this american life

  • Amorphous Mixtape Vol. 7

    · 00:31:01 · Bassnectar Transmission

    Hello from Australia! This past weekend was off the hook, as we sold out of nearly every presale ticket for every show on the VAVA VOOM SPRING TOUR. Full ticket onsale has now commenced. Last fall many shows sold out far in advance and people were forced to scalp tickets, so make your plans with us now, whether you are planning to road-trip or represent your hometown: www.bassnectar.net/tour Would you like to gyrate? We suspect that you would, so we are giving away the latest Bassnectar freestyle session: Tracklisting: Beastie Boys – Intergalactic (Bassnectar Remix) Bassnectar – Wildstyle [live edit] Futurebound – Blind Cobblers Thumb (Giz-roc edit) DC Breaks – The More I Want (Bassnectar edit) BLUR – Song 2 (Bassnectar Remix) Bassnectar & Jansten – Red Step NastyNasty – The Goalie (Bassnectar Remix) Foamo – Centavo [live edit] Bassnectar vs Mochipet – Sloppy Face Shotgun Radio – A Bad Place Ft. Mimi Page (Minnesota Remix) MyBack – Blomman Little Jinder – Youth Blood (12th Planet & Flinch Remix) Bassnectar – Underwater Enjoy! - Bassnectar Crew  

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  • 2x21 - Repasito : Nominaciones a los Emmy 2016

    · 00:15:27 · Repaso En Serie Podcast

    Muy a la carrera ya que han salido hace nada , os comentamos los nominados a los Emmy 2016 , y la quiniela que ha hecho Julio mientras leía los nominados.Este es el listado completo de nominados en los Emmys 2016:MEJOR DRAMA'The Americans''Better Call Saul''Downton Abbey''Juego de Tronos''Homeland''House of cards''Mr. Robot’MEJOR ACTRIZ DE DRAMAClaire Danes, por 'Homeland'Viola Davis, por 'Cómo defender a un asesino'Taraji P. Henson, por 'Empire'Tatiana Maslany, por 'Orphan Black'Keri Russell, por 'The Americans'Robin Wright, por 'House of Cards’MEJOR ACTOR DE DRAMAKyle Chandler, por 'BloodlineRami Malek, por 'Mr. Robot'Bob Odenkirk, por 'Better Call Saul'Matthew Rhys, por 'The Americans'Liev Schreiber, por 'Ray Donovan'Kevin Spacey, por 'House of Cars’MEJOR ACTRIZ DE REPARTO EN DRAMAMaggie Smith por 'Downton Abbey'Emilia Clarke por 'Juego de Tronos'Maura Tierney por 'The Affair'Lena Headey por 'Juego de Tronos'Maisie Williams por 'Juego de Tronos'Constance Zimmer por ‘UnREAL'MEJOR ACTOR DE REPARTO EN DRAMAJonathan Banks, por 'Better Call Saul'Peter Dinklage, por 'Juego de Tronos'Michael Kelly, por 'House of Cards'Ben Mendelsohn, por 'Bloodline'Kit Harrington, por 'Juego de Tronos'Jon Voight, por 'Ray Donovan’MEJOR DIRECCIÓN DE UNA SERIE DRAMÁTICA'Downton Abbey' por "Episode 9"'Juego de Tronos' por "Battle Of The Bastards"'Juego de Tronos' por "The Door"'Homeland' por "The Tradition Of Hospitality"'Ray Donovan' por "Exsuscito"'The Knick' por "This Is All We Are”MEJOR GUION DE UNA SERIE DRAMÁTICA'Downton Abbey' por "Episode 8"'Juego de Tronos' por "Battle Of The Bastards"'Mr. Robot' por "eps1.0_hellofriend.mov (Pilot)"'The Americans' por "Persona Non Grata"'The Good Wife' por "End"'UnREAL' por “Return"MEJOR COMEDIA'Black-ish''Master of None''Modern Family''Silicon Valley''Transparent''Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt'‘Veep'MEJOR ACTRIZ DE COMEDIAEllie Kemper, por 'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt'Julia Louis-Dreyfus, por 'Veep'Laurie Metcalf, por 'Getting on'Tracee Ellis Ross, por 'Black-ish'Amy Schumer, por 'Inside Amy Schumer'Lily Tomlin, por 'Grace and Frankie’MEJOR ACTOR DE COMEDIAAnthony Anderson, por 'Black-ish'Aziz Ansari, por 'Master of None'Will Forte, por 'The Last man on Earth'William H. Macy, por 'Shameless'Thomas Middleditch, por 'Silicon Valley'Jeffrey Tambor, por ‘Transparent'MEJOR ACTRIZ DE REPARTO EN COMEDIANiecy Nash, por 'Getting On'Kate McKinnon, por 'SNL'Gaby Hoffmann, por 'TransparentAllison Janney, por 'Mom'Judith Light, por 'Transparent'Anna Chlumsky, por ‘Veep'MEJOR ACTOR DE REPARTO EN COMEDIALouie Anderson, por 'Baskets'Andre Braugher, por 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine'Keegan-Michael Key, por 'Key & Peele'Ty Burrell, por 'Modern Family'Tituss Burgess, por 'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt'Tony Hale, por ‘Veep'MEJOR DIRECCIÓN EN UNA SERIE DE COMEDIA'Master of None' por "Parents"'Silicon Valley' por "Founder Friendly"'Silicon Valley' por "Daily Active Users"'Transparent' por "Man on the Land"'Veep' por "Morning After"'Veep' por "Kissing Your Sister"'Veep' por “Mother"MEJOR GUION DE UNA SERIE DE COMEDIA'Catastrophe' por "Episode 1"'Master of None' por "Parents"'Silicon Valley' por "Founder Friendly"'Silicon Valley' por "The Uptick"'Veep' por "Morning After"'Veep' por “Mother"MEJOR SERIE LIMITADA'American Crime''Fargo''The Night Manager''The People v OJ Simpson'‘Roots'MEJOR TV MOVIE'A Very Murray Christmas''All the Way''Confirmation''Luther''Sherlock: The Abominable Bride’MEJOR ACTRIZ DE SERIE LIMITADA O TV MOVIEKristen Dunst, por 'Fargo'Felicity Huffman, por 'American Crime'Audra McDonald, por 'Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grille'Sarah Paulson, por 'The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story'Lili Taylor, por 'American Crime'Kerry Washington, por ‘Confirmation'MEJOR ACTOR DE SERIE LIMITADA O TV MOVIEBryan Cranston, por 'All the way'Benedict Cumberbatch, 'Sherlock: The Abominable Bride'Idris Elba, 'Luther'Cuba Gooding Jr., por 'The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story'Tom Hiddleston, por 'The Night Manager'Courtney B. Vance, por 'The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story’MEJOR ACTRIZ DE REPARTO EN SERIE LIMITADA O TV MOVIEMelissa Leo, por 'All the Way'Regina King, por 'American Crime'Sarah Paulson, por 'American Horror Story: Hotel'Kathy Bates, por 'American Horror Story: Hotel'Jean Smart, por 'Fargo'Olivia Colman, por 'The Night Manager'MEJOR ACTOR DE REPARTO EN SERIE LIMITADA O TV MOVIEJesse Plemons, por 'Fargo'Bokem Woodbine, por 'Fargo'Hugh Laurie, por 'The Night Manager'John Travolta, por 'The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story'Sterling K. Brown, por 'The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story'David Schwimmer, por 'The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story'MEJOR DIRECCIÓN DE UNA SERIE LIMITADA O TV MOVIE'All The Way''Fargo' por "Before The Law"'The Night Manager''The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story' por "From The Ashes Of Tragedy"'The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story' por "The Race Card"'The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story' por "Manna From Heaven"MEJOR GUION DE UNA SERIE LIMITADA O TV MOVIE'Fargo' por "Palindrome"'Fargo' por "Loplop"'The Night Manager''The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story' por "Marcia, Marcia, Marcia"'The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story' por "From The Ashes Of Tragedy"'The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story' por "The Race Card" Puedes suscribirte a Repaso en Serie en iTunes / RSS / iVoox / Spreaker para no perderte ningún episodio y sabemos que nos ha hecho la boca un fraile pidiendo pero si nos das buenas valoraciones nos ayudaras a crecer y que esto lo conozca mas gente que quiera conocer esto que hacemos por amor al arte y porque somos así de majetes, muchas gracias.

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  • The State of the Union Address 2016

    · 01:04:28 · State of the Union with Jake Tapper

    President Obama's 2016 State of the Union Address Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, Members of Congress, my fellow Americans: Tonight marks the eighth year I've come here to report on the State of the Union. And for this final one, I'm going to try to make it shorter. I know some of you are antsy to get back to Iowa. I also understand that because it's an election season, expectations for what we'll achieve this year are low. Still, Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the constructive approach you and the other leaders took at the end of last year to pass a budget and make tax cuts permanent for working families. So I hope we can work together this year on bipartisan priorities like criminal justice reform, and helping people who are battling prescription drug abuse. We just might surprise the cynics again. But tonight, I want to go easy on the traditional list of proposals for the year ahead. Don't worry, I've got plenty, from helping students learn to write computer code to personalizing medical treatments for patients. And I'll keep pushing for progress on the work that still needs doing. Fixing a broken immigration system. Protecting our kids from gun violence. Equal pay for equal work, paid leave, raising the minimum wage. All these things still matter to hardworking families; they are still the right thing to do; and I will not let up until they get done. But for my final address to this chamber, I don't want to talk just about the next year. I want to focus on the next five years, ten years, and beyond. I want to focus on our future. We live in a time of extraordinary change - change that's reshaping the way we live, the way we work, our planet and our place in the world. It's change that promises amazing medical breakthroughs, but also economic disruptions that strain working families. It promises education for girls in the most remote villages, but also connects terrorists plotting an ocean away. It's change that can broaden opportunity, or widen inequality. And whether we like it or not, the pace of this change will only accelerate. America has been through big changes before - wars and depression, the influx of immigrants, workers fighting for a fair deal, and movements to expand civil rights. Each time, there have been those who told us to fear the future; who claimed we could slam the brakes on change, promising to restore past glory if we just got some group or idea that was threatening America under control. And each time, we overcame those fears. We did not, in the words of Lincoln, adhere to the "dogmas of the quiet past." Instead we thought anew, and acted anew. We made change work for us, always extending America's promise outward, to the next frontier, to more and more people. And because we did - because we saw opportunity where others saw only peril - we emerged stronger and better than before. What was true then can be true now. Our unique strengths as a nation - our optimism and work ethic, our spirit of discovery and innovation, our diversity and commitment to the rule of law - these things give us everything we need to ensure prosperity and security for generations to come. In fact, it's that spirit that made the progress of these past seven years possible. It's how we recovered from the worst economic crisis in generations. It's how we reformed our health care system, and reinvented our energy sector; how we delivered more care and benefits to our troops and veterans, and how we secured the freedom in every state to marry the person we love. But such progress is not inevitable. It is the result of choices we make together. And we face such choices right now. Will we respond to the changes of our time with fear, turning inward as a nation, and turning against each other as a people? Or will we face the future with confidence in who we are, what we stand for, and the incredible things we can do together? So let's talk about the future, and four big questions that we as a country have to answer - regardless of who the next President is, or who controls the next Congress. First, how do we give everyone a fair shot at opportunity and security in this new economy? Second, how do we make technology work for us, and not against us - especially when it comes to solving urgent challenges like climate change? Third, how do we keep America safe and lead the world without becoming its policeman? And finally, how can we make our politics reflect what's best in us, and not what's worst? Let me start with the economy, and a basic fact: the United States of America, right now, has the strongest, most durable economy in the world. We're in the middle of the longest streak of private-sector job creation in history. More than 14 million new jobs; the strongest two years of job growth since the '90s; an unemployment rate cut in half. Our auto industry just had its best year ever. Manufacturing has created nearly 900,000 new jobs in the past six years. And we've done all this while cutting our deficits by almost three-quarters. Anyone claiming that America's economy is in decline is peddling fiction. What is true - and the reason that a lot of Americans feel anxious - is that the economy has been changing in profound ways, changes that started long before the Great Recession hit and haven't let up. Today, technology doesn't just replace jobs on the assembly line, but any job where work can be automated. Companies in a global economy can locate anywhere, and face tougher competition. As a result, workers have less leverage for a raise. Companies have less loyalty to their communities. And more and more wealth and income is concentrated at the very top. All these trends have squeezed workers, even when they have jobs; even when the economy is growing. It's made it harder for a hardworking family to pull itself out of poverty, harder for young people to start on their careers, and tougher for workers to retire when they want to. And although none of these trends are unique to America, they do offend our uniquely American belief that everybody who works hard should get a fair shot. For the past seven years, our goal has been a growing economy that works better for everybody. We've made progress. But we need to make more. And despite all the political arguments we've had these past few years, there are some areas where Americans broadly agree. We agree that real opportunity requires every American to get the education and training they need to land a good-paying job. The bipartisan reform of No Child Left Behind was an important start, and together, we've increased early childhood education, lifted high school graduation rates to new highs, and boosted graduates in fields like engineering. In the coming years, we should build on that progress, by providing Pre-K for all, offering every student the hands-on computer science and math classes that make them job-ready on day one, and we should recruit and support more great teachers for our kids. And we have to make college affordable for every American. Because no hardworking student should be stuck in the red. We've already reduced student loan payments to ten percent of a borrower's income. Now, we've actually got to cut the cost of college. Providing two years of community college at no cost for every responsible student is one of the best ways to do that, and I'm going to keep fighting to get that started this year. Of course, a great education isn't all we need in this new economy. We also need benefits and protections that provide a basic measure of security. After all, it's not much of a stretch to say that some of the only people in America who are going to work the same job, in the same place, with a health and retirement package, for 30 years, are sitting in this chamber. For everyone else, especially folks in their forties and fifties, saving for retirement or bouncing back from job loss has gotten a lot tougher. Americans understand that at some point in their careers, they may have to retool and retrain. But they shouldn't lose what they've already worked so hard to build. That's why Social Security and Medicare are more important than ever; we shouldn't weaken them, we should strengthen them. And for Americans short of retirement, basic benefits should be just as mobile as everything else is today. That's what the Affordable Care Act is all about. It's about filling the gaps in employer-based care so that when we lose a job, or go back to school, or start that new business, we'll still have coverage. Nearly eighteen million have gained coverage so far. Health care inflation has slowed. And our businesses have created jobs every single month since it became law. Now, I'm guessing we won't agree on health care anytime soon. But there should be other ways both parties can improve economic security. Say a hardworking American loses his job - we shouldn't just make sure he can get unemployment insurance; we should make sure that program encourages him to retrain for a business that's ready to hire him. If that new job doesn't pay as much, there should be a system of wage insurance in place so that he can still pay his bills. And even if he's going from job to job, he should still be able to save for retirement and take his savings with him. That's the way we make the new economy work better for everyone. The 2016 race, Obama's legacy, congressional gridlock - get the most important political news delivered to your inbox. By subscribing, you agree to our privacy policy. Enter email address Subscribe I also know Speaker Ryan has talked about his interest in tackling poverty. America is about giving everybody willing to work a hand up, and I'd welcome a serious discussion about strategies we can all support, like expanding tax cuts for low-income workers without kids. But there are other areas where it's been more difficult to find agreement over the last seven years - namely what role the government should play in making sure the system's not rigged in favor of the wealthiest and biggest corporations. And here, the American people have a choice to make. I believe a thriving private sector is the lifeblood of our economy. I think there are outdated regulations that need to be changed, and there's red tape that needs to be cut. But after years of record corporate profits, working families won't get more opportunity or bigger paychecks by letting big banks or big oil or hedge funds make their own rules at the expense of everyone else; or by allowing attacks on collective bargaining to go unanswered. Food Stamp recipients didn't cause the financial crisis; recklessness on Wall Street did. Immigrants aren't the reason wages haven't gone up enough; those decisions are made in the boardrooms that too often put quarterly earnings over long-term returns. It's sure not the average family watching tonight that avoids paying taxes through offshore accounts. In this new economy, workers and start-ups and small businesses need more of a voice, not less. The rules should work for them. And this year I plan to lift up the many businesses who've figured out that doing right by their workers ends up being good for their shareholders, their customers, and their communities, so that we can spread those best practices across America. In fact, many of our best corporate citizens are also our most creative. This brings me to the second big question we have to answer as a country: how do we reignite that spirit of innovation to meet our biggest challenges? Sixty years ago, when the Russians beat us into space, we didn't deny Sputnik was up there. We didn't argue about the science, or shrink our research and development budget. We built a space program almost overnight, and twelve years later, we were walking on the moon. That spirit of discovery is in our DNA. We're Thomas Edison and the Wright Brothers and George Washington Carver. We're Grace Hopper and Katherine Johnson and Sally Ride. We're every immigrant and entrepreneur from Boston to Austin to Silicon Valley racing to shape a better world. And over the past seven years, we've nurtured that spirit. We've protected an open internet, and taken bold new steps to get more students and low-income Americans online. We've launched next-generation manufacturing hubs, and online tools that give an entrepreneur everything he or she needs to start a business in a single day. But we can do so much more. Last year, Vice President Biden said that with a new moonshot, America can cure cancer. Last month, he worked with this Congress to give scientists at the National Institutes of Health the strongest resources they've had in over a decade. Tonight, I'm announcing a new national effort to get it done. And because he's gone to the mat for all of us, on so many issues over the past forty years, I'm putting Joe in charge of Mission Control. For the loved ones we've all lost, for the family we can still save, let's make America the country that cures cancer once and for all. Medical research is critical. We need the same level of commitment when it comes to developing clean energy sources. Look, if anybody still wants to dispute the science around climate change, have at it. You'll be pretty lonely, because you'll be debating our military, most of America's business leaders, the majority of the American people, almost the entire scientific community, and 200 nations around the world who agree it's a problem and intend to solve it. But even if the planet wasn't at stake; even if 2014 wasn't the warmest year on record - until 2015 turned out even hotter - why would we want to pass up the chance for American businesses to produce and sell the energy of the future? Seven years ago, we made the single biggest investment in clean energy in our history. Here are the results. In fields from Iowa to Texas, wind power is now cheaper than dirtier, conventional power. On rooftops from Arizona to New York, solar is saving Americans tens of millions of dollars a year on their energy bills, and employs more Americans than coal - in jobs that pay better than average. We're taking steps to give homeowners the freedom to generate and store their own energy - something environmentalists and Tea Partiers have teamed up to support. Meanwhile, we've cut our imports of foreign oil by nearly sixty percent, and cut carbon pollution more than any other country on Earth. Gas under two bucks a gallon ain't bad, either. Now we've got to accelerate the transition away from dirty energy. Rather than subsidize the past, we should invest in the future - especially in communities that rely on fossil fuels. That's why I'm going to push to change the way we manage our oil and coal resources, so that they better reflect the costs they impose on taxpayers and our planet. That way, we put money back into those communities and put tens of thousands of Americans to work building a 21st century transportation system. None of this will happen overnight, and yes, there are plenty of entrenched interests who want to protect the status quo. But the jobs we'll create, the money we'll save, and the planet we'll preserve - that's the kind of future our kids and grandkids deserve. Climate change is just one of many issues where our security is linked to the rest of the world. And that's why the third big question we have to answer is how to keep America safe and strong without either isolating ourselves or trying to nation-build everywhere there's a problem. I told you earlier all the talk of America's economic decline is political hot air. Well, so is all the rhetoric you hear about our enemies getting stronger and America getting weaker. The United States of America is the most powerful nation on Earth. Period. It's not even close. We spend more on our military than the next eight nations combined. Our troops are the finest fighting force in the history of the world. No nation dares to attack us or our allies because they know that's the path to ruin. Surveys show our standing around the world is higher than when I was elected to this office, and when it comes to every important international issue, people of the world do not look to Beijing or Moscow to lead - they call us. As someone who begins every day with an intelligence briefing, I know this is a dangerous time. But that's not because of diminished American strength or some looming superpower. In today's world, we're threatened less by evil empires and more by failing states. The Middle East is going through a transformation that will play out for a generation, rooted in conflicts that date back millennia. Economic headwinds blow from a Chinese economy in transition. Even as their economy contracts, Russia is pouring resources to prop up Ukraine and Syria - states they see slipping away from their orbit. And the international system we built after World War II is now struggling to keep pace with this new reality. It's up to us to help remake that system. And that means we have to set priorities. Priority number one is protecting the American people and going after terrorist networks. Both al Qaeda and now ISIL pose a direct threat to our people, because in today's world, even a handful of terrorists who place no value on human life, including their own, can do a lot of damage. They use the Internet to poison the minds of individuals inside our country; they undermine our allies. But as we focus on destroying ISIL, over-the-top claims that this is World War III just play into their hands. Masses of fighters on the back of pickup trucks and twisted souls plotting in apartments or garages pose an enormous danger to civilians and must be stopped. But they do not threaten our national existence. That's the story ISIL wants to tell; that's the kind of propaganda they use to recruit. We don't need to build them up to show that we're serious, nor do we need to push away vital allies in this fight by echoing the lie that ISIL is representative of one of the world's largest religions. We just need to call them what they are - killers and fanatics who have to be rooted out, hunted down, and destroyed. That's exactly what we are doing. For more than a year, America has led a coalition of more than 60 countries to cut off ISIL's financing, disrupt their plots, stop the flow of terrorist fighters, and stamp out their vicious ideology. With nearly 10,000 air strikes, we are taking out their leadership, their oil, their training camps, and their weapons. We are training, arming, and supporting forces who are steadily reclaiming territory in Iraq and Syria. If this Congress is serious about winning this war, and wants to send a message to our troops and the world, you should finally authorize the use of military force against ISIL. Take a vote. But the American people should know that with or without Congressional action, ISIL will learn the same lessons as terrorists before them. If you doubt America's commitment - or mine - to see that justice is done, ask Osama bin Laden. Ask the leader of al Qaeda in Yemen, who was taken out last year, or the perpetrator of the Benghazi attacks, who sits in a prison cell. When you come after Americans, we go after you. It may take time, but we have long memories, and our reach has no limit. Our foreign policy must be focused on the threat from ISIL and al Qaeda, but it can't stop there. For even without ISIL, instability will continue for decades in many parts of the world - in the Middle East, in Afghanistan and Pakistan, in parts of Central America, Africa and Asia. Some of these places may become safe havens for new terrorist networks; others will fall victim to ethnic conflict, or famine, feeding the next wave of refugees. The world will look to us to help solve these problems, and our answer needs to be more than tough talk or calls to carpet bomb civilians. That may work as a TV sound bite, but it doesn't pass muster on the world stage. We also can't try to take over and rebuild every country that falls into crisis. That's not leadership; that's a recipe for quagmire, spilling American blood and treasure that ultimately weakens us. It's the lesson of Vietnam, of Iraq - and we should have learned it by now. Fortunately, there's a smarter approach, a patient and disciplined strategy that uses every element of our national power. It says America will always act, alone if necessary, to protect our people and our allies; but on issues of global concern, we will mobilize the world to work with us, and make sure other countries pull their own weight. That's our approach to conflicts like Syria, where we're partnering with local forces and leading international efforts to help that broken society pursue a lasting peace. That's why we built a global coalition, with sanctions and principled diplomacy, to prevent a nuclear-armed Iran. As we speak, Iran has rolled back its nuclear program, shipped out its uranium stockpile, and the world has avoided another war. That's how we stopped the spread of Ebola in West Africa. Our military, our doctors, and our development workers set up the platform that allowed other countries to join us in stamping out that epidemic. That's how we forged a Trans-Pacific Partnership to open markets, protect workers and the environment, and advance American leadership in Asia. It cuts 18,000 taxes on products Made in America, and supports more good jobs. With TPP, China doesn't set the rules in that region, we do. You want to show our strength in this century? Approve this agreement. Give us the tools to enforce it. Fifty years of isolating Cuba had failed to promote democracy, setting us back in Latin America. That's why we restored diplomatic relations, opened the door to travel and commerce, and positioned ourselves to improve the lives of the Cuban people. You want to consolidate our leadership and credibility in the hemisphere? Recognize that the Cold War is over. Lift the embargo. American leadership in the 21st century is not a choice between ignoring the rest of the world - except when we kill terrorists; or occupying and rebuilding whatever society is unraveling. Leadership means a wise application of military power, and rallying the world behind causes that are right. It means seeing our foreign assistance as part of our national security, not charity. When we lead nearly 200 nations to the most ambitious agreement in history to fight climate change - that helps vulnerable countries, but it also protects our children. When we help Ukraine defend its democracy, or Colombia resolve a decades-long war, that strengthens the international order we depend upon. When we help African countries feed their people and care for the sick, that prevents the next pandemic from reaching our shores. Right now, we are on track to end the scourge of HIV/AIDS, and we have the capacity to accomplish the same thing with malaria - something I'll be pushing this Congress to fund this year. That's strength. That's leadership. And that kind of leadership depends on the power of our example. That is why I will keep working to shut down the prison at Guantanamo: it's expensive, it's unnecessary, and it only serves as a recruitment brochure for our enemies. That's why we need to reject any politics that targets people because of race or religion. This isn't a matter of political correctness. It's a matter of understanding what makes us strong. The world respects us not just for our arsenal; it respects us for our diversity and our openness and the way we respect every faith. His Holiness, Pope Francis, told this body from the very spot I stand tonight that "to imitate the hatred and violence of tyrants and murderers is the best way to take their place." When politicians insult Muslims, when a mosque is vandalized, or a kid bullied, that doesn't make us safer. That's not telling it like it is. It's just wrong. It diminishes us in the eyes of the world. It makes it harder to achieve our goals. And it betrays who we are as a country. "We the People." Our Constitution begins with those three simple words, words we've come to recognize mean all the people, not just some; words that insist we rise and fall together. That brings me to the fourth, and maybe the most important thing I want to say tonight. The future we want - opportunity and security for our families; a rising standard of living and a sustainable, peaceful planet for our kids - all that is within our reach. But it will only happen if we work together. It will only happen if we can have rational, constructive debates. It will only happen if we fix our politics. A better politics doesn't mean we have to agree on everything. This is a big country, with different regions and attitudes and interests. That's one of our strengths, too. Our Founders distributed power between states and branches of government, and expected us to argue, just as they did, over the size and shape of government, over commerce and foreign relations, over the meaning of liberty and the imperatives of security. But democracy does require basic bonds of trust between its citizens. It doesn't work if we think the people who disagree with us are all motivated by malice, or that our political opponents are unpatriotic. Democracy grinds to a halt without a willingness to compromise; or when even basic facts are contested, and we listen only to those who agree with us. Our public life withers when only the most extreme voices get attention. Most of all, democracy breaks down when the average person feels their voice doesn't matter; that the system is rigged in favor of the rich or the powerful or some narrow interest. Too many Americans feel that way right now. It's one of the few regrets of my presidency - that the rancor and suspicion between the parties has gotten worse instead of better. There's no doubt a president with the gifts of Lincoln or Roosevelt might have better bridged the divide, and I guarantee I'll keep trying to be better so long as I hold this office. But, my fellow Americans, this cannot be my task - or any President's - alone. There are a whole lot of folks in this chamber who would like to see more cooperation, a more elevated debate in Washington, but feel trapped by the demands of getting elected. I know; you've told me. And if we want a better politics, it's not enough to just change a Congressman or a Senator or even a President; we have to change the system to reflect our better selves. We have to end the practice of drawing our congressional districts so that politicians can pick their voters, and not the other way around. We have to reduce the influence of money in our politics, so that a handful of families and hidden interests can't bankroll our elections - and if our existing approach to campaign finance can't pass muster in the courts, we need to work together to find a real solution. We've got to make voting easier, not harder, and modernize it for the way we live now. And over the course of this year, I intend to travel the country to push for reforms that do. But I can't do these things on my own. Changes in our political process - in not just who gets elected but how they get elected - that will only happen when the American people demand it. It will depend on you. That's what's meant by a government of, by, and for the people. What I'm asking for is hard. It's easier to be cynical; to accept that change isn't possible, and politics is hopeless, and to believe that our voices and actions don't matter. But if we give up now, then we forsake a better future. Those with money and power will gain greater control over the decisions that could send a young soldier to war, or allow another economic disaster, or roll back the equal rights and voting rights that generations of Americans have fought, even died, to secure. As frustration grows, there will be voices urging us to fall back into tribes, to scapegoat fellow citizens who don't look like us, or pray like us, or vote like we do, or share the same background. We can't afford to go down that path. It won't deliver the economy we want, or the security we want, but most of all, it contradicts everything that makes us the envy of the world. So, my fellow Americans, whatever you may believe, whether you prefer one party or no party, our collective future depends on your willingness to uphold your obligations as a citizen. To vote. To speak out. To stand up for others, especially the weak, especially the vulnerable, knowing that each of us is only here because somebody, somewhere, stood up for us. To stay active in our public life so it reflects the goodness and decency and optimism that I see in the American people every single day. It won't be easy. Our brand of democracy is hard. But I can promise that a year from now, when I no longer hold this office, I'll be right there with you as a citizen - inspired by those voices of fairness and vision, of grit and good humor and kindness that have helped America travel so far. Voices that help us see ourselves not first and foremost as black or white or Asian or Latino, not as gay or straight, immigrant or native born; not as Democrats or Republicans, but as Americans first, bound by a common creed. Voices Dr. King believed would have the final word - voices of unarmed truth and unconditional love. They're out there, those voices. They don't get a lot of attention, nor do they seek it, but they are busy doing the work this country needs doing. I see them everywhere I travel in this incredible country of ours. I see you. I know you're there. You're the reason why I have such incredible confidence in our future. Because I see your quiet, sturdy citizenship all the time. I see it in the worker on the assembly line who clocked extra shifts to keep his company open, and the boss who pays him higher wages to keep him on board. I see it in the Dreamer who stays up late to finish her science project, and the teacher who comes in early because he knows she might someday cure a disease. I see it in the American who served his time, and dreams of starting over - and the business owner who gives him that second chance. The protester determined to prove that justice matters, and the young cop walking the beat, treating everybody with respect, doing the brave, quiet work of keeping us safe. I see it in the soldier who gives almost everything to save his brothers, the nurse who tends to him 'til he can run a marathon, and the community that lines up to cheer him on. It's the son who finds the courage to come out as who he is, and the father whose love for that son overrides everything he's been taught. I see it in the elderly woman who will wait in line to cast her vote as long as she has to; the new citizen who casts his for the first time; the volunteers at the polls who believe every vote should count, because each of them in different ways know how much that precious right is worth. That's the America I know. That's the country we love. Clear-eyed. Big-hearted. Optimistic that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word. That's what makes me so hopeful about our future. Because of you. I believe in you. That's why I stand here confident that the State of our Union is strong. Thank you, God bless you, and God bless the United States of America.

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  • Solopreneur Hour

    · 01:15:57 · Entrepreneur Success Stories By Join Up Dots - Inspiration, Confidence, & Small Business Coaching To Start Your Online Career

    Todays guests is Mr Michael O'Neal, the podcasting master behind the hit Itunes show "The Solopreneur Hour Podcast". The top ranked business show, or The Solohour as it is known to its friends, teaching online marketing and entrepreneurship skills.  Michael is a man who quite simply without him, then I wouldn't be on the mic today. So you know where to send all your complaints too. He is a born entrepreneur with a fascinating story, of successes, setbacks, leaps of faith, and finding his unique path with the guidance of John Lee Dumas and Pat Flynn. Growing up in Philadelphia, the thought of being the host of his own podcast show was the last thing on his mind. He was a normal type of kid, obsessed with sport, finding trouble at school, and generally being a kid. But unfortunately that freedom of thought and energy changed when he was moved from his beloved Philly, and taken down to Florida, and it seems to me this was the start of him looking for his path in life. He didn’t fit in down in the Sunshine State, so as soon as he could, he got himself back up North, and discovered one of the first dots in his life that links him to where he is today…the internet. He was fascinated by the worldwide web, so developed skills to be a web designer. And that was his life for fifteen years, until unfortunately his parents both passed away in a very short time, and he found himself sitting with just $14 dollars in his pocket. He was over 30, with a decision forced upon him. Would he accept the punches that life had dealt him, or would he start fighting back? And that descision was made and he took the steps that made him “Know too much” and not want to work for anyone else again? He was going to become a solopreneur and own his own future. But how did he know he had the skills to be a success in the online arena? How did he know where his true passions lie? And does he regret inspiring guys like me to jump into the pool too? Well lets find out as we bring onto the 100th show to start joining up dots, the man on the mike, the host of the “Solopreneur Hour podcast”, the one and only Mr Michael O’Neal!   For more on the Solohour Podcast go to: The Solopreneur Hour Podcast with Michael O'Neal - Job Security...for the Unemployable By Michael O'Neal Chats with Proudly Unemployable Solopreneurs Like Himself Description They say successful people put their pants on the same way we all do. This show is about watching them put their pants on. Nominated As "Best New Show of 2013" by Stitcher Radio, Our range of guests takes us from comedy, to acting, to the NFL, to UFC and MMA, to Top Music Stars, to Millionaires, to Business Experts, to Real Estate moguls, and everything in between. Guests like Nicole Arbour, Adam Carolla, Hines Ward, Sam Jones, Tucker Max, Jonathan Fields, Derek Halpern, Pat Flynn, Amy Porterfield, John Lee Dumas, Chris Ducker, Chris Brogan, Guy Kawasaki, Mike Johnston, Rich Franklin, and many more, these casual conversations contain tons of action-inducing content wrapped up in an entertaining candy shell. Transcript Yes hello. How are we all? Can you believe it. Episode 100. We have been building up to this for well, it seems like a hundred episodes and we are finally here. We have got a man who who quite simply rose to the top and was going to be the only person who would fit the mantle of being my 100th guest. And I’ve had people banging down the doors. I had Paul McCartney phone up the other day and say I want to be on the show, I’ve heard it’s a big thing and I said to him, “Paul, unless you can get the other four Beatles to join you, it’s not going to happen” We’ve had  David Bowie crying. It’s been pathetic really. So today’s man has been nailed on to do this today, and I’m absolutely delighted that he’s on the show because quite simply without him I wouldn’t be on the microphone. So you know where to send all your complaints to! He’s a man with a fascinating story of successes, setbacks leaps and finding his unique voice. Growing up in Philadelphia he was a normal type of kid obsessed with football at school, and generally being a kid. But unfortunately that freedom of thought and energy changed when he was moved from his beloved Philly and taken down to Florida and it seemed to me this to stop him looking for his path in life. He didn’t fit in down in the sunshine state so soon as he could he got himself back up north and discovered one of the first dots in his life that links him to where he is today the Internet. He was fascinated by a World Wide Web so develop skills to be a web designer and as he’s known for 15 years until unfortunately his parents both passed away in a very short time and he found himself sitting with just fourteen dollars in his pocket. It was over thirty with a decision forced upon him. Would you accept the punches that life had dealt him or would he stop fighting back and that decision was made and he took steps that made him know too much and not want to work for anyone else again. He was going to become a solopreneur and own his own future. But how did he know he had the skills to be a success in the online arena and how did he know where his true passions lie? And does he regret inspiring guys want me to jump into the pool too. Well let’s find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up thoughts the man on the microphone. The host of the Solohour podcast, the only Mr. Michael O’Neal. Well how are you Michael?   Michael O’Neal Oh here is what I can’t even what is happening. I am so flabbergasted by that intro. OK. Two things. Number one that was the best intro I’ve ever had. And formerly Chris Cerrone had that that title of the best in show to a show I’ve ever had. But it was one of the best I’ve ever heard for anybody which is why you are so the right person for this job. Well we’re all thankful you have a microphone in front of you David. Trust me on that. Second thing is I would pay to hear Zombie John Lennon if you could figure out a way to get all four Beatles on the show. That would be cool. David Ralph Well I can do Steve Jobs every day. So I might be able to do them as well. Michael O’Neal Ah so dude that was incredible. I am . I am flummoxed. David Ralph I’m so excited to be on David Ralph’s show. David Ralph – Yeah. Go go and do that because I know you have been doing an action of me on a few shows and we’ll show you a few times night. Yeah you got a little bumper for me on my show. I have these little things that when people ask you me I have a guest on the show that I have them do a little like Hi this is David Ralph and then I get interested in this opener with Mike O’Neill and your voice is so. What’s the first thing I ever said to you. I said you have the ultimate voice for radio. Didn’t I say that you did. Absolutely. David Ralph I haven’t got the face for television but I’ve got a voice for Radio Michael O’Neal Well as long as you’ve got the radio part worked out and you have taken this thing and you’ve run with it my friend. So I’m honored. I’m honored to be at the 100 episode Mark. Thank you. Thank you. David Ralph Absolutely. It is an honor to have you here because it is amazing when you start this thing,because you started your show what was it August 2013. Michael O’Neal Eleven month ago. David Ralph Yeah,11 months ago and now you are rocking and rolling with the best of them you surround yourself with, with the Internet movers and shakers the ziggers and zagers and you know you’re going to be humbled by this. So maybe you won’t. You are an online celebrity of note. When I was saying to people is my show a lot of people sort of touch on the shows of said to me I know who you’re going to have. And I said no you don’t. And I go Yes I know who you’re going to have and ego going and going to no one. And I when Martin O’Neill and I went oh term term how did I know. Really I know. Yes yeah I did it because I had pain you know I don’t want to suck up to you Michael but the early days I didn’t know what the hell I was doing. So I just kept on saying your name over and over again or some kind of benchmark of what I was trying to achieve because you like that you’d come out the gates really and say look like a rocket ship. It’s unbelievable. But you’ve only been around so long because it seems like you’ve been here ever in a day. Does it seems like that to you? Michael O’Neal It is weird. It does feel like it was yesterday that I launched the show. It feels really really recent to me that it happened. So but then at the same time I look at the memories that I’ve had over the last 11 months and all the cool benchmarks and you know different things that have happened and, but it’s packed full of stuff right. So I think if there’s any celebrity it’s sort of a z list celebrity and only at certain conferences. But yeah it’s been it’s been an incredible journey. I couldn’t be happier with how it’s gone. And I can’t wait to see what happens in the next 365. You know I’m really excited about that. David Ralph Is there a plan to the next 365 because you seem to me somebody who is very much stimulated by the now and then. Are you somebody who knows what you’re aiming to achieve? Michael O’Neal No I’m a notorious non planner. Much to the chagrin of my girlfriend who is a total planner and if I didn’t have the you know a calendar app on my phone I would be I would be completely floating out there now because I I wake up and I look at I go OK what do I have to do today. And then I see what’s going on for the day. And sometimes that doesn’t work out for me like in a social situation because people actually make plans to go out and do things. But and I’m not one of them. And all of a sudden it’s Friday I’m like I probably should have planned to do something. Yes I watch movies tonight. But yeah I I’m in an interesting spot right now because I have had this kind of five year run of as you mentioned in the intro bringing myself in this very circuitous path from $14 and not having a clear direction to now. When someone says What do you do. I say I’m a podcast host. And that’s a thing like I. That’s what I do. So I sort of a couple of weeks ago had an occasion to kind of put the cap on that five year journey and now I’m going to be looking ahead but I haven’t quite formulated what that ahead looks like yet. David Ralph And how did you do that? How did you put a cap on that. How did you say that is five years, finished boxed up? Michael O’Neal Well it was as i say I’m I’m a notorious non-celibrator. I’m a guy that usually gets to an achievement and then continues to go without acknowledging it. And I have what is probably a weird story that you’re asking for but hey here comes. So I’ve been a Porsche fan for my whole life. And you may already know where you’re heading with this but I was a Porsche fan my whole life and I don’t know why particularly. I was I had a Volkswagen in high school and I think that maybe planted to see a little bit and I was a car guy and so you know those Porsche ads from the 80s with like the big fender flares and the big wing. I think I was attracted to that and I eventually in 2003 I bought my first vintage Porsche so I bought a 1972 11 and it was a piece of crap. I bought it in New York. I didn’t know better. I drove across country midway across the USA and midway across the country the engine blew up. So that’s how badly. Where were you when this happened. I was in the dead heart middle of Nebraska when it happened in Nebraska I suppose. You it’s nothing. It is hundreds and millions of acres of wide open like cornfields and nothing else. I mean we are I was I have a picture of my car sitting looking like it’s a panther wading in the grass. Waiting to you know to prowl and it’s just sitting there with with like a hundred miles in each direction of grass. There was no middle of nowhere when it happened and I ended up finding a Volkswagen place 60 miles away that towed me in. And the guy dropped the oil pan in the car and just giant chunks of metal came out and I’m like I’m pretty sure that’s not how it’s supposed to be. So I ended up getting a tow truck driving it from Denver where I was living at the time and picking it up. Neither here nor there. So I eventually traded that piece of crap on and got a nicer one. Not when I bought it but in 2005 and I restored this car it took me four years and 2000 hours to restore this car back to better than factory condition when I still have it now. And as part of the dynamic this one in 1969 9/11 and the 69 through 73 nine elevens are very very sought after. They are the iconic 9/11. So when you would see Steve McQueen and a picture of him in the 60s you know you know in LA MA or something driving a 9/11 he was driving one of these sort of 69 to 73 virgins. And one of the sponsors of Porsche in the 60s was a company called Hoyer which was tag Hoyer before Tagg was involved in the mid-80s. So just Hoyer and it’s a guy named Jack Hoyer and he made these beautiful tiny pieces chronographs based on race timers. So you’d have a co-driver with you as a race car and there was a race in Mexico called the career of PanAmericana and the first Porsche Carrera was named after this particular race. So Hoyer as a sponsor of Porsche created a watch based on the chronographs that they used for the race cars and they called it the Hoyer Kura. So this was a very utilitarian type watch you could use it as a race time or you could just click one of the buttons and it had this chronograph on it. It was beautiful automatic beautiful timepiece. And as I’ve been going through this journey for five years this has been on my vision board because these are about three grand and above to get one of these watches. But that was so superfluous for me because I had no i like zero money. And for me to spend three grand on something as excessive as a watch wasn’t even on my radar. So about a month and a half ago now I was in this position where I was like this could be the time. And I scoured the world. I ended up buying a 1972 Hoyer Carrera from a guy in France and it came to my house and it was more beautiful in person than I. I’d never seen one in person is more beautiful than I even thought it could be. And I remember at the mid midday I’d gone to this little swimming pool by my house I belong to this little pool club which is where I work out and I was swimming in the middle of the day two o’clock in the afternoon like Tony Soprano in the middle of a work day and thinking I just did this like this just happened. This 5 year journey comes stops right now like this is where my new journey begins. I’ve gone through this trial by fire. I’ve come out hopefully like a phoenix. I’m in a position where I can buy this watch now which is insane to think about and I’m peaceful and grateful for the life that I’ve built. And so that for me was the cap of a five year struggle. I mean a real struggle to get to where I am today. David Ralph Mr. O’Neill is a perfect story. It started and it made me think if I’m ever in a pub quiz and a question about Portia comes up you’re my man that does it to Luli you are obsessed by that and you. The amount that you were quoting then. Michael O’Neal Ah. I mean I think. I think it’s kind of a lifetime obsession for people that become afflicted by it. In fact there’s a great ad I will send it to you on YouTube and there’s an ad for the new Porsche about the time the new Porsche Carrera ad and it was there it’s a little boy. And he’s a little kid in his classroom and he’s daydreaming and on 9/11 drives by him and you just see him like looking out the window and his pencil drops and you know then he he gets in trouble. And then he runs to the you know was on his BMX bike to the Porsche dealer after school and and he you know he ends up sitting in this car and the steering wheel is bigger than he is and you see Mike raised his head he’s 12 or something and that he goes to the dealer or the guy goes you have a card and the guy goes yeah here you go and he goes I’ll see in 20 years. And then there’s this great voice over that says something like there’s a there’s a there’s a particular moment that happens with you know a Porsche fan. There’s that time you want one. Then there’s the time you get one and for the truly affected afflicted there’s the 20 years in between. And it just like it gives you the chills and my buddies sent it. I sense my body goes man. Pass the Kleenex. So I guess there is a real passion there for this. It’s a very visceral feeling that is so different because of the way they build their cars and because the engines in the rear and it’s a totally different experience than you have with with any other vehicle that yeah there becomes a real passion a real obsession with him. Did you read that because this shows about joining up dots, but do you remember as a young kid having the same kind of obsessive compulsive in both words and things when when you was a little kid running around the streets of Philly pretending you Rocky did most will keep you alive without paying him for the Michael O’Neal No no no. I was a BMX kid. Now I was I was in a suburb. I was the only gentile I was in a super Jewish town north of Philadelphia. And I was a BMX or I rode my BMX bike. I mean I was from 1984 until I mean I was racing bikes from 84 until 2000. David Ralph So Rocky wasn’t on your radar at all? Michael O’Neal No not at all. Tony Hawk and Dave you know Dave Voelker and Matt Hoffman and you know BMX guys Bob horo. They were all on my radar. I’ll tell you here’s here’s a little here’s a join up dot that is current. I rode an entire daywith real wow I just blanked on his name. That’s embarrassing really. I’m killing myself right now this is bad radio. David Ralph What  does he look like? Michael O’Neal He’s a big famous director now and he will watch films John Malkovich. Being John Malkovich won a friggin Oscar. We’re ready. Come on. With it and it might seem seamless Spike Jones for crying out loud. David Ralph Spike Jones Michael O’Neal Yeah Spike Jones the director was a dude I rode with at a place called Rockville BMX and we were just BMX or dudes riding around. And then he he became a photographer for one of the BMX magazines and then started doing filming because he did Beastie Boys first video I forget which one and then started doing independent films then did Being John Malkovich and now he is like an international you know massive director like one of the best most well-reputed directors in the world. And it was kind of cool. I mean so he did adaptation he did Being John Malkovich Where the Wild Things Are You know just just done amazing stuff. So the Academy Awards. And so a pretty pretty bad ass. He did her you know the movie Her most recent Yeah that’s Spike Jones. David Ralph So is there any similarity between the young kid in Philly and now, because from what I see across the pond and I listen into the conversations that you have with your internet guys and it does seem from this side of the pond that you’ve got a gang of friends and followers and whatever that basically control the Internet. I had Rick Mulready on the show. And I said “Do you ever feel like slipping something into Pat Flynns drink, so that the next morning you turn on your screen and see if there’s a black hole on the Internet because he’s not functioning at this time because it kind of seems not” But he wouldn’t be pushed in to slipping a Mickey into his drink in any shape or form. But you seem a little bit edgy to most of them. Michael O’Neal Yeah. David Ralph Is that because you’re from Philly. Is it because he’s a very sort of industrial Con. Its a real city you know. Its like a working class city when you’re there. Michael O’Neal Yeah I think the the edginess is something that I’m kind of a known for. I don’t know if you curse on your show but I’m kind of a no B.S. kind of guy and I’ve never been one to straddle the fence very very much. And I think what happened with Irwin what happens with a lot of these sort of Internet type celebrities is that they’re so concerned about getting the broadest audience that they sometimes come off as being a little bit milktoast or a little bit vanilla. And I come from a totally different perspective where when you think about media you think about New York Philadelphia Boston. These are like the media centers of the world. It’s where you know you go to Boston College that’s one of the broadcasting school that’s where Howard Stern went. That’s where many very famous broadcasters come from those places I went to Temple University which has an incredible media department. And when you look at the people that are iconic in history they’re not people that are vanilla. There are people that have strong opinions one way or the other and people either love them or they hate them but they’re definitely them. So they definitely have a presence. They definitely have a voice that’s unique to them. And I think I always think it took me a little while to settle into that on my show but it is ultimately as you as I developed the show and I developed my own voice I realized hey I’m not in the interest of pleasing everybody. Like that’s not my job. My job is to talk from my perspective on certain issues and try to extract really good business advice from people without them or my audience really seeing what I’m doing. And one of my favorite quotes to that is and you probably heard me say before but which just never let him see your work. You know that’s from Bill Cosby also from my alma mater Temple University in Philly and that basically means that go through your process ask your questions you know have questions written down but you don’t have to be so blatant about it. You can you can ease through you know great standup comedians do this like Louis C.K. talks you know he’ll be sputtering and angry and going through all this process on stage and you think that that’s just how he is. You laugh at his angry energy but he knows all the beats within that he knows exactly what he’s doing within that realm and that is that is him not letting you see him work on him. David Ralph When your on the mike then how much is you now being absolutely authentic and how much is it creating a mood creating an atmosphere on the show. Michael O’Neal Well it can’t. Can’t you have both? David Ralph Oh I don’t know CAN you? Michael O’Neal What are you asking? Are you asking how much is sort of pre-written and how much is off the cuff? David Ralph Well on this show for example some of the things I say I only say to get a reaction from the guest. You know do I really mean it kind of. Do I think that they will go against it. Yes. So I will say it. How much do you actually say that you believe 100 percent. Michael O’Neal Well first of all you do that because you understand this and you’re a pro. I mean this is a very natural place for you to end up. So I think that that I do very similar things to you, as you do just because yeah sometimes you want to extract some stuff from a guest that is being difficult. But yeah I mean I’m pretty authentic dude. I there’s not a lot there’s people that have met me in real life and go Oh you’re exactly like you are on the show. Yeah Im exactly like I’m in the show. I turn it on and I talk so I don’t have this, I’m not affected in any way. I just go. David Ralph So you’re not like you haven’t got a human graphic equalizer when you press record you just kind of increase certain parts of your personality. Michael O’Neal Not really. No. This is pretty much how I am. Yeah I’ll speak like I speak. I’m probably slightly dirtier in real life. David Ralph Well you don’t know where the words will land do you! Michael O’Neal I probably curse a little more which is fine. I’ve done a few podcasts now where I was allowed to do that and it did make it really nice. David Ralph Are you in the same situation as me because I used to listen to your show all the time and it was a staple diet during my transition at that time and now I’m doing this. One of the failures of me is that I don’t get time to listen to other people’s shows. I listen to your one  the other day because I just suddenly realized I had a gap but you almost become an island of your own success where before I used to listen to shows and I used to think oh I’ll take a bit of it and I’ll take a bit of it and become like a magpie. And now I don’t know what vibe is out there and I don’t know whether I’m being edgy or whatever. It just seems to be you. Speaking to the mic and I throw it out to the world and hopefully it goes well. It seems to be a fault of mine, and so do you have the same thing? Michael O’Neal No I’m exactly the same way. I’d say partially by choice and partially by by time. So when I when I do have time to consume podcasts I don’t tend to go business. I tend to go comedy. And lately I tend to go NFL football. I listen to podcasts related to that because I want to be able to clock out a little bit when I do want real inspiration. I’ve been listening to here’s the thing with Alec Baldwin it’s WNYC. I’ve not heard a better intro or production or interview style than that show. It’s his in his intros are nothing short of brilliant. I mean they’re amazing how he brings a guest on an and then how he interviews and his questions are very in-depth and he’s such a pro that it makes it really easy for me to like look at that bar and go OK that’s where the soul open for hours going. That’s what I do. I actually honestly David I find now the more that I get into this show the more I almost can’t stand other people’s shows like there so few that can capture my attention and that I feel like are being done well even with really good friends of mine that do shows I just go and that is almost unlistenable. You know it’s so. So I just don’t I definitely look far above the kind of Internet Marketing slash business world for inspiration on how I want to run mine. David Ralph because the only two that I listen to now is yours. And I went on started. I wanted to listen to every single one. And but the nerdiest and there the only two reasons. Yeah great and Nerdist is good for a number of reasons. David Ralph Yeah I just like the way it kind of flows and you don’t even know it started and it just kind of teases right. Michael O’Neal That’s right. Yeah they just start it. We kind of did that today didn’t we. David Ralph Yeah absolutely and that was the good stuff. Michael O’Neal And we talked for a while before we started recording. You know me I mean it just felt like yeah hit it. Go for it. We’ll start like Nerdist. But yeah no I think that there’s a sense there’s such a glutton of new shows out there and I don’t. but if I’m being opinionated I don’t. There’s a lot of places where people are learning quote on quote how to podcast. And I think they’re feeding them crap information.So often a big problem. David Ralph And I know he’s a mate of yours and I wish him all the success in the world, but the problem is so many people are trying to duplicate John Lee Dumas and that’s not right. He came first and he created the structure of his show, and whether you like that format or whatever that is he’s and he’s made in his own by being him. And I hear these shows and after about three minutes I think oh my god it’s the same thing again. Now I will listen to your shows and I will go all the way through. But people miss a trick don’t lay up coming back to my all the time is finding your authentic self playing to your streams. And and if you do that you create a bigger loyalty. You know if you are totally yourself people either hate you or like you but the ones that like you will love you. And that’s where these people are missing out because they’re not even being authentic to themselves they’re just kind of a middle ground. Michael O’Neal Yeah. And John would tell you and I’ve said this a million times in front of him and said do you the success of your show or his show has nothing to do with his format. And it has nothing do with him as a podcast for that all. It has everything to do with the fact that he has a financial background writes great marketing copy and has a schedule and a rigidity too. He has a military rigidity because he was in the military to his to his business. And unless you come with that exact kind of background you will not have success in that way. People think that because of the way he does his show because it’s structured and because he has these set questions and does it seven days a week that that’s why he’s successful and is completely irrelevant to that. So the problem is is like you said so many people listen to that or they go to podcasters paradise and they learn a certain way to do things. And I’m almost diametrically opposed to every single thing that they’re learning. So it’s like it’s like man I it’s it’s frustrating for me in that way. And I shouldn’t say that like I want to rephrase that I’m not time actually oppose everything they’re learning what I’m what I’m worried about is that the things that I think make podcasting successful aren’t emphasized in a lot of training courses. And like you just said finding your own voice is a number one you have to be successful. You have to find your own voice and you have to have a great brand and it’s not something that people speak about a lot. Like I took a lot of cliff Ravenscroft stuff. I’ve taken all the stuff. I’ve seen a number of course is out there a lot of them don’t pay a lot of attention to that piece and I worry that with this next phase of podcasting and what’s you know since everyone’s starting a show they’re going to find it a lot harder to sustain it unless they’ve found their own voice on their voice. And and it’s within this brand that they’ve really created. So we’ll see. But that’s the jury’s out on that. David Ralph Did you really have to love doing this because I’m going to play a speech in my Jim Carrey and I’m actually I’m going to play now and we’re going to talk afterwards. This is Jim Carrey. Jim Carrey Sound Clip My father could have been a great comedian but he didn’t believe that that was possible for him. And so he made a conservative choice. Instead he got a safe job as an accountant. And when I was 12 years old. He was let go from that safe job. And our family had to do whatever we could to survive. I learned many great lessons from my father. Not the least of which was that you can fail at what you don’t want. So you might as well take a chance on doing what you love. David Ralph Is that the true message that we should be getting across? Michael O’Neal Yes it is unfortunately the connecting of the dots joining of those two dots which is I found this thing that I love and now I have to figure out how to get paid for it is difficult. That’s a difficult journey. And that’s my that was my five year journey. Right. First not even knowing what it was that I loved. I had no idea I was going to podcast five years ago but I had an initial foray into public speaking. I started teaching social media on stage and I ended up traveling and going to 17 cities teaching people how to use social media to grow their business and I found it very like oh this is something I could be good at. And then that morphed into doing back end production on a podcast for a year and a half and just starting to understand the podcasting industry that finally morphed into me starting my own show and here we are. But it was a five year journey to find that you know like I had indicators of it and if someone in 2009 it said hey do you want to get. You want to make six figures and be a public speaker. I be like totally that be great. But at the time I had nothing to speak about. And now I do. So it’s kind of a I I do feel like you have to find something that will and you’ve probably seen this in your life with your show something that will make you walk into that studio and record an episode even if you’re exhausted or not in the mood or whatever because you truly love it and you’re excited about it. Oh yesterday. That’s how I am. Yeah I’ve had times when I’ve recorded 12 shows back to back and now I’ve. Why just because I knew I was going to do it seven days a week show and that was the hardest time I had. I had no internet for two weeks he just crashed on me and I suddenly panic but I didn’t have enough to cover. And I was going away as well. So yes seven days a week he goes out and I needed the boke. And so I did it and I started off at six o’clock in the morning and I just went through through move through and I edited and I did everything in the gap between when I recorded the next one and he just went seamlessly. And when I pressed record yes I was on I was on. Once I was off it was just like I was you know on drugs or something I was just slump too much. But it wasn’t until the very last ones that I realized actually about that passion that you’re talking about the ability to actually do it when you’re tired. I’ve gone past by and I was actually feeling ill. And I remember doing this show and the sweat was pouring off me and I listened back to and it doesn’t sound like it but I realized brain actually no you’ve got to look up to yourself as much as you do actually doing something. Yeah I’m very committed to that. DAVID It’s I have I have three sort of pillars if you will that I do I think make a good soul a partner or a successful soul a partner. And there’s there’s time freedom there’s financial freedom and there’s location freedom. And so the first one is really easy time freedom simple you walk into your boss’s office tell him to go screw himself and then you have time freedom. There you go. Location freedom. You can pretty much just get in a car and go somewhere that we have that kind of freedom in the U.K. and in the United States. Yeah there’s some complications in between. But technically you can just go do that. It’s the financial freedom part. That’s the tricky part of the three. That is a little harder. But I find that I’m so unwilling to compromise my time freedom. I’ve turned down so many more so much more money because it would compromise my time freedom like I could have a lot more coaching clients and a lot more people in my my group coaching. It’s called Solo lab. But with that I would have to commit another couple of days to taking care of them and I’d I’m willing to do that at all. Like i will i love my life the way it is right now and I can be comfortable financially I can go do fun things. And I don’t have to compromise that. And you know hopefully I can continue to grow and continue to you know make more money maybe have more speaking gigs things like that but I don’t intend on working any harder. I just want to you know work smarter maybe try to over deliver a little more to my audience and that’s what I’m looking for. Well was sensible and that’s exactly what I want to do as well because I hate these people and it’s almost like a badge of honor. But I’ve quit in nine to five job. And then you go yes I’m an online marketing do I do this I’m a diva and I cook my time and I’m doing 80 hours a week and I think right. Right. What the hell do you do that. Why don’t you just do two days hard work and have the rest of the time of it. It seems stupid that I say that. That’s right. And it’s. It does. It is counter intuitive. The thing is when my parents passed away you mentioned this in the intro when they did that. My perspective on time completely shifted and I just I. Life’s too short. So I am very much a person that says both. When someone says would you like this or this. I say both. When I get an opportunity to do something I say yes. Win you know and I just do it like it’s a thing that I have committed to and not mentally like I don’t just go yeah this is what I’m going to do from now on. I just do it now I just say yeah let’s do that. That sounds fun. Let’s just go for that. I’m going to go on a hike. Yeah. Great book a ticket. You know and we just do it. And I found that that has served me really well because when I do that and I put that as a priority in my life then the the stuff that I’m not so thrilled about I still end up having to do it. It still fills in the blanks but my priority is to really extract the most that I can out of my life and I’ll tell you not a person that does that well I think as John John Lee Dumas he works probably a little more like the person you were just mentioning. He works a lot but he’s also great at saying yes when when something comes across his desk he goes yeah lets do that. And it’s like on the schedule. And I think that’s that’s part of I think what that’s part of success. To me that’s part of what success feels like is being able to do that. I remember hearing an interview with Billy Joel and the interviewer said to him Billy you’ve sold X squillion albums and singles and you’ve done these tours and you play Madison Square Garden five straight nights. What has success given you. And he just said time and that was it. He can wake up each morning and if he doesn’t want to do something he doesn’t. And that single word resonated with me hugely especially when I was in my 9 to 5 job and I realized then that things were not right. And why should I be doing a nine to five job when there are options I suppose. I began to know too much. And then once you know too much brain you realize you can’t ever go back. Michael O’Neal Yeah. It’s really really is a one way street. It also but that carries over as well into my personal life as well. And I think when the there’s ever such a different confidence now just in my life in general and I think Billy Joel would sort sort of anybody that reached a level of success has this this this underlying confidence about them that is very attractive not only to you know the opposite sex but it’s what attracts other successful people to you. There’s just there’s a subtlety in actions and just how really how you go through life when you’re confident that is very attractive to you know both both people both sexes and that is something that people pick up on pretty easily. You become a success back humor don’t you. You know the old Jim rhône thing about you know the average of you know five people to surrender a lot of people I talked to. Yeah. I mean a crappy job and all these miserable people all the time. How can I surround myself. And one of the things I say to them is you know focus on success because the more success you get and the more competence as you say they end up a successful people get sucked into your world and suddenly you created what he was saying. It’s not easy to do. But it certainly is a mindset that starts moving in that direction. That’s right. And you it’s funny you just asked that question of me is how do you now you’re on it you’re on an island so you’re you’re in the UK you’re not. I’m in San Diego so I get to have a bunch of people around me at all times. I will say though we don’t get together. I mean you know we get together as friends but I’m not in a mastermind with any of these people around me. We don’t sit there and me out. So you know to answer your question I’m mean answer answered on my show tomorrow. But you’ve got to join a group you’ve got to join a group mastermind of some sort. And there’s really no other way. If you if you’re not surrounded by those five people that that you feel are motivating you in a way that that is bettering your life and hopefully their lives. You’ve got to separate from those people and find the people that are doing that and pretty much everyone I know that’s in this you know business Internet Marketing podcasting world has some sort of coaching program. And my best advice is to get people that you really enjoy like how they speak and like how they deliver and join their group and that’s it. And you know once you’re a part of that community you’ll be a lot more apt to be motivated you know learn the things you want to learn. It’s part of the reason why I don’t need to listen to podcasts anymore because I have so many people in my group that are doing cool things. I get to learn about all the cool new stuff without having to go listen. They sort of comes to me. So so do you now feel that you’re ahead of the curve. Because when when you started the show I remember you saying it’s the Wild West and now it seems like every man Dogan whatever has made me a podcast. So do you think now about you it’s not the Wild West but you actually ahead of the curve. It’s good. Get a question. Yes and no I think it’s still the wild west. I think that people in this environment aren’t necessarily looking in the right direction to advance their business where they should be. Let me clarify that. I think inspiration for how someone’s podcast get better gets better doesn’t happen within the new podcasting community. It happens with old media. Then you go look at how you all learn how to interview you go study Howard Stern if you want to learn how to produce an an excellent show. You go you know you look at and some an NPR show or something like that like a where a BBC show something that you know pay close attention to how people are introducing guests and what they’re how they do their ads and how they integrate you know clips from this person’s body of work into their intro or into the show itself. So I think there is really a professional side to this that will ultimately come out. For me personally what I’ve realized over the last couple of months and this is something that I think you can you can sort of strap on as a badge of honor as well is that I’m a better interviewer than most. Just in general I’m more intuitive and I have more range of knowledge so I can connect those dots. You know I can join those dots. And that’s what makes for a compelling and entertaining interview no matter who you are it’s the people that have the pre-scripted questions that I think are really going to struggle because that’s that’s very exhausting to an audience. So on one side I think I’m still really ahead of the curve in that. I come from this and as do you come from this background this history of paying attention to interviewers and then sort of bringing this natural ability to the microphone that 99 percent of people don’t have. And that’s the building not only to interview someone in a business sense and extract what they do for a living but actually make an entertaining hour of programming for someone. And in my opinion they can get the business data from 80000 podcasts that are on iTunes but it’s really hard to get entertainment out of it. And that’s what I’m trying to bring to the table and I think that’s what you do a really great job bringing to the table as well because because what I’ve realized you know was a complete nobody is basically the very first interview I did was no you weren’t Yes. Stop it. Tom Mocha’s was episode your line on the line. Me right now David. And he was a huge inspiration to me so I wanted him as guest number one. And he was talking to a gentleman called John Lee Dumas and so awful who’s is CHEP never heard of him. And I went over to his show and the very first show I listened to was episode 3 2 2 which was yourself and kidding. That was I didn’t know that. Yeah that was the very first episode. And the fascinating thing about it was which got me on the show and this is my sort of join up thought was the fact that everything you see in life is normally about benchmarking against success. You see people already Veja and you go I’d like to do that but it worked for him he’s had this skill he’s got that you know he’s a natural that’s for sure. On that show on 0 5 3 2 2 you hadn’t even lunged and he was saying to you you know when are you going to go and you and I’m going to go on Wednesday or whatever it was. And I tuned in and I listened or whatever you do you click on it you don’t tune into you. But I heard you speak for the very first time and I found it fascinating because I was seeing but not some bouts of somebody finding their way. And you was saying Yeah and I had 17 downloads and it wasn’t that you were looking at success you were looking at somebody finding their flow finding them. Moving on. And that’s right. But that’s what really flavored my show was the fact that you were doing something that seemed natural and you were holding your hands up and you going really. I don’t know if this is going to work but hey if it doesn’t change we’ll move on later on. And remember you did this show and it was it was some chap I don’t remember who was with them on the on the beach somewhere and calls were whizzing past and your battery ran out half way through. Yes and yes you still put out and I thought that’s interesting because what he’s saying back is not that this show has got to be polished and perfect what he’s saying is is a journey and I’m going to improve from that and that be the last time that my battery runs out halfway through. That’s right and it was definitely the last time that happened. Yeah. Yeah it’s a good way to good insight. I see. If I were doing it again yeah I would probably do the same thing again. I was I’ve been always sort of a fan of the let’s just put it out at that at that time. I was leaning more on my hopeful interview skills than I was like ultimate show quality and since I’d already put out a couple of episodes it wasn’t that bad but I really loved the guys story. So I was like yeah there was Harry. Harry Smith was the guy’s name and. And. And I thought yeah let me let me throw that on. And why not. What happened. You know and somewhere. This is what’s so cool about this right. You heard one single episode I did from Johnny Dumas which was like a random occurrence. And look how much it’s affected both of us. Yeah. Just that one thing. So if one little episode you put out catches the right person it can literally be life changing. I will say something. I want your listeners to go to solo our solo our dotcom and I want you to go back to like three. I don’t know let’s say pre 70s so anything from episode like I don’t know one until episode 70 and I want you to click on those posts and read how great David’s comments are for the episodes. They are so insightful and brilliant. And you do such a great job summarizing. I think I even wrote you once and said Do you want to write my show summaries. Remember that you did and it was just that the crux of me doing this and I knew I was just going to stall so cool. So I am and you still you just did it the other day when you were that episode you listened to. You do such a great job summarizing. You’re going to be such a smash successful podcast. David Yeah I have no doubt whatsoever you are going to I hope you will let us be on your show someday when you do these live broadcasts in front of you know a hundred thousand people at the Wembley Stadium. Did you know when you start this and I’m really going to open up here so I don’t really have a Chevez. But when you start based you want it to be so good and you want it to be brought in and you kind of. There were job. You look back on them and you go OK yeah that wasn’t quite where I wanted to be but it was all right. And then you hit sort milestones and you listened back to some of these shows I don’t know if you listen to yours and I thought oh that was a bit closer to what I had in my head my original vision. And I got to show it E.T. and that’s when I suddenly realize Michael that was the host of a show and it was my responsibility to be the host to even I think he was too grateful for people giving up their time to be on my show. I it was a complete mind set. Now I want this to be the biggest show out there. I absolutely do. And it’s all I can focus in on and it’s in many ways it’s killing me or my life is totally out of whack. But all I want is about is the number one thing upset that on any show because it sounds a bit arrogant really I’m upset. Once we’ve stopped recording them when somebody asked me about it that is where I want to be and I want to be join up not as a brand. Exactly as you say. Right. Because it’s one of those things that you kind of go join up towards. What does it mean. And I’m very aware of if you provide quality and content as quality brand in many ways take care of itself. It’s like we always talk in the early episode the name that was always mentioned was Pat Flynn. And you know he’s got that classic smart passive income and you forget that’s a premium brand but actually he’s only three words put together and he’s because he’s provided that great content and quality and value. But it becomes the kind of the trust word where what he’s trying to achieve. That’s right in he that he can live that now. But I actually want I want to focus on something you said just before that you will be bigger than him and so will I. And I know I don’t mean that like he doesn’t have the same aspirations as you do. Right. And I’m saying in terms of podcasts in terms of like Pat wants to speak I’m not speaking for him here but just knowing what I know about him. He he is sort of the crash test dummy of internet marketers. So he does all these really cool things on the web. I want my show to become about like I want to. I want to be interviewing complete legitimate A-listers you know and finding out about their kind of business and so normal journey. That’s where I will see the show going. And because of that if when and if I get to that point. The show the podcast itself will be bigger than all of the internet marketing type podcasts. Does that make sense. Yeah it’ll be way bigger than that. It’ll be more like Nerdist. You know Chris Hardwick gets killer guests on his show and that’s why his podcast is you know number one number two number three on iTunes overall. And so it’s it’s one of those things that that I it’s what I aspire to do as well is to get working within this world like real A-list category of people because I think that they’ll appreciate talking about their journey. And so that’s where I want to head with that. Also I was very strategic and I changed direction. I realized that when I started I was just throwing out the net to anyone and anyone would jump on the show. I would have them round about sort of thing once again I thought to myself no I can’t do this because when I was looking at other people’s shows I was thinking Oh I’ve been on my show I’ve been on my show and it was just the sort of hybrid of people doing the rounds. So I went off in a different direction. So if you listen to episode 88 I had Cathy O’Dowd who was the first woman to hit the summit of Everest from both sides. I’ve got the first civilian astronaut coming on the show. I’ve got a chap over a few years ago was worldwide news because he sold his life on e-bay and he’s just sold his life to Disney and all that kind of stuff. So I realized I had to change direction to become more unique to be more interested by the stories more. Yes. Extract out of them what I wanted to show to the world and that was my original vision but I couldn’t say Eva until later on in the journey. Yeah and that’s really what you’ve done. That’s the whole point. That’s why you will be successful because you’ve you’ve done this in a sort of a different way in your life when you look back to sort of the Philadelphia kid and you riding around on your BMX and all that kind of stuff. Well you just sort of wanting to be the classic sports kid was. If you look back and now we all going to send you back in time soon on the Sermon on the mike. No I was a show off though. I think I think I was you know a performer of some sort and the PA is I keep is that makes my colonial who he is to play better racquetball with an audience. Yes. Every single time. Yeah I think so. I think there’s that’s there that’s in there. It’s in the DNA for sure. I don’t use that a lot but it’s in the DNA. I work better in a performance environment which is presumably why I kind of screw myself on the show intentionally. I don’t I I prepare in a way where I I’ve researched my guest as you have. You know you know and you certainly listen to the show but at times you know a little bit about me and you’re able to then naturally structure questions that that dovetail into my history and that’s what a good interviewer does. I don’t write a lot of questions out sometimes intentionally and that’s because I there’s something about the performance side. I realize now that I’m I’m doing this the shows this this month I’ve got over 300000 downloads for the first time and this is a and I realize so there’s people listening and I have to perform. You know what I like it. It makes me it UPS my game. I’m live on the show. And I think I do that to myself on purpose because because I work better in that environment a lot maybe underpressure a little. Well we’re very similar. It’s fascinating. I feel like I’m finding out the real Marcantonio here. Where is the person behind the that the presenter. Because I am somebody who has spent my life doing training courses and presentations and that’s my job. I’ve never done this kind of thing. It was totally BA and I’m somebody very much likes to be on their own likes no one near them. And then when I suddenly go ping. That’s it. It’s performance time. And I don’t know if it’s showing off or trying to create a different persona for myself because that’s kind of not naturally me. But I do have the ability to raise my game and present a different side to myself if you know me deep down you would say to me different people that the people who know me from seeing where I allow them to see me they would say yeah you it’s like I’m on the mike as you are when you normally doing those things because I’m letting them see what they want to see. Yeah. Yeah I mean I think there’s there’s an element of that and again I want people to understand this is why we and we talked earlier about sort of what John brought to the table. And I’m you know people look at my show and say it’s it’s been it’s it’s been pretty successful in the first 11 months just overall debt is not that’s not a fluke because I didn’t just start in August of 2013 with kind of media. You know I’ve been a professional drummer my whole life. I’ve performed I’ve been on I’ve been a racer I’ve been you know a competitive racquetball player for for many many tournaments for many many years now and before that it was tennis. So I’ve always been performing in some way or the other. I I coached for five years on teaching people social media in front of huge audiences. I’ve played Red Rocks in front of 10000 people like me being on a microphone and being natural at it is not something that happened overnight. It’s a it’s this is something that you walked in with. You’ve been training for years before you turned a mike on yourself. So it’s kind of like Yeah right yeah. You were new to podcasting but not nuda trying to translate a concept from one person to an audience like that’s something you’ve been doing for a long time. So so that’s I think that it’s a bit of a misnomer within our industry that yeah anybody can you know podcast or anybody can start blah blah blah. That’s kind of cool I get it. Yes technically you can turn on an app you can go to boss jock on your iPhone and upload it to clips and you’ve got a podcast but can you do it. Well can you do it so that when someone switches from morning radio or Howard Stern or the BBC to your podcast that they don’t notice a huge drop off in quality or you know sound quality interview quality production quality that’s that’s what I try to bring the table and I think you do the same thing. So is that what you’re saying really and I’m going to play the words of Steve Jobs because he says it very well as well but no experience is wasted. It doesn’t matter what you’ve done in your life you will pull elements and you extract what you need to create your new path. Out 100 percent. Absolutely yes. Everything you’ve done up until this point is does training for you for this next phase. When I have people on their show and we have these episodes called Find your swing I want to find out everything that person has done because it find your swing is like well what do I do. Like what am I naturally gifted at how can I make money off of something that I really enjoy that I’m passionate about that’s what finding your swing is. And it’s I want to find out like what you did when you were a kid. Were you an athlete did you or you or you a professional knitter you like to knit hats. You know like what is it what do you do. And when people can start accessing those things that they’ve done their whole lives they’re really gifted and I like to find ways that we can use those talents in whatever their next business endeavor is. We call about connecting our past to build our future and here. And one of the names as come out is if you really want to know your passion really want to know what you’re naturally good at. Don’t think about what you were doing in adult life because very much you would have been taking a responsibility for a wage or whatever. Look at what you was doing as a kid when you weren’t being paid for it. And if you was a drama when you was a kid and you loved doing it then try and look at something that would do that. And he says that exactly the same way as you do it and you’ll find your swing episodes. That’s right. And I and I love those. Again that’s another instance where we totally put ourselves on the spot. I have a co-host. Her name is Dawn Mars. For those episodes and we never read the questions first. Like I only you know sometimes I glance at them to see just a copy and paste them into my Evernote when we’re doing the show. But we were reading them and answering them live and which again has another element of pressure that we’ve got to come up with an answer and these people are literally like I’ve had people that have taken what we’ve said on the show. They’ve made a business from it like the next day they’ve gone and done it. So it’s it can be a little daunting. And I was going to ask you earlier you know your show’s growing now and this this will be big your show will have a huge audience at some point and I’ve asked this with other people that are in the space. Have you yet felt this sense of responsibility that comes with that the fact that you’re speaking into a microphone and someone’s actually listening to what you’re saying. Yeah. With power comes great responsibility. And it’s funny the very first show I released I got two e-mails and they were from people I’d never met and they were saying thank you so much for putting the show out there and I thought oh my God. And from that moment of being very aware of what I’m saying or being very aware of I don’t know where my words are landing. And of also having a conversation with my wife this afternoon saying if this really takes on. Just as I want it to really take on I’m a little bit scared but I haven’t got the value to provide the audience but I won’t and I don’t know why that is because you know success is everything you want. But I suddenly felt a pressure because I can see the downloads increasing increasing increasing. I can see the work coming towards me and I’m doing this seven days old on my own. There’s not one person that helps me and I’m also balancing other responsibilities as well. So this isn’t my only so restrained I suddenly freaked this afternoon for the exact reason that you said oh my god this is power this is responsibility. I’ve got to be careful with it. Yeah. Have you also found it. I agree. I felt that in some I haven’t had yet. Hey buddy come back to me I’m like you ruin my life but I’ll show it. That’s going to have to happen right. Someone will listen to something you’ve said or I’ve said and they’re going to do it and it’s not going to work for them and we won’t have the details but they’re going to say I listened to you when you were in my life. That’s going to happen. There’s no way it that doesn’t happen. When you’re when you grow this thing to where it can go there’s no way that doesn’t happen. Well think shows a slightly different note because you teach nuts and bolts. I think with my show I talk about hope and I told you why leap of both. Yeah I really think I teach nuts and bolts because that’s that’s I feel like there’s a lot of shows that do that specifically. And I I feel like I teach more of the journey and then the nuts and bolts sort of fall from there. Well I think that’s the same thing. I think what you do you you talk about the journey you get the cogs working in your own brain and brain when you throw out the nuts and bolts which you probably don’t think have got value as such. You’re already using those cokes and you’re thinking yeah I can use that yeah I can tell you that that’s exactly what happened with me. You know I couldn’t see how to do this because I’ve never done this. But just by you having conversations with people you take the element and you take the element and you take that element and what do you do. He’s been up to you as an individual to put it together. Yeah I actually find myself pretty. I can be very socially awkward at the beginning and I sometimes I’ve actually accessed my I’ve switched into interview mode when I’m meeting someone in real life. I just watch on Mike I like my mentally switch on a podcast microphone in front of me and I found it so much easier to have conversations with people that way. So that’s kind of interesting to me is bizarre. I’m getting ready to play Steve Jobs now because I’m fascinated to see your spin on this. And this is the fulcrum of the whole show so this is a job. Don’t be free to do that of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward. When I was in college but it was very very clear looking backwards. Ten years later again you can’t connect the dots looking forward. You can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something your gut destiny life karma whatever because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart even when it leads you off the well-worn path. And that will make all the difference. When I’m going to ask a different question because I think you’ve answered it already but you will say yes you believe in it. But why do you think so many people don’t believe in that. I think that’s a lot. Most people get hung up on the how of something for example I think that we we pick a point be right we pick a point B that’s there’s the dot so I’ve got this I want to I want to do I want to have this show. And to get this show together I need this this this this this this this and we get stuck in the details of the this this this this this instead of. All right I’m going to sort of flow through this. All I want to do is get to that thing. I’m not sure how I’m going to get there yet but I’m going to I don’t really know. And by the time you get there and you look back and go wow that is not the path that all that I was going to take. My favorite metaphor. Or maybe it’s an analogy I forget but for this is if you and I were sitting at a cafe and I there was you know a three story building across the street and I said David there’s a hundred thousand pounds sitting in a bag on the roof of that building across the street. You have 15 minutes to get it. How fast would you be out the door to go get that money. I’d be on the right run the window right but you wouldn’t know how you were going to get it. You had no idea how to get to the roof of that building. You just knew you were getting to the roof. You don’t know if you’re going to you know helicopter down you know if you’re going to call the fire department to take you up there or you know scale like Spiderman but you’re getting to the roof of that building somehow. And I think what successful entrepreneurs do is they just keep their eye on that that you know that bag the bag that’s on the roof. They’re not quite as concerned about the how part. And we very much get concerned about the how part. And the second piece of that is when someone gives you an opportunity I just said this a little earlier when someone gives you an opportunity. Our instinctive reaction is to say no because of this this and this versus just instinctive to say yes and I’m going to figure out how to work out this this and this and that is a huge mental shift even though it’s very subtle. It’s just yes and no. But if you’ll find that people in your world that are really successful or really look like they’re just having a great time. They’re the ones that say yes first and then figure out how it’s going to work after and most of the people that are stuck and they don’t get from that one dot to the next dot. Those are the ones that say no because you know I I can’t live in San Diego because I have kids in school or because I can’t afford the move or because whatever we can come up with 15 different ways. But in reality all that stuff can be worked out. So I think that’s how I would respond to that and I hope that helps someone. So what scares you this is probably my final question before I send you on the mike and you can have a one on one with your younger self. As you all know and you’ve got these rocking and rolling show everything’s going well you’ve just bought these the watch you’ve finished off the last five years and everything’s good and you’ve got a lovely new girlfriend. What scares you. Well when you look at what you need to achieve. What scares me. I have to say I look at the bank being intimidated or being excited. I sort of treat the same way. So I don’t get super excited about everything and I don’t get scared about everything. I gosh I mean I don’t I I can honestly say I don’t have that for the same reason when someone said you know when I was so literally I was scraping up change so I could take in an airport shuttle for a ticket that was paid for by somebody else to go speak in front of 3000 people and that in which I was going to make $5000 or whatever that weekend. A few years ago I I literally had to scrape $8 up so I could take the shuttle like in change so I could take the shuttle to get to the airport that I had. I had $18 in my bank account at the time. And so it wasn’t enough to get the cash out of the machine. So I wasn’t worried about it. I’ve never been worried about stuff like that and I didn’t even know what success was going to look like for me. But I had a feeling that I was destined for it. And that’s the only way I can say is that it was it was very innate and I didn’t know where it was going to come from but I was very patient about it. Now I was also very patient about about you know I knew I was going to meet a great woman at some point and I was able to reach you know like you said read about a year ago but but recently. So I think that I have that that vibe that that it’s the same reason I don’t plan a lot. I just don’t. I’m living very much in the moment as I go day by day. And for better or for worse I don’t plan as much as I probably could or should. But right now I’m not really you know scared about anything. I mean I could say you know the show doesn’t grow at all. But even if it doesn’t I’m live in a great life right now. So I guess I’m not even that scared of that. OK last question before we send you back this time. Is it easier to move forward when you’ve hit rock bottom and you really did hit rock bottom. Yes it is. It’s easier for me to keep perspective on it. I just last weekend went to I went to Napa Valley with my girlfriend’s family and it was a very first class trip like from private private jet from San Diego to Napa Valley which I’ve never done before my life and everything was super exclusive super like Michelin star first class and I was like man I don’t want to be here like this. No I don’t mean like I didn’t want to be at the weekend. I just I don’t want to live in that universe of that sort of high end world. And that’s it. I I remember looking longingly at a train that goes through Napa Valley and it stops at all these different wineries and I’m kind of like Man I wish I would’ve just taken the train and gotten kind of drunk at the third winery and kept going and that would’ve been a really fun day. Instead it was like this you know 12 people serving our table kind of thing and it just wasn’t me. But my my Philly boy sort of like Kragen pragmatist personality carried me through that whole weekend thinking yeah I would be fine with stopping at a fast food place now and going to another winery. We don’t have to go to a hundred dollar plate dinner you know. And so I think if anything it’s given me perspective and there’s one more piece of perspective that in my very very lowest time and it was very low. And I thank you for not like making me go through that again like 40000 other shows have but I had a I remember the current hurricane Katrina had hit the southern United States and it just decimated New Orleans. And this was literally at my lowest time. And I remember looking on the news and seeing like a little 9 year old little black kid who everybody in his family died. Right. And he lost everything like lost every piece of memory he ever had including all of his family members. And he’s this kid who doesn’t have much of an education. He’s a minority. He doesn’t have a lot of opportunity that are coming coming to him and I remember thinking all right no matter what happens I’m a white male with a skill set in United States and that’s not and that’s not to be racially insensitive I’m looking. That was a practical. OK. So no matter what my situation is I can’t complain like I’m starting with these four advantages that a lot of people all over the world don’t have. I will be given opportunities that a lot of people don’t have and that really kept me grounded like that there was this you know that some people had to struggle to get to what I had innately by birth that I had nothing to do with. So that really kept me grounded and it still keeps me grounded to this day is that I always realize that there’s people out there that do not have the same opportunities that I knew the answer. Mike are we going to put you on the Sermon on the mike now. This is when we send you back in time lost a young Marty McFly to have a one on one with yourself and if you could go back in time. What age would you choose and what advice would you say. So I’m going to play the music and when he gets out you’re up. This is the Sermon on the mike. Here. We go with the speed of this. This man. Who. I think that first of all very handsome very very talented man couldn’t congratulate now. If you could work on harnessing that Philly attitude a little bit just over the next few years if you could take the edge off of that. Not everybody is out to get you and focus on building some relationships that you will sustain forever without having that kind of you know screw you Gene. Not Eugene. I don’t know anybody named Eugene. I’m not trying to signal that that will serve you in the future. Yeah. So to some or to to to bring that and I know that was very short but to bring that in I feel like over the last few years I’ve been able to take this. There was a bit of filea attitude like where if someone slighted me in any way that was it they were erased like done. And there was no real going back. It was partially like it was a Scorpio in me that that that’s sort of like had that stinger. And I you know it’s it’s the it’s the patience I have now which is maybe a little bit of it’s I wouldn’t say less judgment because I think judgment makes for good comedy. But but it’s just maybe being a little more empathetic to people’s situations and realizing that that people aren’t always in control of their actions and sometimes they’re going through a learning process as well. And to just instantly give them the guillotine and out of one’s life is not the most productive way to go through things. I don’t do that anymore but I did it for a number of years and I think it was just a reaction to losing my parents and it being so so much. OK Wolf I’m going to lose this anyway I might as well just cut it right off. And I think that didn’t that didn’t serve me for a long time. So I’d fix that. Michael how can our listeners connect with you sir. Well you know this. Oh I know you say you say in an American Xon is better I would say the same thing if you were speaking in a British accent. By the way you going to come on my show some time. I would love to come on your show it oh no great. And Howard Jones I want him to go. Has he been on your show yet. No he isn’t knocking me back. He said he would and not me but I’ve called a few of them that sign up for it. And then you just come down and that’s a drag. Anyway the show is called the Solar Perner hour. The Web site because no one can spell pre-New or is solo our dotcom. And if you’d like some coaching give a coaching program yet. I’ve only been focused on building you audience. That’s good. Well so if anybody needs coaching including you my friend I can’t believe you’re not in solo lab. I want solo lab dotcom and we’d love to have you in our really cool community. Mancow thank you so much for spending time with us tonight joining up those dots on the 100th episode and it’s quite the world’s longest episode of ever done as well. Please come listen. Is. Yeah we were about seven minutes past what we normally do. So come back again when you have more dots to join up because I do believe that by joining up the dots and connecting up pasts is the best way to build a future. Mr. Michael O’Neill thank you so much. And thank you.

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  • Michael ONeal The Host Of The Solopreneur Hour Podcast Joins The Dots On The 100th Show

    · 01:14:39 · Entrepreneur Success Stories By Join Up Dots - Inspiration, Confidence, & Small Business Coaching To Start Your Online Career

    Todays guests is Mr Michael ONeal, the podcasting master behind the hit Itunes show "The Solopreneur Podcast". The top ranked business show, or The Solohour as it is known to its friends, teaching online marketing and entrepreneurship skills.  Michael is a man who quite simply without him, then I wouldn't be on the mic today. So you know where to send all your complaints too. He is a born entrepreneur with a fascinating story, of successes, setbacks, leaps of faith, and finding his unique path with the guidance of John Lee Dumas and Pat Flynn. Growing up in Philadelphia, the thought of being the host of his own podcast show was the last thing on his mind. He was a normal type of kid, obsessed with sport, finding trouble at school, and generally being a kid. But unfortunately that freedom of thought and energy changed when he was moved from his beloved Philly, and taken down to Florida, and it seems to me this was the start of him looking for his path in life. He didn’t fit in down in the Sunshine State, so as soon as he could, he got himself back up North, and discovered one of the first dots in his life that links him to where he is today…the internet. He was fascinated by the worldwide web, so developed skills to be a web designer. And that was his life for fifteen years, until unfortunately his parents both passed away in a very short time, and he found himself sitting with just $14 dollars in his pocket. He was over 30, with a decision forced upon him. Would he accept the punches that life had dealt him, or would he start fighting back? And that descision was made and he took the steps that made him “Know too much” and not want to work for anyone else again? He was going to become a solopreneur and own his own future. But how did he know he had the skills to be a success in the online arena? How did he know where his true passions lie? And does he regret inspiring guys like me to jump into the pool too? Well lets find out as we bring onto the 100th show to start joining up dots, the man on the mike, the host of the “Solopreneur Hour podcast”, the one and only Mr Michael O’Neal!   For more on the Solohour Podcast go to: The Solopreneur Hour Podcast with Michael O'Neal - Job Security...for the Unemployable By Michael O'Neal Chats with Proudly Unemployable Solopreneurs Like Himself Description They say successful people put their pants on the same way we all do. This show is about watching them put their pants on. Nominated As "Best New Show of 2013" by Stitcher Radio, Our range of guests takes us from comedy, to acting, to the NFL, to UFC and MMA, to Top Music Stars, to Millionaires, to Business Experts, to Real Estate moguls, and everything in between. Guests like Nicole Arbour, Adam Carolla, Hines Ward, Sam Jones, Tucker Max, Jonathan Fields, Derek Halpern, Pat Flynn, Amy Porterfield, John Lee Dumas, Chris Ducker, Chris Brogan, Guy Kawasaki, Mike Johnston, Rich Franklin, and many more, these casual conversations contain tons of action-inducing content wrapped up in an entertaining candy shell.   Yes hello. How are we all? Can you believe it. Episode 100. We have been building up to this for well, it seems like a hundred episodes and we are finally here. We have got a man who who quite simply rose to the top and was going to be the only person who would fit the mantle of being my 100th guest. And I’ve had people banging down the doors. I had Paul McCartney phone up the other day and say I want to be on the show, I’ve heard it’s a big thing and I said to him, “Paul, unless you can get the other four Beatles to join you, it’s not going to happen” We’ve had  David Bowie crying. It’s been pathetic really. So today’s man has been nailed on to do this today, and I’m absolutely delighted that he’s on the show because quite simply without him I wouldn’t be on the microphone. So you know where to send all your complaints to! He’s a man with a fascinating story of successes, setbacks leaps and finding his unique voice. Growing up in Philadelphia he was a normal type of kid obsessed with football at school, and generally being a kid. But unfortunately that freedom of thought and energy changed when he was moved from his beloved Philly and taken down to Florida and it seemed to me this to stop him looking for his path in life. He didn’t fit in down in the sunshine state so soon as he could he got himself back up north and discovered one of the first dots in his life that links him to where he is today the Internet. He was fascinated by a World Wide Web so develop skills to be a web designer and as he’s known for 15 years until unfortunately his parents both passed away in a very short time and he found himself sitting with just fourteen dollars in his pocket. It was over thirty with a decision forced upon him. Would you accept the punches that life had dealt him or would he stop fighting back and that decision was made and he took steps that made him know too much and not want to work for anyone else again. He was going to become a solopreneur and own his own future. But how did he know he had the skills to be a success in the online arena and how did he know where his true passions lie? And does he regret inspiring guys want me to jump into the pool too. Well let’s find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up thoughts the man on the microphone. The host of the Solohour podcast, the only Mr. Michael O’Neal. Well how are you Michael?   Michael O’Neal Oh here is what I can’t even what is happening. I am so flabbergasted by that intro. OK. Two things. Number one that was the best intro I’ve ever had. And formerly Chris Cerrone had that that title of the best in show to a show I’ve ever had. But it was one of the best I’ve ever heard for anybody which is why you are so the right person for this job. Well we’re all thankful you have a microphone in front of you David. Trust me on that. Second thing is I would pay to hear Zombie John Lennon if you could figure out a way to get all four Beatles on the show. That would be cool. David Ralph Well I can do Steve Jobs every day. So I might be able to do them as well. Michael O’Neal Ah so dude that was incredible. I am . I am flummoxed. David Ralph I’m so excited to be on David Ralph’s show. David Ralph – Yeah. Go go and do that because I know you have been doing an action of me on a few shows and we’ll show you a few times night. Yeah you got a little bumper for me on my show. I have these little things that when people ask you me I have a guest on the show that I have them do a little like Hi this is David Ralph and then I get interested in this opener with Mike O’Neill and your voice is so. What’s the first thing I ever said to you. I said you have the ultimate voice for radio. Didn’t I say that you did. Absolutely. David Ralph I haven’t got the face for television but I’ve got a voice for Radio Michael O’Neal Well as long as you’ve got the radio part worked out and you have taken this thing and you’ve run with it my friend. So I’m honored. I’m honored to be at the 100 episode Mark. Thank you. Thank you. David Ralph Absolutely. It is an honor to have you here because it is amazing when you start this thing,because you started your show what was it August 2013. Michael O’Neal Eleven month ago. David Ralph Yeah,11 months ago and now you are rocking and rolling with the best of them you surround yourself with, with the Internet movers and shakers the ziggers and zagers and you know you’re going to be humbled by this. So maybe you won’t. You are an online celebrity of note. When I was saying to people is my show a lot of people sort of touch on the shows of said to me I know who you’re going to have. And I said no you don’t. And I go Yes I know who you’re going to have and ego going and going to no one. And I when Martin O’Neill and I went oh term term how did I know. Really I know. Yes yeah I did it because I had pain you know I don’t want to suck up to you Michael but the early days I didn’t know what the hell I was doing. So I just kept on saying your name over and over again or some kind of benchmark of what I was trying to achieve because you like that you’d come out the gates really and say look like a rocket ship. It’s unbelievable. But you’ve only been around so long because it seems like you’ve been here ever in a day. Does it seems like that to you? Michael O’Neal It is weird. It does feel like it was yesterday that I launched the show. It feels really really recent to me that it happened. So but then at the same time I look at the memories that I’ve had over the last 11 months and all the cool benchmarks and you know different things that have happened and, but it’s packed full of stuff right. So I think if there’s any celebrity it’s sort of a z list celebrity and only at certain conferences. But yeah it’s been it’s been an incredible journey. I couldn’t be happier with how it’s gone. And I can’t wait to see what happens in the next 365. You know I’m really excited about that. David Ralph Is there a plan to the next 365 because you seem to me somebody who is very much stimulated by the now and then. Are you somebody who knows what you’re aiming to achieve? Michael O’Neal No I’m a notorious non planner. Much to the chagrin of my girlfriend who is a total planner and if I didn’t have the you know a calendar app on my phone I would be I would be completely floating out there now because I I wake up and I look at I go OK what do I have to do today. And then I see what’s going on for the day. And sometimes that doesn’t work out for me like in a social situation because people actually make plans to go out and do things. But and I’m not one of them. And all of a sudden it’s Friday I’m like I probably should have planned to do something. Yes I watch movies tonight. But yeah I I’m in an interesting spot right now because I have had this kind of five year run of as you mentioned in the intro bringing myself in this very circuitous path from $14 and not having a clear direction to now. When someone says What do you do. I say I’m a podcast host. And that’s a thing like I. That’s what I do. So I sort of a couple of weeks ago had an occasion to kind of put the cap on that five year journey and now I’m going to be looking ahead but I haven’t quite formulated what that ahead looks like yet. David Ralph And how did you do that? How did you put a cap on that. How did you say that is five years, finished boxed up? Michael O’Neal Well it was as i say I’m I’m a notorious non-celibrator. I’m a guy that usually gets to an achievement and then continues to go without acknowledging it. And I have what is probably a weird story that you’re asking for but hey here comes. So I’ve been a Porsche fan for my whole life. And you may already know where you’re heading with this but I was a Porsche fan my whole life and I don’t know why particularly. I was I had a Volkswagen in high school and I think that maybe planted to see a little bit and I was a car guy and so you know those Porsche ads from the 80s with like the big fender flares and the big wing. I think I was attracted to that and I eventually in 2003 I bought my first vintage Porsche so I bought a 1972 11 and it was a piece of crap. I bought it in New York. I didn’t know better. I drove across country midway across the USA and midway across the country the engine blew up. So that’s how badly. Where were you when this happened. I was in the dead heart middle of Nebraska when it happened in Nebraska I suppose. You it’s nothing. It is hundreds and millions of acres of wide open like cornfields and nothing else. I mean we are I was I have a picture of my car sitting looking like it’s a panther wading in the grass. Waiting to you know to prowl and it’s just sitting there with with like a hundred miles in each direction of grass. There was no middle of nowhere when it happened and I ended up finding a Volkswagen place 60 miles away that towed me in. And the guy dropped the oil pan in the car and just giant chunks of metal came out and I’m like I’m pretty sure that’s not how it’s supposed to be. So I ended up getting a tow truck driving it from Denver where I was living at the time and picking it up. Neither here nor there. So I eventually traded that piece of crap on and got a nicer one. Not when I bought it but in 2005 and I restored this car it took me four years and 2000 hours to restore this car back to better than factory condition when I still have it now. And as part of the dynamic this one in 1969 9/11 and the 69 through 73 nine elevens are very very sought after. They are the iconic 9/11. So when you would see Steve McQueen and a picture of him in the 60s you know you know in LA MA or something driving a 9/11 he was driving one of these sort of 69 to 73 virgins. And one of the sponsors of Porsche in the 60s was a company called Hoyer which was tag Hoyer before Tagg was involved in the mid-80s. So just Hoyer and it’s a guy named Jack Hoyer and he made these beautiful tiny pieces chronographs based on race timers. So you’d have a co-driver with you as a race car and there was a race in Mexico called the career of PanAmericana and the first Porsche Carrera was named after this particular race. So Hoyer as a sponsor of Porsche created a watch based on the chronographs that they used for the race cars and they called it the Hoyer Kura. So this was a very utilitarian type watch you could use it as a race time or you could just click one of the buttons and it had this chronograph on it. It was beautiful automatic beautiful timepiece. And as I’ve been going through this journey for five years this has been on my vision board because these are about three grand and above to get one of these watches. But that was so superfluous for me because I had no i like zero money. And for me to spend three grand on something as excessive as a watch wasn’t even on my radar. So about a month and a half ago now I was in this position where I was like this could be the time. And I scoured the world. I ended up buying a 1972 Hoyer Carrera from a guy in France and it came to my house and it was more beautiful in person than I. I’d never seen one in person is more beautiful than I even thought it could be. And I remember at the mid midday I’d gone to this little swimming pool by my house I belong to this little pool club which is where I work out and I was swimming in the middle of the day two o’clock in the afternoon like Tony Soprano in the middle of a work day and thinking I just did this like this just happened. This 5 year journey comes stops right now like this is where my new journey begins. I’ve gone through this trial by fire. I’ve come out hopefully like a phoenix. I’m in a position where I can buy this watch now which is insane to think about and I’m peaceful and grateful for the life that I’ve built. And so that for me was the cap of a five year struggle. I mean a real struggle to get to where I am today. David Ralph Mr. O’Neill is a perfect story. It started and it made me think if I’m ever in a pub quiz and a question about Portia comes up you’re my man that does it to Luli you are obsessed by that and you. The amount that you were quoting then. Michael O’Neal Ah. I mean I think. I think it’s kind of a lifetime obsession for people that become afflicted by it. In fact there’s a great ad I will send it to you on YouTube and there’s an ad for the new Porsche about the time the new Porsche Carrera ad and it was there it’s a little boy. And he’s a little kid in his classroom and he’s daydreaming and on 9/11 drives by him and you just see him like looking out the window and his pencil drops and you know then he he gets in trouble. And then he runs to the you know was on his BMX bike to the Porsche dealer after school and and he you know he ends up sitting in this car and the steering wheel is bigger than he is and you see Mike raised his head he’s 12 or something and that he goes to the dealer or the guy goes you have a card and the guy goes yeah here you go and he goes I’ll see in 20 years. And then there’s this great voice over that says something like there’s a there’s a there’s a particular moment that happens with you know a Porsche fan. There’s that time you want one. Then there’s the time you get one and for the truly affected afflicted there’s the 20 years in between. And it just like it gives you the chills and my buddies sent it. I sense my body goes man. Pass the Kleenex. So I guess there is a real passion there for this. It’s a very visceral feeling that is so different because of the way they build their cars and because the engines in the rear and it’s a totally different experience than you have with with any other vehicle that yeah there becomes a real passion a real obsession with him. Did you read that because this shows about joining up dots, but do you remember as a young kid having the same kind of obsessive compulsive in both words and things when when you was a little kid running around the streets of Philly pretending you Rocky did most will keep you alive without paying him for the Michael O’Neal No no no. I was a BMX kid. Now I was I was in a suburb. I was the only gentile I was in a super Jewish town north of Philadelphia. And I was a BMX or I rode my BMX bike. I mean I was from 1984 until I mean I was racing bikes from 84 until 2000. David Ralph So Rocky wasn’t on your radar at all? Michael O’Neal No not at all. Tony Hawk and Dave you know Dave Voelker and Matt Hoffman and you know BMX guys Bob horo. They were all on my radar. I’ll tell you here’s here’s a little here’s a join up dot that is current. I rode an entire daywith real wow I just blanked on his name. That’s embarrassing really. I’m killing myself right now this is bad radio. David Ralph What  does he look like? Michael O’Neal He’s a big famous director now and he will watch films John Malkovich. Being John Malkovich won a friggin Oscar. We’re ready. Come on. With it and it might seem seamless Spike Jones for crying out loud. David Ralph Spike Jones Michael O’Neal Yeah Spike Jones the director was a dude I rode with at a place called Rockville BMX and we were just BMX or dudes riding around. And then he he became a photographer for one of the BMX magazines and then started doing filming because he did Beastie Boys first video I forget which one and then started doing independent films then did Being John Malkovich and now he is like an international you know massive director like one of the best most well-reputed directors in the world. And it was kind of cool. I mean so he did adaptation he did Being John Malkovich Where the Wild Things Are You know just just done amazing stuff. So the Academy Awards. And so a pretty pretty bad ass. He did her you know the movie Her most recent Yeah that’s Spike Jones. David Ralph So is there any similarity between the young kid in Philly and now, because from what I see across the pond and I listen into the conversations that you have with your internet guys and it does seem from this side of the pond that you’ve got a gang of friends and followers and whatever that basically control the Internet. I had Rick Mulready on the show. And I said “Do you ever feel like slipping something into Pat Flynns drink, so that the next morning you turn on your screen and see if there’s a black hole on the Internet because he’s not functioning at this time because it kind of seems not” But he wouldn’t be pushed in to slipping a Mickey into his drink in any shape or form. But you seem a little bit edgy to most of them. Michael O’Neal Yeah. David Ralph Is that because you’re from Philly. Is it because he’s a very sort of industrial Con. Its a real city you know. Its like a working class city when you’re there. Michael O’Neal Yeah I think the the edginess is something that I’m kind of a known for. I don’t know if you curse on your show but I’m kind of a no B.S. kind of guy and I’ve never been one to straddle the fence very very much. And I think what happened with Irwin what happens with a lot of these sort of Internet type celebrities is that they’re so concerned about getting the broadest audience that they sometimes come off as being a little bit milktoast or a little bit vanilla. And I come from a totally different perspective where when you think about media you think about New York Philadelphia Boston. These are like the media centers of the world. It’s where you know you go to Boston College that’s one of the broadcasting school that’s where Howard Stern went. That’s where many very famous broadcasters come from those places I went to Temple University which has an incredible media department. And when you look at the people that are iconic in history they’re not people that are vanilla. There are people that have strong opinions one way or the other and people either love them or they hate them but they’re definitely them. So they definitely have a presence. They definitely have a voice that’s unique to them. And I think I always think it took me a little while to settle into that on my show but it is ultimately as you as I developed the show and I developed my own voice I realized hey I’m not in the interest of pleasing everybody. Like that’s not my job. My job is to talk from my perspective on certain issues and try to extract really good business advice from people without them or my audience really seeing what I’m doing. And one of my favorite quotes to that is and you probably heard me say before but which just never let him see your work. You know that’s from Bill Cosby also from my alma mater Temple University in Philly and that basically means that go through your process ask your questions you know have questions written down but you don’t have to be so blatant about it. You can you can ease through you know great standup comedians do this like Louis C.K. talks you know he’ll be sputtering and angry and going through all this process on stage and you think that that’s just how he is. You laugh at his angry energy but he knows all the beats within that he knows exactly what he’s doing within that realm and that is that is him not letting you see him work on him. David Ralph When your on the mike then how much is you now being absolutely authentic and how much is it creating a mood creating an atmosphere on the show. Michael O’Neal Well it can’t. Can’t you have both? David Ralph Oh I don’t know CAN you? Michael O’Neal What are you asking? Are you asking how much is sort of pre-written and how much is off the cuff? David Ralph Well on this show for example some of the things I say I only say to get a reaction from the guest. You know do I really mean it kind of. Do I think that they will go against it. Yes. So I will say it. How much do you actually say that you believe 100 percent. Michael O’Neal Well first of all you do that because you understand this and you’re a pro. I mean this is a very natural place for you to end up. So I think that that I do very similar things to you, as you do just because yeah sometimes you want to extract some stuff from a guest that is being difficult. But yeah I mean I’m pretty authentic dude. I there’s not a lot there’s people that have met me in real life and go Oh you’re exactly like you are on the show. Yeah Im exactly like I’m in the show. I turn it on and I talk so I don’t have this, I’m not affected in any way. I just go. David Ralph So you’re not like you haven’t got a human graphic equalizer when you press record you just kind of increase certain parts of your personality. Michael O’Neal Not really. No. This is pretty much how I am. Yeah I’ll speak like I speak. I’m probably slightly dirtier in real life. David Ralph Well you don’t know where the words will land do you! Michael O’Neal I probably curse a little more which is fine. I’ve done a few podcasts now where I was allowed to do that and it did make it really nice. David Ralph Are you in the same situation as me because I used to listen to your show all the time and it was a staple diet during my transition at that time and now I’m doing this. One of the failures of me is that I don’t get time to listen to other people’s shows. I listen to your one  the other day because I just suddenly realized I had a gap but you almost become an island of your own success where before I used to listen to shows and I used to think oh I’ll take a bit of it and I’ll take a bit of it and become like a magpie. And now I don’t know what vibe is out there and I don’t know whether I’m being edgy or whatever. It just seems to be you. Speaking to the mic and I throw it out to the world and hopefully it goes well. It seems to be a fault of mine, and so do you have the same thing? Michael O’Neal No I’m exactly the same way. I’d say partially by choice and partially by by time. So when I when I do have time to consume podcasts I don’t tend to go business. I tend to go comedy. And lately I tend to go NFL football. I listen to podcasts related to that because I want to be able to clock out a little bit when I do want real inspiration. I’ve been listening to here’s the thing with Alec Baldwin it’s WNYC. I’ve not heard a better intro or production or interview style than that show. It’s his in his intros are nothing short of brilliant. I mean they’re amazing how he brings a guest on an and then how he interviews and his questions are very in-depth and he’s such a pro that it makes it really easy for me to like look at that bar and go OK that’s where the soul open for hours going. That’s what I do. I actually honestly David I find now the more that I get into this show the more I almost can’t stand other people’s shows like there so few that can capture my attention and that I feel like are being done well even with really good friends of mine that do shows I just go and that is almost unlistenable. You know it’s so. So I just don’t I definitely look far above the kind of Internet Marketing slash business world for inspiration on how I want to run mine. David Ralph because the only two that I listen to now is yours. And I went on started. I wanted to listen to every single one. And but the nerdiest and there the only two reasons. Yeah great and Nerdist is good for a number of reasons. David Ralph Yeah I just like the way it kind of flows and you don’t even know it started and it just kind of teases right. Michael O’Neal That’s right. Yeah they just start it. We kind of did that today didn’t we. David Ralph Yeah absolutely and that was the good stuff. Michael O’Neal And we talked for a while before we started recording. You know me I mean it just felt like yeah hit it. Go for it. We’ll start like Nerdist. But yeah no I think that there’s a sense there’s such a glutton of new shows out there and I don’t. but if I’m being opinionated I don’t. There’s a lot of places where people are learning quote on quote how to podcast. And I think they’re feeding them crap information.So often a big problem. David Ralph And I know he’s a mate of yours and I wish him all the success in the world, but the problem is so many people are trying to duplicate John Lee Dumas and that’s not right. He came first and he created the structure of his show, and whether you like that format or whatever that is he’s and he’s made in his own by being him. And I hear these shows and after about three minutes I think oh my god it’s the same thing again. Now I will listen to your shows and I will go all the way through. But people miss a trick don’t lay up coming back to my all the time is finding your authentic self playing to your streams. And and if you do that you create a bigger loyalty. You know if you are totally yourself people either hate you or like you but the ones that like you will love you. And that’s where these people are missing out because they’re not even being authentic to themselves they’re just kind of a middle ground. Michael O’Neal Yeah. And John would tell you and I’ve said this a million times in front of him and said do you the success of your show or his show has nothing to do with his format. And it has nothing do with him as a podcast for that all. It has everything to do with the fact that he has a financial background writes great marketing copy and has a schedule and a rigidity too. He has a military rigidity because he was in the military to his to his business. And unless you come with that exact kind of background you will not have success in that way. People think that because of the way he does his show because it’s structured and because he has these set questions and does it seven days a week that that’s why he’s successful and is completely irrelevant to that. So the problem is is like you said so many people listen to that or they go to podcasters paradise and they learn a certain way to do things. And I’m almost diametrically opposed to every single thing that they’re learning. So it’s like it’s like man I it’s it’s frustrating for me in that way. And I shouldn’t say that like I want to rephrase that I’m not time actually oppose everything they’re learning what I’m what I’m worried about is that the things that I think make podcasting successful aren’t emphasized in a lot of training courses. And like you just said finding your own voice is a number one you have to be successful. You have to find your own voice and you have to have a great brand and it’s not something that people speak about a lot. Like I took a lot of cliff Ravenscroft stuff. I’ve taken all the stuff. I’ve seen a number of course is out there a lot of them don’t pay a lot of attention to that piece and I worry that with this next phase of podcasting and what’s you know since everyone’s starting a show they’re going to find it a lot harder to sustain it unless they’ve found their own voice on their voice. And and it’s within this brand that they’ve really created. So we’ll see. But that’s the jury’s out on that. David Ralph Did you really have to love doing this because I’m going to play a speech in my Jim Carrey and I’m actually I’m going to play now and we’re going to talk afterwards. This is Jim Carrey. Jim Carrey Sound Clip My father could have been a great comedian but he didn’t believe that that was possible for him. And so he made a conservative choice. Instead he got a safe job as an accountant. And when I was 12 years old. He was let go from that safe job. And our family had to do whatever we could to survive. I learned many great lessons from my father. Not the least of which was that you can fail at what you don’t want. So you might as well take a chance on doing what you love. David Ralph Is that the true message that we should be getting across? Michael O’Neal Yes it is unfortunately the connecting of the dots joining of those two dots which is I found this thing that I love and now I have to figure out how to get paid for it is difficult. That’s a difficult journey. And that’s my that was my five year journey. Right. First not even knowing what it was that I loved. I had no idea I was going to podcast five years ago but I had an initial foray into public speaking. I started teaching social media on stage and I ended up traveling and going to 17 cities teaching people how to use social media to grow their business and I found it very like oh this is something I could be good at. And then that morphed into doing back end production on a podcast for a year and a half and just starting to understand the podcasting industry that finally morphed into me starting my own show and here we are. But it was a five year journey to find that you know like I had indicators of it and if someone in 2009 it said hey do you want to get. You want to make six figures and be a public speaker. I be like totally that be great. But at the time I had nothing to speak about. And now I do. So it’s kind of a I I do feel like you have to find something that will and you’ve probably seen this in your life with your show something that will make you walk into that studio and record an episode even if you’re exhausted or not in the mood or whatever because you truly love it and you’re excited about it. Oh yesterday. That’s how I am. Yeah I’ve had times when I’ve recorded 12 shows back to back and now I’ve. Why just because I knew I was going to do it seven days a week show and that was the hardest time I had. I had no internet for two weeks he just crashed on me and I suddenly panic but I didn’t have enough to cover. And I was going away as well. So yes seven days a week he goes out and I needed the boke. And so I did it and I started off at six o’clock in the morning and I just went through through move through and I edited and I did everything in the gap between when I recorded the next one and he just went seamlessly. And when I pressed record yes I was on I was on. Once I was off it was just like I was you know on drugs or something I was just slump too much. But it wasn’t until the very last ones that I realized actually about that passion that you’re talking about the ability to actually do it when you’re tired. I’ve gone past by and I was actually feeling ill. And I remember doing this show and the sweat was pouring off me and I listened back to and it doesn’t sound like it but I realized brain actually no you’ve got to look up to yourself as much as you do actually doing something. Yeah I’m very committed to that. DAVID It’s I have I have three sort of pillars if you will that I do I think make a good soul a partner or a successful soul a partner. And there’s there’s time freedom there’s financial freedom and there’s location freedom. And so the first one is really easy time freedom simple you walk into your boss’s office tell him to go screw himself and then you have time freedom. There you go. Location freedom. You can pretty much just get in a car and go somewhere that we have that kind of freedom in the U.K. and in the United States. Yeah there’s some complications in between. But technically you can just go do that. It’s the financial freedom part. That’s the tricky part of the three. That is a little harder. But I find that I’m so unwilling to compromise my time freedom. I’ve turned down so many more so much more money because it would compromise my time freedom like I could have a lot more coaching clients and a lot more people in my my group coaching. It’s called Solo lab. But with that I would have to commit another couple of days to taking care of them and I’d I’m willing to do that at all. Like i will i love my life the way it is right now and I can be comfortable financially I can go do fun things. And I don’t have to compromise that. And you know hopefully I can continue to grow and continue to you know make more money maybe have more speaking gigs things like that but I don’t intend on working any harder. I just want to you know work smarter maybe try to over deliver a little more to my audience and that’s what I’m looking for. Well was sensible and that’s exactly what I want to do as well because I hate these people and it’s almost like a badge of honor. But I’ve quit in nine to five job. And then you go yes I’m an online marketing do I do this I’m a diva and I cook my time and I’m doing 80 hours a week and I think right. Right. What the hell do you do that. Why don’t you just do two days hard work and have the rest of the time of it. It seems stupid that I say that. That’s right. And it’s. It does. It is counter intuitive. The thing is when my parents passed away you mentioned this in the intro when they did that. My perspective on time completely shifted and I just I. Life’s too short. So I am very much a person that says both. When someone says would you like this or this. I say both. When I get an opportunity to do something I say yes. Win you know and I just do it like it’s a thing that I have committed to and not mentally like I don’t just go yeah this is what I’m going to do from now on. I just do it now I just say yeah let’s do that. That sounds fun. Let’s just go for that. I’m going to go on a hike. Yeah. Great book a ticket. You know and we just do it. And I found that that has served me really well because when I do that and I put that as a priority in my life then the the stuff that I’m not so thrilled about I still end up having to do it. It still fills in the blanks but my priority is to really extract the most that I can out of my life and I’ll tell you not a person that does that well I think as John John Lee Dumas he works probably a little more like the person you were just mentioning. He works a lot but he’s also great at saying yes when when something comes across his desk he goes yeah lets do that. And it’s like on the schedule. And I think that’s that’s part of I think what that’s part of success. To me that’s part of what success feels like is being able to do that. I remember hearing an interview with Billy Joel and the interviewer said to him Billy you’ve sold X squillion albums and singles and you’ve done these tours and you play Madison Square Garden five straight nights. What has success given you. And he just said time and that was it. He can wake up each morning and if he doesn’t want to do something he doesn’t. And that single word resonated with me hugely especially when I was in my 9 to 5 job and I realized then that things were not right. And why should I be doing a nine to five job when there are options I suppose. I began to know too much. And then once you know too much brain you realize you can’t ever go back. Michael O’Neal Yeah. It’s really really is a one way street. It also but that carries over as well into my personal life as well. And I think when the there’s ever such a different confidence now just in my life in general and I think Billy Joel would sort sort of anybody that reached a level of success has this this this underlying confidence about them that is very attractive not only to you know the opposite sex but it’s what attracts other successful people to you. There’s just there’s a subtlety in actions and just how really how you go through life when you’re confident that is very attractive to you know both both people both sexes and that is something that people pick up on pretty easily. You become a success back humor don’t you. You know the old Jim rhône thing about you know the average of you know five people to surrender a lot of people I talked to. Yeah. I mean a crappy job and all these miserable people all the time. How can I surround myself. And one of the things I say to them is you know focus on success because the more success you get and the more competence as you say they end up a successful people get sucked into your world and suddenly you created what he was saying. It’s not easy to do. But it certainly is a mindset that starts moving in that direction. That’s right. And you it’s funny you just asked that question of me is how do you now you’re on it you’re on an island so you’re you’re in the UK you’re not. I’m in San Diego so I get to have a bunch of people around me at all times. I will say though we don’t get together. I mean you know we get together as friends but I’m not in a mastermind with any of these people around me. We don’t sit there and me out. So you know to answer your question I’m mean answer answered on my show tomorrow. But you’ve got to join a group you’ve got to join a group mastermind of some sort. And there’s really no other way. If you if you’re not surrounded by those five people that that you feel are motivating you in a way that that is bettering your life and hopefully their lives. You’ve got to separate from those people and find the people that are doing that and pretty much everyone I know that’s in this you know business Internet Marketing podcasting world has some sort of coaching program. And my best advice is to get people that you really enjoy like how they speak and like how they deliver and join their group and that’s it. And you know once you’re a part of that community you’ll be a lot more apt to be motivated you know learn the things you want to learn. It’s part of the reason why I don’t need to listen to podcasts anymore because I have so many people in my group that are doing cool things. I get to learn about all the cool new stuff without having to go listen. They sort of comes to me. So so do you now feel that you’re ahead of the curve. Because when when you started the show I remember you saying it’s the Wild West and now it seems like every man Dogan whatever has made me a podcast. So do you think now about you it’s not the Wild West but you actually ahead of the curve. It’s good. Get a question. Yes and no I think it’s still the wild west. I think that people in this environment aren’t necessarily looking in the right direction to advance their business where they should be. Let me clarify that. I think inspiration for how someone’s podcast get better gets better doesn’t happen within the new podcasting community. It happens with old media. Then you go look at how you all learn how to interview you go study Howard Stern if you want to learn how to produce an an excellent show. You go you know you look at and some an NPR show or something like that like a where a BBC show something that you know pay close attention to how people are introducing guests and what they’re how they do their ads and how they integrate you know clips from this person’s body of work into their intro or into the show itself. So I think there is really a professional side to this that will ultimately come out. For me personally what I’ve realized over the last couple of months and this is something that I think you can you can sort of strap on as a badge of honor as well is that I’m a better interviewer than most. Just in general I’m more intuitive and I have more range of knowledge so I can connect those dots. You know I can join those dots. And that’s what makes for a compelling and entertaining interview no matter who you are it’s the people that have the pre-scripted questions that I think are really going to struggle because that’s that’s very exhausting to an audience. So on one side I think I’m still really ahead of the curve in that. I come from this and as do you come from this background this history of paying attention to interviewers and then sort of bringing this natural ability to the microphone that 99 percent of people don’t have. And that’s the building not only to interview someone in a business sense and extract what they do for a living but actually make an entertaining hour of programming for someone. And in my opinion they can get the business data from 80000 podcasts that are on iTunes but it’s really hard to get entertainment out of it. And that’s what I’m trying to bring to the table and I think that’s what you do a really great job bringing to the table as well because because what I’ve realized you know was a complete nobody is basically the very first interview I did was no you weren’t Yes. Stop it. Tom Mocha’s was episode your line on the line. Me right now David. And he was a huge inspiration to me so I wanted him as guest number one. And he was talking to a gentleman called John Lee Dumas and so awful who’s is CHEP never heard of him. And I went over to his show and the very first show I listened to was episode 3 2 2 which was yourself and kidding. That was I didn’t know that. Yeah that was the very first episode. And the fascinating thing about it was which got me on the show and this is my sort of join up thought was the fact that everything you see in life is normally about benchmarking against success. You see people already Veja and you go I’d like to do that but it worked for him he’s had this skill he’s got that you know he’s a natural that’s for sure. On that show on 0 5 3 2 2 you hadn’t even lunged and he was saying to you you know when are you going to go and you and I’m going to go on Wednesday or whatever it was. And I tuned in and I listened or whatever you do you click on it you don’t tune into you. But I heard you speak for the very first time and I found it fascinating because I was seeing but not some bouts of somebody finding their way. And you was saying Yeah and I had 17 downloads and it wasn’t that you were looking at success you were looking at somebody finding their flow finding them. Moving on. And that’s right. But that’s what really flavored my show was the fact that you were doing something that seemed natural and you were holding your hands up and you going really. I don’t know if this is going to work but hey if it doesn’t change we’ll move on later on. And remember you did this show and it was it was some chap I don’t remember who was with them on the on the beach somewhere and calls were whizzing past and your battery ran out half way through. Yes and yes you still put out and I thought that’s interesting because what he’s saying back is not that this show has got to be polished and perfect what he’s saying is is a journey and I’m going to improve from that and that be the last time that my battery runs out halfway through. That’s right and it was definitely the last time that happened. Yeah. Yeah it’s a good way to good insight. I see. If I were doing it again yeah I would probably do the same thing again. I was I’ve been always sort of a fan of the let’s just put it out at that at that time. I was leaning more on my hopeful interview skills than I was like ultimate show quality and since I’d already put out a couple of episodes it wasn’t that bad but I really loved the guys story. So I was like yeah there was Harry. Harry Smith was the guy’s name and. And. And I thought yeah let me let me throw that on. And why not. What happened. You know and somewhere. This is what’s so cool about this right. You heard one single episode I did from Johnny Dumas which was like a random occurrence. And look how much it’s affected both of us. Yeah. Just that one thing. So if one little episode you put out catches the right person it can literally be life changing. I will say something. I want your listeners to go to solo our solo our dotcom and I want you to go back to like three. I don’t know let’s say pre 70s so anything from episode like I don’t know one until episode 70 and I want you to click on those posts and read how great David’s comments are for the episodes. They are so insightful and brilliant. And you do such a great job summarizing. I think I even wrote you once and said Do you want to write my show summaries. Remember that you did and it was just that the crux of me doing this and I knew I was just going to stall so cool. So I am and you still you just did it the other day when you were that episode you listened to. You do such a great job summarizing. You’re going to be such a smash successful podcast. David Yeah I have no doubt whatsoever you are going to I hope you will let us be on your show someday when you do these live broadcasts in front of you know a hundred thousand people at the Wembley Stadium. Did you know when you start this and I’m really going to open up here so I don’t really have a Chevez. But when you start based you want it to be so good and you want it to be brought in and you kind of. There were job. You look back on them and you go OK yeah that wasn’t quite where I wanted to be but it was all right. And then you hit sort milestones and you listened back to some of these shows I don’t know if you listen to yours and I thought oh that was a bit closer to what I had in my head my original vision. And I got to show it E.T. and that’s when I suddenly realize Michael that was the host of a show and it was my responsibility to be the host to even I think he was too grateful for people giving up their time to be on my show. I it was a complete mind set. Now I want this to be the biggest show out there. I absolutely do. And it’s all I can focus in on and it’s in many ways it’s killing me or my life is totally out of whack. But all I want is about is the number one thing upset that on any show because it sounds a bit arrogant really I’m upset. Once we’ve stopped recording them when somebody asked me about it that is where I want to be and I want to be join up not as a brand. Exactly as you say. Right. Because it’s one of those things that you kind of go join up towards. What does it mean. And I’m very aware of if you provide quality and content as quality brand in many ways take care of itself. It’s like we always talk in the early episode the name that was always mentioned was Pat Flynn. And you know he’s got that classic smart passive income and you forget that’s a premium brand but actually he’s only three words put together and he’s because he’s provided that great content and quality and value. But it becomes the kind of the trust word where what he’s trying to achieve. That’s right in he that he can live that now. But I actually want I want to focus on something you said just before that you will be bigger than him and so will I. And I know I don’t mean that like he doesn’t have the same aspirations as you do. Right. And I’m saying in terms of podcasts in terms of like Pat wants to speak I’m not speaking for him here but just knowing what I know about him. He he is sort of the crash test dummy of internet marketers. So he does all these really cool things on the web. I want my show to become about like I want to. I want to be interviewing complete legitimate A-listers you know and finding out about their kind of business and so normal journey. That’s where I will see the show going. And because of that if when and if I get to that point. The show the podcast itself will be bigger than all of the internet marketing type podcasts. Does that make sense. Yeah it’ll be way bigger than that. It’ll be more like Nerdist. You know Chris Hardwick gets killer guests on his show and that’s why his podcast is you know number one number two number three on iTunes overall. And so it’s it’s one of those things that that I it’s what I aspire to do as well is to get working within this world like real A-list category of people because I think that they’ll appreciate talking about their journey. And so that’s where I want to head with that. Also I was very strategic and I changed direction. I realized that when I started I was just throwing out the net to anyone and anyone would jump on the show. I would have them round about sort of thing once again I thought to myself no I can’t do this because when I was looking at other people’s shows I was thinking Oh I’ve been on my show I’ve been on my show and it was just the sort of hybrid of people doing the rounds. So I went off in a different direction. So if you listen to episode 88 I had Cathy O’Dowd who was the first woman to hit the summit of Everest from both sides. I’ve got the first civilian astronaut coming on the show. I’ve got a chap over a few years ago was worldwide news because he sold his life on e-bay and he’s just sold his life to Disney and all that kind of stuff. So I realized I had to change direction to become more unique to be more interested by the stories more. Yes. Extract out of them what I wanted to show to the world and that was my original vision but I couldn’t say Eva until later on in the journey. Yeah and that’s really what you’ve done. That’s the whole point. That’s why you will be successful because you’ve you’ve done this in a sort of a different way in your life when you look back to sort of the Philadelphia kid and you riding around on your BMX and all that kind of stuff. Well you just sort of wanting to be the classic sports kid was. If you look back and now we all going to send you back in time soon on the Sermon on the mike. No I was a show off though. I think I think I was you know a performer of some sort and the PA is I keep is that makes my colonial who he is to play better racquetball with an audience. Yes. Every single time. Yeah I think so. I think there’s that’s there that’s in there. It’s in the DNA for sure. I don’t use that a lot but it’s in the DNA. I work better in a performance environment which is presumably why I kind of screw myself on the show intentionally. I don’t I I prepare in a way where I I’ve researched my guest as you have. You know you know and you certainly listen to the show but at times you know a little bit about me and you’re able to then naturally structure questions that that dovetail into my history and that’s what a good interviewer does. I don’t write a lot of questions out sometimes intentionally and that’s because I there’s something about the performance side. I realize now that I’m I’m doing this the shows this this month I’ve got over 300000 downloads for the first time and this is a and I realize so there’s people listening and I have to perform. You know what I like it. It makes me it UPS my game. I’m live on the show. And I think I do that to myself on purpose because because I work better in that environment a lot maybe underpressure a little. Well we’re very similar. It’s fascinating. I feel like I’m finding out the real Marcantonio here. Where is the person behind the that the presenter. Because I am somebody who has spent my life doing training courses and presentations and that’s my job. I’ve never done this kind of thing. It was totally BA and I’m somebody very much likes to be on their own likes no one near them. And then when I suddenly go ping. That’s it. It’s performance time. And I don’t know if it’s showing off or trying to create a different persona for myself because that’s kind of not naturally me. But I do have the ability to raise my game and present a different side to myself if you know me deep down you would say to me different people that the people who know me from seeing where I allow them to see me they would say yeah you it’s like I’m on the mike as you are when you normally doing those things because I’m letting them see what they want to see. Yeah. Yeah I mean I think there’s there’s an element of that and again I want people to understand this is why we and we talked earlier about sort of what John brought to the table. And I’m you know people look at my show and say it’s it’s been it’s it’s been pretty successful in the first 11 months just overall debt is not that’s not a fluke because I didn’t just start in August of 2013 with kind of media. You know I’ve been a professional drummer my whole life. I’ve performed I’ve been on I’ve been a racer I’ve been you know a competitive racquetball player for for many many tournaments for many many years now and before that it was tennis. So I’ve always been performing in some way or the other. I I coached for five years on teaching people social media in front of huge audiences. I’ve played Red Rocks in front of 10000 people like me being on a microphone and being natural at it is not something that happened overnight. It’s a it’s this is something that you walked in with. You’ve been training for years before you turned a mike on yourself. So it’s kind of like Yeah right yeah. You were new to podcasting but not nuda trying to translate a concept from one person to an audience like that’s something you’ve been doing for a long time. So so that’s I think that it’s a bit of a misnomer within our industry that yeah anybody can you know podcast or anybody can start blah blah blah. That’s kind of cool I get it. Yes technically you can turn on an app you can go to boss jock on your iPhone and upload it to clips and you’ve got a podcast but can you do it. Well can you do it so that when someone switches from morning radio or Howard Stern or the BBC to your podcast that they don’t notice a huge drop off in quality or you know sound quality interview quality production quality that’s that’s what I try to bring the table and I think you do the same thing. So is that what you’re saying really and I’m going to play the words of Steve Jobs because he says it very well as well but no experience is wasted. It doesn’t matter what you’ve done in your life you will pull elements and you extract what you need to create your new path. Out 100 percent. Absolutely yes. Everything you’ve done up until this point is does training for you for this next phase. When I have people on their show and we have these episodes called Find your swing I want to find out everything that person has done because it find your swing is like well what do I do. Like what am I naturally gifted at how can I make money off of something that I really enjoy that I’m passionate about that’s what finding your swing is. And it’s I want to find out like what you did when you were a kid. Were you an athlete did you or you or you a professional knitter you like to knit hats. You know like what is it what do you do. And when people can start accessing those things that they’ve done their whole lives they’re really gifted and I like to find ways that we can use those talents in whatever their next business endeavor is. We call about connecting our past to build our future and here. And one of the names as come out is if you really want to know your passion really want to know what you’re naturally good at. Don’t think about what you were doing in adult life because very much you would have been taking a responsibility for a wage or whatever. Look at what you was doing as a kid when you weren’t being paid for it. And if you was a drama when you was a kid and you loved doing it then try and look at something that would do that. And he says that exactly the same way as you do it and you’ll find your swing episodes. That’s right. And I and I love those. Again that’s another instance where we totally put ourselves on the spot. I have a co-host. Her name is Dawn Mars. For those episodes and we never read the questions first. Like I only you know sometimes I glance at them to see just a copy and paste them into my Evernote when we’re doing the show. But we were reading them and answering them live and which again has another element of pressure that we’ve got to come up with an answer and these people are literally like I’ve had people that have taken what we’ve said on the show. They’ve made a business from it like the next day they’ve gone and done it. So it’s it can be a little daunting. And I was going to ask you earlier you know your show’s growing now and this this will be big your show will have a huge audience at some point and I’ve asked this with other people that are in the space. Have you yet felt this sense of responsibility that comes with that the fact that you’re speaking into a microphone and someone’s actually listening to what you’re saying. Yeah. With power comes great responsibility. And it’s funny the very first show I released I got two e-mails and they were from people I’d never met and they were saying thank you so much for putting the show out there and I thought oh my God. And from that moment of being very aware of what I’m saying or being very aware of I don’t know where my words are landing. And of also having a conversation with my wife this afternoon saying if this really takes on. Just as I want it to really take on I’m a little bit scared but I haven’t got the value to provide the audience but I won’t and I don’t know why that is because you know success is everything you want. But I suddenly felt a pressure because I can see the downloads increasing increasing increasing. I can see the work coming towards me and I’m doing this seven days old on my own. There’s not one person that helps me and I’m also balancing other responsibilities as well. So this isn’t my only so restrained I suddenly freaked this afternoon for the exact reason that you said oh my god this is power this is responsibility. I’ve got to be careful with it. Yeah. Have you also found it. I agree. I felt that in some I haven’t had yet. Hey buddy come back to me I’m like you ruin my life but I’ll show it. That’s going to have to happen right. Someone will listen to something you’ve said or I’ve said and they’re going to do it and it’s not going to work for them and we won’t have the details but they’re going to say I listened to you when you were in my life. That’s going to happen. There’s no way it that doesn’t happen. When you’re when you grow this thing to where it can go there’s no way that doesn’t happen. Well think shows a slightly different note because you teach nuts and bolts. I think with my show I talk about hope and I told you why leap of both. Yeah I really think I teach nuts and bolts because that’s that’s I feel like there’s a lot of shows that do that specifically. And I I feel like I teach more of the journey and then the nuts and bolts sort of fall from there. Well I think that’s the same thing. I think what you do you you talk about the journey you get the cogs working in your own brain and brain when you throw out the nuts and bolts which you probably don’t think have got value as such. You’re already using those cokes and you’re thinking yeah I can use that yeah I can tell you that that’s exactly what happened with me. You know I couldn’t see how to do this because I’ve never done this. But just by you having conversations with people you take the element and you take the element and you take that element and what do you do. He’s been up to you as an individual to put it together. Yeah I actually find myself pretty. I can be very socially awkward at the beginning and I sometimes I’ve actually accessed my I’ve switched into interview mode when I’m meeting someone in real life. I just watch on Mike I like my mentally switch on a podcast microphone in front of me and I found it so much easier to have conversations with people that way. So that’s kind of interesting to me is bizarre. I’m getting ready to play Steve Jobs now because I’m fascinated to see your spin on this. And this is the fulcrum of the whole show so this is a job. Don’t be free to do that of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward. When I was in college but it was very very clear looking backwards. Ten years later again you can’t connect the dots looking forward. You can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something your gut destiny life karma whatever because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart even when it leads you off the well-worn path. And that will make all the difference. When I’m going to ask a different question because I think you’ve answered it already but you will say yes you believe in it. But why do you think so many people don’t believe in that. I think that’s a lot. Most people get hung up on the how of something for example I think that we we pick a point be right we pick a point B that’s there’s the dot so I’ve got this I want to I want to do I want to have this show. And to get this show together I need this this this this this this this and we get stuck in the details of the this this this this this instead of. All right I’m going to sort of flow through this. All I want to do is get to that thing. I’m not sure how I’m going to get there yet but I’m going to I don’t really know. And by the time you get there and you look back and go wow that is not the path that all that I was going to take. My favorite metaphor. Or maybe it’s an analogy I forget but for this is if you and I were sitting at a cafe and I there was you know a three story building across the street and I said David there’s a hundred thousand pounds sitting in a bag on the roof of that building across the street. You have 15 minutes to get it. How fast would you be out the door to go get that money. I’d be on the right run the window right but you wouldn’t know how you were going to get it. You had no idea how to get to the roof of that building. You just knew you were getting to the roof. You don’t know if you’re going to you know helicopter down you know if you’re going to call the fire department to take you up there or you know scale like Spiderman but you’re getting to the roof of that building somehow. And I think what successful entrepreneurs do is they just keep their eye on that that you know that bag the bag that’s on the roof. They’re not quite as concerned about the how part. And we very much get concerned about the how part. And the second piece of that is when someone gives you an opportunity I just said this a little earlier when someone gives you an opportunity. Our instinctive reaction is to say no because of this this and this versus just instinctive to say yes and I’m going to figure out how to work out this this and this and that is a huge mental shift even though it’s very subtle. It’s just yes and no. But if you’ll find that people in your world that are really successful or really look like they’re just having a great time. They’re the ones that say yes first and then figure out how it’s going to work after and most of the people that are stuck and they don’t get from that one dot to the next dot. Those are the ones that say no because you know I I can’t live in San Diego because I have kids in school or because I can’t afford the move or because whatever we can come up with 15 different ways. But in reality all that stuff can be worked out. So I think that’s how I would respond to that and I hope that helps someone. So what scares you this is probably my final question before I send you on the mike and you can have a one on one with your younger self. As you all know and you’ve got these rocking and rolling show everything’s going well you’ve just bought these the watch you’ve finished off the last five years and everything’s good and you’ve got a lovely new girlfriend. What scares you. Well when you look at what you need to achieve. What scares me. I have to say I look at the bank being intimidated or being excited. I sort of treat the same way. So I don’t get super excited about everything and I don’t get scared about everything. I gosh I mean I don’t I I can honestly say I don’t have that for the same reason when someone said you know when I was so literally I was scraping up change so I could take in an airport shuttle for a ticket that was paid for by somebody else to go speak in front of 3000 people and that in which I was going to make $5000 or whatever that weekend. A few years ago I I literally had to scrape $8 up so I could take the shuttle like in change so I could take the shuttle to get to the airport that I had. I had $18 in my bank account at the time. And so it wasn’t enough to get the cash out of the machine. So I wasn’t worried about it. I’ve never been worried about stuff like that and I didn’t even know what success was going to look like for me. But I had a feeling that I was destined for it. And that’s the only way I can say is that it was it was very innate and I didn’t know where it was going to come from but I was very patient about it. Now I was also very patient about about you know I knew I was going to meet a great woman at some point and I was able to reach you know like you said read about a year ago but but recently. So I think that I have that that vibe that that it’s the same reason I don’t plan a lot. I just don’t. I’m living very much in the moment as I go day by day. And for better or for worse I don’t plan as much as I probably could or should. But right now I’m not really you know scared about anything. I mean I could say you know the show doesn’t grow at all. But even if it doesn’t I’m live in a great life right now. So I guess I’m not even that scared of that. OK last question before we send you back this time. Is it easier to move forward when you’ve hit rock bottom and you really did hit rock bottom. Yes it is. It’s easier for me to keep perspective on it. I just last weekend went to I went to Napa Valley with my girlfriend’s family and it was a very first class trip like from private private jet from San Diego to Napa Valley which I’ve never done before my life and everything was super exclusive super like Michelin star first class and I was like man I don’t want to be here like this. No I don’t mean like I didn’t want to be at the weekend. I just I don’t want to live in that universe of that sort of high end world. And that’s it. I I remember looking longingly at a train that goes through Napa Valley and it stops at all these different wineries and I’m kind of like Man I wish I would’ve just taken the train and gotten kind of drunk at the third winery and kept going and that would’ve been a really fun day. Instead it was like this you know 12 people serving our table kind of thing and it just wasn’t me. But my my Philly boy sort of like Kragen pragmatist personality carried me through that whole weekend thinking yeah I would be fine with stopping at a fast food place now and going to another winery. We don’t have to go to a hundred dollar plate dinner you know. And so I think if anything it’s given me perspective and there’s one more piece of perspective that in my very very lowest time and it was very low. And I thank you for not like making me go through that again like 40000 other shows have but I had a I remember the current hurricane Katrina had hit the southern United States and it just decimated New Orleans. And this was literally at my lowest time. And I remember looking on the news and seeing like a little 9 year old little black kid who everybody in his family died. Right. And he lost everything like lost every piece of memory he ever had including all of his family members. And he’s this kid who doesn’t have much of an education. He’s a minority. He doesn’t have a lot of opportunity that are coming coming to him and I remember thinking all right no matter what happens I’m a white male with a skill set in United States and that’s not and that’s not to be racially insensitive I’m looking. That was a practical. OK. So no matter what my situation is I can’t complain like I’m starting with these four advantages that a lot of people all over the world don’t have. I will be given opportunities that a lot of people don’t have and that really kept me grounded like that there was this you know that some people had to struggle to get to what I had innately by birth that I had nothing to do with. So that really kept me grounded and it still keeps me grounded to this day is that I always realize that there’s people out there that do not have the same opportunities that I knew the answer. Mike are we going to put you on the Sermon on the mike now. This is when we send you back in time lost a young Marty McFly to have a one on one with yourself and if you could go back in time. What age would you choose and what advice would you say. So I’m going to play the music and when he gets out you’re up. This is the Sermon on the mike. Here. We go with the speed of this. This man. Who. I think that first of all very handsome very very talented man couldn’t congratulate now. If you could work on harnessing that Philly attitude a little bit just over the next few years if you could take the edge off of that. Not everybody is out to get you and focus on building some relationships that you will sustain forever without having that kind of you know screw you Gene. Not Eugene. I don’t know anybody named Eugene. I’m not trying to signal that that will serve you in the future. Yeah. So to some or to to to bring that and I know that was very short but to bring that in I feel like over the last few years I’ve been able to take this. There was a bit of filea attitude like where if someone slighted me in any way that was it they were erased like done. And there was no real going back. It was partially like it was a Scorpio in me that that that’s sort of like had that stinger. And I you know it’s it’s the it’s the patience I have now which is maybe a little bit of it’s I wouldn’t say less judgment because I think judgment makes for good comedy. But but it’s just maybe being a little more empathetic to people’s situations and realizing that that people aren’t always in control of their actions and sometimes they’re going through a learning process as well. And to just instantly give them the guillotine and out of one’s life is not the most productive way to go through things. I don’t do that anymore but I did it for a number of years and I think it was just a reaction to losing my parents and it being so so much. OK Wolf I’m going to lose this anyway I might as well just cut it right off. And I think that didn’t that didn’t serve me for a long time. So I’d fix that. Michael how can our listeners connect with you sir. Well you know this. Oh I know you say you say in an American Xon is better I would say the same thing if you were speaking in a British accent. By the way you going to come on my show some time. I would love to come on your show it oh no great. And Howard Jones I want him to go. Has he been on your show yet. No he isn’t knocking me back. He said he would and not me but I’ve called a few of them that sign up for it. And then you just come down and that’s a drag. Anyway the show is called the Solar Perner hour. The Web site because no one can spell pre-New or is solo our dotcom. And if you’d like some coaching give a coaching program yet. I’ve only been focused on building you audience. That’s good. Well so if anybody needs coaching including you my friend I can’t believe you’re not in solo lab. I want solo lab dotcom and we’d love to have you in our really cool community. Mancow thank you so much for spending time with us tonight joining up those dots on the 100th episode and it’s quite the world’s longest episode of ever done as well. Please come listen. Is. Yeah we were about seven minutes past what we normally do. So come back again when you have more dots to join up because I do believe that by joining up the dots and connecting up pasts is the best way to build a future. Mr. Michael O’Neill thank you so much. And thank you.

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  • The 3 C's Of The Perfect Day Formula With Craig Ballantyne - I Love Marketing Episode #245

    · 01:15:24 · I Love Marketing with Joe Polish and Dean Jackson

    Why Craig developed The Perfect Day Formula and 3-part system for becoming more successful and achieving your dreams Craig shares the 3 C's of The Perfect Day so you can concentrate on what really matters and make better decisions 12 rules Craig lives by and how you can go about developing your own rules for every aspect of your life 2 secrets to happiness and a life well lived: 1. The _____ You _____ Your Time _____ 2. The _____ You Have _____ Those _____

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  • BreVis Ludica 025 - American Rails

    · BreVis Ludica

    American Rails es un juego diseñado por Tim Harrison, publicado por Quined Games, de 3 a 5 jugadores y unos 90 minutos de duración. American Rails lo podéis conseguir en la tienda Juégamestore por 35,00€ (Enlace patrocinado). Componentes: mapa montado y hexagonado del este del Misisipi en EEUU, cartas para las acciones de las seis compañías, cubitos en seis colores, cartas de jugador/ayuda y billetes. Descripción: En American Rails encarnamos la figura de un magnate del ferrocarril del siglo XIX en la costa este de EEUU con el propósito de convertirnos en el inversor más rico. Empezamos con un capital que invertiremos en acciones de compañías ferroviarias que conectarán sus vías entre las ciudades del mapa y que repartirán beneficios entre sus accionistas. American Rails es un juego basado en el famoso Chicago Express de John Bohrer y podría considerarse una versión muy, muy ligera del género de los 18XX. La partida comienza subastando una acción de cada una de las seis compañías que hay en el juego y a partir de ahí los jugadores expanden estas compañías por el mapa buscando su mayor revalorización. Para ello tratarán de conectar las ciudades que más ingresos reportan a la vez que entorpecer las rutas de otras compañías. Los jugadores además irán adquiriendo más acciones de las compañías con nuevas subastas. Esto hace posible que varios jugadores sean accionistas de una misma compañía dando pie a negociaciones sobre la estrategia de la compañía. Es un juego donde es muy importante saber leer la situación de la partida, evaluar el potencial de cada compañía y conocer su valor en las subastas. Pros: Reglas sencillas y rápidas de explicar. Muy fácil de jugar pero con curva de aprendizaje. Interacción y negociación entre jugadores (en el mapa, en la subasta). Cero factor azar, para los que no le guste. Alta rejugabilidad, partidas muy distintas. Orden de turno variable. Ágil, sin entreturno. Duración ajustada (90’). Cons: Conceptos poco familiares (capital de las compañías, dividendos). Mapa bastante feo, muy mejorable. Tablero de baja calidad, se comba. Cero factor azar, para los que le guste. A tres jugadores pierde, mejor a cinco. Conclusiones: American Rails se ha convertido en uno de mis juegos preferidos en los últimos meses. Me encanta comprobar cómo un juego tan sencillo de jugar donde no hay azar consigue que cada partida sea tan diferente e interesante. Cumple con uno de los principales requisitos para un buen juego: profundidad con reglas sencillas. Si te gustó Chicago Express , los juegos económicos y/o las subastas, es muy probable que te guste American Rails. No recomendable como juego de iniciación, o si no te atraen los juegos económicos donde hacer cálculos, ni el género de construcción de vías. Bola extra: Diferencias entre American Rails y Chicago Express en este hilo de la BGG (en inglés). El juego nos ha sido proporcionado por  Juégame Store una tienda online que lleva Isra, conocido por muchos por ser un jugón incansable y por su buen trato con el cliente, allí podéis conseguir Este American Rails por 35,00€ (Enlace Patrocinado). Opiniones del resto de Vis Ludica: David: Tim Harrison, el autor de American Rails fue influenciado por Chicago Express a la hora de diseñar este juego, American Rails podría ser una variante de Chicago Express. El juego es bastante similar a Chicago Express pero tiene unas cuantas diferencias que a mi parecer le hacen superior: American Rails es un juego mas abierto y las compañías pueden comenzar en diferentes ciudades otorgandose los bonus de diferente manera. La otra diferencia principal son las acciones que están muy estratificadas y que crean una gran rotación a lo largo del juego, elige una buena en una ronda y sabes que en la siguiente te va a tocar una mala debido al orden de turno que se genera al seleccionar las acciones. Este tipo de juegos tienen reglas sencillas, pero son difíciles de jugar, la naturaleza abierta de American Rails a la hora de colocar las compañías hace que haya que estar pendiente incluso antes de iniciar el juego propiamente dicho. Un juego divertido y exigente con pujas de infarto que gustará a los amantes de los trenes y que es mucho mas entretenido y con opciones que Chicago Express, no es un juego en el que puedas ver su potencial en solo una partida, pero es un juego dinámico y rápido que se juega en menos de una hora, asi que es fácil que vea mesa. Calvo: Me parece increible que con unas reglas tan rápidas y tan sencillas de explicar se pueda tener un juego tan bueno. Destacaría las pujas (nunca sabes si pujas poco o mucho, genera mucha tensión) y las decisiones de la acción a elegir ( elijo esta acció que es un truño o no quiero pero la próxima soy el primero o cojo una buena y el siguiente turno me como los mocos...). Como punto negativo los componentes no me terminan de convencer (tablero combado, mapa algo estirado, hexagonos feos, caja grande con mucho aire). Prefiero la primera edición. Es un 8,5 pero solo a 4 o 5 jugadores. A 3 quizas se quede corto y no sea mas que un 7. Para jugones medios y hardcores.

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  • How To Stay Peaceful, Positive And Productive In The Face Of Negative Feelings - I Love Marketing Episode #250

    · 01:31:55 · I Love Marketing with Joe Polish and Dean Jackson

    Show Notes: Catching The Carrot: How to live your truth and be happy Kevin reveals how he got his article shared over 348,000 times Why unlearning is key to living a life of balance, purpose and clarity How to stay peaceful, positive and productive in the face of negative feelings Connecting The Dots: How to become more creative by having more fun A powerful 60-second technique that can transform your life Kevin shares 3 books everyone should read The truth about building an audience from scratch Kevin gives you his best tip for becoming a great writer How to achieve success and live a fulfilling life

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  • Voice and Accent Expert Patrick Munoz

    · 00:36:15 · Speaking with TJ Walker - How great leaders communicate through the media, public speeches, presentations and the spoken word

    Ep 225 Voice and Accent Expert Patrick Munoz August 12, 2016 Go to www.patrickmunoz.com or www.patrickmunoz.com/accent-american Below is a time-coded transcript of the interview: 0:00 is it really possible to change your accent to change your tone of voice 0:12 speaking the show about effective speaking in public to the media 0:20 at work and in life 0:24 speaking with TJ Walker 0:29 the first thing I do it every media training or presentation training is 0:34 record people speaking and add them listen to it and make notations of what 0:38 do they like what do they not like it's frankly rare that people don't dislike 0:44 their voice they don't like their tone of voice 0:48 they don't like how it sounds nasal quality you name it 0:53 people don't like their voices now I've always caution them up 0:59 time out your voice isn't that bad let's focus on actually saying something 1:03 interesting 1:04 that's relatively an easy problem to solve 1:07 vocal problems accent issues can be hard and difficult but they can be worked on 1:14 they can be improved my guest today is an expert i'm not an expert on changing 1:19 people's accent changing their vocal qualities my expert 1:23 my guest today is an expert on that let's dive right into the interview in 1:28 just a moment but remember as always we take all of your questions here at 1:33 speaking with TJ Walker any questions to do with public speaking speaking to the 1:37 media crisis communications i used to do is send them to me 1:40 TJ at media training worldwide com or on twitter at TJ Walker now let's hop into 1:48 my conversation with Patrick Munoz expert out in Hollywood he's trained 1:52 some of the top stars and he has a new book out I wanted to bring to your 1:56 attention 1:57 it's called accent American the complete guide to speaking the standard American 2:03 accent Patrick thanks for joining us SI je veux having me i'm excited to Peter 2:07 and talk to you 2:08 I've had clients over the air say TJ I want to change my accent I'm really 2:13 worried about it 2:15 my standard advice has been 2:17 focus on having an interesting speech first and as long as people can 2:24 understand you 2:26 that's the bigger issue but there are some people who let's face it or just 2:31 hard to understand they need to get better 2:33 how do you start with them for those people who are it is very difficult to 2:38 understand 2:39 yes first off I just want to kind of piggyback on what you said which is 2:43 completely true as far as accents go 2:46 I think the richness of accents the richness of different sounds of the way 2:51 people carry wear it with their experiences whether from hugely helps 2:58 the interestingness of people put the easy way to say that is having an accent 3:03 and a great thing 3:04 however there are people who are so kind of encumbered by the accent that they 3:12 have to just attack those sounds are giving them the biggest trouble 3:17 so what I'd like to do is just we always do a diagnostic in the first lesson I go 3:22 through talk to them even if you please to read the the course contract and then 3:28 what I do is make all those marks about the sounds they have to work on and will 3:33 we have time we really kind of go through all the sound so they can see 3:36 what their accent is and then what is the standard American accent is and 3:41 start to incorporate that 3:42 however we were they want to have to do a triage thing right so it's it if if it 3:47 is there is really this difficulty in being understood 3:50 we just go right to those sounds practice them I show them how to make 3:54 the sound for instance of an L sound at the end of a word or we're saying the 3:59 word fall or well and they're there they're not making a full actually 4:04 saying fall 4:05 well and they're not touching their tongue I show them what to do i get the 4:09 mirror out and say look yourself in the in the mirror and look at mine now 4:14 repeat those sounds over and over again and then we'll put them right in the 4:18 tongue twisters will take phrases that they need to work on 4:22 look at the book will do those exercises 4:24 and that's the easiest way to get them to feel comfortable and confident in 4:28 knowing how to make the sound because really some people as they you know 4:32 maybe english as a second language of the different parts of the country they 4:37 have done a really good job of doing the sound reproduction on their own kind of 4:43 hearing it and they're connected like this and like guessing you're doing a 4:46 great naturally but we'd like to do is get it was really specific and they go 4:50 oh I see this is what you do this is how I do it 4:54 repetition repetition practice 5-10 minutes a day and they're starting to 4:58 speak way better 4:59 how much is the ability to have a neutral accent or any sort of accent you 5:04 want a function of having a so-called good ear the way you think of a great 5:08 musician and how much of it is simply the discipline of working placing your 5:15 tongue in the right place recording yourself is something anyone can do they 5:19 are motivated the ear of ability that god-given ability that you're here can 5:26 hear things that you're able to imitate things 5:28 - ooh child I just huge and it can be like that case for those of us who is 5:33 here or is is good but we are not quite sure 5:38 it takes some time anybody if they work at it and they have an open mind and 5:44 they spend five to ten minutes a day were really addressing it on their own 5:47 because we can work for you are a 50-minute session but they were going to 5:51 every day 5:52 anybody can get better now or more standardized accents 5:57 then again we have the range of people who coming from other countries that are 6:02 are the actions are so strong 6:05 anybody can get better but it really the gift is if you have an ear for however 6:10 just kind of rigorously going at it looking at it kind of like a 6:14 mathematical equation or like going to the gym and doing that same repetition 6:18 of a pull-up or push up and all of us if you have the muscles 6:22 it's the same thing for the musculature of your mouth so anybody can do it in 6:27 terms of the end result anybody's going to get better 6:30 some people are able to like concrete fully some people have a huge jump in 6:36 there understand it 6:36 the intelligibility of the accent and for them even the rewards that they get 6:41 in terms of their own local power there sounds are going to pay back off and 6:46 work and their personal relationships and their overall confidence in life so 6:51 good question 6:52 definitely that the ear is is key and people who can work on it get better 6:58 in a moment I want to dive a little deeper and going to some of the 7:02 nitty-gritty of your book accent American the complete guide to speaking 7:07 the standard American accent but I have to help him with something else sooner 7:11 when friends and family of mine found out i was interviewing you and some of 7:16 your top Hollywood clientele they said you've got to ask him why is it a so 7:22 called movie star like Matthew McConaughey always sounds like Matthew 7:27 McConaughey Arnold Schwarzenegger always sounds like Arnold Schwarzenegger aren't 7:33 there enough actors in Hollywood who can do any accent that producers don't 7:37 expletive rely on people who can't seem to 7:41 I won't say can't act but can't do any X and other than their own 7:45 well there you go into the years it's kind of celebrity versus the actor as a 7:51 craftsperson so you have actors who let the Australian actors hugh jackman you 7:58 Lori or American actors male street 8:03 all you can do is that they can do anything they care they really actors 8:09 their stars and and yes and Marilyn was a celebrity celebrity star actor but 8:14 those are we have this celebrities imagine McConaughey 8:18 he pretty much keeps to his Texas accent is that a function of just laziness he 8:24 doesn't want to learn or is it that what Meryl street does is so wildly difficult 8:30 that even if he spent 10 hours a day he wouldn't get any better at got a good 8:34 question 8:35 so Matthew McConaughey I don't know I don't know I've never worked with him 8:40 it works for surely doesn't suit him and he certainly does do things for the 8:45 roller he is an actor in heat is the way that he 8:48 this is for the Dallas 40 Dallas Dallas club dallas buyers club that is amazing 8:54 he's an amazing actor he does tend to kind of keep the range speech wise and 9:00 arnold schwarzenegger and we can do anything or he cares about it 9:03 I know I had that we cruise one of my clients and I don't think for her 9:09 it matters in the end so much you really wanted to work on it but it's about that 9:12 kind of what each person kind of feels as a port for themselves like what is it 9:18 for her it was important but at a certain point I think she just wanted to 9:22 get her voice to be stronger which actually after we work together 9:26 one other reviews of the new york times for films was from her tone is stronger 9:31 voice is stronger but it really is interesting TJ that actors 9:36 some actors that's who they are that you're going to see that by the same 9:38 part in every role 9:41 that's who they are Cary Grant always had is no English accent and whatever 9:48 role he was in and you made it happen for himself so it is a kind of thing 9:52 like this is who I am this is I'm going to be every role and that's what I bring 9:57 to my character and there's some actors who are like I'm gonna be a leonardo 10:01 dicaprio and I'm gonna work with Tim demonic and i'm going to have a 10:04 different accent 10:05 each of my roles and that's part of it so really is kind of their own sort of 10:09 sense and other actors to play the role that would have the off the authentic 10:13 accent um yes there are but we need people who are usually people who have 10:19 names 10:19 get out there so the advice to actors who are my advice and actors I was an 10:26 actor to actors who are in their in their formative years or even you going 10:31 on in the in their career they have the ability to change when I think most 10:35 actors wanted to do it because they're excited to play different characters so 10:38 if you could only do one accent then you kind of limiting limiting yourself and 10:43 if you can do all kinds of accent and then make it not be about the exit 10:47 they could be about the connection you have as a character to the other person 10:50 into this telling of the story that you're in great shape 10:54 let's switch gears away from Hollywood let's imagine that someone is let's say 11:00 I've become 11:01 executive whether they are from the south from the Northeast but they are 11:07 professional person they are well educated but they're self-conscious 11:10 about having their southern accent an outer borough in New York accent of 11:17 Brooklyn New Jersey accent they want to soften the edges and get to the point 11:23 where people can't really tell where they're from 11:26 how do they use your book how do they work with someone like you to get to 11:31 that point 11:32 perfect so in the book and it's an American you just open it up and you 11:37 start to do the exercises that are in the warm up so it starts off as very 11:43 organized it simple 11:44 even I didn't purposely is a very thin book so it's kinda like a primer or a 11:48 primer everyone to say that but it really get you started in first of all 11:52 developing your voice 11:54 I have a lot of executives all authors founders of organizations companies and 12:00 people who are really successful and they know a lot and so it's at a certain 12:08 level DJ you know you're you you coach people in public speaking is you said 12:14 just have this have your message be important to have the speech be 12:18 important 12:19 haven't you are saying you have a passion for them so for a lot of my 12:23 people come to me 12:24 they want to work on the accident they want to work on their intelligibility 12:27 they want to work on the power of your voice 12:30 so what you do is you start with the book open up and start and this is how 12:35 to use the workbook and basically it says I'm how to use the workbook go get 12:40 some simple things by opening your mouth more than you're used to practice 12:43 speaking in a flowing way and but the big thing you identify which sounds need 12:49 improvement and put your focus on those 12:52 so what you'll do first of all is go through the first section of the book 12:56 which are warming up your voice articulation exercises tongue twisters 13:01 so you feel confident in your speech you feel really like you have more power in 13:05 your voice 13:06 then you go through 13:08 you and I but those sound under for yourself 13:12 I do consultations on that with people online and i'll give them a rundown of 13:18 what the sounds are they need to focus on and then download the audio from the 13:22 book which is included in the purchase of the book and start to go over those 13:26 sounds when your headphones on or just dropping it on your on your desktop 13:32 get your iphone or your smart phone out and record yourself repeating after you 13:38 hear my voice and then go back and say because that's the important part 13:42 oftentimes our ear doesn't hear the way we're talking when we hear objectively 13:48 on the iphone on the smartphone and you can hear yourself in relation with your 13:52 hearing for me and you can say oh this whole time I thought I was saying Phil 13:58 but I was saying fail feel 14:01 oh I need to say Phil Phil feel and give yourself some time again 10 minutes and 14:06 eight is going to practice to get those sounds in your mind and say like oh it's 14:10 that single sound it as in fill that I met that I tend to go feel if I can just 14:16 remember as I read through this going through these single vowel cells 14:20 it's phil is a single vowel sound there is no movement at all go from saying 14:24 this diphthong feel to fill and that's what you do 14:29 and then there's also some work in there four sentences apologize for 14:36 interrupting but I have to ask you for one trainer to another large part of our 14:41 audience trainers people in public relations fields who are working with 14:45 executives who are self-conscious about their accent issues 14:49 what percentage of people will actually record and listen to their own voice on 14:56 their own if you're not there standing over there because that's the bane of my 15:00 existence 15:02 I can help people all day long become better speakers better media 15:05 communicators 15:07 what I'm they are in the room I don't give them the option i recorded play it 15:10 back 15:11 we do that a dozen times but when i try to encourage people to go to my own 15:16 online programs public speaking I always say 15:20 record yourself speaking 15:21 uploaded here far far fewer than not one percent but . one percent of students 15:30 ever do that so I'm just wondering if you have a better track record 15:33 I can't say that I do i can think about myself when I took piano lessons 15:39 so it's okay i was a kid and then to break from one with the back in my 15:44 thirties 15:46 I started as the train again and piano and I was always the same story 15:50 same story DJ ok so I'm seeing him wednesday is my daily day for my daily 15:55 weekly a weekday study so we do it wednesday 15:59 like I am motivated i'm going to practice the next day Thursday 16:04 oh I have to go do hiking I have to go do some work here I coaching saturday 16:10 sunday i got plans for 10 minutes 16:11 yes follow through is super difficult and especially about getting the 16:16 feedback 16:17 so what I do most of my clients especially clients to get the best 16:21 results are the ones probably this is yourself 16:25 are the ones that I see every week and as far as how many people are actually 16:29 doing the work 16:30 some people are hard workers are so motivated never 16:34 it's interesting they are like tight days they're gonna they're going to work 16:37 on this other people are Taipei's don't have the time or the discipline 16:42 so in answer to your question I couldn't give you a statistic I can say that it 16:48 makes the heck of a lot easier 16:50 I know for myself TJ in terms of doing my business 16:54 I am an assistant come once a week for five hours 16:57 we focus I need somebody I admit I need somebody to coach me and that's what I'd 17:03 like to provide for the people so in terms of them doing it on their own 17:07 mmm 17:09 you need to get somebody whether it's me whether it's you or voice for 17:13 particularly for this for the band's not me I definitely can access into the 17:22 world 17:23 I do have clients ask about it from time to time 17:27 here's my experience about a third of my clients they come in for a day of public 17:32 speaking training or media training 17:34 I always record them first ask them what they like and don't like 17:38 i would say about a third of my clients which is fairly representative of your 17:44 professional successful population about a third of people hate their voice think 17:51 that their voice is dramatically substandard whereas in all the years 17:57 I've done this more than 30 years probably 10,000 clients 18:01 I really only remember one client who truly had an awful awful voice I always 18:07 tell people that you may disagree i'd like to hear your opinion 18:11 it's basically three types of voices in the world here's the top point 0 0 1 18:15 percent with her voice is so distinctive so melodias so pleasing that they can 18:22 roll out of bed at noon tape a voiceover commercial get a million-dollar check 18:27 and go back to bed or go to the beach 18:29 there's the bottom . 0001 percent of people their voice is so irritating 18:35 awful screechie people rather jump out a window and have to listen to them and 18:41 then there's the other 99.999% where our voices aren't so fantastic people are 18:47 going to give us money 18:48 it's not so awful people are going to leave the room they're just voices that 18:52 help us communicate 18:53 i'm interested in your own take of those those two perspectives your perspective 18:58 of your clients how they rate their own voices and then how you rate that 19:03 spectrum of great 19:04 normal and awful i love it so in terms of how they write their own voices 19:10 because i'm a voice and speech Trojan because many bytes coming to me for 19:13 beyond just the accent work coming for local power things like that 19:19 a lot of people come to me that a lot me think what i say i would say about 19:25 thirty percent of my clients who come to me telling me they don't like the sound 19:29 of their own boys 19:31 I say listen you actually have a really nice boys and sometimes it's because 19:36 there's tension there's tension that they just let it relax all of a sudden 19:41 they get this kind of comfort so in terms of the people being people who 19:47 come to me and to be a little bit harder on their the cell phones because for 19:53 whatever reason it's feedback that we've gotten from the world from our teachers 19:58 our parents have one student whose brother is a is a speech pathologist and 20:06 kind of always gave her our time I have another about her voice I'm like well 20:11 did you ever help you know 20:13 so we get these these these loops for ourselves and even for myself TJ I when 20:21 I was growing up i don't know i think that my voice was nice 20:25 my speech I can still start to go so fast that's where my natural places to 20:29 go so fast and so by doing all these exercises over the years again like you 20:34 30 years of doing work at a time 20:36 I've got control about my voice so i would say many people come to me are 20:41 more critical of their voice 20:43 then they need to be but I would tell them to be and as a professional you and 20:48 I you we can say to them 20:50 your voice is great embrace it embrace it but i think what has so that's that's 20:56 the one part the answer the same question 20:59 I totally agree with the point n % about the people being is wonderful melodious 21:04 voice they walk out you go wow you every once in a while you could I just think 21:07 oh my god and they do they said oftentimes they're not actors they'll 21:12 say you know what so much BTW i should do something about my voice of them 21:16 well yeah you should but it is a naturally to natural attractor 21:21 it's great so that's that as far as most people I think their voices were pretty 21:25 well i would give a much higher percentage of 21:28 people who use their voice to their disadvantage to the disadvantage 21:35 now that would be amazing voices or nasal and that kind of my type voice 21:41 that boys are kind of high pitch is coming right from the throat 21:45 the people who are very quiet 21:48 I was a good by Tyson and pressure haha very quiet 21:53 can't be any and and there again all of these things like psychological 22:00 ramifications 22:02 not from me but from the other person so if you're speaking very loudly does in a 22:07 way in the kind of obvious away kind of commands attention 22:10 you have to really screwed into listen to somebody that's a little bit tiring 22:14 in terms of why I just been talking to somebody this weekend when I was a 22:17 little vacation and they spoke in that manner and I was a man I put so much 22:21 effort into it 22:22 I was tired of that I don't really want to talk to this person any more of this 22:25 is taking too much ever 22:26 it wasn't somebody was a good friend and i guess i would say could you speak up 22:30 but that is that one of the cases too lightly on to that a lot of people out 22:37 here you're in New York two different situation but in California we have a 22:41 lot of good women young women who have that Kardashian phase 22:47 it's called her vocal fry for me it was like an old man but they're always kind 22:51 of goes like there when they finish the sentence to his hands off so i would 22:56 really rate 22:57 yeah i'm going to take your kind but i think most of your clients are huge 23:01 pj our public speakers so already there at the level that the voice is coming to 23:07 their consciousness consciousness and they want to get better now this part of 23:12 putting all in the frame a painting the picture for me 23:15 I noticed just in the and the number of people i run into on the street people 23:20 making my clients the overall listening on TV that there is a high percentage of 23:25 people who were using their voice in a way that does not sound good 23:32 that is off-putting it is not putting off putting to everybody but it's 23:36 off-putting to the people who if they have 23:39 is that was more pleasing and some way or more fuller more resident they could 23:43 really advanced in their personal lives and their careers and the way they felt 23:47 about themselves 23:48 our special guest is Patrick Munoz for more information on him you can go to 23:53 his website just spell out the name patr IC k mu and cozy . com 24:01 switching gears Patrick speech impediments 24:05 how big of a problem is it for adults and how hard is it to overcome we're 24:10 recording this during political season with major presidential conventions 24:15 going on 24:16 so we it brings to light a number of top politicians with speech impediments rudy 24:21 giuliani has a list john mccain has a list there are several commentators on 24:27 MSNBC and other networks with lisps for that matter 24:32 Churchill Winston Churchill had a list and a stutter 24:36 how much does it matter if you have a compelling message number one number two 24:41 if you are an adult 24:44 let's say you're over 30 and you already have a good career how time-consuming is 24:52 it not just to change your accent but to actually overcome our pics & impediment 24:57 great questions 24:58 so a quirky voice look I know I like 40 I just mean that it's a voice that has 25:05 its that has let's say an impediment obstacle is a little bit different to 25:08 live a stutter 25:10 maybe not saying they're ours it's an interest it's so it's fascinating TJ 25:17 because if it's part of who you are and you own it and you're in the middle of 25:22 your career and you doing this the way you speak and you're out there you're 25:28 doing things and people say oh you sure now that last winter but you're like but 25:33 you you're okay with it 25:35 you're okay with it you do it and you're like yeah I have this but i'm not going 25:38 to work 25:38 it I say the more power to you I mean as a voice and speech I could be very like 25:43 this is the way I used to do it 25:45 it's about for me everyone knows about for you to send the moment ago it's 25:49 about communicating 25:50 that's all it is it's about communicating so as far as people who 25:55 are our have accent are having pediments but and they are they embrace them and 26:02 they can do it and it's not detracting from their advancement in their own 26:05 personal life 26:07 I think it's it works out it works it good more power to them a lot of people 26:14 who have impediments as an adult I've had people come to me in their 20 is 26:18 that couldn't say there are so it was very difficult to say there was and it 26:23 wasn't a new york thing it was just they consider oz and we try to get try to do 26:27 it was very disheartening for my mom and I'm thinking of young twenties 26:33 no man in his twenties and in fact when I talked about how that you know certain 26:38 sound sound like the Boston X and some likely to San from Boston and I said you 26:42 know you could we ever going to pause an exit 26:45 but for him it was a little bit challenging but I'm working on it 26:51 it got better it got better and because he's a good-looking man like me did 26:58 modeling 26:59 he's going into a profession where he's going to be a salesperson at higher end 27:06 and he wants it i'm not telling what he has to do but he wants to be able to 27:12 speak in a way that sounds more professional 27:15 he can work on it we met once a week we do over the course of 12 weeks 12 27:20 sessions is ours got much better with a perfect no but there are much better and 27:25 he did it 27:26 I've had girls love a woman that woman is backed by the list and as an actress 27:30 she has a better ear perhaps and a more compelling reason to get rid of that 27:35 list and we did it in six sections 27:39 lists are often times easier to take care of the arson is very challenging 27:45 the stutter is about relaxation 27:50 and about exercises oftentimes when they start to sing 27:54 that's daughter goes away but I was watching this show on TV 27:58 bloodline apparently he was on something else before I don't know the actors name 28:01 but he played the DA and he can't he doesn't have the walkway and say it's 28:06 all right but he has a major role that's the way he plays but he's playing these 28:09 balls so and i watched I was not want to know 28:14 broadway show you a few years ago and this woman had a list it's like I was 28:18 like a kick-ass you would say but she works all the time 28:21 it's it is such a time I'm so glad we live in a world that if you have 28:27 something and you believe in it you can make your self 28:32 if you believe in yourself and you're doing this you have some feedback from 28:35 the University so working 28:37 go for it if they're like all of us 28:40 I know for myself I've had my own fears of my own obstacles to get over and by 28:47 doing that by facing it 28:49 that fear and getting over the obstacle I feel so much more in my life so much 28:53 more whole and I want to get better and better as i get older and it 28:58 and as I teach and I learned from my clients so for those people 29:01 let's do a little do they have to all of a sudden go away from their life and put 29:05 all the time working on it 29:06 no it's been a few minutes a day identifying it and they have the 29:10 discipline to do that with a coach do it for six weeks probably see what happens 29:14 and and and for that they can see that they think this is impossible 29:18 at least they faced it but to walk away from something and say i'm not going to 29:22 do it was like I'm never going to see my arse 29:24 well that's the only impediment to actually learning is say no you say yes 29:31 let me try and you can go from so long answer to your question all my answers 29:35 are longer your questions and that is that's how this is the program this is 29:40 in fact the program for really in depth answers to questions about speaking so 29:45 if anything i want the longer I i would be remiss if I let you get away without 29:50 weighing in on one other 29:52 what I see is a major controversy regarding voice use of the vocal vocal 29:59 cords and that is with respect to women every six months I see some art of 30:03 buy some punitive expert saying women art is respected as much as men because 30:10 they don't speak and as low voice in there 30:13 they just spoke lower they would be more respected get more promotions 30:19 I have a particular theory on those theories but I want to hear from you 30:23 first 30:24 it's interesting so I we have in communication 30:29 I've been working with a call center recently working coaching for them and 30:32 the tone of voice 30:34 so on a call tone of voice and what you say that when you say part is that a 30:39 12-percent was a study done by UCLA professor years back and tone of voice 30:46 what you're saying the way you say that's like eighty percent or eighty 30:50 eight percent of what you're communicating the the words about twelve 30:55 percent for this kind of communication that we have I see you you see me 31:01 body language is 50% again their statistics wrong but that's a large part 31:06 what I say twenty percent and the toll is thirty percent so this goes back to 31:12 the tone of the voice right does the high-pitched voice then that can be that 31:16 can be taken many ways so women's voices 31:22 we all have our own little attitude and our own beliefs but how we react to 31:29 different voices 31:30 some people have had women come to me and say my voice did to Heidi to get it 31:35 i need to get a fuller 31:36 well oftentimes and here's my take on this TJ is that most of us i would say 31:41 ninety percent of americans and seventy percent of the world of making it up 31:46 don't use their voice fully right especially Americans will talk to my 31:50 throat right here that's where we talked for this is where the sound comes from 31:53 so how can we really use our voice fully effects were talking from you don't have 31:57 any kind of impact tomorrow our body or are resonators show 32:03 I think they're doing a disservice to themselves and I'm not going to point 32:07 out just women are going to say men and women are doing a bigger service to 32:10 themselves 32:11 we're not finding out that they have is bigger for stronger voice they can 32:16 ask them for their life women their voices are higher in excitement when we 32:25 get excited men and women we can start our voices are to pick up as a woman of 32:32 my voice is high or are you know in the get it 32:35 it's some women have a higher . some have a lower our voices but if I'm 32:38 starting from a platform 32:41 my boys start a little higher I'm gonna get excited and they're going to go up 32:44 here again some people that's fine they love it that's great for some people who 32:52 have been in a restaurant and there's a a table of young women and they start to 32:57 get excited about something almost always like this it's like very high now 33:02 it's a very temple in personation and always going to be you know being 33:06 accused of being sexist 33:07 I'm not saying that i was saying that as a as a woman you keep we have to get a 33:15 look at life is life is in life is changing luckily we have more opinions 33:19 and more open-minded this and realizations of only our own power and 33:24 having said that as a woman to be unfairly branded as though they're 33:31 screech your this I think that's I think that's completely chauvinistic but i do 33:36 think that they can they're doing a disservice themselves 33:41 if that's the only voice they know because oftentimes TJ 33:44 we've been conditioned to speak in a certain way either consciously or 33:47 unconsciously wouldn't we be honest feedback like oh boys don't cry boys 33:52 don't cry boys don't cry so man we don't we hold it so we don't show emotion 33:56 perhaps 33:56 and suddenly we're losing our communication which is some sort of an 34:00 emotional voicemail some people aren't emotional some people are more 34:03 I want you to be who you are but as a woman and as a man to develop your voice 34:10 and have that whole range is really gonna do you well now there was one 34:14 politician recently that some of my students interestingly enough said to me 34:18 you all of you only coach sure we really wanted to reach out to her and culture 34:22 because that voice gets kind of screech eat and other people say oh that and a 34:28 few people say that 34:29 face of hers is so wonderful is a strong man voice 34:32 so again to get to the range of opinions I will say this that I know for sure 34:37 having a coven voice where you breathe and it's relaxed and it's open that's 34:43 your base 34:44 you'll be in good stead in whatever situation if your voice goes high that's 34:48 great and it will most likely the back down and even more important than that 34:53 it will last through these it's the week of convention we can convention when you 34:58 have to be out there talking loudly or when you're on the campaign trail you're 35:01 speaking all the time you want to have a dependable voice so working on your 35:05 voice will always be to your benefit 35:08 the book is accent American the complete guide to speaking the standard American 35:14 accent it's available at amazon.com finer bookstores everywhere 35:21 the author Patrick Munez you can find him talk to him about personal coaching 35:27 sessions if you're interested in any aspect of improving your voice accent go 35:32 to Patrick Munoz . com patr IC k mu n 0 z dot com Patrick thank you for being 35:40 our guest give it a pleasure thank you TJ 35:45 speaking with TJ Walker is the number one rated daily streaming TV and radio 35:52 show devoted to all aspects of speaking and communication if you received value 35:58 from this show 35:59 then please subscribe to it at media training worldwide . com 36:04 please review the show leave comments and share it with your friends and 36:08 colleagues today   Thanks for listening to Speaking with TJ Walker. The show about public speaking, media training, presentation skills, crisis communications, and presentation training. Please send any speaking-related questions you have directly to TJ at tj@mediatrainingworldwide.com and he will answer them in future episodes.   Please connect with us at Media Training Worldwide and post your questions here http://www.mediatrainingworldwide.com/blog/   On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tjwalkerinteractive Twitter: https://twitter.com/tjwalker Linkedin: T.J. Walker Youtube  https://www.youtube.com/user/MediaTraining iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/id1072936158?mt=2&ls=1   Receive Free online Public Speaking or Media Training Course today http://www.mediatrainingworldwide.com/give-away.html   Call +1.212.764.4955 now to discuss a customized media training or presentation training program for you or your organization.   For keynote speech and media inquiries, call +1.212.764.4955   Online media and presentation training at  http://www.mediatrainingworldwide.com/online-training.html   Media Training Worldwide teaches people how to speak effectively to the media and to live audiences. We train people on all aspects of media training, public speaking, PowerPoint Presentations, crisis communications and presentation training.  

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  • Interview with Les Brown

    · 01:03:24 · The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

    Interview with Les Brown Hugh: Hi, this is Hugh Ballou again, and this is a very special episode of The Nonprofit Exchange. I have over here my good friend, Les Brown. And Les is going to share with you this movement that he has initiated. Over here, my new friend Tamara Hartley. Les? Les: Yes? Hugh: We have been capturing ideas on the storyboards about this project that you have got in mind. Tell people what this project is. Les: It’s a project that is designed to make a greater impact on people on the general population and helping people to develop the tools, mindset, skillset, and collaborative, achievement-driven relationships that will allow them to create the greatest version of themselves. This is the era that the late Peter Drucker calls the Era of the 3 C’s: accelerated Change, overwhelming Complexity, and then Competition. With all the changes taking place with technology—according to the Department of Labor, over 20,000 people are losing their jobs every day, and 50% of the jobs that now exist can be done by robots—when we look at the advance of artificial intelligence and cheap labor abroad, people literally are now in an entrepreneur’s era, and they have to begin to expand their skillset so they will be able to handle what is required to be in this global economy where accelerated change is taking place. Hugh: It is so true. You see it happening every day. Les: Yes. Hugh: Every day, there is massive changes. You have a special passion for those people who are incarcerated and continue to be incarcerated. Talk about that. Les: We incarcerate more people in America than anyplace else in the world. We are making people bitter rather than better. I believe that we have to develop a higher level of consciousness on how we deal with people that have made some bad choices. My goal is, to people that are incarcerated, if prisons will allow me, to have my programs in the prison that will change their mindset, teach them how to become an effective communicator, how to develop positive, collaborative, achievement-driven, supportive relationships, how to earn money online as entrepreneurs, and how to dress like a prospect rather than a suspect. Hugh: A prospect rather than a suspect. Les: Yes, because the truth is, when people get a criminal background, they are not going to get any jobs. If they do, those jobs won’t pay much money. These individuals are not going to starve to death. They are going to find a way to feed themselves. As a result, that is why the recidivism rate is over 80%. If you had a factory that was producing products, and 80% of the products came back defective, you wouldn’t continue to use that process. There has been a slight change in how we are dealing with people that have made some bad choices in our society. Rather than throwing money at caging them, they are now looking at the possibility of helping them to learn how to read because over 76% of them are functional illiterates, giving them the skillset and giving them some support to help them to be reintegrated into society. If you go to jail, you can’t stay in public housing. If you apply for a job, you have to put down that you have a criminal background. Most employers will say, “We’ll call you. Don’t call us.” They are penalized throughout their lives, even after they have paid their debt to society. That’s not fair. My mother was once incarcerated. She sold home brew and moonshine and wrote numbers when she could no longer work at the M&M cafeteria. That was a tough time. I became a man at ten years old as a result of that. Seven children in a house that no longer had the guardian, the person who took care of us. She adopted seven of us. She said that she made a commitment when she did that that we would never go to bed hungry, and we did not. We would always have a roof over our head, and we did have that. That was a gaff in our lives that was very painful and challenging. There are a lot of good people who made some bad choices, and I believe the world consists of the caught and the uncaught. I have made some bad decisions in my life. I did some stupid things when I was younger. Thank God I didn’t get caught. I believe that God was looking out for me because when I go to the bathroom, I leave the door open a crack. I do it all the time. What did Retta say? If you can’t do the time, don’t commit the crime. Hugh: Les Brown, you have this magical ability to put concepts into powerful words and to communicate it to people. I have been in groups that have just been so excited. I know that people write you and people speak to you about how you have inspired them. Something you said, and the content you gave them, gave them substance to get them out of where they were. It’s a mind shift, isn’t it? Les: No question. To put it in another context, you are expanding their vision of themselves. When people are going through a tough time, they have a tendency to expand and exaggerate the circumstances they are going through. When I speak, my goal is to expand your vision of yourself, to begin to see that there is greatness in you, that you are greater than your circumstances. You are better than anything you are going through now or in the future. You have to affirm to yourself. I have dealt with cancer on a regular basis for 21 years. My affirmation is: “This will not get the best of me.” I have to say this to myself, “I refuse to allow this to live in my life. I am stronger than this.” We have to, I believe, program ourselves and talk to ourselves to get through the stuff we are dealing with because things are going to happen to us. Forrest Gump is right, “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re going to get.” Greater is He that is in us and the He that is in the world as a presence. There is a power that we all have within ourselves that we have not been trained how to access so that we can rise above what we are going through and live our lives from the inside out rather than living our lives from the outside in. You have to discipline yourself not to get caught up and buy into what I call the weapons of mass distractions. There are so many things that will distract you and tell you that you can’t handle this or deal with this. You have to harness your will. You have to say to yourself, “I am going to get through this.” When life has been kicking my butt, no matter how bad it is, I have an affirmation, “I am going to make it.” When I say that, I think about my mother because she went through some tough times, raising seven children that she didn’t give birth to. She had a third grade education, was a domestic worker, and had arthritis. She would say, “Arthur is bothering me.” I would ask her, “Mama, who is Arthur? You are always talking about Arthur.” She said, “Don’t worry. If you live long enough, you’ll find out.” I have Arthur in my right butt. In my behind. You know what I mean? On the right side. I was at a church service, and this lady was a healer. So I decided to get in line. She asked, “Can I help you?” I said, “Well, just touch me at the top of my head, and the healing power will go through my whole body.” She said, “I want direct impact.” I said, “Well, I have prostate cancer, and I have arthritis in my right butt.” She said, “Touching means the same.” She was not going to touch me in the groin. Hugh: Oh my. Les: This is real, I’m telling you. She gave me some prayer cards, which I still have in my underwear right now. I was going back and forth on the stage. I saw people laughing and looking past me. This was in Detroit. I asked, “What are you laughing at?” These prayer cards that I had paid $3 for had slipped out of my pants, and I had a line of prayer cards going across the stage. I said, “You all can laugh if you want.” I picked them up and put them right in my underwear. 21 years of kicking cancer’s butt. Hugh: Your whole life is changing the paradigm because of your determination and your vision for yourself. Les: Yes. Hugh: We are in Cleveland, Ohio. We spent a chunk of yesterday letting you download your vision. This is a foundation that you are starting, but it’s bigger than that. It’s more like a movement. You are talking about 80% return to prison. That is a crisis. Les: Yes. Hugh: And you’re doing something about it. This is an official notice. We haven’t named it, but you are launching the Les Brown Foundation that provides support. You are going to invite people to participate in this movement with you. We are in this room in Ohio, and we have had some really powerful conversations. This is a huge vision, Les. I have worked with charities for 31 years. This is the top of the heap. This is powerful. Why am I here, and why is Tamara here? Les: The two of you have a skillset that I don’t have. You are very knowledgeable and experienced in this area of how to set up a nonprofit, along with Sherita Herring. Part of what I want to do, two people that I know who have integrity and experience and the skillset and other relationships that I don’t have, and that can teach me. I have asked for help, not because I am weak, but because I want to remain strong. Ask for help, but don’t stop until you get it. I could have gone on to set up a nonprofit; a lot of people do that. But I wanted to do it in the right way. I wanted to have a system and a level of transparency. When people contribute to the work that we are going to be doing, they will know beyond a shadow of a doubt that the money is going where we said it will go. I believe that when you are going to do something of this magnitude, you need people in your corner that can help you do that, that know things that you don’t know, and can set it up the right way so you can accelerate your level of success. You and Tamara are two individuals I strongly believe in. I met you at CEO Space. When we look at putting something together that will outlast you—to me, greatness is living your life in such a way that the things that you create, as one Russian author said, will not be undone or destroyed after you’re gone. We are only here for a limited amount of time. I had a plan of doing an event with Wayne Dyer, and we talked about doing a PBS Special. We put it off for several months. He finally called me and said, “I am coming to Orlando. Let’s get together and do this PBS special.” Two days later, he had a massive heart attack. We have to seize the moment. I am 72. I look much younger because I don’t believe in gray hair. There is no shade in my gait. I travel around with mascara in my pocket. If any gray hair comes out, I will touch it up in a heartbeat. The only three gray hairs that show up are in my eyelashes because I haven’t figured out how to do that yet. But I’m thinking about working on getting me some Mary Kay and hooking this stuff up. My goal now is about leaving a legacy. What will be different because I came this way? I have been thinking about that as a 21-year cancer conqueror, because of God’s grace and mercy. My goal is to live a life that they could say, This guy, because of his passion and his commitment to help transform people’s lives, like somebody transformed his life, he made an impact. There are people as a result of going through his training or hearing him speak that they were never the same as a result of being in his presence. I want to make my life mean something. Most people after they die, about two or three weeks later, because their lives were so inconsequential, they just worked a job, paid the bills, and took care of the family. One day, they were out of here. I don’t want it like that. I remember talking to my daughter on the telephone, and she said, “Dad, I am here in traffic, and there is a policeman on a motorcycle in the middle of the road. He is obviously stopping traffic for a funeral procession to come by.” I said, “Okay.” She said, “I think I’m going to be here a minute.” All of a sudden, she said, “Whoa, wow.” I said, “What’s wrong?” She said, “Nothing’s wrong. A hearse just went through. Only one car was behind it. When I die, Dad, I want, because of how I live my life, there to be a long procession of cars and people coming out to celebrate my life, that I was here in the difference I made for them.” I said, “I understand that.” That is what I want. When I go, people will come out to celebrate my life because I did some good stuff. As evil prevails, a lot of good men and women do nothing. There is a lot of good that all of us can do. But one of the things that I think about often, a lady that flew over from Australia for me to train her in speaking, I asked her, “Why did you select me? There are a lot of people all over the world.” She said, “I saw you on YouTube speaking in the Georgia Dome, and you speak from your heart. Therefore, I want to learn how to speak from the heart as well.” I said, “I can teach you how to do that.” Then I stopped and said, “What is your why? What is the reason you want to discover your power voice?” She said, “When I saw Dylann Roof, a young white kid who went to an African-American church and killed nine black people, “I felt there should be another person on his side standing before the judge. He was not born with that level of hatred in him. Somebody was in his ear. Somebody twisted his mind.” Then she paused and said, “I believe the world is as it is not because a few people are violent. I believe the world is as it is because too many people are silent.” When she said that, that really grabbed me. That gave me goose bumps. I want my voice and the voices of the people I train to be a chorus to create a different kind of mindset on the planet. I believe that can be done in our lifetime. Hugh: What we are here to set up is a way for people not only to be at your celebration for your life, but to continue the celebration. In Africa, there is a saying, “When a man dies, they burn his library.” We are not burning your library. We are building it up. Les: In fact, put them in my casket with me. I tell my kids, “When I die, don’t let them do anything with me until you come down to the morgue to identify my body. To make sure that I’m gone, put a microphone in my hand. If I don’t sit up and say, ‘You’re gonna be hungry,’ you can say that Dad’s gone.” “How do you know he’s gone? Did you check his pulse?” “No, we put a microphone in his hand and his mouth was still closed.” Hugh: Oh man. You have touched the lives of so many people in person. Like you said, your YouTube and Facebook and videos that are online, people view them. When I say Les Brown to people, they are like, “Oh yeah, I saw that video.” That is one way to live on. But what I have discovered, I have known you for a number of years, and you mentioned CEO Space. I have had to follow you twice on stage. Les: You called me your opening act. Hugh: That’s right. You gave me a high five. I knew you’d either love it or hate it. Les: I thought you were quick on your feet. I saw another speaker, this former mayor of Detroit, Colman Young. He had to speak to a group of cosmetologists, all of these females. As he was coming up on the platform, he tripped and fell. Everybody gasped. When he got himself together and came up to the microphone, he said, “Obviously I have fallen for you.” I said, “You go, boy.” That was awesome. Hugh: In this last day, my appreciation for Les Brown has grown deeper, not only for your ability to recall tons of profound quotes that are relevant to what we are talking about, but also the depth of your knowledge, perception, and experience. You know what you’re talking about, and you have paid the price. I knew that. Now I really know that. I always believed it. I know because I had to follow you that you made me a better me. The first time you talked and left, and I had to come speak an hour or so later, I was getting dressed, and I was trembling. You had this group going, man. They cooled off and came back and were like, “Who is Hugh Ballou?” I looked in the mirror and I said to myself, “You’re going to go out there, and you’re going to be Hugh Ballou.” I had the inspiration from me from that session. Because you triggered something in me, and I gave myself permission to be me. You talked about that earlier. I can really understand, when you say helping people to access that greatness within them, which you talk about in a number of ways, I am paraphrasing my hearing it—I want to say to people I have known you for a while, I have known your content. I have a whole deeper level of appreciation. What this movement is about, you are creating a foundation to be able to provide resources for those people that are trapped. 80% return to prison, I heard you say. Les: Yes. Hugh: And we are talking about doing a teen program because they get into a cycle that is going to lead them there. There is the training to help people break the cycle, but you are also helping people not get in the cycle. You have some outstanding programs. Les: I want you to pause. We decide the number of prisons that we are going to build based upon the failure rate of African-American students in the third grade. Based upon that. I say if we can track failure, we can also track success. Rather than tracking people to find out what number of kids are going to drop out in the third grade, and that will tell us the number of prisons based on those numbers we extract to build, we can decide we are going to do an intervention here, and we will give them the tools that they need to transform their mindset; teach them how to become effective communicators; teach them how to develop collaborative, achievement-driven, supportive relationships; teach them how to use the Internet; to be taught or learn how to use money online and become entrepreneurs; and teach them how to dress like a prospect rather than a suspect. I was looking at television, and they had these police arrests live. They arrested this guy whose pants were below his butt. They said, “Pull those pants up.” There is a comedian years ago on television. He had a bag over his head. If you hear a guy with a bag over his head, that would be me right through the shopping mall with a big belt and popping these butts with these pants hanging so low. I don’t even have to say to pull your pants up because they will pull them up after that. That will be me. That is a level of insanity to be in that. My goal is to eradicate the age to addiction and incarceration death syndrome. The sagging started in the prisons. I had to speak in a prison a few months ago. I used to challenge young men to come on stage, and I would pay them $1,000 if they could do more pushups than me. At the time, I did 142 pushups consecutively. I went into this prison, and I asked these young guys who came into the room. They had the pants sagging. I said, “Hey, I’m an old man. Why do you wear the pants the way you do? What do you call that?” They said, “Sagging.” I said, “Sagging?” They said, “Yeah.” “How do you spell that?” “S-a-g-g-i-n.” I said, “Wow, saggin’.” If you can determine what a man will think, you will never have to concern yourself with what he will do. If you can make a man feel inferior and never have to compel him to seek an inferior status, for he will seek it himself, and if he can make a man feel justly an outcast, never have to order him to go to the back door, he will go without being told. If there is no door his very nature will demand one. I said, “Spell it again.” “S-a-g-g-i-n.” I said, “Good. Flip it. Spell it backwards.” They paused for a moment and said, “Whoa.” I said, “Yeah. That’s how you’re dressing. Yeah. That is your vision of yourself. Yeah. You think that’s cool? Yeah.” Let me tell you something. When I left there, there was no saggin’. They pulled their pants up. I never had to tell them. I believe that people are as they are because if we knew better, we would do better. We have created a culture that is an entertainment-driven culture. The average immigrant who comes to the United States has a four times’ greater chance of creating wealth, buying a home, and having their own business. Why? Even though they can’t speak the language and don’t know the culture, when they hit the ground, they are hungry. They came here to achieve. Immigrants have an achievement-driven mindset. We as Americans are spoiled. We are spoiled. Are we perfect? No. But there are things we have that we take for granted. I have traveled to over 40 countries. When I am coming through security, I say, “God bless America.” I am so glad to get back home. We are blessed. We live on the greatest country on the planet. My goal is to help people overcome the psychic disrepair that this culture has created in many cases, to help them to discover the truth of who they are that will empower them to make choices that will free them from living a small life, from infecting people with their mediocrity and begin to affect people with their greatness. Hugh: Powerful. Part of why I came and Tamara came was the brilliance that we see when you are influencing people on stage and in person. I heard you coaching people on the phone yesterday. It’s like they are the only person in the world. You give them such focus, love, and attention. I can’t imagine why they wouldn’t want to go on and be successful. You have a real, genuine interest in people. You actually care about- Everybody I’ve seen you with, you really care about them. You have a huge segment, and to be able to create sustainability, the Les Brown influence is the catalyst. What you’re creating is programs, mentoring, accountability, a whole system to help people stay on a track. Les: Yes. T.D. Jake said something I agree with. He said, “There is no success without successors.” We learn, we earn, and you pass it on. I am in this stage now to pass on the things that I have learned. I was on a plane, and they had to have an emergency landing. I became ill on the plane. I remember being on the floor after they pulled me out of my chair, and I was going in and out of consciousness. I remember saying to myself, “God, don’t let me die now around these strangers with the knowledge that I have to transform kids’ lives. Please give me some more time to do the work that I feel You have given me to do.” When we landed in Salt Lake City, Utah, and the emergency crew came on the plane with all of their instruments, they wanted to put a paddle on my chest and the guy said, “Hey, wait a minute. You, mister. I know you. You are that man who help people deliver their dreams. I got this job because of you.” He put the oxygen mask on me. “Be gentle with him as you take him up. He’s got people’s lives he must change. He can’t go now.” I mean, the tears begin to fall from my eyes. What are the chances? They say coincidence is God’s way of being anonymous. God was affirming to me that my work is not done, I have touched more people than I will ever know. He was talking to me as I was going out. He said, “How is Gladys doing?” I tell you, this has been an exciting journey. I have grown. People have blessed me in so many ways. I am here because there were people who believed in me when I didn’t believe in myself. I teach that sometimes you have to believe in somebody’s belief in you until your belief kicks in. Hugh: Yes, sir. My wife has a saying that somebody believed in her when I was nothing but potential, and I can say that, too. Les: Yes. Nothing but potential. Hugh: Tamara is here. You picked up the phone, called us, and said, “Let’s get together.” So we came. You are a man of influence. Leaders are a lot of things, but number one, leaders are influencers. You influence us as well as the rest. Tamara has a real high-level consulting career. She is leaving that to come and help put this together and make sure it is done right. Why did you say yes to being a part of this- I’m going to call it a movement, is that all right? Why, Tamara, did you say yes to this? Tamara: When we talk about Les Brown in my house, you should hear what me and my husband say. My husband is so supportive of me going with Les Brown, helping him with his vision. He says, “You’re not just doing this for Les Brown; you’re doing it for the world.” He has influence over the world. That is extremely important. I get excited about his vision, the things he wants to do. I am a mother of four. I understand the mindset and how important it is to change people’s mindsets, particularly in children. With my own children, I teach them who they really are. Sometimes it works against me. I have a 13-year-old son, and I promise you when he was about nine years old, my girls had gone out and he stayed home. I asked them, “Why don’t you take your brother with you?” They said that he is staying home today to work on his back flip. I said, “His back flip?” “Yeah, he is down in the basement working on his back flip.” I say, “He can’t do a back flip?” I go downstairs and ask him, “Son, what are you doing?” He said, “Don’t worry. I am not doing the back flips yet. I am working on it in my mind.” I said, “What?” He said, “You said if I put my mind to it, I can do anything.” You know what? You’re right. Let’s both of us put our minds on lessons before back flipping in the basement. Having four children and seeing their growth and actually inputting the things I put into them, I know how important it is to work on mindset. When Les talks about the mindset of children and incarcerated persons, I wholeheartedly believe in that, and I want to help flesh out his vision. You have a visionary, you have a details person, we work well together. Hugh: As part of my series, I interviewed Cal Turner. Cal Turner went to his executive team at Dollar General and said, “My dad founded this company. I got this job because of my genes, not because of my skill. But I have the vision. You got the skill. We’re going public.” They went public, and it was very successful. They sold it later, and everybody received a lot of rewards for that. They all stepped up because he let them step up because he was the influencer and the visionary. He said to me, “Hugh, leadership is about defining your gaps and finding really good people to fill them.” That is part of my leadership education program now. Cal has influenced me. He is older than us, just a little bit, but he is still out there sharing his wisdom. It’s not about you asking for help. It’s about you being a good leader, saying, “Here is my expertise.” What she just pointed out, you have the vision, you have the goods, and she has the details. I am pleased to be a part of this project. I am a NASCAR fan. They go faster when they draft together. Les: Absolutely. One of the things that leaders also do is they are perpetually engaged in the process of a talent hunt, looking for people who have talent, skills, resources, access, and credibility that you don’t have. We can’t do the things we want to do by ourselves. One goose can fly 75% further in formation with other geese that it could never fly by itself. Part of my training is I teach people to practice the principle of OQP, only quality people. Dr. Dennis said, “If you are the smartest one in your group, you need to get a new group.” I have seen Tamara. I know about her leadership skills, her integrity, her commitment, and she is a person who can get things done. She has propensity for detail. That is opposite of me. I am not a details person. My skill is in speaking and training people how to speak, but she knows how to put systems in to place, and complemented with your skills and knowledge, we will be able to build something that will outlive us. It will be part of the future we cannot see. That is why I am excited about this new chapter in my life, building something that will outlast me and will be here long after I’m gone, that my grandchildren and great-grandchildren—I have three great-grandsons. My goal is to build something that will continuously transform people’s lives. My children share this vision as well and work with me. I am excited about what we can produce working with you and Tamara and also with the skillset and mindset of Sherita Herring. I believe what we are putting together is going to be an incredible movement that people can see, believe in, sink their teeth into, that they want to support. We are going to train young people. My goal is to help young people develop a different kind of mindset, to reduce the bullying and suicide rates. Suicide among young people has increased over 300%. According to the Center for Disease out of Atlanta, over 3,000 people committed suicide last year in this country. More people died from suicide than traffic accidents. In the land of opportunity, where people try to outswim sharks to get here or outrun jeeps barefooted to get here, I believe that is the result of lack of hope. When there is hope in the future, that gives you power in the present. When you combine hope, methods, and collaborative achievement-driven supportive relationships, that when people take some hits, and we are all going to have some hits. We will help people to weather those storms. We will help people to have the wherewithal to weather those hits, and they will come from so many places. One doctor looked at me and said three words no one ever wants to hear, “You have cancer,” those three most feared words in seven languages. I asked, “Can you get me a second opinion?” He said, “Yes, and you are ugly, too.” Hugh: We did some drilling down on the sustainability, the continuity of this. We are going to invite people to be part of this tribe, to take on the programs. But you are going to train trainers to train other trainers. As far as the youth go, they are going to have peer-to-peer training. We are going to build a cadre of student leaders who will speak in a very different way to their peers. I think your pleasure is to start with those who are incarcerated because it is such a crisis and jails are full. Les: They are. When you look at the jails, the juvenile detention centers, the prisons at both the state and federal level, the numbers are staggering. When we look at the things we can do to give them the support and the tools they need, and the mindset that you are worth something- If you are in a prison, you are not even recognized by your name but your number. The system as it is is designed to destroy a person’s sense of self. They treat them like animals. They get out and act like animals. We can do better than that. We are the United States of America. When we look at young people today, and their behavior… I was on a bus to the airport. They have those shuttles. A lady got on with her mother, and her mother is a senior citizen. She was holding a small baby, and the mother was like eight months pregnant. You know those shuttles. They are rocky and not sturdy. If you are a pregnant woman, I got up and offered her my seat. She gladly sat down. There is a young guy sitting there. I said, “Brother, do you mind giving this lady your seat?” I was talking about the grandmother holding the baby. He said, “Hey, I paid my money just like she did,” and he wouldn’t get up. I just said, “Wow.” I felt bad for him. I said to myself, “When I see these young guys with pants below their butt or they are disrespectful and have no sense of decency, I get angry with myself. I need to multiply my self through other people so that someone else can get in their ear other than what they are listening to every day that does not give them a vision of themselves in the future and keeps them in a very limited mindset.” It’s all about mindset. He thinks, and so as he continues to think, so he remains. We spend no money on the county level, city level, state level on transforming mindsets. Not anything. That is where everything begins. We know that. They did a study on some top achievers around the world, over 3,000. They wanted to know what the common denominator was among them that caused them to reach their goals. They discovered that 85% of them reached their goals because of their attitude, 15% because of their aptitude. The training that we are going to provide is to train a trainer so that this is not surrounding and driven by a personality, but by systems and people who have a vision for our kids in the future, living in a global economy and operating at a higher level of consciousness where they can live a life of contribution as opposed to a life of liabilities. Hugh: James Allen said—you triggered a quote—in his book A Man Thinketh, “People want to change their circumstances and are unwilling to change themselves. They therefore remain bound.” Les: Yes, bound and stuck. That is where all the transformation takes place, in the mind. He also said something: You can’t destroy negative thoughts. They are like weeds. You can overpower them for a period of time, but once you stop doing the things that you do to get the clutter and the negative things out of your mind, then those negative thoughts come back with a vengeance and are stronger. When I had a talk show, King World paid me $5 million. I became so busy and caught up and preparing to be on television and going through the training to be before the camera that I stopped my ritual of reading 30-40 pages every day. I stopped my ritual of listening to Earl Nightingale and Jim Rowan and Zig Ziglar and Tony Robbins and other speakers every day because I was so busy preparing for television. Those negative thoughts came back. I forgot who I was. I was disconnected from my power. I just was not myself until after the program was cancelled. I took a hit. Things happened during that particular time, and I was not prepared to handle them. My best friend died. My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer and passed. I went through a divorce when I was married to Gladys. At that time, I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. All of these things happened within 3-4 months. Had I been in my ritual, I would have been knocked down, but I would have been knocked out that I popped. One thing I encourage people to do is maintenance work to maintain that level of consciousness so that when things happen to you, you can handle it. We have the ability to handle it. Dr. Howard Thurman, who was a mentor to Martin Luther King Jr and Mahatma Gandhi, he wrote Deep is the Hunger and The Voice of the Genuine, “There is something in each and every one of us that waits and listens for the voice of the genuine in ourselves. It will be perhaps the only guide we ever have or hear. If we cannot hear it all of our life, our days will be spent on the ends of strings that somebody else pulls.” When you live your life from the inside out, you are literally saying, “Nobody, no circumstances, no situation will pull the strings of my mindset, my attitude, and how I feel about who I am and how I show up in life.” A profound thinker. Hugh: Part of the track that you are laying down is that nurture that helps people not only continue learning, but also to stay on the track. You talked about four programs that you have now and have more in mind. What is the background on why you developed those? What are the circumstances around them? They are powerful programs. EDITED AND PULLED (46:15) Les: I was a state legislator in Columbus, Ohio. I was elected to three terms. I became chairman of the Human Resource committee and the Education committee. I was a very controversial disc jockey, educating people on the things that maintain our detriment in the ‘80s, doing editorials, legislating against police brutality and the deadly use of force. When I was in the legislature, a guy named Clarence King—who had worked with Werner Erhard to create an organization called est—one of the great icons of the South development, he came and sat in the legislature to watch me. He had heard about me being an effective communicator, and he had gotten a contract under the Carter Administration called PIC, Private Industry Council, to train people on welfare, how to transition from welfare to working and being self-sufficient. But he could not get them to be open to that. He saw me and asked me, “Would you come down and talk to them so that you can get them in the mindset to be open to what I could provide for them? If they can do that, I can train them and transform their lives from the inside out, but I can’t get them to listen.” I came down and observed. He hired me as a consultant. My job was to come in first and train them. When I spoke at graduation, I went in a room three times, and I didn’t realize it was the same group of people. They were so transformed in how they were dressed, how clean-shaven they were. They looked like businesspeople. My God, I wanted to learn how to do that. When you speak, you only have 30 minutes to an hour, but I wanted to do more than just speak and leave. These people started doing the same thing they did before I came there. I wanted to be able to create an experience that people will be preeminently transformed for and have the tools and coaches in place to review, repeat, and reinforce the principles that change their mindset. So I became a student of this, me and my mentor Mike Williams who wrote the book called The Road to Your Best Stuff. I started studying and reading everybody that put anything out there dealing with the mind. Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, The Power of Positive thinking. Zig Ziglar, See You at the Top. Winston Churchill, The Truth is Incontrovertible. Alice Metack, AT the end there it is. The New Psycho-Cibernetics. The Secret of the Ages, Robert Collier. Earl Nightingale, The Strangest Secret in the World. I read these books. I listened to these recordings, and I decided I was going to master this. What I discovered from all these guys I studied, they had the complexion of connection. I had the complexion of rejection. So I could do all the things they told me to do, but I still wasn’t going to get that promotion. So I said, Wait a minute. I had to go back to the drawing board. How did Booker T. Washington and Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman- “Pray as if everything depends upon God, but work as if everything depends upon you.” I needed to know, What do you do if you are in a system that is stacked against you? How are you going to make it against all odds? I remember John H. Johnson in his book Succeeding Against the Odds said, “There is no defense against excellence that meets a pressing public need. When you have the complexion of rejection, you have to hold yourself to a higher standard, and you have to be committed to make it happen no matter what.” You told me an incredibly inspiring story that drives my life. In 1961, John F. Kennedy asked Wernher von Braun, “What will it take for us to beat the Russians to the moon?” He said five words, and he decided to call a news conference just on those five words. He decided to risk the embarrassment of the United States of America by proclaiming to the world that we are going to the moon in ten years. We did it in eight years. Those five words were, “The will to do it.” I believe that if you are faced with being laid off; if you are going through a divorce; if you have been diagnosed with a terminal illness; if we want to reduce the teenage pregnancy rate, the dropout rate, the recidivism rate, we must incorporate those five words, the will to do it. Everything I believe comes out of that. You are going to have some resistance. You will encounter some obstacles or setbacks, but if you have a will—where there is a will, there is a way. Jesus said, “Whoseever will, let him come.” If you have that mindset, there is an energy, there is a release of power and a presence in you that will allow you to overcome what appears to be insurmountable odds and do things that you don’t even know you can do right now. I’ve seen some things, and I’ve been around. I’ve seen a thing or two. So I know these principles work. They work with me. They work with my children; I use them as guinea pigs. And it’s exciting and fun. In this stage of my life, there are people who are listening right now who can hear me in their ears, but there are a few who can hear me in their heart. Because we all have an energy signature, there are certain people when you speak, they will hear you in their heart. If they heard Tamara or me, they will only hear us in their ears because of your energy signature, something about you. I believe that as we begin to duplicate ourselves and train people and get more voices and troops on the ground giving a message of hope and peace, and create a new conversation to create a different vision of how people see themselves and show up in life, that as we begin to increase those numbers, we will decrease the level of violence and mediocrity. We will decrease the things in our society that are maintaining our detriment. As we look at the words of Elsie Robinson, “Things happen around you and things happen to you, but the only things that really count are the things that happen in you.” When people are stirred up and ignited to become a force for God, to be an instrument, to operate out of a thinking that “the least that you do unto these my brethren, you do it also unto me,” and that you have, as Horace Mann said, “We should be ashamed to die until we have made some major contribution to humankind.” Operating out of that sense of oneness that drove Mrs. Rosa Parks to step up for herself and refuse to get up and give a white person her seat and was incarcerated, there was something in her that said, “I ought to do this on this particular day” and was a defining moment in history. We all have defining moments in our lives. Denzel Washington was in a movie and said, “There are things in life that happen, and it appears like slow motion. There is before this, and there is after this. After this, nothing will ever be the same again.” When I think about Mr. Lou I. Washington, I was in his class my junior year in school. He taught me to work out a problem on the board, and I said, “I’m not one of your students. I’m here to see MacArthur Stevens.” He said, “Doesn’t matter. Do what I’m telling you anyhow.” I said, “I can’t, sir.” The other kids started laughing. He said, “You see, he has a twin brother, Wesley. He’s smart. He’s the dumb twin.” I said, “I am, sir.” He came from behind his desk as they erupted in laughter. I was standing there, tears in my eyes with humiliation. He said, “Don’t ever say that again. Someone’s opinion of you does not have to become your reality.” That was a transforming moment in my life. Even though I’ve never known my birth parents, this guy became like my spiritual father. I told Tamara, “I need to meet your mama because you look so much like me.” But he taught me how to tell time. I wanted to be like him. I watched him. He was an eloquent speaker. He was a speech and drama teacher. He influenced me. My goal is- I have a lot of spiritual sons and daughters out there who have adopted me and I have adopted them. I adopted Mr. Washington. I remember eulogizing him and being at the celebration of his life. I watched his sons from an angle. When I spoke, they looked up at me, and none of his children spoke. We called him the great communicator. I realized something as I watched them: Even though he was their father, I knew a part of him that they never knew. I saw something in him that they never saw. That to me is one of the mysteries of life. How is it that people can be raised in a certain circumstance and end up dramatically different? Mr. Washington had thousands of kids, but he only had one Les Brown. So my goal before leaving the planet is: There are some other Les Browns out there who will do what I’ve done and will go even further, who will do more. They should do greater things. In this stage of my life, I am looking for people who are hungry to do the greater work. Hugh: Tamara and I have agreed to be the arms and legs for this movement. You are the influencer. You have created magical content, and we are going to put it in a form that is accessible for more people. We are going to help you put together a plan so that people know how they can support this. There are a lot of ways for people to support it. One way is to join your tribe. There are lots of ways we are going to roll out in time. We are going to roll this out gradually. The first stage is to get some funding in. We have a link. Is it the Les Brown Foundation? Tamara: Yes, it’s lesbrownfoundation.com and lesbrownfoundation.org. We have both. Hugh: Yes. We will have it set up to revert to a page so people can vote with dollars. They want to be a part of seeing this come to reality. The dollars are like putting gas in the car. It will make this run. There is no limit to the influence this movement can have and the impact it is going to have on our country. Just think of all those people who could be productive, who could get out of that cycle. We have done a whole lot of work in a short period of time. You are very clear. We were able to capture this vision and put some tactics around it and create a strategy that other people can understand. Is there a piece of this we haven’t touched on that you think we need to share with people? Tamara: Just listening to his vision and getting people excited about what we’re doing is super important. I relaly think we have done a good job of rolling it out. Visit the website, see how you can support it. I think we have done a great job telling it today. Les: I encourage people to go to the mindset and invest in this movement we are creating. It’s helping me to seal my deal with God. I remember saying, “God, if You help me get up off this floor,” when they have an emergency landing on a plane, they only do it if you are dead or dying. So I had a colonoscopy, and I got on a plane three days later and had internal bleeding I didn’t know I had. I remember when they said, “Is there a doctor on board?” and I had passed out in my chair and they laid me on the floor. They said that the guy came and checked my pulse and I had blood on the floor under me. His hands were soaked with blood from the internal bleeding that was coming out. He said, “We need to make an emergency landing.” They said, “It will only take us two and a half hours more to Detroit.” He said, “If you’re going to do that, then just strap him on the seat in the back and call the morgue and have them waiting. He won’t make it there.” That is when they made that emergency landing, and this guy who was a part of the emergency team said, “Hey, I know you, mister. You’re that man who helps people live their dreams. I got this job because of you.” But I promised God. I said, “If You help me get through this, I’m going to go back to where I started.” I started out training youth and training in prisons. Marysville Penitentiary and Ohio Penitentiary. Jails and prisons across the country. I said, “I promise I will do Your will.” This allows me to seal that deed. I’m still here. I made a deal with God. I gave Him my word. “If You help me overcome this, I will be used by You to make this world a better place until I take my last breath.” That’s what I want to do: make people feel good, laugh, know that I am not playing with a full deck, and make a difference, make a mark. We are very blessed to be in this country and to be a blessing to others. Naomi Brown, God took me out of my biological mother’s womb and placed me in the arms of my adopted mother. I am here because of two women. One gave me life, and the other one gave me love. So I am grateful to both of them. I feel that I was chosen for this. There is a time I couldn’t admit that. but I have had too many things, signs I have seen, that I know that a hand has been on my life. My steps have been ordered. Things I was encouraged to do and to learn. I don’t know where that came from. But I believe it’s a calling. Sometimes it takes you some time to recognize it. It’s a humbling experience, to feel that you have been chosen for something. So I am humbled because of that. Hugh: Les Brown. Les: Yes? Hugh: Thank you for saying yes to this. Les: Thank you and Tamara for saying yes to me and helping me do this. I appreciate you very much, more than you know. that’s my story, and I’m stickin’ to it. Hugh: Thank y’all for being here.

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  • #56 - Suicide and Black American males: An interview with Sean Joe, Ph.D., LMSW

    · 00:28:37 · The Social Work Podcast

    Episode 56: Today's podcast is on Suicide and Black American Males. Why suicide and Black Americans? Well, there is a belief among most Americans, and particularly among African American adults, that Black Americans do not kill themselves (Joe, 2006). When we think of violent death among Black Americans we think of homicide. Suicide is thought of as a “White” problem. While it is true that suicide was not a leading cause of death for African Americans 40 years ago, today it is the third leading cause of deaths among African Americans 15 – 24 years of age. So why Black American Males specifically? Well, among all racial and ethnic groups, the suicide rate is lowest among Black American females. Given that Black American males, particularly youth, are over-represented in social services, social workers need to be aware of the risk for suicide, and prepared to provide potentially life-saving services. One thing that makes social workers professionals is that we are trained to see things that others do not. Most of us have not been trained to see suicide as an important issue in the Black American community. It is my hope that after hearing today's guest, Dr. Sean Joe from the University of Michigan, you will be more likely to see suicide among Black American males as an important clinical and programmatic issue. Dr. Joe holds a joint position as associate professor in the School of Social Work and the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan's School of Medicine. He is also a faculty associate with the Program for Research on Black Americans at the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan. Dr. Joe is a nationally recognized authority on suicidal behavior among African Americans. He is the 2009 recipient of the Edwin Shneidman Award from the American Association of Suicidology for outstanding contributions in research to the field of suicide studies and the 2008 recipient of the Early Career Achievement Award from the Society for Social Work and Research. He serves on the board of the Suicide Prevention Action Network (SPAN USA), the scientific advisory board of the National Organization of People of Color Against Suicide, and the editorial board of Advancing Suicide Prevention, a policy magazine. He is co-chair of the Emerging Scholars Interdisciplinary Network (ESIN) Research Study Group on African American Suicide, a national interdisciplinary group of researchers committed to advancing research in this area. He has published extensively in the areas of suicide, violence, and firearm-related violence.In today's podcast, Sean talks why it is important to look at the suicide rate among Black American males, specifically adolescent males. He talks about how recent research has started to put together a profile for Black American Males most at risk for suicide, and the factors that seem to protect against suicide. He talks about some of the social and historical factors associated with the increase in suicide rates among Black Americans. Sean gives an example of how he talks with Black Americans about suicide and stigma. We talked about recommendations for social workers who are working with Black American males who might be suicidal, including talking about faith, valuing that child, having a vision of that child as an adult, and healthy masculinity. Sean discussed some resources for social workers interested in learning more about this topic. We ended the interview with Sean extending an invitation to social work clinicians and researchers to join him to better understand suicide and suicidal behaviors in Black Americans.One quick word about today's podcast: I recorded today's podcast using a Zoom H2 recorder on location at the Society for Social Work Research annual conference. If you listen closely you can hear the sounds of San Francisco in the background: a clock chiming, busses loading and unloading passengers, and even some pigeons congregating outside of the interview room. They don't detract from the interview, but I wanted to give fair warning in case you were listening to this podcast anywhere were those sounds might be cause for alarm. To read more about theories for clinical social work practice, and to hear other podcasts, please visit the Social Work Podcast website at http://socialworkpodcast.com.

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  • Show 635 American Colossus The Triumph of Capitalism, 1865-1900. Medved talks to author. Audio MP3

    · American Conservative University Podcast

    Show 635 Michael Medved talks to author of American Colossus The Triumph of Capitalism, 1865-1900  American Colossus The Triumph of Capitalism, 1865-1900 Written by H.W. Brands ABOUT THE BOOK- In a grand-scale narrative history, the bestselling author of two finalists for the Pulitzer Prize now captures the decades when capitalism was at its most unbridled and a few breathtakingly wealthy businessmen utterly transformed America from an agrarian economy to a world power.  The years between the Civil War and the end of the nineteenth century saw the wholesale transformation of America from a land of small farmers and small businessmen into an industrial giant. Driven by unfathomably wealthy and powerful businessmen like J. P. Morgan, Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller, armies of workers, both male and female, were harnessed to a new vision of massive industry. A society rooted in the soil became one based in cities, and legions of immigrants were drawn to American shores. What’s more, in accomplishing its revolution, capitalism threatened to eclipse American democracy. “What do I care about the law?” bellowed Cornelius Vanderbilt. “Hain’t I got the power?” He did, and with it he and the other capitalists reshaped every aspect of American life. In American Colossus, H.W. Brands portrays the emergence, in a remarkably short time, of a recognizably modern America.   The capitalist revolution left not a single area or aspect of American life untouched. It roared across the South, wrenching that region from its feudal past and integrating the southern economy into the national one. It burst over the West, dictating the destruction of Native American economies and peoples, driving the exploitation of natural resources, and making the frontier of settlement a business frontier as well. It crashed across the urban landscape of the East and North, turning cities into engines of wealth and poverty, opulence and squalor. It swamped the politics of an earlier era, capturing one major party and half of the other, inspiring the creation of a third party and determining the issues over which all three waged some of the bitterest battles in American history.   Brands’s spellbinding narrative beautifully depicts the oil gushers of western Pennsylvania, the rise, in Chicago, of the first skyscraper, the exploration of the Colorado River, the cattle drives of the West, and the early passionate sparks of union life. By 1900 the America he portrays is wealthier than ever, yet prosperity is precarious, inequality rampant, and democracy stretched thin. American Colossus is an unforgettable portrait of the years when the contest between capitalism and democracy was at its sharpest, and capitalism triumphed. For all of Michael Medveds shows go to https://www.michaelmedved.com/site to listen live for free or $4.95 per month to download all of his podcasts.- Look up American Conservative University on Itunes.   Click here for all ACU Podcasts http://acu.libsyn.com/index.php?post_category=Click%20here%20for%20all%20podcasts   It takes a few minutes to download the entire page. Be Patient.   To download this show, right click the direct download file below and select "Save target as..." and save the file on your computer. Mac users should hold down the control key when clicking to get the "Save as..." option.    

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  • Janeane Garofalo & Larry "Bubbles" Brown

    · 04:01:29 · David Feldman Show

    Winner of the American Book Award Journalist Emil Guillermo, plus David interviews an angry listener.  Janeane Garofalo stars in David's daughter's favorite movie Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp. Janeane is one of the bravest voices of our generation. Do you need to know anything else about her? Other than we love Janeane Garofalo? There are comics who have never thrown a punch in their lives who have actually punched people for saying anything bad about Janeane. In fact I should have one of those guys on the show. Come on, do I really need to tell you about Janeane? You know her from The Ben Stiller Show, The Larry Sanders Show, and Saturday Night Live, then appeared in more than 50 movies, with leading or major roles in The Truth About Cats and Dogs, Wet Hot American Summer, The Matchmaker, Reality Bites, Steal This Movie!, Clay Pigeons, Sweethearts, Mystery Men, and The Independent, among numerous others. She has also been a series regular on television programs such as Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp, 24, and Girlfriends' Guide to Divorce. Garofalo is an outspoken progressive activist. From March 2004 to July 2006, she hosted Air America Radio's The Majority Report with Sam Seder. Also on the show Larry Bubbles Brown who holds the record for longest gap between appearances on The David Letterman Show. Larry is considered to be one of the funniest people in the world by comedians.  Emil Guillermo is an American print and broadcast journalist, commentator and humorist. His column, "Emil Amok", appeared for more than 14 years in AsianWeek—at one time, the most widely read and largest circulating Asian American newsweekly in the U.S. The column has now migrated to the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund site blog.Born in San Francisco, Guillermo is an alumnus of Harvard University, where he studied history and film, and was a member of the Harvard Lampoon. He delivered the Ivy Oration as class humorist in 1977. From 1989-1991, he was host of NPR's "All Things Considered." He was the first Asian American male, and first Filipino American, to host a regularly scheduled national news broadcast.[1][2] He has also worked as a television reporter in San Francisco, Dallas, and Washington, D.C. He has hosted his own radio talk show in Washington D.C., San Francisco and Sacramento. His writing and commentary has been widely published in newspapers around the country, and has earned him national and regional journalism awards. In 2015, Guillermo received the Asian American Journalists Association's Dr. Suzanne Ahn Award for Civil Rights & Social Justice, in recognition of excellence in coverage of Asian American Pacific Islander civil rights and social justice issues,[3] Guillermo is the author of Amok: Essays from an Asian American Perspective—a compilation of essays originally published in Asian Week—that won an American Book Award in 2000. Tell us what you think in the comment section below. More David @ http://www.DavidFeldmanShow.com Tune in every Tuesday and Friday for brand new episodes of our show featuring a diverse mixture of comedians, actors, professors, comedy writers and journalists talking about your world. Check out our new You Tube channel. More about David: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0271017/?ref_=nv_sr_1 David writes for Triumph The Insult Comic Dog's series on Hulu and Maya and Marty on NBC. David has also won three Prime Time Emmys for comedy writing, as well as four Writers Guild Awards. He has also written on ABC's Roseanne, HBO's Dennis Miller Live, HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher, Comedy Central's The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Academy Awards, The Emmys, and countless roasts on Comedy Central. Get Social With David: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/davidfeldmancomedy?ref=hl Twitter: https://twitter.com/David_Feldman_ Subscribe to his audio podcast: iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/david-feldman-show/id321997239 Become a subscriber to our podcast! When you join for only a $5 monthly subscription donation you’ll gain access to the David Feldman Premium Content, featuring bonus material from the funniest comedians who have been guests on the show. We accept all major credit cards. Join today and help support the show!  

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  • Native American Religions

    · 00:19:03 · Understanding World Religions

    Our quote for today is from Luther Standing Bear. He said, "Out of the Indian approach to life there came a great freedom, an intense and absorbing respect for life, enriching faith in a Supreme Power, and principles of truth, honesty, generosity, equity and brotherhood as a guide to mundane relations." In this podcast, we are making our way through Garry R. Morgan's book, "Understanding World Religions in 15 Minutes a Day." Garry Morgan is a Professor of Intercultural Studies at Northwestern College. He served with World Venture for 20 years in Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda, and Tanzania. And, I want to remind you to take advantage of our special offer. If you enjoy this podcast, please feel free to purchase a copy of the book that we are using -- "Understanding World Religions in 15 Minutes a Day" by Garry R. Morgan. It is available on our website for just $20. You can make your purchase today at understandingworldreligionspodcast.com. Our topic for today is, "Native American Religions"  Like all animistic religions, Native American religions (NARs) provide a variety of beliefs and practices that make generalizations challenging. Thus it is necessary to speak in the plural of Native religions. Depending on where they have settled, the various Native American people groups, or tribes, have made their living through agriculture, pastoral tending of livestock, or hunting and gathering. Some have lived in settled towns or small cities. Others have lived nomadically, following herds of buffalo or other wild game. One consequence has been an assortment of religious expressions and rituals.  Another factor inhibiting description of these religions is that in most cases Native Americans left no written records of life before the arrival of European immigrants. Written sources, therefore, usually have been produced by outside observers of Native life, which inserts a non-Native worldview into depictions and explanations, even when the writer strives to avoid bias. Many early sources, unfortunately, did not even attempt neutrality but describe these religions in negative terms.  Finally, Native American interactions with European settlers from the seventeenth century onward resulted in extensive conversion, at least outwardly, to Christianity. By the mid-twentieth century, most Native people professed to be Christian, though many mixed traditional practices with their new faith. Since 1960, there has been a massive resurgence of interest in Native culture and religions, with a subsequent reversal of the number of Native Americans professing Christianity. However, we cannot always know whether today's post-Christian Native practices and rituals are the same as they were before interaction with Europeans.  One applicable generalization is that Native American religions have a strong emphasis on the spirit world, something they share with the rest of the huge animistic category. But specific beliefs about its traits vary. Some Native tribes have worship rituals of key spirits such as Mother Earth, thunder and/or lightning, and guardian spirits; these might be considered polytheistic, since they lack one central deity. Many other tribes, however, believe in a Great Spirit or Creator Spirit who exists above the rest of the spirit world. This spirit may be impersonal, leading to Deism, or personal and so more monotheistic in nature. Still others see this Great Spirit as a divine force in nature and, accordingly, are more pantheistic in outlook.  Another generally valid observation is that Native peoples highly value living in balance with the natural environment. While traditionally this was a physical necessity, it also found and continues today to find validity in their respect for the spirits they believe live in the natural realm. There have been exceptions on both sides, but among the most common sources of conflict between Native American and European American cultures has been disparity in how the land and nature are treated. As European settlement moved west across the continent, the cutting of forests, plowing of the soil, and decimation of buffalo herds and other game were viewed by Native peoples as a physical encroachment on their livelihood and an attack upon the spirits that were the providers of and even dwellers in those natural resources.  The focus of Native religions, even for believers in a Great Spirit or Creator, is not typically on that central deity (as in monotheistic religions), but rather on the surrounding spirit world that is believed to impact daily life. As with other animistic systems, maintaining good relations with the spirit realm is at the core of most beliefs and practices. Again, these religions are often described as practical, as they deal primarily with the pragmatic present.  Because the spirits are nearby and have certain demands or requirements in order to keep relationships with humans, it is possible to offend them, with negative consequences for individuals or even entire communities. Therefore, taboos are a common feature. In Western culture, this term is often used for actions prohibited on social, moral, or ethical grounds. In Native religions, taboos are behavioral requirements or prohibitions such that doing (or not doing) them would upset the balance of nature, bring negative magical power into individuals, or offend the spirits. Taboos are rigidly enforced, since failure to follow them may bring disastrous corporate consequences.  Native American religions rarely have priests or other full-time leaders. Everyone participates at some level. A few may have closer relationships with the spirit world and thus have ability or spiritual insight that benefits the community, most commonly in the form of healing. These medicine men (or women), as they were called by European observers, hold significant power but also great responsibility for the community's well-being.  The usual purpose of the many types of rituals and ceremonies is to draw the physical and spiritual worlds closer together. A familiar goal is that humans may obtain strength, endurance, or wisdom from one or more spirits. The best-known ritual for an individual is the Vision Quest, which, in some tribes, may be done by anyone needing special spiritual assistance, though they're most common for young men (occasionally young women) as part of entrance into adulthood. The quest typically involves isolation from the community and fasting for several days. The aim is to receive a vision of an animal (visually representing a particular spirit) that becomes the person's totem, believed then to guard and guide him or her throughout the rest of life.  The most common group ceremonies involve dancing and drumming, activities intended to help humans become more open to the spirit world. Dances may go on for hours or even days as the dancers disengage from the everyday world and seek communion with the spirits. Today, powwows are becoming increasingly common and nearly always include dancing. For some, this is more about recovering their culture than a religious exercise, but, again, Native peoples characteristically do not separate the sacred from the secular.  Beliefs regarding the afterlife are variable, but generally Native people do not fear dying. Most believe there is a place to which one's spirit goes at death. For some this is a happy place; for others it contains sadness. Usually people's spirits are considered to abide in this other plane of existence as long as they are remembered by those still living. As they are forgotten, their spirit gradually fades from existence.  Now, for An Extra Minute  Native American religions are seeing a resurgence of interest on the part of both Natives and non-Natives (usually those exploring New Age religions). Attendance at powwows has soared, and Natives knowledgeable about traditional practices are in great demand. While some Natives are pleased that outsiders are interested, many others are concerned that more will be lost than gained. Some Native religious teachers have been known to alter symbols and practices slightly when teaching non-Natives. 

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  • Setting Powerful Goals with Dr. Joe White

    · 00:52:46 · The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

    Dr. Joe White is a nationally know, Author, speaker and business consultant. Joe has a true entrepreneurial spirit and it has allowed him to join the ranks of those entrepreneurs who can boast that they have never worked a 9 to 5 job throughout their adult life. His professional experience has quite varied Dr. White has sharpened his skills in several capacities. From serving as CEO and COO of million dollar companies, to speaking on stages across the country. In 2001 he started a real estate investment company buying and selling houses through out North Carolina. In 2005 he took to the stages across the country selling his Real Estate Course “How to Make 5,000 to 10,000 a month wholesaling real estate”. The course taught the successful strategies he learned and developed on buying and selling properties with little to no money down while running his company. During the 2005 lecture tour, he was asked to be the keynote speaker at the 2005 graduation of the Breakthrough Bible College in Temple Hills, Maryland. Where he was bestowed with an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters during the graduation. Sault after for his advise and insight by business start ups, celebrates and large corporations. For over 20 years he has served the entrepreneur community. Launching events like The Triad Entrepreneur Pitch Tank the number one business event in the Triad area of NC, serving on boards such as Benaiah Holdings Group a OTC publicly traded venture capital firm and serving as the NC reparative for CEO Space International, the business conference ranked #1 in the world by Forbes and Inc. magazine as” the conference entrepreneurs can’t afford to miss. Dr. White is also the co-author of The Best selling book Concrete Jungle Success Strategies for the Real World, which also features best selling author and star of the movie The Secret Bob Proctor. Dr. Joe White is currently avalible for business consulting, real estate investing coaching and speaking engagements nationally and internationally. With topics ranging from Business Strategy, Goal Setting, Real estate Investing and Entrepreneurship. To Book Dr. Joe White or get more information email admin@drjoewhite.com or visit www.drjoewhite.com   Here's the Transcript of the Interview Hugh Ballou: Welcome, everybody. The Nonprofit Exchange is about goals today. I am attending a conference and have a little bit of noise in the background. While our guest today, Joe White, is speaking, I will be muting myself so there is no noise in the background. I have known Dr. Joe White for a number of years. He is an expert in real estate. He is also an expert in leadership and goal-setting, among other things. About a year or so ago, I asked him to participate in my Nonprofit Leadership Empowerment Symposium and teach the module on goal-setting. He was so good it was better than me doing it. I invited him to come on the Nonprofit Exchange and talk about goal-setting. Joe, we have shared one of your books, the anthology, but I believe you have a book that is more about goals. Feel free to talk about that book. Joe White, welcome to the Nonprofit Exchange. Joe: Thank you, Hugh. It is good to se you again. Hugh: We have our co-host Russell Dennis who is having some technical issues, but he will be on here to ask you some really hard questions later. He is streaming it live to Facebook. Dr. White, would you tell us about yourself, especially your background working with leaders and setting goals? Joe: Hugh, one of the things I always tell people that is unique about me is I am a person who has never had a job in my adult life. In not having a job or set occupation or set system, I pretty much had to figure out goals and systems and things like that at a very early age. What made me make that decision was when I had my first kid. I was thinking to myself without an college education, What can I do to mak sure my first daughter had the type of life I felt like she deserved? I knew entrepreneurship and business would be what I needed to do. I quickly started reading. I still to this day go through about four books a week. I study everything from business to entrepreneurship to real estate to religion to spirituality. I use all of that information and put it into different systems I use to help myself and my clients. I have been doing that since the age of 16, 17. I always had some way of making income that I would create myself just basically out of my head. I did real estate for a number of years. I took every course you could probably think of, every boot camp, workshop. Quickly made a million dollars in real estate. Switched from real estate to mental health for a while. Then I started doing speaking, consulting, and things like that, working with clients around the world, helping them be better in the areas of entrepreneurship and real estate investment. Hugh: That’s more than I had previously known about you. Joe: It’s something a little different. Hugh: Absolutely. That is why I invited you on today so we could learn some more about these different areas of expertise. Let’s talk about this topic of goals. Everybody writes goals. Very few people accomplish goals. I wanted to hone in on this particular piece because I have seen you teach this before. Why have you gravitated to this as one of the topics that you teach? Joe: I think that one of the things I feel like I am known for is making things simple for entrepreneurs and businesspeople because every business has its own language. If you were to go to Spain or Mexico and you didn’t speak Spanish, you couldn’t get a lot accomplished. What I try to do is make things simple. One of the first steps I think everybody needs to learn is how to set proper goals: the foundation of which everything in your business and your life is built upon. I feel like that was the best place to start. I read Think and Grow Rich when I was 14 years old. I have been setting goals ever since. I always learn something new. I am constantly studying. It is not like I learned about goals then and I stopped. I constantly study it. What I did was simplified the major techniques of goal-setting so that the average person could understand. Hugh: I have seen you present a short lesson on this. Are you prepared to give us Joe White’s overview of setting and achieving goals? Joe: I am. Hugh: Well, I am going to be all ears. I am going to listen for a little bit. Russell has been known to take notes and come back with a really hard question, so be prepared. Joe: I’m ready for you, Russ. So Hugh, what I will tell you is the system that I use for goal-setting, I call GPS. Just like you have a GPS in your car or on your phone, the purpose of the GPS is to guide you from one point to the destination you are looking to go to. I feel like GPS was the appropriate title for what I consider to be my goal-setting system. That stands for when I do that. When I say GPS, in this particular case, GPS stands for Goals, Purpose, Steps. Sometimes I interchange “system” with “steps” because sometimes we go through the steps, and sometimes we put a system in place in order to get what we actually need to get. What is a goal? It’s something you want to achieve in your life, in your business, in your personal life, or wherever it is. Most people die within five years after retiring. The reason why they die is because if we are not growing, we are dying. If you lose your purpose for life, what I am saying is you are probably going to die shortly after. Now, some people, if they retire, they will switch to something else, whether it’s taking care of their grandkids or going to another part-time job. But if we are not constantly working toward something, it’s like there is no reason to live. Goals are that important to our life. What we focus on is what we get. That is why it’s important to find things that we have to focus on for achievement. What really makes us happy—and it’s hard to define happiness—is seeing progress. Something about progress in human beings makes us happy or feel fulfilled. If you think about it, why I say that, I’ll give you an example. When we are growing up, most of the time in the house where we live, our mom would mark with a marker over your head how tall you were. You just couldn’t wait every month to see if you had grown. I used to be that small, and now I’m this tall. I was three feet, and now I’m four feet. We would get happy or excited to see that we had grown an inch or two inches and see how tall we got. That was progression. That was a way of measuring progression. We didn’t understand that was almost like goals because a lot of people will say, “I can’t wait to get as tall as Dad or my brother.” We were really setting goals. We were using the notches on the door or on the wall as a way of measuring that and showing progression. That is basically what I’m talking about when I’m talking about GPS. Let’s set a goal. Let’s measure the goal. Let’s put a system in place for getting that goal and knowing if we are on track or off track. The other thing that I love to tell people about is what’s called goal alignment. This is what I really talked a lot about, Hugh, at your event. Most people understand the basics of goals. What they don’t understand is there has to be a balance to goals. You just can’t have a goal to make a million dollars and not have other goals. I will give you some examples and tell you what I’m talking about. I set goals in every major area of my life. Just like a car has to be aligned, if you drive a car and the car is not aligned, when you start to go fast, the car will start to shake. If you go off the road, you could crash. Something bad could happen because you are going fast and you haven’t aligned the car. The same thing happens in our life when we don’t align our goals. You have to set goals in all the major areas of your life, not just in the financial area or the weight loss area. You have to set goals in your physical area. The reason why that is important, and I will give you examples on how goal alignment works in each of those areas, is if I don’t set a physical goal to exercise and take care of my health and go to the doctor and get checkups, if I am working on these financial goals and my business goals, and I get sick or have a heart attack or something else, all of those goals now crash. Then my #1 focus will have to be on my health, so I have to have health goals. In my spiritual life, I have to have spiritual goals because a lot of times that is where fulfillment comes in, that is where balance comes in. My family life: if I don’t take care of my kids, there are so many people who are wealthy who have problems with their kids where their kids are on drugs or whatever is happening. The kids are getting in trouble. When that comes up, now you have to take your focus off the business and money and build those kids. They are in trouble because you didn’t make taking care of your kids or teaching your kids part of your goals. Part of my goals are physical and spiritual and family and friends. I don’t know about you, but I know we have all had a situation with a friend where we say, “I really need to call this person,” and then something happens. The friend passes, God forbid, and you feel really bad because you feel like you didn’t call that friend or family member before they passed. We have to have goals in the friend area. We have to have goals in the spouse area. How many people do you know who have been successful in business, and then they get a divorce and lose it all or lose half or lose the focus? Now later on they are regretting it, “I am enjoying the money, but I wish I had a better relationship with my wife or my kids.” There has to be goals in every single area of your life. You have to look at where these different areas are, where these different roles and responsibilities lie. I am a father, I am a son, and I am a business owner. You have to set goals for each of those. If you don’t, what happens is you are going to have a crash in another area that will take away from you achieving those goals. That is what goal alignment is, and that is why that balance is super important. A lot of people don’t think about that when they think about goals. The next thing is the P. Do you have a question, Hugh? Hugh: This is good stuff. You got my attention when you said people die five years after they retire. That is why Russ and I never retire. We keep pushing the inevitable later and later. This is so good. People set goals without the realization of what is the benefit. How is it going to benefit me in my life? You talked about that a little bit. Go ahead. This is extremely valuable stuff. Before you end, I want to focus on personal goals and corporate goals. We are leading a charity, church, or synagogue, so those are organizational goals. Very often, we don’t write personal goals. Then compare the two. Let me not interrupt you any more. This is really good stuff. They can comment. Russ, is your audio working yet? I don’t know if his audio is working yet. Are you there? Russell Dennis: I’m going to try. Can you hear me again? Hugh: Yes. Glad you’re here. Just know, Joe, that he is capturing sound bites in his brilliant way. He will have a chance to come back with questions. Russ, if it’s okay, we’ll let him finish his presentation part, and then I’d like to throw it to you for a few questions, if that works for you. Russell: That will work. Hugh: All right, Joe, go on. Joe: Those are called areas of management. Everybody has two main areas of management, which are the personal areas of management and your business areas of management. Each of those areas has to be aligned. You want to balance out your business area. What are the key elements in business that make you successful and set goals in those areas? What are the key elements you need for your personal life? Set goals in those areas. I used to think, I only need a business goal or a sales goal or a money goal. But I quickly learned I had to balance all those areas in business and personal. Going to the P in GPS, the P stands for purpose. It is your why. I can tell you about setting all these goals, but it doesn’t make a difference if you don’t have a why. The why is the gas in the tank of the car. It’s what makes things go. If I tell you, “Don’t touch the stove,” we would tell little kids not to touch the stove, the first thing they say is, “Why?” “Because it’s hot.” Maybe they don’t understand at first, but the moment they touch the stove, they quickly understand that it’s hot. That is the motivation, the why. Why don’t we run red lights? Why does everybody stop at a red light? Because you will get a ticket. That motivates us not to do it. We have to understand with anything we’re doing what’s our why. Why are we doing this? What feeling, reward, are we going to get from actually achieving that goal? That is going to be the motivation for us to act. If we don’t understand that why, we often don’t achieve the goal. One of the most average, normal goals that everyone wants to set is how to lose weight. The problem becomes a lot of times the why isn’t strong enough. The why isn’t more powerful than the ice cream sundae. Sometimes we have to do a deep dive within ourselves and figure out why we want it. Sometimes it’s not important enough to us. We’re okay with where we are. Sometimes people don’t go after that goal. We definitely want to build a strong why. The S is Steps or System. If you remember before there was GPS, everyone would pretty much have a map. We would get these maps from the gas station. How we would gauge if we took a trip to Winston-Salem, where I live, to Orlando, Florida, where Hugh is now, is we would look at the map and see the different cities along the way. I would see in an hour and a half I would be in Charlotte. Then I’ll be in Georgia. Then I’ll be in Jacksonville. Then I’ll be in Orlando. That was a way of us gauging we were going in the right direction. Sometimes when my GPS screws up and it sets me on the wrong road, it will reroute me back the right way. That happens to us sometimes, too, when we are doing goals. We start going the wrong direction, and we have to reroute ourselves to go back in the right direction. I’m saying all that to say if we have a goal to lose 30 pounds, we want to plan stops along the way. We want to say, “Okay, in one month I am going to lose ten pounds. Month two I am going to lose pounds. Month three I am going to lose ten pounds.” When we gauge or check, we know we are headed in the right direction. If we’re not, we know we need to do something different. We need to exercise more or diet more or whatever it is we need to do. But that is just a way of gauging if we are going in the right direction. The other thing is systems. A lot of times you don’t have to think of everything yourself. There are systems already in place created by other people that allow you to just plug and play. I am a big fan of systems. I listen to Dave Ramsay and use his budgeting system. There are different dieting systems. If you think about a company like McDonald’s, every Big Mac at every McDonald’s tastes the same way. That is because they have a system in place to make it the same no matter where you go. There are systems in every area of life that you can plug and play that will help you get the result you are looking for. Again, that goes back to that why. If you don’t have a strong enough why, you don’t move forward in the systems and actually do the things you are supposed to do. Questions, Russ? Russell: Good day. Thanks for joining us. Can you guys hear me okay? Hugh: We can. Russell: Excellent. I love the GPS. It’s really a good direction. We rely on these for our cars. We rely on them to keep us going the way that we’re going. It’s important to put the right information in the GPS, so the why is really critical. How long have you been using the GPS system, and what sort of success have you had with the people you work with in explaining this system? It certainly sounds like something that people, once they hear about it, get. Joe: I have been using it for five years. I use it a lot of times on projects. I have a lot of clients I work with. Some are celebrity clients. I am working on projects, whether they are movies, television shows, major real estate projects, or projects for hedge funds. Pretty much, even though they are all big strategic projects, some are small or some are up to ten million, the premise is till the same. There is a goal they want at the end: if it is a movie, to get the movie made; if it’s a TV show, to get the season filmed; if it is a real estate project, to raise the money in order to buy the land. It’s the same process, GPS. I have used that process with major clients to regular people. Russell: Do you find that people who work with this system enjoy using it? Whether the results they have gotten using the GPS system as opposed to what they have tried before. Joe: What I find is that people like things they can relate to something else. What helps us understand something is when we can say, “Okay, this is sort of like this.” When you can say, “Okay, I get it because I can think of a map and destinations and directions. It’s pretty simple.” The current project I am working on is for a large television show with a celebrity who has been on TV for years. We use the system for funding and getting the project done. We had great results and raised half a million dollars. I am using the system now with a former NBA player. He is raising five million dollars, and we have had great progress. We are still in the middle of it. I have used it for myself for years. I used it also on my kids. I don’t tell my kids what to do anymore because they are all in college, but I coached them. This is one of the things I coached them on. What are your goals? What type of grade do you want to get in this class? How many hours do you ned to put in? How much do you need to study? What do you need to study in? Things of that nature. I am working on my daughter now who is taking the bar. We are using GPS to get her prepared for the bar. Her goal is to pass the bar and start to practice law. So far, we are having great success with her as well. Russell: The thing with this system that makes it so beautiful is that it’s simple. But it can be deceptively simple because of the concept. Have you found people that stumble with it or just stumble grasping the simplicity of it and applying it to their goals? Joe: I think that goes back to that why piece. Most things to do with success are easy anyway. We all pretty much know what we need to do. If we need to lose weight, we know that we need to move more and eat less. What stops us from doing that is not having a strong enough why. You want something that you shouldn’t have more than you want the results that you want. I don’t think it’s so hard; I think the discipline comes into anything you want to achieve. Anything you really want, there is an element of discipline. I always think about people who pray but never take any action. There is a funny story I heard about a woman who wanted to win the lottery. She would get up every single morning for a year and say, “God, please let me win the lottery today. I hope I win that million dollars.” She kept doing it for a year. By the end of the time, He said, “Listen, lady, I need some help. At least buy a ticket.” Often that’s what I find a lot of people do. They don’t buy a ticket. Russell: When people come to you, they probably have gotten to know who you are. When people come to you, where do they typically find themselves? Is a typical person that comes to you someone who is already a high performance person, or do you get people who are stuck personally and professionally looking for solutions? Joe: I think a lot of people find me when they have vision confusion. They have a vision of something they want, but it’s almost like they don’t know how to get it. I do believe a good coach doesn’t really give you the answers, but a coach pulls the answers out of you that are already there but you just don’t believe that those are the answers. With anybody I work with, from celebrities to my kids, I find they all have the same similar issues. They know the answers; you just have to pull them out of them. Russell: Okay. I think people have an inherent genius and they get blocked. You talked about the word “belief.” I think that’s critical because I have had blockages. It’s really a matter of what I believe would actually happen. So when you meet a person and they are in that place and it is clear to you that the belief is the problem, how do you approach getting them on track? Seeing the possibilities when they are stuck? Joe: I think that there is something I use called the power of questions. Anytime there is something wrong, pray first. Then if you sit down with a piece of yellow paper and write the numbers 1-50, I say to write 50 ways to make this happen. Let’s look at the top three ways you come up with and read those top three ways every day. There is something, too, about the subconscious mind. That is when we go back to reading Think and Grow Rich. Normally I fall asleep with it playing on my audiobook, and I will wake up and play it again. Building that subconscious mind, that self-confidence, doing affirmations, redoing it every single day to build your confidence and faith in yourself, and then going back to those solutions that you know you should use and implement them. I was seeing something on Facebook the other day: Motivation gets you in the game; execution keeps you there. Russell: It is about executing. It is about taking action. For me, I have had to act my way out of these blockages more than anything else. Once you get somebody to believe, do you start on the small scale, or do you just say we are going to go into this at full speed? Do you start at a small scale and build small victories? Or does that approach vary from person to person? Joe: I think it varies from person to person because different people need different things. I have had celebrities that you would think would be much further ahead than the average person, and they really aren’t. Everybody has different strengths and weaknesses. Most people do a SWAT. What are your strengths and weaknesses? We talk about that. We need to look at if we need to strengthen the strengths or the weaknesses first. That is normally where the first place I start is. Are you the right person to be doing certain things? There are some things you maybe shouldn’t do. Maybe if you are bad at accounting or bad at money, instead of getting stronger at budgeting, maybe you need to bring in someone who is already strong at that, a CFO or something like that, to handle that particular issue. Everybody we deal with a little bit differently. Russell: Okay. I think it’s probably better to work from your strengths. Sometimes we can burn a lot of energy working on weaknesses. Do you find that that is a big part of the roadblock? Too much focus on the weakness. Joe: Most definitely. Recently, I was doing a lot of studying on how to do Wordpress to do my own website development. I felt myself spending so much time on that. I said, “You know what? The time I am spending on trying to learn this, I could have hired somebody and been doing something that actually matters that makes me money.” It’s not that it’s not important, and I like to be able to update it; I’ve got that part. Some of the design, it’s not a good use of my time to learn how to do all of that. I think we all have to look at what things we should remove from our day or remove that we don’t do. There’s something I call the time-money equation. Is this the time I’m spending off the money I will make doing the major things that I do? If it’s not, I don’t need to do it. That may be cleaning the house, cutting the grass, washing the car, whatever it is. The majority of our time needs to be spent on what h most important things for me to do to make progress. Russell: That’s a good way to measure. Does the time spent actually pay for itself? Does it pay for itself? Everybody has got a little bit of a different value. Do you tend to move people toward monitoring value? Is it personal core values? How do you help people prioritize that cost and that value, that time spent? Joe: I think there are different currencies. Sometimes we only speak of money as currency. Time is a currency. Health is a currency. So I think we have to look at what the most important currency is. Do you want to free up your time so you can work on the other areas that we talked about with your goals, keeping that system in balance? Now I am going to stop doing the things that I’m not good at. I’m going to outsource them. I am going to focus on freeing up the currency that is time so I can spend it with my family, friends, wife, or whomever, so I can achieve the goals in those other areas we talked about that are important. There are all kinds of currencies. I don’t want to think money is the only currency. Some people’s goals are not to make lots of money; they want to make enough money to be comfortable but to have enough time to spend with their family and enjoy life. There is a balance we all have to find. Russell: I believe that people just don’t have money for the sake of having money. What are the things that money are going to allow me to do? That might mean spending more time with family. That might mean vacationing. That might mean providing help or actually spending time working on a cause that is important to them. It’s a little bit different for everyone, I believe. As a group, I know you work with people from many different walks of life. Do you find that people who are what I call difference-makers—my friend Wendy Lipton-Dibner says they are people with the heart space. They are either faith-based or working with a charity. Do you mind that these folks are more conflicted than folks that work in the corporate area, or are the problems universal, regardless of the type of profession a person takes on? Joe: I think they’re universal. There may be the different currencies they are looking for. But I think it’s universal what they’re actually looking for. Some people in the heart space are looking to make a difference in as many lives as possible. Other people are looking to make money, and maybe they use that money to make a difference. It depends on the individual. Russell: How common is it when a person is sort of stuck professionally for it to be a personal heart space type of manner? Do you find that most of the blockages, regardless of what they are, can be traced to personal confusion or blockage? Joe: I think sometimes we want to repeat the same act but the show has moved on. What I mean by that is things change. When you look at commercials that have the ‘60s, ‘70s, ‘80s, and ‘90s, you will start to see a big change in fashion, but also the energy, how everybody looks. I think every ten years, the world changes. If you don’t change in that ten-year space with the world, you will often get left behind. Then you’re stuck because you’re still trying to use what worked in that ten years in this ten years. I look at some of the changes that are coming up, and I see a lot of people who are stuck. We have a system where they are doing self-driving trucks. In the next six years, they are probably going to get rid of 60-70% of truck drivers. We get self-driving cars. We have screens on restaurants that are going to be taking orders. If you are still trying to drive a truck, and 70% of the work is gone, then of course you are going to be stuck. I think what happens to people that we are not adapting. One of the blogs I am working on writing right now is what would happen if you got fired today? It’s one of the reasons I am really big on entrepreneurship and why I love working with entrepreneurs. There is not the job security that we used to have. So many jobs are going overseas, technology. I think that we have to adapt with the times. We have to always be growing. Going back to when we were talking about how when people don’t grow, they die. I think that there are a lot of people I come across who haven’t read a book since high school. They spend all their time either working or watching TV. Hugh: Russ, those are really good questions. I was going to encourage you to make them harder and harder. What Russ and I know to be true, and I have discovered this about Joe a while back, is that we in SynerVision—Russ is one of the WayFinders in SynerVision—reframe a consultant to be a WayFinder, but we also reframe strategies that aren’t working. I would want to know from Joe a couple of things. Russ, maybe you had a couple more and I interrupted you. I’m sorry if you do. But may I ask two right here? Russell: Go for it. Hugh: It’s piggybacking on what you are setting up so well. What are some of the things people do that are wrong that hurt them? What are some of the worst practices? You are giving us some best practices. What are some of the things that people should avoid doing? Russ, I will give it to you, and then you can take us out. We are in the last 15 minutes of the interview, so I will let you do a wrap, if you will. Joe: I would say number one is not being consistent. Sometimes you have the start/stop issue. They start something, they do it for a week or two, and they stop. If you start losing weight and working out, then you stop, of course your body will go back to where it was before, and then you are starting over. When they start over, they get discouraged or they can’t find that same why that actually motivated them the first time. The other thing is to listen to people who don’t have their best interest at heart. A lot of times, what happens is when you start to make progress in your life, that makes people around you who aren’t making progress uncomfortable. If you can do it, then they have to look at themselves and say, “Why aren’t I doing that?” It’s much easier to stomp on your dreams or tell you you shouldn’t be wasting your time losing weight than it is to actually do something themselves. I think that when we are starting to make change, we have to start to be friendly but not familiar. What I mean by that, even with family, sometimes we have to distance ourselves, or just show up at the Thanksgiving dinner but maybe in between that we don’t talk as much because we are working on our goals. We don’t need anything to taint that process or contaminate it. We need to stay focused on it and we need to stay consistent. Russell: Some people won’t lift you up. It’s hard to leave people behind. I think that’s kind of a common problem. If I change, I am going to start losing people. That becomes a personal challenge that creates an inner conflict. One of our running jokes that I have with Hugh is that when I am standing in a room and I look up and realize that I’m the smartest guy in there, I run like hell and find myself another room because there is that disconnect. I know the work you do has a way to build accountability as part of that system. Do you find that a lot of people make commitments to others they don’t make to themselves? In those instances, how do you help them work around that? Joe: I deal with that all the time. As a matter of fact, a coach is almost like a paid accountability partner. What I find a lot of people, and I’m guilty of this, too, is we will keep promises to others, but we won’t keep them to ourselves. When you don’t keep promises to yourself, that is actually what starts to kill your self-esteem and your confidence. Now you don’t have confidence in your own word. If you kept breaking promises to your kids, eventually they won’t believe what you say. If you do that to yourself on a constant basis, say I’m going to lose weight or I am going to make $10,000 and it doesn’t happen over a period of time, you actually lose confidence in yourself. Whether you feel it or not, it’s actually happening. What I believe you should do is either make a public declaration, like going on Facebook and saying I am going to do this by this time, because normally people will say something about it. Or you have an accountability partner who checks in with you once a week, and you tell them what you did toward your goal that week; maybe you do the same thing for them. Or you pay somebody to be accountable to. When I had a trainer, I felt like he was trying to kill me. I don’t know if he had life insurance on me or what was going on. He would ask me every single week, “Let me see your food journal. What did you eat?” That accountability does help. Russell: I have an accountability coach. Wonderful guy. Hugh knows him. He has become a very good friend: Ryan Roy. The name of his business is Justify or Just Do It. His reasons are results. I think there is a level of comfort that comes from finding a reason why something didn’t happen. Sometimes what we do doesn’t work, but do you find that you come across a lot of people that would rather be in that comfort zone than actually really looking at results? Is excuse-making something that happens frequently? Joe: I think we all do that at times. We make an excuse as a way of keeping ourselves comfortable, but it’s not getting us closer to our goals. I think that one of the reasons we have to measure constantly is when we measure something, there is no way we can deny that we are not getting results. The other thing is sometimes you have to come up with multiple ways of measuring. I go back to losing weight because it’s something we can all relate to. I know I want to do it. But I realize that sometimes I would work out super hard, eat right for a whole week, and I wouldn’t lose one single pound. What could happen is I would get discouraged, say this isn’t working, and go eat the ice cream sundae. Then I start realizing, You know what? Maybe what I have to do is measure inches, too. I have to take a tape measure and measure the inches in the areas I want to lose because maybe I’m not losing pounds but inches of fat. Or maybe I’m gaining muscle. One of the things to prevent being discouraged or getting in the zone like feeling something isn’t working is we have to find multiple ways to measure if we are making progress. There are multiple ways to see the growth. Russell: One of the things that Ryan has said to me is it took me a while to wrap my mind around the idea of celebrating small things. It doesn’t matter how small. It’s celebrate. That’s what I like about your GPS system because you are talking about pulling things apart. That’s what we try to advocate. Pull things apart. Take the larger goal. Pull it apart. Get smaller, more manageable. These little things add up to success. You get momentum. What are some of the ways that you help people build that momentum so that they are actually moving forward and are looking at things that can be measured? Joe: I think that any time you start a goal, you need a springboard. You need a way to have at least a small succession in a short period of time so the motivation stays high for you to continue. I go back to losing weight. It may be that you have a week where there is a cleanse or a fast. It’s a little simpler to do, and it gets off three to four pounds. All of a sudden, you kickstart everything. When I am teaching real estate, I give my students a kickstart course, which is a simple course with four to five simple instructions that allows you to go out and see progress instantly so you are motivated to continue. Russell: That’s it. Sometimes it’s hard. We have to look back. That’s the beauty and importance of making instant win. When somebody hasn’t been doing things, they start working with you and they’re not stuck, but you go a week and they are just on fire. You talk to them a few days or a week later, and they don’t just have a list, they start off with a list of three things. The next time you talk to them they have War and Peace in front of them. How do you help them manage that process? Does it go from one thing to the extreme to the other? They’re enthusiastic; you don’t want to dampen that. But how do you reel that in as it were to keep somebody from overextending themselves? Joe: That’s the catch. When we were first talking about GPS, we talked about setting goals in multiple areas of your life. They have to crash sometimes. Something happens in the personal life because you didn’t set a goal in that area. All of a sudden, you can’t focus on the business life. Or something is happening physically because you didn’t set goals in that area. That is why those crashes come up. If you align, that doesn’t happen as often. What I mean by that is if you think about a lot of pro athletes who didn’t study finance, all of a sudden they get a contract with millions of dollars. Life starts to go fast, and now you see all those other issues. They didn’t focus on their spirituality, so issues come up. They didn’t focus on learning their financial piece about money, so now they start having money problems. When they leave the NBA or NFL, they’re broke. They didn’t align everything, so when life starts to go fast, a crash happens. We have to balance out all those areas in our life and set goals in those individual areas from financial to physical to spiritual to family to spouse to home to auto. When I have my system in place, I have home, auto, style, fashion, everything because there has to be a balance in there that all of these things are important to my life. If I neglect them, there will be a consequence at some point in time. That’s the crash: the consequences from not actually balancing everything out. It’s simple, but it’s complicated. It’s simple because all you have to do is sit down with a piece of paper and say, “What do I want in my physical life? What do I want my health to be like? What do I want my relationship with my creator to be like? What do I want my relationship to be like with my kids? Am I once a week going to take my kids on a date?” Sometimes couples do date night; what about your kids? Have a date night with your kids where you are going to take two hours once a week to spend with each kid because you are going to have two to three kids and not know them as individuals. You have to have that individual time as well. Or what about your spouse? After being in a relationship for so many years, you start to be more like roommates than lovers. There is no romance. That’s because you didn’t set a goal for that to happen. You didn’t focus on that, so it didn’t come to fruition. I saw Hugh on his birthday, and he was out on a date with his wife at a concert. Go, Hugh! That’s GPS in the works. It worked. Keeping the juices going. Russell: I’m just wondering if he said to her, “Honey, you should probably drive because I’ve had a little bit. Because of my age and mental condition, I’ve forgotten my way to the theater.” She probably said, “Turn on the GPS.” Joe: That’s probably exactly what happened. Hugh: My wife taught me harassment is a form of affection. I’m getting some of that now. Russell: I only torture people I love. Speaking of people that we love… What happened to me is I said I was going to do some things. Your family may hear some of these grand ideas and schemes and go, “Ah yeah, there he goes again.” There could be a little skepticism from those who are close to us. It’s easy for a bachelor like me, but if you get somebody that is married and they have a family, sometimes that natural resistance that we have within ourselves, it comes from people around us. What are some ways you help people address that? That is very real. There is a lot of pressure with children, spouse, and other obligations. Joe: I believe every new ideal is born drowning. When you first come up with something in the first few minutes, the moment that you come up with it, it’s best not to share it. It’s better to fully develop it. Someone could say something negative, and it automatically starts to kill that dream because you haven’t fully completed a vision. If you are going to share that idea, don’t share it with anybody who is going to say something negative right away. Go to your support system. Go to your mastermind. Go to the people who are going to tell you how to make it happen, not the people who are going to tell you what could happen if you start to move in that way. I always believe if I come up with a great idea, I don’t even want to share it. If I come up with a new book idea, there are certain people I am not going to share it with, except for a Hugh or a Russ who are going to say, “Joe, you should do this with that,” and they start pouring into that idea, breathing life into it, giving me positive feedback. Russell: That’s important. Use the support systems that are available and keep it moving. Hugh? Hugh: I have a contrasting perspective on that. Sorry there are people being loud around me. My A of SMART goals is accountable. I find there is power in sharing it. I find motivation in like you said, Joe, when you write a goal and people go, “Let me connect you with some people. I can help you with that.” That is one powerful way of motivating ourselves with our goals, by sharing it. Another one is what Russ brought up, sharing it and people go, “You’re going to do what?” I call that motivation. Watch me! There is a twist on that piece. I think you can win. We are coming up to our last five minutes here. Russ, do you have any more questions? Or do you want to let Joe do a final tip or piece of advice for people? Russell: There is a lot. I could spend all day asking questions. But I would really love for Joe to put a nice bow on it and talk to people because they face all of these doubts. As I said before, their system is deceptively simple in the concept of its intent. Taking that initial step, taking that initial step no matter how overwhelmed you are. I would love to have you talk to people about how they can do that, how they can fight that fear and move through that. Joe: Going through the system like you said is really simple. Figure out what you want in your goal. Hugh spoke briefly about SMART goals. You could easily, and I’ll be happy to put a link up to a SMART goal sheet people can use. SMART goals is that the goal should be specific, measurable- What is the A, Hugh? I forgot. Hugh: Accountable. Joe: He said it before. Accountable. The goal should be realistic and time-sensitive. I will put up some SMART goal sheets on my website that you can use when setting your goals. I like to keep things simple, and that is why I came up with GPS. Know your goal, know why you want that goal, and know the steps to getting there. Simple steps. If it’s five steps or ten steps, whatever the steps are. One of my goals is to help 100 people make $10,000 in real estate investing. To anyone who is on the actual podcast, if they will go to drjoewhite.com/freegift, I am going to put up the SMART goal sheets. I will give them a book on actual goal setting, and I will give them my free real estate kickstart course. That is quite a bit of stuff. Drjoewhite.com/freegift. They can have all of that stuff if they go there. Russell: I put that link up in the chat. That’s great stuff. That’s wonderful. Hugh: We’ll make sure that link is in the notes for the podcast and on the page for the Nonprofit Exchange at thenonprofitexchange.org. We will put those links on that page. Russell: Yeah, I’ve got it in the chat here. This is wonderful stuff, Joe. I love your system. I am going to go have a look at that. Love to talk to you a little bit further. Joe: Most definitely, Russ. I am here to help anybody I can. I enjoy helping. I think service is super important. I want to serve and be a servant and help in any way I possibly can. We all have some things we want to achieve. We all want to be better. I would just say to everybody that now is the time. If not now, when? That is what I always ask people. Russell: Now is the time. Hugh? Hugh: Time is now. The time is now. Russ, those were really good questions. Joe, I teach goals, but like I said earlier in the broadcast, Joe did this module in my workshop in Raleigh. He did a better job than I do teaching my modules. I wanted to have him here to do that. When Russ does a module, he does a better job than me. One way I look really good is surround yourself better than you are, which is what Russ talked about earlier. Joe, thank you so much for being a guest today. Russ, thank you for being my co-host in this and crafting such great questions. Joe, we will put your information on the podcast and on the site. Thank you for the offer and the free gift for people. Joe: Thank you, Hugh. Have a great trip and a great time in Florida. Hugh: I’m loving it. Thank you.

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  • HBW062: Angie Gray, Modeling and Teaching Work Life Balance to Find Purpose and Success

    · 00:34:57 · Happy Black Woman Podcast with Rosetta Thurman

    The issue of work life balance is one that every one of us feels because life these days seems more fast-paced than ever. Is there really a way to balance the things you do in your workday with the needs and desires you have concerning the rest of your life? On this episode of the Happy Black Woman podcast, Rosetta talks with another of her mastermind members, Angie Gray about the importance of understanding what work life balance is really all about and how every woman can truly take control of her situation to ensure that what needs to be effectively addressed in her life is not falling through the cracks. You’ll get a ton of value out of what Angie has to share so be sure you listen. Your life experiences are what show you your purpose. Angie Gray is a woman who was serving people at every turn. She has long been active in the life and ministries of her church family and found herself meeting the same kinds of needs more and more. But problems arose when she realized that the time she was giving out to people who were truly in need was taking away from the priority time she needed to be giving to her family. That’s when she received the revelation that her talents and skills could be used to build a business that helped the same people while providing for her family. Following some simple steps to clarify and focus, she was able to build margin into her life to keep her family first. You can hear Angie’s inspiring story on this episode. Is work life balance even possible? With all the demands and stress that press in on every side these days, it’s natural to ask whether the concept of work and life balance is really something that can be achieved. Today’s guest says that it’s not so much about balance but about knowing your true calling and purpose as a whole person - mind, body, soul, and spirit. When you get clear on those things the place that family priorities need to fit in your life become much clearer. Angie Gray is on the Happy Black Woman podcast today to share some wisdom about how she models and teaches work life balance, so be sure you take the time to hear what she’s got to say. How do you turn your gifts and skills into a business? Every person has gifts and talents, given to them at birth. But it’s often difficult to figure out what they are, how they are to be used to benefit the people around you, and how to use them to create a means of support for yourself and your family. Angie Gray has walked that path herself, struggling to make the priorities she loved and cared about into a revenue stream that could also support her long term. On this episode, Angie tells her story and highlights the steps she took that enabled her to gain much-needed clarity and move her new business toward success. Simple, short routines can make a huge difference in your life. When it comes to keeping your life and business on track there’s nothing more powerful than routines. And they don’t have to be complicated. Angie Gray says that some of the simplest things, when done in a systematic way, can set you up for success day after day. As she spoke with Rosetta, Angie shared some examples from her personal life of the kinds of simple and short routines she uses to run her business, household, and family life with ease. If you’re looking to get a handle on your own busy life the simple ideas Angie shares could be exactly what help you get things running smoothly. Outline of this great episode [0:30] Rosetta’s introduction to Angie Gray, a Happy Black Woman mastermind member. [1:47] The mission and work Angie does: discover and activate your superpowers. [3:23] The life experiences that have led Angie to the calling she now enjoys. [12:34] Turning gifts into a business through walking her talk. [20:52] The process Angie follows to help women find their purpose and passion. [24:44] Angie’s personal disciplines that keep her productive and on track. [30:47] Books and other resources that have helped Angie. Resources & Links mentioned in this episode www.BlessedBlackWoman.com BOOK:BOOK: Successful Women Think Differently About ANGIE GRAY Angie Gray has answered the Lord’s call to become an influential woman of God that assists women of all walks of life to become their very best selves. Having taken small, consistent and intentional steps to transform her own life to one of purpose, Angie has a firm understanding of her role in helping and guiding women to transform their lives, one step at a time. Angie’s speech entitled, “Small Change Adds Up!” is just one of many themes that have blessed and empowered women with a clearer understanding of self-care and personal growth strategies they can immediately implement to improve their outlook on life and become their best selves. Armed with God’s purpose and destiny for her life, Angie founded BlessedBlackWoman.com and PEARLS4LIFE, foundations designed to meet women and girls where they are on their life journey and help them move forward to leading the life and lifestyle of their heart’s desire. Using these vehicles of transformation from a “real talk” approach, Angie serves the Kingdom through her speaking and writing on real issues and real strategies that are relevant to real women living in real life. Angie dedicates her life’s journey to empowering women to identify and release recurring distractions and negative forces (real and perceived) that have prevented them from accessing their inner strengths and resources necessary to lead the purposeful, fulfilled, and thriving lives and divine destiny God intends for them as He declares for us in John 10:10. With over twenty years of experience and training, relevant academic degrees, numerous certifications, honors and awards, Angie is living her mission and purpose to serve women and girls around the globe to embrace wellness and wholeness in all facets of their lives. Angie Gray is a Blessed Black Woman who enjoys the life of a Pastor’s wife and is the mother of four daughters. Angie serves as a Minister and Christian Life Coach in her church and as a Counselor, Educator and Mentor in an urban school.

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  • Iran Chat: Interview with David Collier, Author of "Democracy and the Nature of American Influence in Iran, 1941-1979"

    · 00:49:14 · Iran Chat: An Interview Series from the American Iranian Council

    Our latest Iran Chat is with Dr. David Collier, author of the new book, Democracy and the Nature of American Influence in Iran: 1941-1979.  Dr. Collier is also a research consultant in Washington DC and teaches democracy and democratization in Boston University's Washington DC program. The first half of our conversation focuses on Dr. Collier's usage of linkage and leverage to analyze and better understand the history of the period; the second half addresses how his analysis of the history applies to current issues in US-Iran relations and US foreign policy more generally.  Dr. Collier's book is being published this month; you can purchase a copy on Amazon or Syracuse University Press.   Some excerpts from our conversation are below:   Using Linkage and Leverage to Understand American Influence in Iran "Linkage and leverage [first introduced in a book by Levitsky and Way] have often been used to try to understand external pressure in the processes of democratization... I think it's an interesting model to try to examine how the US can influence other countries in an effective way."  "Linkage looks more at the soft power aspect of how the US can influence other countries based on linkages to the administration or a society in general.  These links can include economic links, social links, political links – the whole spectrum of relationships between one country and another.   Leverage looks more at the hard power aspect of what the US can do in a more active way to promote change in a different country. For example, whether it can offer rewards (e.g., acceptance into international organizations) or punishment (e.g., sanctions, international condemnation) for the behavior of an administration." Whether Increased US Linkage or Leverage Could Have Prevented the Revolution "I think the beginning of the decline of US leverage in Iran, which began after the enactment of the Shah's White Revolution [and which accelerated under Nixon]... I think if the US had maintained its position that without political reform the Shah would eventually succumb to eventual revolution - and if they had been able to work to push the Shah towards political reform rather than economic and social reform (which was the Shah's focus) - that could have led to a more peaceful evolution of the Iranian system.  Maybe it would look more like the British system today where you have a monarch that reins but doesn’t rule.  If the US had been able to apply constant pressure in the 60’s and 70’s, something like that could have occurred.“ US Foreign Policy's Focus on Short-Term Goals "I think the nature of the American political system is that it gives itself to short term thinking and not much to self reflection.  Administrations in the US are always working towards the next election; are always focused on the short term, "what can we do in the next 4 or 8 years," and there isn’t much of an ability to create a long term plan to look at things in more of a historical perspective.  So you do get lots of repetition.   If you wanted to change the system you would have to maybe think about term limits for presidents allowing them to focus on longer terms or [install an advisory body] with a view to history and the goal of focusing the minds of the administration to not repeating the mistakes of the past." "America First": Is it More Honest Foreign Policy? "I think it is.  One of the main problems that faced American-Iranian relations was the lack of interest in the Iranian society in general, the Iranian opposition, and what the Iranian people wanted. So it wouldn’t be helpful to go back to a situation where the US was able to control Iran. I think it would be better if the US had less of a proactive role in trying to control states and did focus more on America first and gave more respect to countries to develop independently.  The current regime in Iran uses American intervention as a reason for their continued presence... they always argue about being wary of American intervention. Maybe if the US withdrew a bit from certain policy areas that could allow Iran in particular to have more of an internal debate over its future rather than always focusing on threats from the external environment.  I think that could be beneficial in a certain way.  I think going back in time to an overly controlling American foreign policy is not the way to go forward."   To support this and other AIC programming, please make a tax-deductible contribution at http://www.us-iran.org/support.

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  • your weekly address-20151010

    · 每周演讲|每周英语

    Hi, everybody. This week, after five years of effort with eleven other nations, we reached agreement on a new trade deal that promotes American values and protects American workers. There’s a reason this Trans-Pacific Partnership took five years to negotiate. I wanted to get the best possible deal for American workers. And that is what we’ve done. Here’s why it matters. Ninety-five percent of the world’s consumers live outside our borders -- 95 percent. They want to buy American products. They want our cars; our music; our food. And if American businesses can sell more of their products in those markets, they can expand and support good jobs here at home. So it’s no wonder that exports played a huge role in helping America recover from the Great Recession. In fact, last year, we set a new record for American exports for the fifth year in a row, selling more than $2 trillion in goods and services. Our exports support roughly 12 million American jobs -- and they’re jobs that typically pay better than other jobs. But here’s the thing: Outdated trade rules put our workers at a disadvantage. And TPP will change that. Right now, other countries can cut their costs by setting lower standards to pay lower wages. This trade agreement, TPP, will change that, holding partner countries to higher standards and raising wages across a region that makes up nearly 40 percent of the global economy. Right now, other countries charge foreign taxes on goods that are made in America. Japan, for example, puts a 38 percent tax on American beef before it even reaches the market. Malaysia puts a 30 percent tax on American auto parts. Vietnam puts taxes as high as 70 percent on every car American automakers sell there. Those taxes and other trade barriers put our workers at a disadvantage. It makes it more expensive to make goods here and sell them over there. Well, TPP is going to change that. It eliminates more than 18,000 of these taxes on American goods and services. And that way, we're boosting America’s farmers, ranchers, manufacturers, and small business owners -- make it easier for them to sell their products abroad. That’s what it means to level the playing field for American workers and businesses. And when the playing field is level, and the rules are fair, Americans can out-compete anybody in the world. Now, I’m the first person who will say that past trade agreements haven’t always lived up to their promise. Sometimes they’ve been tilted too much in the direction of other countries and we haven't gotten a fair deal. And that makes folks suspicious of any new trade initiatives. But let’s be clear. Our future depends not on what past trade deals did wrong, but on doing new trade deals right. And that's what the TPP does. It includes the strongest labor standards in history, from requiring fair hours to prohibiting child labor and forced labor. It includes the strongest environmental standards in history. All these things level the playing field for us, because if they have to follow these rules, then they can't undercut us and sell their products cheaper because they’re violating these rules. And unlike past trade agreements, these standards are actually enforceable. Without this agreement, competitors that don’t share our values, like China, will write the rules of the global economy. They’ll keep selling into our markets and try to lure companies over there; meanwhile they’re going to keep their markets closed to us. That’s what’s been going on for the last 20 years. That's what’s contributed so much to outsourcing. That's what has made it easier for them to compete against us. And it needs to change. With this Trans-Pacific Partnership, we are writing the rules for the global economy. America is leading in the 21st century. Our workers will be the ones who get ahead. Our businesses will get a fair deal. And those who oppose passing this new trade deal are really just accepting a status quo that everyone knows puts us at a disadvantage. Look, you don’t have to take my word for it. In the coming weeks and months, you’ll be able to read every word of this agreement online well before I sign it. You’ll be able to see for yourself how this agreement is better than past trade deals -- and how it’s better for America’s working families. You can learn more at WhiteHouse.gov. And I look forward to working with both parties in Congress to approve this deal -- and grow our economy for decades to come. Thanks, everybody. And have a great weekend.

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  • “Ash” Sound (Æ) in American English: Æ Tensing

    · 00:14:02 · Accent Adventure Podcast: Improve English Pronunciation | Learn American English | Learn British English

    This is it!I’ve finally found out everything about the “ash” sound in American English – and if you’ve also been wondering about the following problem:Why is it that in some American English words the letter ‘A’ gets pronounced as [eə] despite the phonetic transcription describing it as [æ]?… then you should definitely read the rest of this article and watch the video above!Let’s take a very simple word such as “frank”, for example.Any dictionary will tell you it’s pronounced as /fræŋk/ while in reality it’s to be pronounced as [freənk] – it’s almost as if the actual word is “frenk” instead of “frank”.So, over the time I’d noticed that the “ash” sound [æ] is often pronounced as [eə] in American English, but I couldn’t figure out WHEN it’s happening – I mean, are the any RULES? I recorded the first video about it (watch it HERE) a year and a half ago – the conclusion was that you just have to learn which words are subject to the letter ‘A’ sound transformation. Another video followed a year later and the advice was – just gravitate toward the [eə] sound whenever possible and you won’t get it wrong! (It’s not actually such a bad piece of advice, by the way.) Then I recorded a video as a response to Greg’s comment where the main focus is on the word “family” – I pronounce it as [feəmli] whereas Greg sticks with [fæmli].And then, when all hope was lost, I received a comment with a Wikipedia article link in – and it actually answers every question I’ve been having about the American “ash” sound :!:HERE’s the Wiki article about Æ tensing – yes, turns out the technical term for this pronunciation transformation I’d been noticing is Æ tensing, and it also turns out there are definite rules to follow.To put it simply, if the “ash” sound is followed by the following sounds: R, M and N, the letter ‘A’ is pronounced as [eə] in General American pronunciation – and it’s called Æ tensing.Moreover, I found out in the same article that if you were to tense the “ash” sound at all times, it wouldn’t be so wrong either, because there are American accents – such as Chicago – were it’s tensed in all words. Turns out, I wasn’t so wrong advising you to do so in the second video!But if you’re going to argue that if you were to do that, it wouldn’t be pure General American pronunciation, let me tell you this: if we, foreigners, manage to speak fluent English with an accent that sounds even 80% American, it doesn’t really matter whether it would be perceived as the General American, Boston or Chicago accent.I’ve spoken about it previously – please check out this video HERE - but of course, it’s nice to finally be aware of the rules determining when the American “ash” sound becomes tense and try to get it right just like the General American.Is it not?And thanks so much for the eye-opening comment, Titi ;-)Cheers,Robby

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  • 135: 10 Life Lessons 2016 Taught Me

    · 00:27:46 · The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style

    “It is within the boundaries of reflection we are able to become aware of insights that can lead us to understanding.”  ― Kat Lahr ~The Simple Sophisticate, episode #135 On the first of January with each new year, twelve months stretch before us full of potential to progress and evolve and to observe the magic that we could never predict. The year 2016 has offered life lessons in abundance. Having filled three journals over its duration, as I was trying to decide what today's topic would be, I had a long list of ideas I wanted to share, but seeing that it is the end of the year, I thought let's take a look at the year that was and the aha moments it provided, all of which are life lessons that could help provide the magic for 2017 should they be applied. 1. Sometimes what we need is the one thing we think we cannot possibly do In previous years I have shared the benefits of meditating, and most recently, written a handful of posts which included meditation as a practice worth incorporating into our daily routines. I know some, even my previous self, dismiss meditation, each for our own reasons. Mine in my twenties was that I couldn't possibly be still with my thoughts - it was, to be frank, frightening. But as I contemplated this real fear as to why I wasn't investing in the practice of meditation, I realized it was the most important reason to begin meditating so that I no longer had to be fearful of my mind, or frightened to experience emotions or ideas that I wasn't comfortable with. While I am by no means a guru or even a semi-proficient meditator, I do find I look forward to meditating (of which I try to do each day, but sometimes a few days each week are unable to find the time - something I am still working on). I also find that rogue thoughts (that still pop up from time to time) no longer scare me. I have come to understand how to use the tools of observing and then letting go all thoughts, as well as being more present rather than arrested by worries about the future or anguish about the past. I had initially begun using Headspace a couple of years ago and then abandoned it citing no need for someone to tell me how to sit still with my thoughts. However, after I stopped using the app, I also stopped meditating regularly. So with the inspiration from a friend who uses it regularly, I re-downloaded it onto my phone (the first series is free and you can just loop the series again and again if you don't want to upgrade), and have been meditating with the app for the past two months (this summer I meditated each day for 5 minutes, and now with the app I am up to 10 minutes - small, but significant growth). There are other helpful meditation apps based on what you want, and one of my go-to podcasts, The Positive Psychology podcast shares three of them in episode #72 with a detailed explanation of what each offer (one is Headspace). 2. Practice physical exercise that you love and that loves your body and mind Stepping back into a former method of exercise this past summer was one of the best decisions I made. For me it was yoga, and while I stepped away for about a year and tried Pilates as a replacement, I soon realized it was yoga that had not only helped my physical body, but my mind as well. Most important was having instructors that were inspiring, encouraging and warm. Since August, I have been taking a vinyasa yoga class one day a week from one of two different instructors depending upon my schedule. Not only have I seen a return of flexibility, but of calm and a quiet confidence that while not entirely due to the return of yoga, certainly was encouraged with my weekly practice. 3. True friendship is a slow blossoming fruit As someone in her thirties having relocated to an entirely different town, the establishment of friends has been quite intriguing. On one hand, I find people are quite clear about what they can and cannot do as they have priorities, responsibilities, some have families, others busy careers as they hold top positions as they rise in the ranks, but due to these same reasons, finding the time to build deep friendships is hard. Some people already have their tried and true relationships, not necessarily wanting to exclude you, but not having the time to dedicate to an unknown entity as their time is limited as is their energy. In other instances, due to people as they reach their thirties and forties coming to understand what they want, who they are and how they enjoy spending their time, connections with others who do not share a similar interest dash the potential of a friendship almost immediately. In 2012, The New York Times shared an article on just this topic, forging friendship after turning 30. However, what I have also discovered about friendships in our adult years is that it is a lesson in quality over quantity and patience over expediency. Let me explain. Initially meeting people can begin by attending events of genuine interest and striking up conversations with those who have a similar passion. But even if you do have a similar interest, or a common connection, the determination of someone as a friend (and there are a variety of different types of friends that enhance our lives, and not all will be a person you reveal your most intimate self to) takes time. Spending time with others whom you have just met in many ways is like dating in that you need to give yourself time for the qualifying process. I don't mean you are judging or comparing, but in many ways you are determining what you can share (remember the ping pong analogy?), observing how the neophyte relationship makes you feel while you're with them and after you've spent time with them. It has been my experience that it is not the initial meet-and-greet that will reveal if someone should be welcomed into your life, but rather a duration of experiences and in time, any masks or façades that were presented will be worn down, if they even existed, and you will be better able to determine where or if that new friendship will play a role in your life moving forward. 4. Embrace a healthy tension when it comes to your life fulfillment A regular Youtube series I watch for inspiration and boosts of confidence and direction with the ever-changing tech entrepreneur path I feel fortunate to be on is Marie Forleo. And it was this episode that provided a significant aha moment after more than a year of contemplating a few big questions in my life. The topic was lasting fulfillment and she reveals that while we need to feel accomplished and successful in some of what we seek along the journey of fulfillment, we need not have accomplished everything. In fact, it is the tension that helps provide the fulfillment as we come to understand that we have the power within ourselves to cultivate the fulfillment we seek. It doesn't need to be external, in fact, it cannot be. Everything we need and are seeking already resides within each of us, we just need to discover how to tap into it. And with the help of experts in the fields we are passionate about, we can do just that. 5. It's okay to feel uncomfortable My first experience with the French meet-up group here in Bend required of me to overcome great trepidation. My first real date after truly being open to the idea of a relationship again was nerve-shakingly absurd beyond what even I thought I was capable of. But guess what, all went well. Not well in the fairy tale sense: I still do not speak fluent French or even hold a conversation beyond the basic hello, how are you, nor am I madly in love with another, but in the sense that I was reminded that my nerves were for naught. I had worked myself up for nothing, but because I was unsure of how it would go, the events that would unfold were out of my hands, it threw me. Maybe it was partially because I had undergone so much change in the previous year with the new move, the new job, selling my house after having dedicated so much of myself into it, but it was also because it was out of my comfort zone. And as I wrote about a handful of years ago, we are all just one small adjustment away from contentment. Jennifer Aniston's quote regularly dancing in my mind when I contemplate the idea of allowing myself to feel uncomfortable during the pursuit of something I desire, “Everything you want in the world is just outside your comfort zone.  Everything you could possibly want.”  6. The mind is malleable One valuable lesson I have discovered is that my mind, unbeknownst to me until now, was not being utilized in a manner that was conducive to the life I have been seeking. Not entirely, at least. And the beautiful reminder, after seeking out experts to help me understand more fully and completely was that I had the power to change the mental stories I had allowed to run on repeat for years and years and years due to conditioning, modeling and an unhelpful perspective. The mind can either be our most valuable tool or our most destructive adversary. And if we don't understand why our mind falls into ruts that are not helpful, choosing to investigate and then heal and redirect them is one of the best life investments we can make. 7. Old bad habits can be overcome Speaking of falling into ruts. The ruts will always be there, but we can overcome them. Perhaps bad eating habits, maybe negative default comments or thoughts that pop up or are uttered without even thinking about it, whatever your unhelpful ruts are, we can reroute our behavior, but it must be conscious, and we must repeat the new habits again and again until they become engrained. In repeated posts, habits (how to cultivate, which ones are worth our time and investment for a better everyday life, etc.) have been discussed in-depth on the blog. Part of being successful with the shift in your habits is understanding that it is possible to overcome bad habits, but because those bad habits have such deep ruts, we need to be conscious that we don't fall back into them when trigger-events take place. Simply being cognizant of this truth will help you avoid them. 8. There is a limit to planning our lives As someone who is a planner and actually loves to spend an evening, morning or afternoon planning the next month, week or year, this life lesson had to repeatedly reveal itself before I accepted it as a truth. Now, not to worry, I am not going to encourage you to let go of planning. Absolutely not. In fact,when it comes to our financial stability, our careers, and our health, planning is an asset and the foundation of living well. However, when it comes to our personal lives, and even the journey our careers take us on, we have to learn to do our best and then let go of the result. And due to a handful of experiences that took place this past year, I have come to realize that we may read books about how things should work out if we do this or that, but in the end all we can do is be ourselves, do our best and then step forward when opportunities present themselves. I have found the key is to have a life, an everyday life of our own cultivation dependent upon no one else but ourselves, that we truly love living. Because if we love the life we have built for ourselves, we are better able to simply let go of the result when it involves other people. (Discover a handful of posts have been written about letting go.) 9. Bigger isn't always better Over the past 18 months I have lived in a significantly smaller house that I had prior to my move, and I honestly have never missed one square foot that I no longer have. I haven't truly thought about it except to contemplate the goal of owning again instead of renting, but even then I am dogged in my pursuit of a small house (which is actually hard to find in Bend). The life I now have the opportunity to live is more alive, engaging and fulfilling than any other time in my life in part due to the fewer responsibilities I have to tend to if I lived in a larger space. Again, what I find to be revealed as true again and again is that it is the quality of life that resides within the home and within the life of the individual, not the size of the house, that determines one's true contentment. A clean home? Yes. A home that is curated to the comforts and needs of the residents? Absolutely. But just as important as a roof over one's head that is warm, clean and inviting is understanding how to live fully and letting go of the unnecessary, the burdens, the false "have-to" beliefs and "must-have"s. Quality over quantity again and again and again. 10. Contentment resides within each of us Each morning, I wake up and I pinch myself. No, everything in my life is not perfect. I still have doubts, fears and wonderings about the future, as we all do, but I don't let them percolate and muddle the truth that the life we can each create, the life I am creating and doing my best to share with you as I make the journey, is something worth savoring each day. As was mentioned in #8, it is far easier to let go when we enjoy the life we've curated for ourselves. When we've tended to all that we do have control over. When we've realized that much of the angst we have about life is self-created and we are causing more problems and worry than is warranted. When we understand the true power we have within ourselves, we open a world of opportunity to live a more fulfilling and contented life. It does take courage to apply some, if not all in some capacity, the life lessons shared today. And as we need to remember, courage is not eliminating fear, it is simply overcoming it. Fear will always want to step in and pull us back into the world of worry, doubt and anxiety, but we have the choice to not give it its power. We have the choice to step up to the plate, put in the hard work and dance with life, because as we also know, some years we learn a weighty amount, other years we have the opportunity to put it into practice and still other years are gifts to simply savor. It turns out 2016 involved a little bit of all three. So is life, unfolding its magic so long as we participate. ~The Simple Sophisticate is taking its yearly one week vacation beginning the week of 26th. The next new episode will be available on Monday January 2nd. In the meantime, peruse the previous 134 episodes or stop by the blog next week for a year in review where I will share the top five episodes of 2016. ~Stop by next Monday to discover the TOP 5 Episodes from 2016.  ~Peruse all of the past 134 episodes here. EXTRA, EXTRA! ~Discover my list of the Top 10 Podcasts I listened to in 2016 here.   Petit Plaisir: ~love in lowercase: a novel by Francesc Miralles An international best-seller translated from its original language of Spanish, Love in Lowercase tells the story of 37-year-old Samuel, a professor of linguistics living in Barcelona who while certain the new year will be more of the same hum-drum quickly sees the start of January begin with an array of opportunities all beginning with the arrival of a cat who makes himself right at home in Samuel's apartment. In less than a week, this delightful novel was read and enjoyed, and with its short, topical chapters, readers who appreciate the liberal arts will find an appreciation of the thoughtful character who is more open to grasping onto opportunities when they present themselves than he ever was in the past, and that makes all of the difference. Download the Episode ~Subscribe to The Simple Sophisticate: iTunes | Stitcher | iHeartRadio

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