life speaking with TJ Walker 0:25 my guest today is as close as it comes to a natural-born salesman as I've ever 0:32 encountered Justin ledford is with us by the age of 18 he sold more than a 0:37 hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars worth of cutco knives 0:42 I don't know what that is but it sure sounds difficult by the time you is just 0:47 a college it sold more than a million dollars almost 2 million dollars worth 0:51 of other products he's also the author of visions to the top a millionaire 0:57 secret formula to productivity visualization and meditation Justin 1:04 thanks for joining us 1:05 TJ thank you so much for having me i really appreciate it 1:08 so is it a myth or is there such a thing as a natural-born salesman 1:13 um I think it's a myth because anybody can be taught how to communicate with 1:21 people effectively and anybody can be taught how to sell a product especially 1:28 if they find a passion behind what they're selling you know at the end of 1:32 the day we're all selling herself and meeting with people i mean we're always 1:38 selling herself and so I believe it's a myth 1:41 I fortunately had great training great mentors and I literally learned from the 1:47 best of the best in the business and just followed after them and did what 1:52 they did and had great success from that philosophy follow the best I want to 1:58 hear about your mentors in the beginning in a moment the first share with us one 2:04 of your top nuggets from the book visions to the top what are people gonna 2:09 learn from this 2:10 wow that's a great question i truly believe that more and more people need 2:15 to access their inner spiritual self what i mean by that is we all have the 2:21 ability to close our eyes focus on our breath and we all have the ability to 2:26 some people call meditation it's actually known as visualization Olympic 2:32 athletes they they all do this stuff 2:35 Michael Phelps he just won the gold medal 2:38 two girls in the volleyball arena in the Olympics they just won the gold medal as 2:44 well and in their interview they talked about visualization as being the key to 2:49 their success 2:50 visualization is a practice where you in the quietness of your home or your 2:55 office you close your eyes and you see your day as if you want it to happen so 3:02 i have put together the the four phases of visualization and basically it i 3:08 teach people how to access a calm state phase one is just being focusing on your 3:16 breath 3:16 phase two is past successes or you're focusing on you you literally go back in 3:25 time and you see past images in your mind images that were you want in life 3:30 or a moment in time where you are happy somebody gave you love a moment in time 3:35 where you were celebrating and that's in your past and you cycle through multiple 3:40 times of your past that's past images future vision future visions is phase 3:48 three 3:49 that's where you focus on how you want your day to go and you see your day as 3:54 if it's happening right there before you at the highest level of success what you 3:59 want to achieve for the week 4:01 see those things unfolding before you and what you want to achieve for the 4:05 month or the year I go as far as five years 10 years 15 years and the practice 4:11 is anywhere from five minutes to 30 minutes every morning and I've studied 4:17 literally like some of the most successful businesspeople spiritual 4:22 leaders athletes celebrities and there's one thing in common its visualization so 4:31 let me play devil's advocate with a moment because I i certainly think that 4:35 visualization can be an important part of any successful persons toolkit and 4:42 I've heard Michael Phelps talk about that as well but i also know that for 4:45 example Michael Phelps has watched in detail all of his gold medal 4:51 winds from the swimming sessions he's actually not just visualized himself 4:57 winning gold he's watched video of himself watching gold and he's been able 5:02 to see the ultimate vision video in front of him so I so my frustration is 5:08 when it comes to communication is I often hear so-called public speaking 5:14 experts say close your eyes and visualize a standing ovation or 5:19 visualize your audience loving you and my point is don't even think about doing 5:26 that until you've practiced your speech on video and actually seen a vision of 5:33 yourself on video speaking the way you want it 5:36 tell me at are very contradictory or am i off base now you're absolutely correct 5:40 you actually have to practice 5:43 I mean there is a study but published by some russian scientist and they took for 5:47 group of Olympic athletes group one did 100-percent physical training group to 5:53 did 75% physical training and twenty-five percent mental training 5:56 group 3 50 50 physical and fifty percent mental group for they did 25-percent 6:03 physical training and seventy-five percent mental training and they found 6:07 that over and over group for was the one who outperformed all of them 6:12 yes they did their physical training twenty-five percent of the time and 6:15 seventy-five percent of time they did their visualization the reason this is 6:19 because our mind literally the neuroscience behind it are mine gets 6:24 wired even though we're just sitting there closing our eyes and tapping into 6:28 those emotions and feelings and senses and imagery our mind don't knows no 6:34 difference it wires itself as if it's already happening and yes you do have to 6:39 take action 6:40 you do have to practice some of the greatest speakers tony robbins zig 6:45 ziglar jim rohn they off you know as well as I know TJ they practice there's 6:50 the presentation or their pitch or their whatever they wanted to come across 6:56 multiple times before they went onstage 6:58 the book is visions to the top a millionaire secret formula to 7:03 productivity visual 7:05 zation and meditation Justin ledford thanks for being our guest 7:10 you're very welcome okay stop timeout let's pull back the curtain now that was 7:15 sort of the typical length of an interview if you were on let's say a 7:20 public radio show or NBC's Today Show Good Morning America 56 minutes now 7:27 let's step back for a minute just it and tell us what we're trying to accomplish 7:33 their how did you prepare how do you typically prepare for an interview like 7:37 that how do i typically prepare for an interview like we just had 7:41 yeah I literally get into power pose 7:44 there's something called power poses and weak poses and imagine you're standing 7:48 there with your chest out 7:50 you have one hand on the table your your your focus on your breathing 7:54 that's a power pose and then imagine the week pose where you're here maybe one 7:59 hand is on your chin or your arms are crossed 8:03 you're slouching over they've done Studies on power poses and weak poses a 8:08 person who's in a power pose their brain releases testosterone and decreases 8:13 cortisol levels whenever they're in a week pose it's the opposite 8:17 they lose testosterone and increased cortisol so long story short what that 8:22 means there is a woman in the Olympics recently and all ten girls are 11 girls 8:27 are about to race and run for the sprint from the jumping over those little 8:31 things and one of these ladies was in a power pose jumping up and down constant 8:36 state of a power pose and the other girls are just standing there literally 8:41 not doing anything and it was mind-boggling to me because I knew what 8:47 she was doing 8:47 I knew she was increasing her blood with testosterone and we're reducing cortisol 8:53 from the power pose long story short once the gun was fired 8:57 she flew down the track and beat everybody house this house this 9:03 associated with communication when you're in a confident state or also 9:08 known as peak state you feel confident you feel ready and that's how I prepare 9:15 i show up in that state of mine confidence 9:19 and a peak state with my chest out ready to take on whatever somebody has to 9:23 offer and Justin this probably won't surprise you it might surprise some of 9:28 our listeners I'm standing right now are you standing or sitting i'm standing 9:32 both hands on my hips chest out 9:35 ok it we're two peas in a pod and we didn't we didn't coordinate that advance 9:41 the other just practical reason I think it's a good idea to stand for podcast 9:46 interviews radio interviews is you're more likely to gesture move your hands 9:51 you're more likely to breathe more deeply and I'm not someone who stood 9:56 historically puts a lot of emphasis on the whole breath thing but i do think 10:01 standing and not being all slumped over is an advantage for any sort of spoken 10:07 presentation I agree 10:09 whenever you're you can breathe in you you have more time to think and respond 10:15 instead of being so like it's easy 10:19 I've been on stage before my first you know presentations and business and I 10:23 wasn't breathing and i noticed i started getting nervous 10:26 so it's important to take a breath when you're in front of you know we have we 10:30 have professional communicators here listening to us it's important to take a 10:34 breath calm your mind and focus on what you need to focus on to close that deal 10:40 or get your point across 10:41 let's talk about focus what was your specific goal in the interview we just 10:45 did and what were the three or more or fewer messages you really wanted to 10:50 leave with the audience my specific goal on I really truly believe I've had a 10:57 crazy amount of success before the age of 30 have made millions of dollars i 11:01 have multiple businesses that produce millions of dollars in business and it's 11:06 all because my goal is I want more people to tap into their inner power 11:11 self their their level 10 life i want more people to understand that we can 11:17 all visualize I give keynote messages all the time literally twice a month and 11:24 whenever i do the visualization practice i see people with huge smiles I see 11:29 tears coming down her face while their eyes are closed going through the 11:32 this so what I want people to realizes we all have a great power within us we 11:38 sometimes forget you know it's like going to the gym the first time you go 11:42 you might not be so strong you might run it might be difficult but the second and 11:46 third and fifth and tenth time you start to enjoy yourself running that's your 11:51 physical body 11:52 I'm talking about your inner mental clarity and focus and and that whenever 11:57 somebody starts tapping in that regularly that's when they start to 12:01 become more powerful so my purpose is to help people tap into visualization and 12:07 meditation ultimately so they become more productive and fulfill their dreams 12:14 so let's ask our audience let's ask them to give you feedback if you picked up on 12:20 those messages from the interview 12:21 feel free to to send a tweet to Justin and your twitter handle is with your 12:30 Twitter handle 12:30 oh my goodness it's that's a great question i am i why and for that you 12:38 know I think presumptuous my why I'm on my wife desert my wife handles all that 12:43 well but you don't have to use Twitter my question should be actually what is 12:48 the social media outlet you prefer people communicate with you on it so 12:54 they can find me on instagram at just ledford dot-com somebody took justin so 13:01 it's j ust led ffordd or you can obviously find me on Facebook Justin 13:07 ledford or of course my book visions to the top . com it has a contact form or 13:12 just inlet for.net no good rule for those of you hosting podcast don't 13:19 assume everyone thinks the same you to who 13:22 same as you do i'm assuming people like to give out twitter for instant feedback 13:27 but instagram is the perfectly fine social media outlet where I am 13:32 profoundly ignorant so i'm showing my pious there so thanks for thanks for 13:38 sharing that and go ahead and contact him on Instagram with any thoughts you 13:44 have on the messages now 13:46 mention anthony robbins I it's been probably 10 years but I've been to one 13:49 of his seminars he doesn't awful lot with visualization so do many of the 13:55 other self-help gurus you mentioned what's different about your approach how 14:00 do you how do you communicate differentiation in your brand of and i 14:07 don't mean this pejoratively self-help but it is help for business people in 14:11 more than just business but life 14:13 how do you differentiate your take on visualization well one of the things 14:17 that I do with the audience that is listening to me whether it's in a 14:21 keynote environment or if the reading my book are listening to the audiobook is 14:27 there's something called a dreams list and it's you know what is a GPS do a GPS 14:33 takes you to point a to point b as fast as possible and we all have dreams that 14:39 we might not be fulfilling because we forgot about him 14:42 we we are busy with work our family and whatever the case might be so what I do 14:49 is I tap into people's dreams and simply put allow them to just get out a pen and 14:54 paper and we write dreams list physical intellectual spiritual emotional 15:00 material psychological and we go through several others and then we list out 325 15:06 per category and the thing about it is when people don't know what they want in 15:11 life how can they expect to get it when you go shoot up up bow and arrow you 15:17 have to know what you're trying to hit and that's the concept with the dreams 15:22 list so I tie the dreams list into the visualization practice and when I'm 15:26 guiding somebody through the visualization practice i say certain 15:30 things where they're able to see what they want to happen in their dream so I 15:37 might need money might not be i'm not a guru or anything I'm just a normal guy 15:41 who has had a lot of success before the age of 30 and i tribute that too hard 15:47 work and visualization and our guest today is justin leopard he's the author 15:53 of visions to the top a millionaire secret formula to productivity 15:57 visualization 15:59 and meditation it is available on amazon i read the kindle version lot of good 16:06 nuggets there i would urge you to check it out 16:09 by the way this program is brought to you by media training worldwide if you 16:14 would like a free no-obligation media training or presentation training course 16:20 more than a hundred videos good media training worldwide dot-com and click on 16:26 the online school you can get that no obligation course Justin you do several 16:32 keynote addresses to various audiences conferences all over the country in the 16:37 world every month 16:39 what is your signature story that is an awesome story so when I was 18 years of 16:45 age I was having great success like you mentioned selling cutco knives which is 16:50 a really high-end kitchen knife that's made here in America and i cut my up i 16:56 was about to cut a pumpkin 16:58 i sat down on the floor to get better leverage i pulled a brand new knife out 17:02 of a sheath i put the pump the knife inside the pumpkin with my right hand I 17:06 put my left hand on the pumpkin and I push down and before I know that I i 17:12 dropped the knife for some reason and I felt this rush of heat go straight 17:17 through my hand I stood up and my hand was on fire and then all the sudden just 17:22 split open from out from my from my thumb all the way down to near my pinky 17:28 and at that moment I said to myself do not freak out I literally said that over 17:34 and over don't freak out 17:35 don't freak out what I I think I would be freaking out and because i knew i 17:39 could die if I'd freaked out blood 17:41 I mean I don't straight up man blood was gushing hitting my ceiling 17:46 I was hitting my fan was all over me all over my house my couch everything so I 17:50 ran inside my bathroom grabbed a purple towel rush wrap it around my arm went 17:57 outside started screaming for you by yourself i myself this is the day after 18:01 Halloween I went outside and I'm screaming how 18:04 path as long as I can and two people walk by me because my my apartment is 18:10 facing the the parking lot they thought I was joking they were literally 18:14 pointing at me like huh that's funny good prank and I'm screaming for help 18:19 fortunately somebody showed up by the grace of God at the you know nick of 18:23 time 18:24 drop me off to the hospital and I drop me off at the wrong location i had to 18:29 run to the ER and it with every run the blood was pumping from my arm with every 18:36 step and I get to the window and I'm like help help the lady said no no 18:42 you're fine just go sit down will be with you in a minute 18:45 I remember saying some curse words to her and hitting the window that she was 18:50 behind because I was dying you know and I go to the door 18:56 the big blue doors and I kick through the doors with all my might 19:00 ice cream how as loud as I can and the doctors they all they're pushing 19:06 patients this is behind the ER where doctors are supposed to go only and they 19:10 all look at me and start running to me I fall on the ground and i'm on the ground 19:16 bleeding out and this guy comes up to me he takes the purple towel off me it was 19:21 blue but now it's purple and he looks at my hand he's like oh my god what cut you 19:27 and I looked up at this guy and right in his eyes and I said cutco have you ever 19:34 heard of it it's okay i was still trying to sell the guy even though as died but 19:41 that was a great moment of my life I'd say that was a signature moment in my 19:45 life from that moment I realized you know I could make the choice to their 19:50 prescribing drugs because of the serious pain that I was in I I could have made 19:55 the choice to you know be a victim and play the victim mentality and all 20:01 woe is me but instead i realized that we are powerful we can accomplish anything 20:07 we want life and i decided to say no to what their prescribing and and heal 20:14 through my mind through meditation through prayer through this 20:18 organization there's a guy named dr. Emoto he studied water and the cells of 20:23 water something i highly recommend your audience look at and i decided to heal 20:29 myself and within a month the doctor by the way the doctor said you'll never use 20:33 your hand again he told me right in my eyes and I looked at him I said I will 20:38 not accept your diagnosis and then I woke up in a couple days later you know 20:45 within a week I was that back out in the field closing deals meeting with people 20:50 having a good time because i live by the five-minute rule if something happens in 20:54 my life and it's bad or good 20:57 let's just say it's a bad it happened I can't change it so why dwell on the past 21:03 you know some people get upset and bring it up a week or two or a month later for 21:08 me the five-minute rule i can i found out when i first learned about this 21:12 about 11 years ago I can be super upset stop my feet you know bigger and moan 21:17 but then it after five minutes I did that for like 30 seconds and i'm like 21:23 okay well I'm supposed to do this for five minutes and I'm already done I 21:26 don't have anything else to complain about 21:28 so after doing that the fourth or fifth time I realized you know what I can't 21:32 change it so let's just focus on what I can focus on and what I can achieve so 21:38 that's the moment in my life I'd like to share with your audience 21:41 anytime we go through challenges those are really just opportunities to see how 21:46 we're going to take it we're gonna grow from it or put our tail between our legs 21:51 and become weaker from it i chose to grow from it so how did you really start 21:57 selling your career at age 14 I was someone who was more comfortable public 22:05 speaking certainly than most kids i was one of these little student government 22:08 nerds running around giving speeches all the time and I had no problem doing that 22:14 but I could never sell anything I always came in last place for the magazine 22:18 sales in the candy sales for the various your baseball team your Cub Scout Troop 22:24 and I did try to sell i don't know if it was cutco knives but some sort of direct 22:30 sales thing I went out three days I think I sold nothing i was a kirby 22:36 vacuum cleaner salesman for three days so nothing so I have tremendous respect 22:42 for anyone especially the young age you can do that how did you do that 22:45 well i was actually mowing yards and doing odd jobs painting houses anything 22:50 of that nature at a young age I grew up in kind of a humble background you know 22:55 we didn't have everything 22:57 some of my friends more blessed and fortunate to have a nice home nice car 23:02 and my family went through a divorce at a young age and it was really 23:07 challenging I never wanted that to happen with my future family so I 23:11 realized it was mostly about money 23:14 the fights and stuff in my growing up so I realized I never wanted that so i 23:19 started as an entrepreneur at a young age I was that weird guy you know 23:23 selling candy in school I was you know selling the football tickets and and 23:29 just having car washes and and I always always like always very entrepreneurial 23:34 and one day I was painting a house i got a phone call while i was on a ladder and 23:40 was a guy named matt storm never remember it 23:43 he called me is super hot outside in Texas and asked if i was looking for 23:47 work I spilled the paint all over the house so obviously I was upset while I 23:51 was talking with him but he told me one of my friends had a lot of success which 23:56 I knew that guy was very successful 23:58 I went in for an interview and the rest is history and I just knocked it out of 24:04 the park once i got trained and started learning under the top people in the 24:07 business and what was the key to that just the ability to walk into any store 24:13 home and not worry about doors shut in your face or rejection is a numbers game 24:18 or how much of it is about just being a great communicator and good listener 24:23 once you've got someone 24:24 well you know in any business whether you're dealing with CEOs are trying to 24:28 close a prospect or you're dealing with your wife or husband or children you 24:32 have to know you have to listen to them and I wasn't afraid of hearing no 24:38 because you're right it is a numbers game so I'd go in people's houses and 24:43 just first and for 24:44 most how to win friends and influence people it's a great book I wanted to 24:49 become their friend first and foremost and by doing that if they like you and 24:54 they trust you then we'll do business with you 24:56 so that's what ended up happening people people like me because I was friendly 24:59 and I had a great product so they ended up buying it 25:04 so how've you continue to improve you obviously started honing your speaking 25:09 skills even if it's just one on one when you're 14 15 and selling knives 25:15 how do you continue to improve as a speaker and what what motivates you to 25:20 watch TED talks to watch old Ziggler videos you watch that's a great question 25:25 I'd say what motivates me I listen to podcasts literally every day on my way 25:29 to my office i rarely watch TV unless it's something very specific beneficial 25:35 knowledge because we are what we put inside of ourselves and if we're 25:39 listening to you know top-performing people speak and we're listening to you 25:44 know the best of the best 25:46 then it's going to rub off on us you know our level of income is in direct 25:49 proportion to the level of how much we're growing personally and we r who we 25:56 surround yourself with so i try to surround myself with you know very 26:00 successful people I'd like i said i don't watch very much TV unless it's a 26:05 documentary or something specific i do listen a TED talks all the time I love 26:10 your podcast and multiple other people's podcast knows that if you could share 26:15 with and thank you by the way but share with us some of the names of other 26:17 podcast you find particularly helpful very very good question i'd say Mady a 26:22 with millionaire mind set is one very good show podcast another one is how 26:29 Elrod with achieve your dreams 26:33 another one is the front row factor with John Roman the smart passive income 26:39 podcast with pat flynn those are a couple that just stick out to me but I'd 26:45 say the one that inspires me the most is John Roman the front row factor and how 26:49 I rod achieve your dreams never heard of those so i will check those out 26:54 certainly heard of pat flynn and do subscribe to his 26:56 podcast but the others are new to me so I will double-check that those out and 27:03 get the best speech you ever saw someone in person not necessarily on video or 27:10 Franklin Roosevelt's inaugural address but someone you saw in person the best 27:14 speech ever saw in person was in 2008 with a man named matthew kelly he wrote 27:19 the rhythm of life that book changed my life 27:22 he also wrote the dream manager that book also had a big influence of who i 27:28 am today Matthew Kelly is from Australia he's got this crazy awesome 27:33 Australian accent and he went up on stage and just dazzled me with how he 27:38 spoke his words and told his stories and it was just great man i left that 27:44 conference feeling like I was on fire and that was the best speech ever 27:48 listened to 27:49 ok and my next question it's okay did not mention somebody by name but can you 27:54 think of the worst speech you ever so on person to me it's peter low of the whole 28:00 success seminars to me he always seemed like sort of a bad parody of a 28:05 motivational speaker but is there anyone you can think of and if you want to just 28:09 describe them that's okay too 28:11 I can I can't on honestly think of like a bad speech that I've listened to I am 28:17 I could say that I've seen speeches where people weren't prepared where they 28:22 were shuffling through their notes where they weren't connecting with their 28:25 audience where they weren't getting their audience engaged 28:31 those are I can't nail one person is the worst speech I've ever heard but i can 28:36 say those simple things that if you're not connecting with your audience you 28:40 know shuffling your papers you're not prepared if you're standing in week 28:44 poses like i mentioned people can sense this stuff and those are some of the 28:50 things that i would say I've noticed bad speakers do any other major influences 28:57 on you as a communicator when you were growing up in particular TV announcers 29:02 are politicians you admired or respected because of their speaking skills 29:06 honestly my baseball coach he wasn't like a 29:09 you know the famous or anything but he had a really really big house and he had 29:13 a baseball field in his backyard and he was a drill sergeant and some when the 29:19 Marines or something like that and just the way he spoke to us he was caring but 29:24 at the same time he was Stern he was you know passionate and that the heat of the 29:29 moment like when we were in our baseball championship games but he was also you 29:34 know common collected when he needed to be 29:36 I didn't really watch much TV grown-up sorry don't have had nothing to be sorry 29:42 about i'm sure you will not be on your deathbed regretting a little TV you 29:46 watched yeah you just gave me a flashback talking about your baseball 29:51 coach I remember for completely different reasons the speech of my 29:56 little league football coach i was in fifth grade and everything out of the 30:01 coaches they were two coaches mouths was an obscenity and how I was brought up in 30:07 a very sort of cloistered protective Leave It to Beaver family great family 30:13 and your parents were mild mannered conservative southern baptist and I just 30:19 had never really heard a curse word other than you know once every five 30:23 years in a major crisis and i just remembered having this terrible you like 30:31 depressing almost like a slap in the face what I heard it from the football 30:36 coaches so it is amazing the things that can stick with you now for me that was 30:42 more than 40 years ago and that's amazing you brought that up because 30:46 things are ingrained in our subconscious mind forever 30:51 that's a fact and sometimes we can get rid of those things but our subconscious 30:56 is like it's like that you know hey you say the tip of the iceberg 31:01 while our conscious mind is the tip our subconscious is underneath the water its 31:05 deep its vast it goes on and on and on and on and that's your subconscious mind 31:10 clicking and saying hey remember that moment and i truly believe I mean that 31:16 I'm not the only one like i said i'm not a group if you know how to program your 31:19 subconscious mind you can achieve anything you 31:22 life i learned this 11 years ago when i first started in business and I've been 31:27 doing it since $YEAR and helped a lot 31:31 our guest is justin ledford he is the author of visions to the top a 31:36 millionaire secret formula to productivity visualization and 31:40 meditation available now on amazon and especially the kindle edition the 1i 31:47 read by the way this is speaking with TJ Walker you have any questions comments 31:54 suggestions for guests in the future criticisms critiques send it to me 31:58 directly on twitter at TJ Walker you can also email me TJ at media training 32:06 worldwide . com 32:09 is there anyone else you respect now in the business world political world media 32:16 world as a communicator and we're not really talking about their politics or 32:21 even what business there in but just their ability to communicate as far as 32:25 ability communicate i would say how alrod he is the creator of the miracle 32:31 morning which is incredible book that changed my life 32:35 he's one of the best speakers that I've ever listened to 32:38 same with jon berghoff jon berghoff is not very well known but companies hire 32:43 him like Vitamix he helped that company go from i think it was 50 that 50 32:49 million to over 200 million and one year he isn't very effective communicator i 32:56 don't really keep up with current events as much as some people do 33:01 I'm kind of in my own bubble of personal growth I like to listen to your podcast 33:05 and the other podcast i mentioned and then go close deals with people that's 33:11 pretty much what i'm doing throughout the day or giving speeches at 33:14 conferences let's talk about speeches you were speaking in an early age making 33:20 sales of your painting gigs everything else one-on-one but was the first time 33:25 you spoke and said you so okay that's an actual speech it's more than five people 33:30 it's not just a schoolroom 33:32 what was your first speech my first speech I'd have to say would be actually 33:39 at a cutco vent when I was 18 years of age I had an awesome summer I was 33:44 produced over at five hundred thousand dollars in sales personally and over a 33:48 hundred twenty-five thousand dollars as a manager I train people and taught them 33:52 how to sell and I was in room with 500 people in Arizona at a big conference 33:57 and I remember just the feeling of just nailing that conversate that that speech 34:03 people standing up clapping it was a great feeling man 34:07 well that's if only we could all have so many nice successes to start with that 34:14 is it a good benchmark some people have great first speeches son like Barbara 34:20 Corcoran the famed real estate investor who is now on shark tank always talks 34:25 about our very first speech she stood up 1,000 people and her just throws nothing 34:31 came out of her mouth and she ran out of the room 34:34 it's but things turned out for her to you know speaks all over the place it's 34:38 a muscle TJ it really is my first speech ever 34:41 it was a childhood play and school I don't know how old i was i was a sheriff 34:46 and I remember being nervous and you know feeling anxiety as a kid I remember 34:51 these feelings today and the first time I didn't do so well and then the second 34:56 time and third that you know you get better with practice 34:59 they say practice makes perfect but i like to say if you try to practice 35:03 perfectly 35:05 that's how you get it perfect and any star athletes have bad days had 35:11 strikeouts 35:13 what are some of your bad speeches surely you must have had some that 35:16 weren't quite as smooth as the first one 35:18 some of my bad speech is let's see i was trying to I'm trying to think my worst 35:26 speech i I've been brutal stages before I I've tried fallen off the stage before 35:33 that stuff my worst speech ever happened when i was $DAY i was young I you know 35:41 19 years old I started to try to sell to real estate agents inside of their 35:45 office 35:46 so I'm used to one-on-one personal person i tried to do business to 35:50 business sales but the thing is i have to go in and do a team meeting where 35:55 there's like a hundred or two hundred real estate agents and I tried that and 35:59 the people in my business that do that phenomenally but when I tried it I 36:03 didn't do so well and I didn't have that immediate success that I would use to 36:07 having so i decided to stick with my strength my strengths were one-on-one 36:13 with the people you know I've been referred to and that's the thing with 36:17 your with your communicating your audience that communicates find out what 36:21 your strengths are and focus on those strengths 36:25 that's what you want to focus on that's what I do in my business and in all 36:31 parts of my life as well and its really helped me go very far by focusing on my 36:36 strength I do agree that that's generally the best way to go too many 36:43 people obsess over the the two-percent area where they're not doing something 36:46 right 36:47 so for example i am just not a good stand-up comic i took a stand up comedy 36:51 class 20 years ago never got to the point where I really felt like it was 36:57 working even with a test audience of friends in the stand-up comedy class and 37:02 you know what I just don't do stand-up comedy and no one's been disappointed 37:08 on the other hand i was doing an interview at ABC couple years ago my 37:16 wife was with me and she said you started every single answer using the 37:22 word well I didn't say our arm but I said well so i did have a problem there 37:30 and i decided to improve so I wrote out the word well but the International no 37:35 sign around it like no left-hand turn no parking and I tape that sign on my cell 37:40 phone computer and a few other places and drastically reduce it so we all have 37:47 flaws i know i'm certainly not perfect 37:52 do you see any flaws you have now as a speaker where are you still trying to 37:56 improve as a communicator 37:57 yeah 37:58 I feel I definitely have flaws and I feel I always find myself doing things 38:03 last minute I i like to rush I like that feeling of showing up in a peak state 38:10 and just nailing that moment so I should probably spend more time planning and 38:14 preparing and by what i mean by that 38:17 I kind of live in the philosophy of ready shoot aim instead of the 38:23 philosophy of set of the philosophy 38:25 ready aim fire so it helps me in the past but it's also hurt me in the past 38:33 so I should probably be more prepared 38:36 that's one of my flaws and speaking of not being fully prepared 38:42 can you think of your i'll give the opportunity positive to your worst media 38:47 interview ever 38:48 and your best media interview my worst media interview ever and my best okay so 38:55 I'm gonna start with my best my best interview ever or speech ever 39:01 it was funny enough it happened last week I was a keynote speaker at a 39:05 conference in Arizona or it could have been a two months ago in Houston there 39:10 they both felt the same just awesomeness if that's even a word that the speech 39:15 was titled visions to the top obvious in my book and I basically felt like tony 39:20 robbins because the room was interacting their answering questions people came up 39:26 on stage and I did some mental psychological techniques on them the 39:31 connection in the room was it was really on point at the end of it people were 39:35 crying during in at the end people were crying with joy the negative ones in the 39:40 room they ended up being cheerful and happy and the managers of each division 39:45 they contacted me afterwards and they said their teams were noticeably doing 39:49 better in performance and more productive so that would have to say one 39:53 of my best training some cells people in different states especially that last 39:58 statement that people were contacting you after the fact seeing an actual 40:02 change of performance because that's the hard part getting a tier or standing 40:07 ovation for a lot of people can be easy but it's all forgot 40:12 sometimes hours even minutes later 40:16 yeah you got to give them like a plan of action you know okay so what did we 40:20 learn today 40:21 one two three and then you know you get them something to do rather than feel 40:28 people they will remember how you made them feel but if you give them a plan of 40:32 action with that feeling they'll go home and do that action since you made them 40:37 feel great now my worst interview man thats I i don't want to sound like i 40:44 don't consider anything but i'm i'm really trying to have a hard time my 40:49 worst interview okay so this was I here we go 40:52 I was on bourbon street at the crowne plaza hotel I was a keynote message for 40:56 young college students who were also in sales and there was just a lot of 41:02 distractions i'm going to blame it on the distractions like bourbon street and 41:05 you know a TD and these kids I was the last person to speak so they were ready 41:10 to get you know go and have fun 41:13 someone to blame it on that but I also that does seem like a less than ideal 41:18 scenario and inform hat for a serious interview is a 41:23 I well remember when I was young on Bourbon Street and listening to people 41:28 pontificate on anything serious who is not the top priority and you know as far 41:32 as your audience goes like if I have found that the introduction is the 41:37 biggest one of the most important things the district manager he didn't introduce 41:42 me properly 41:43 he just like hey this is just left he's awesome let's let's hear him talk 41:47 instead of what I'm used to this guy has succeeded ah he's doing great and here's 41:53 why you should let you know the introduction whenever you're meeting 41:56 somebody or introducing somebody make that person feel special and what 42:01 happens is they become more receptive to you and open to listening and this is 42:06 slightly different but related how do you introduce yourself let's say you're 42:10 at a speaker's convention or some conference and all the sudden it's 30 42:16 people the room and they say okay let's all go up us all stand up and introduce 42:19 ourselves for 20-30 seconds how do you introduce yourself in that situation 42:24 because I know a lot of people who are articulate and accomplished suddenly 42:30 turn into just the most boring name rank and serial number people when that 42:36 happens first of all I would stand in a power pose and I would smile and that's 42:43 a how's everybody doing and I get some odd get some interaction with the stage 42:48 or with the group whoever i'm talking to and then if there was no interaction i'd 42:53 say i'm sorry i can't see very well and I put my hand on my ear and say how is 42:59 everybody doing in the next thing you know everybody's like we're doing great 43:02 so I get some interaction and then save guys my name is Justin ledford i'm not a 43:08 guru I'm just a young man who has a passion and a dream to help people 43:12 become a better version of themselves 43:14 I've had a lot of success before the age of 30 and i just have a message 43:20 it's inside my book visions to the top I teach people how to use visualization 43:23 how to use meditation and ultimately live a dream fulfilled life you know 43:29 that's basically what i would do 43:31 I'd say whether whether you're super successful in life or maybe you haven't 43:36 made it to the success that you want 43:38 it's like a buffet platter it has nuggets of wisdom inside of it that can 43:43 teach anybody at any walk of life and that's something you're interested in 43:48 you should come check we should have a conversation and I did it with a smile 43:52 and just a hot you know waving my hands people can sense if you're if you're 43:57 stuck up and stubborn and you know I like to have fun with life i wear 44:02 flip-flops you know I'm just a laid back kind of dude who home wearing Crocs 44:07 right now myself away but with we heard two peas in a pod it sounds like an 44:12 awesome i want to hear from you I don't certainly want to end on a negative note 44:18 but i do want to know what you think is some of the worst communication advice 44:23 out there because anybody can call themselves a communications expert or 44:27 are you communications guru that to use that word that I think you're not a huge 44:32 fan of what i want to know what some of the best 44:35 communication advise you think there is that isn't it either isn't followed or 44:41 people just don't stop to think about but I also want to know what bad advice 44:46 is out there that you think people should really tion absolutely that is a 44:51 great question and I will say as far as like the best advice goes you know 44:58 there's a quote that I've i live by 45:01 let's see if I can find it it's from jim rome and he said I'm having a hard time 45:07 finding it would be basically said your level of income is in direct proportion 45:14 to the amount of time you spend growing yourself and as far as communication 45:20 goes know who your audiences that's one of the best piece of advice know who 45:26 they are know what their struggles r know what their strengths are know what 45:31 they're trying to accomplish know where they're having difficulties and if you 45:37 can know that come from a place of value 45:40 how can I offer value to this audience whenever I got that in my head by 45:46 offering value people that helped me in my communication tremendously so that's 45:52 a one of the best pieces of communication that people rarely follow 45:56 know your audience and offer value to them now 45:59 did you ask me about the worst communication advice yes I'd say worse 46:05 communication device 46:07 great question uh going up and not being confident not looking people in the eye 46:15 not connecting with your audience not interacting with them these are things 46:20 I've mentioned before but I've seen it before when they're up on stage in there 46:24 they're just kind of going through the motions you know conceded like that's 46:29 not good you want to connect with your audience and get them interacted that 46:34 would be my tip and are there ways of interaction that just don't work out i 46:41 will be honest with you I personally just 46:44 really don't like it when a speaker gets up and says how's everyone doing today 46:51 or you know who here wants to make more money to me always feels very contrived 46:58 and like they're manipulating me it's like okay I have to raise my hand and 47:02 say something 47:04 how do you how do you make this judgment between the right amount of engagement 47:09 versus something that can maybe half the audience likes be the other half thinks 47:13 is cheesy and manipulative 47:16 that's a great question you really got to feel your audience out and they're 47:20 you're right TJ there's people who don't like don't like that stuff so there's 47:25 ways around it 47:27 what you do is you change their physiology and what I do is when i 47:31 noticed that kind of weirdness in the audience 47:33 I'll get them to say everybody stand up please grab all your belongings 47:37 I need everybody to take a deep breath in and a lot of times as they need to 47:41 breathe and then ok next I want you to turn to your neighbor on your right and 47:45 give my little massage turn to your left and give a little massage and that 47:49 changes their physiology changes their mental state and then if I see it again 47:53 in the presentation I will literally all guide the audience if it's a one-on-one 48:00 will walk somewhere else and change the atmosphere if it's a group presentation 48:04 i'll change it up and we'll go we'll all get them to move into a different 48:10 location 48:11 whenever it's like a hundred or 200 plus people will have everybody switch seats 48:15 that changes the philosophy physiology of people and it kind of throws them off 48:20 a little bit and then they're they're back in peak state and final question 48:27 just what is it you want my audience to do well the is av audio sounds 48:34 pretentious amari audience what am I rush limbaugh been doing this for 50 48:37 years now what you want the listeners to the bizzle of this show to do 48:42 well you know obviously I appreciate asking i would love your audience to 48:46 pick up a copy of my book i'm actually for your audience i'm giving away that 48:49 first two chapters for free just so they can get a feel for it 48:53 I want them to read that at visions to the top . 48:57 Tom against visions to the top calm and if you like it be a supporter join our 49:03 Facebook community there's people all around the world 49:06 I never would have expected this Russia China Japan all over Europe emailing me 49:11 everyday telling me how this tactic or this technique has really helped them 49:16 and business are in their health so I want your audience to become the best 49:20 version of themselves and that how does that happen it happens by personal 49:25 growth whenever people are personally growing that's when better better this 49:31 begins it allows them to focus on contribution and and living a better 49:37 life you know as well as I know TJ whenever you learn something new you 49:42 want to share it with somebody right of course 49:46 so I want your audience to be the best communicators possible learn how to 49:51 visualize and definitely pick up a copy of my book visions to the top calm and 49:56 they could find you on facebook just by typing in Justin ledford that is correct 50:01 they can search for genocide for addition the time that's led f 0 rd 50:06 that's correct and also my website 50:08 Justin led for.net Justin led for.com and.net 3 w's . Justin ledford . net and 50:18 we'll post a link to that in the show notes as well 50:21 Justin thanks for being our guest today again the name of the book visions to 50:25 the top a millionaire secret formula to productivity visualization and 50:31 meditation available now on amazon 50:34 Thank You th-thank you speaking with TJ Walker has been brought to you by media 50:40 training worldwide for all of your media training and public speaking training 50:43 needs whether it's one-on-one training workshops group workshops individual 50:49 workshops online on-demand courses in person or skype training all available 50:55 to you from media training worldwide com 50:59 speaking with TJ Walker is the number one rated daily streaming TV and radio 51:08 show devoted to all aspects of speaking and communication if you received value 51:14 from this show then please subscribe to it at media training worldwide . com 51:20 please review the show leave comments and share it with your friends and 51:24 colleagues today

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  • #24: [Re-Edit]: Two Precise Steps To Getting Attention

    · 00:27:16 · The Three Month Vacation Podcast: Online Small Business|Marketing Strategy Plan| Sean D'Souza | Psychotactics

    If you're struggling to get attention on your website or when you meet a client, it's because you're not using two core factors: novelty and consequences. When you use these two concepts back to back with each other, something magical happens?you get attention! http://www.psychotactics.com/dc (Finish Your Book Workshop in Washington DC)http://www.psychotactics.com/denver (Where I'm speaking at the Copyblogger conference). http://www.psychotactics.com/magic (for magic, of course) === Sean D'Souza:Hi. This is Sean D'Souza from Psychotactics.com, and you're listening to The Three-Month Vacation Podcast. This podcast isn't some magic trick about working less. Instead, it's about how to really enjoy your work and enjoy your vacation time.  On January 15, 2008, Steve Jobs stood in front of an audience and in his hand he had something that seemed quite boring. It was just an envelope, a yellow envelope, a manila envelope but, still, quite boring. Then he proceeded to take out a computer from that envelope, and that's when the audience gasped. What did Steve Jobs do that was so amazing? It's what you should do as a presenter no matter where you stand in front of an audience. It's what you should do when you're presenting something, a product or a service, and that's something that you should work on. It's called attention.  While we all seek attention, we don't seem to get as much of it as we'd expect. The reason why we don't get that attention is simply because we don't understand the elements of attention. Attention has two elements, novelty and consequences. We'll start off with the concept of novelty. What is novelty? Let's take the example of Sara Blakeley. She started this company called SPANX. SPANX is an undergarment that smoothes the contours of a woman's body, making clothes more flattering, making them more comfortable.  Sara was having a problem. She was having trouble making her first sale. That's because when you're presenting something, it's usually in a boardroom and some buyer is looking at your stuff and you're in a list of seventeen buyers or seven hundred buyers. For some reason, Sara decided to change the tactics. She decided to go with novelty. Instead of making the presentation in the boardroom, she decided to take the buyer to the Ladies' Room. There she was at a Neiman Marcus in Dallas and they go to the Ladies' Room.  To really make a point, Sara had worn some form-fitting white pants, and because it was form-fitting and white, well, you can tell it wasn't that flattering for a woman. Then she pulled out her product, which she had called SPANX, and she put it on and the buyer saw the before and after. Right there and then, there was a moment of conversion. There was this flashing bolt of light and suddenly she was able to sell this product that she was having so much trouble selling before. What she found or stumbled on or figured out was this factor of novelty. The whole scenario of the Ladies' Room, the white pants, it being form-fitting, all of that combined to form this moment where it was impossible for the buyer to ignore. That's really what you're doing. You're making it impossible for the buyer to ignore you.  In this episode we look at the methods that you can use to get novelty going. We'll look at the length of the novelty and finally, we'll look at the connection. Once you've done your novelty act, how do you connect? How do you stay relevant? Where do you go from there? Let's start off with the first one, which is the methods that you need to use to get to novelty.  When I make the Brain Audit presentation, I do something very odd. I'll step into the audience and pick up a chair that no one is sitting on. Then I will get the chair to the front of the room and I will say, "I'm going to sit on this chair, stand up." Sit on the chair, stand up. Sit on the chair and stand up. Then I turn to the audience and say, "Did any one of you expect this chair to break? Why didn't the chair break?" What you've seen there is a demonstration of novelty. It's breaking that cycle of whatever people are doing. The method that was used in this system of novelty was to use the demonstration.  You can use stories, analogies, and demonstrations. Those are the most common uses of novelty. Whether you're writing an article, you're doing a presentation, you're in front of a client and you're selling some product or service, one of these three methods, stories, analogies, or demonstrations, are extremely powerful. The reason why they're powerful is more important, and that is because it breaks the pattern. When an audience or a client is expecting something and you've come out from left field, they are forced to pay attention. You are forced to pay attention when someone walks onstage and pulls out a computer from an envelope. You are forced to pay attention when someone starts to pull up a chair and sit on the chair and stand on it.  In another example, when I was speaking in Chicago, there were about two hundred fifty people in the audience. I don't know about you, but it's very hard to get two hundred fifty people to pay attention to you. The topic that I was speaking about was pricing, about how to increase your prices without losing customers. How would you start such a presentation? I started the presentation with a video of New Zealand. That is novelty. It breaks that pattern in a matter of seconds. It doesn't matter what you are thinking or doing or thinking of doing. The pattern is broken. You have to pay attention.  When Tom Dickson wanted to sell his blenders, well, how can you break a pattern with blenders? When an iPhone comes out, it's extremely coveted. To destroy an iPhone is crazy. It almost flies in the face of reason, so that's what he did. He broke the pattern by going the opposite way. What he did was he took that iPhone and put it in a blender and crushed it to pieces. That got everyone's attention. He became a sensation on YouTube. The sales have soared since then. Whenever you look at this factor of how people have got attention, it's by going almost counterintuitive, that everyone expects you to go one way and you're going the other way.  When we go back to the sixties and we look at Bill Bernbach, he started up an advertising agency which is now called BBDO. He had a lot of these things. We had the Volkswagen, which is the Beetle. All of America was thinking big, big cars, big everything, Big Mac. His campaign was completely the opposite. it was think small. They started selling these Bugs, the Beetle Bugs, and they were about thinking small. In the car rental business, Avis and Hertz have been at each other's throats forever. It was such a delight, such an attention-getter when Avis said, "We're number 2. So why go with us?" Immediately, that gets your attention.  What we're looking at here is this attention-getter, which is this disruption in what people are expecting to get and what you give them. It's done through stories, analogies, demonstrations, and just plain counterintuitiveness, but at the very core of it, what gets attention is the novelty. If you're expecting me to say something and I say exactly that, you fall asleep. You have to find something that's going to wake me up. Yes, novelty wakes me up, but what about the length of that novelty? How long should I go before I stop?  When we read a novel, we tend to find a lot of description; the character is being built up. The same thing applies to movies; the character is being built up. When you're communicating, you don't have that build-up time. Let's say you're writing an article, you've got maybe a paragraph, maybe two paragraphs of telling a story or a demonstration or creating some kind of analogy. That's it. Then you have to go and connect. You have to continue. You have to go to the next section. You can't stay in the novelty for too long because the novelty wears itself out.  The same thing applies with presentations. When you're standing there in front of an audience, you don't have half the presentation to get the novelty across. In fact, it would be boring. When you sit on that chair, stand up, sit on the chair, stand up, that's quick. When Sara Blakeley went through the whole routine of changing into SPANX and showing how it made a difference, that was quick. The same thing applied to Blendtec where he spun those iPhones around in the blender. Again, it's quick. It doesn't have to be very quick; it just has to be quick enough. The novelty lasts for a few minutes, and this applies to reading or speaking or anything.  If you're standing in front of a person, making a presentation, you've probably got a few minutes, maybe three or four minutes. If it's an article or a sales page, you probably have less time; you have twenty seconds, thirty seconds. The novelty of a story, demonstration, or analogy doesn't last very long. It's best to get there, not to be too hurried about it, but to tell the story and get out of there. Pretty much like you've heard in the podcast here. There's a story, it shows up, you get the point, and then we move on to something else. That something else is the third part in today's episode, and that is the consequences.  When you look at a story like Little Red Riding Hood, yes, it's a story. It's a novelty, it's very interesting and kids love it. The little girl is headed to her grandma's place and she's taking some goodies for grandma. Then along the way, she meets the wolf and there are consequences, not just for the girl but for the grandma as well. There is a moral to that story, but before we get to any kind of moral, we are looking at two distinct phases. One is the whole novelty of the girl meeting the wolf and then the consequences.  Sometimes the consequences are not so apparent. When Sara Blakeley shows the before and after of SPANX, those consequences are apparent immediately. When Steve Jobs took the MacBook Air out of the envelope, there didn't seem to be many consequences. In the Steve Jobs presentation, the consequences are in the lightness. When you don't have that light MacBook Air, which was billed as the lightest notebook, well, you've got a heavy computer.  These messages are driven through the media and in the presentation. When you went with Avis instead of Hertz, it was to show you that Hertz is number one; they don't care. Number two, we have to care. In many cases the consequences are either stated or implied. When you're making a presentation, when you're speaking to a client, you cannot afford to let it be implied. You cannot afford to let the client figure out what the consequences are. You need to tell them.  When I'm making a presentation on pricing and I show them this video of New Zealand, the next thing I talk about is The Three-Month Vacation and how pricing affects your ability to go on vacation and how you have to work a lot harder and money is not easy to come by. What happens is a very unconnected topic like the video on New Zealand then connects nicely into pricing with consequences. When I do the Brain Audit presentation, sitting down, standing up, sitting down, standing up, what are the consequences there?  Again, the consequences are explained. It's how a chair is built on science and how marketing doesn't work on science, how it falls apart, how we raise thousands of dollars just buying some crazy system that's supposed to be working tomorrow instead of understanding the science behind it and why things work. Then the audience gets it. We've gone from a stage of novelty to a stage of consequences, and that's how you get and you keep that attention. You can do that very, very quickly. It does take some practice. All of the great stories and demonstrations and analogies, all of them have to have this little practice routine before they go live. Once it goes live, you'll see the results for yourself. You'll stand up and people will pay attention. Then you'll drive home the consequences, and they'll want to know how do I buy into whatever it is you're selling?  Yes, that brings us to the end of this episode. Let's do a quick summary. We started out with the methods of getting attention. We saw that the methods are usually a story, an analogy, or a demonstration, but at the very core it has to be almost counterintuitive. It has to be something that the audience or your client is not expecting to hear, and that gets the attention. It snaps the person to attention.  The second thing you want to do is you want to figure out the length. The length needs to be short enough. In an article, that means a paragraph, maybe two paragraphs. When you're meeting a client face-to-face, you'll get three, four minutes. Anything more and you're just pushing the boundaries. Novelty lasts only so long, and then you have to move to the next stage, which are the consequences. That was our last section, which was the consequences. Sure, you can have implied consequences, but it's very dangerous because the client needs to know specifically what are the consequences of not taking that action. You should bring that in your presentation, in your speech, in your article, in your sales letter.  There you go. Novelty and consequences, and you get attention. What one thing can you do today? We covered quite a lot. The important thing that you can do today is to look at whatever you're saying. Whatever you're saying is what you'd call intuitive. It's what you've trained yourself to say. How about going counterintuitive? Let me give you an example. I started writing a series on writer's block this week, and maybe I'll make it into a booklet, maybe a book, but I went counterintuitive. How would we do this intuitively? How would we come up with a title? We'd say, "How to avoid writer's block." Mine was counterintuitive. It said, "How to get writer's block." Notice how it gets your attention? That's what you want to do, that one thing.  This week, try and do one thing that is counterintuitive and you'll see how it just gets the attention of your audience. Then move to the consequences.  Yes, that's the end of this episode. If you haven't already rated this podcast, please do so at iTunes. If you have a list and would like to share this podcast with your list, please do so. I'm telling you because unless you tell, things don't happen. On another front, if you've been struggling to finish your book or your e-book, then there is a workshop and this is at Psychotactics.com/dc. It's three days. It's a lot of fun. More importantly, it helps you understand the structure of how to finish a book.  A book is very frustrating to write, and the reason why it's frustrating is not because of the whole factor of the content. You already have the content in your head. It's how you structure it. When you are able to structure it quickly, put the book together quickly, your client is able to do the same. They're able to read it, to consume it. As a result, they come back for more. They come back for more consulting, for more training, and for more books and products.    That's Psychotactics.com/dc. We'll see you there on May 5th, 6th, and 7th. That's it from The Three-Month Vacation and Psychotactics.com. If you haven't been to Psychotactics, go there today. Bye for now. 

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  • Capitulo 7. Soporte o dock barato para smartphone y portátil.

    · El Consultorio de Enteratec

    Después de gastar un pastizal en un smartphone de los buenos, o en un android, toca la moral un poco tener que gastarse más dinero aún en un dock, o un soporte para un portátil que nos ha dejado pelada la cuenta del banco. En este capítulo os contamos varias manualidades que podéis hacer con vuestros hijos, sobrinos, o solos… para que os salga realmente barato, con materiales cotidianos, haceros un soporte de dispositivo que en relación calidad precio, no tienen demasiado que envidiar a los caros. El primer dock, de Dessine Moi Un Object Adoro este sitio, no sólo por el dock, sino por toda la creatividad que se respira en el: http://www.dessinemoiunobjet.com/iphone-and-itouch-paper-stand-dock/ Si entráis en su web, el autor asegura que os manda a vuestro correo de forma gratuita el pdf para que os lo imprimáis, antes se descargaba directamente. De cualquier modo, aquí tenéis la imagen por si la queréis descargar e imprimir en un A4 Template de DessineMoiUnObject. Pulsa para ver grande e imprimir. Y así es como queda con el cartón del pescado que os comento en el capítulo Dock Para mi iPhone. Con la carita que me hizo mi hija Paula al lado… Segundo dock. Stand para Tablet hecho con una percha Como una imagen vale más que mil palabras, os pongo un vídeo de cómo realizarlo, en menos de 30 segundos. http//www.youtube.com/embed/YfFKT-VtK4s Tercer dock. Stand para tablet con caja de pizza. Es algo asqueroso, por aquello del olorcillo a anchoas, pero es increíble. Lo podéis ver, por ejemplo, en este enlace: http://www.instructables.com/id/Pizza-Box-iPad-Stand/ En esta web, por cierto, también están los modelos en pdf, por si los queréis hacer en cartulina u otro material resistente. Cuarto dock. También con una caja de pizza, pero esta vez para el portátil. DockLapTop. Hacer click para ver grande. Podéis ver la web de estos tíos resalaos en este enlace: http://www.behance.net/gallery/Laptop-stand-made-of-a-pizza-box/5580265 Por último mi creación, el poliespaniphone Podéis ver en esta entrada, el proceso y resultado con mi flamante iphone 3GS. Poliespaliphone. Mi dock casero por detrás. Creo que no me dejo nada en el tintero. Como siempre, para cualquier cosa, recordad, nos podéis encontrar en Twitter con las cuentas @Enteratec_com, @Materron y @Pacaspor. Enviadnos vuestras consultas tanto aquí como en comentarios en el blog o en el formulario de contacto del blog. La música del podcast: Intro: Lucky_One del artista George_Woods. Métodos de contacto: Funny_Children_s_Song del grupo Akashic_Records

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  • Comics Eddie Pepitone & Dave Sirus

    · 04:22:15 · David Feldman Show

    Trump, Healthcare, Europe, Bigotry and Eddie Pepitone's dirty dark secrets with Comics Eddie Pepitone, Dave Sirus, and Arish Singh. Plus World Politics Review's Judah Grunstein and Professor JB Silvers. Eddie Pepitone confesses his dirty dark fantasies. Dave Sirus explains why Donald Trump Junior is an even larger slice of human excrement than Donald Trump Senior. Arish Singh talks about getting kicked out of a Trump rally. Judah Grunstein, editor-in-chief of World Politics Review, explains why Trump is not so far off from the GOP mainstream when it comes to foreign affairs. And Professor JB Silvers explains why the Senate's new healthcare bill is naïve and unworkable.    Described as a "cult favorite”, Pepitone is a staple in the Los Angeles comedy scene. He is known for his regular appearances on the WTF with Marc Maron podcast and his sketch appearances on Late Night with Conan O'Brien and Conan, often playing his recurring role as the "New York City Heckler" in the audience.He has also had recurring roles on television programs such as The Life & Times of Tim, The Sarah Silverman Program and Nick Swardson's Pretend Time. His short mockumentary film "Runyon: Just Above Sunset", co-written by Karen Simmons, and directed by Troy Conrad, won Best in Show (as well as Best Actor in a Mockumentary) at the L.A. Mockfest as well as Best Comedy Short at the Burbank Film Festival in 2011.  Pepitone was a first round contestant during the first season of Last Comic Standing. Throughout the late 1990s and early 2000s Pepitone was a regular sketch performer on Late Night with Conan O'Brien. He has appeared in films such as The Muppets, Old School, School for Scoundrels, and Terri. Pepitone regularly performs stand-up comedy at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater in Los Angeles. Pepitone has made many guest appearances on comedy programs such as Bob's Burgers, The King of Queens, Chappelle's Show, Monk, Community, Childrens Hospital, The Eric Andre Show, Happy Endings, Flight of the Conchords, 2 Broke Girls, Whitney and It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia. Eddie also appears in the 2012 documentary "Alone Up There" that looks at the craft of stand-up comedy.  Pepitone's first stand-up album A Great Stillness was released in 2011. His also released a sketch comedy album in 2006 called "The Big Push".  From 2011 to 2013, Pepitone starred in the 500 episodes of the web comedy series "Puddin."  In the fall of 2013, Pepitone started hosting his own podcast called "Pep Talks" after being a member of the "The Long Shot" podcast for several years.  In 2014, he won the September 7 episode of @midnight.  A documentary about Pepitone's career entitled The Bitter Buddha was released in 2012 to positive reviews.]  Pepitone is now starring in the Adult Swim comedy, "Your Pretty Face is Going to Hell". He stars as Eddie, a tortured soul.  Dave Sirus is a writer and stand-up comedian who performs at venues in New York and Los Angeles. He produces and writes sketch comedy, is known for interviewing the Westboro Baptist Church members under the guise of 'Brick Stone' and appearing as a guest and recurring comedic correspondent on RT's The Alyona Show and HuffPost Live. On September 21, 2015, he was hired as a writer for the forty-first season of Saturday Night Live for which he was nominated for an Emmy for Writing in a Variety Series, and won a WGA award for writing in a comedy/variety series. He is currently a writer for Triumph, the Insult Comic Dog's Summer Election Special and Election Watch series on Hulu.   He has produced other interview videos as his Brick Stone character with Occupy Wall Street residents, conspiracy theorists, street preachers, gay pride marchers, and the general public.  Dave is a featured comedian on season 1 episode 7 of nuvoTV's Stand Up and Deliver.  Dave interviewed the Westboro Baptist Church while protesting the Golden Globes January 12, 2014[ and for the second time included a "Ramone" reference to the Opie and Anthony show. He appeared on the Opie & Anthony Show on Sirius/XM the following Tuesday. Along with discussing the Church, Sirus also mentioned his upcoming mockumentary Archie Black: The Worst starring O&A's Jim Norton, Jay Mohr, Artie Lange, Dee Snider, Otto & George, and Rick Overton. The film is premiering at the LA Comedy Fest. The comedy of Arish Singh, with its unique fusion of absurdist humor and political commentary has been praised by many, and described by many others as “yeah, just not my thing.” Singh is a Chicago-based comedian who has opened for national acts like Tim Heidecker (Tim & Eric), Hasan Minhaj (The Daily Show) and W. Kamau Bell (Totally Biased), and has performed on stand-up showcases like Hot Tub with Kurt Braunohler & Kristen Schaal, Andy Kindler’s Particular Show and Chicago’s Comedians You Should Know. Singh has been featured in theBridgetown Comedy Festival, the Chicago Comedy Exposition,  and the Crom Comedy Festival. In Chicago, Singh co-produces SolidHilarity, a comedy show that raises money for activists and labor unions, is a producer for Woke-Up Stand-Up, and is a contributing writer for the progressive talk show Good Evening with Pat Whalen. Judah Grunstein is World Politics Review’s editor-in-chief. His coverage of French and American politics, foreign policy and national security has appeared in World Politics Review, the International Herald Tribune, the Atlantic online, Politico Magazine, Foreign Policy online and the Los Angeles Review of Books. He is a regular guest commentator on France 24, as well as a published playwright. J.B. Silvers, PhD, is the John R. Mannix Medical Mutual of Ohio Professor of Health Care Finance and professor of banking and finance at Weatherhead School of Management with a joint appointment in the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. His research in the areas of financial management and health services has been published in numerous journals including the JOURNAL OF FINANCE, FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, MEDICAL CARE, ANNALS OF FAMILY MEDICINE, and the JOURNAL OF BUSINESS RESEARCH, among others.  Listen to entire episode here: https://goo.gl/xxgnjP Tell us what you think in the comment section below. More David @ http://www.DavidFeldmanShow.com About the show: http://bit.ly/2rqp5un Tune in every Tuesday and Friday for brand new episodes of our show featuring a diverse mixture of comedians, actors, professors, comedy writers and journalists talking about your world. Check out our new You Tube channel. More about David: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0271017/?ref_=nv_sr_1 David writes for Triumph The Insult Comic Dog's series on Hulu and Maya and Marty on NBC. David has also won three Prime Time Emmys for comedy writing, as well as four Writers Guild Awards. He has also written on ABC's Roseanne, HBO's Dennis Miller Live, HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher, Comedy Central's The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Academy Awards, The Emmys, and countless roasts on Comedy Central. Get Social With David: Facebook: Twitter: https://twitter.com/David_Feldman_ Subscribe to his audio podcast: iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/david-feldman-show/id321997239 Become a subscriber to our podcast! When you join for only a $5 monthly subscription donation you’ll gain access to the David Feldman Premium Content, featuring bonus material from the funniest comedians who have been guests on the show. We accept all major credit cards. Join today and help support the show!

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