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  • This week, host Isaac Butler talks to cartoonist and now showrunner Noelle Stevenson about the process of rebooting the ‘80s TV show She-Ra: Princess of Power. In the interview, Noelle talks about developing a fresh vision for the show and ultimately creating one of the most diverse kids shows in history. She also discusses her webcomic, Nimona, which was adapted into a graphic novel and earned her a National Book Award nomination at the age of 23. 
    After the interview, Isaac and co-host June Thomas offer advice to a listener who wonders if focusing on their art, rather than working with vulnerable people, is too privileged a life choice.  
    In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Noelle talks about The Weight of Them, a webcomic she created about her decision to get top surgery. 
    Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675.
    Podcast production by Cameron Drews.
    If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now to help support our work.
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  • In Part 2 of this episode of Hit Parade, Chris Molanphy continues to demonstrate a weird chart phenomenon he calls The AC/DC Rule.

    Hit Parade episodes are now split into two parts, released two weeks apart. For the full episode right now, sign up for Slate Plus and you'll also get The Bridge, our Trivia show and bonus deep dive. Click here for more info.

    What was the only No. 1 album by Jimi Hendrix? How about the first No. 1 by Billy Joel? Jackson Browne? Pat Benatar? Pearl Jam? Lady Gaga?
     
    In all cases, the answer isn’t obvious—it’s not the album you know best, the one with the most hits on it. It’s the album after that classic that goes to No. 1. And there’s no better example than AC/DC, the Australian-by-way-of-Scotland hard rock band that’s sold more than 20 million copies of Back in Black. But it was their next album (can you name it?) that topped the Billboard album chart.
     
    Just as less-good movie sequels open better at the box office than classic first installments, follow-up albums often chart higher than their slow-growing but hit-packed predecessors. Some of the rock and pop legends who fell prey to this chart phenomenon might surprise you…might just leave you shook all night long.
     
    Podcast production by Asha Saluja.
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  • This week Steve, Dana, and Julia talk about Chloé Zhao’s Nomadland. Next, they dig into their obsession with the New York Times’s Spelling Bee puzzle and interview its creator, 24-year-old Sam Ezersky. Finally, they discuss group chats in light of Heidi Cruz’s recent troubles with the forum.
    In Slate Plus, the hosts discuss a piece of culture that they used to love and are now done with? Thanks to listener James Callan. Send us your questions and topic suggestions at culturefest@slate.com.
    Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Rachael Allen.
    Outro Music: "Back to Silence" by OTE
    Slate Plus members get a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest and access to exclusive shows like Dana Stevens’ classic movies podcast Flashback. Sign up now to listen and support our work.
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  • Welcome to Slate Money Goes to the Movies, a miniseries in which Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski, and a different guest each week discuss popular business-themed movies. 

    This week, Felix and Anna are joined by Peter Kafka, a senior correspondent at Recode and host of the Recode Media podcast, to talk about the 2007 Oscar-winning film Michael Clayton. They break down some of the plot issues, get into what makes it a good New York film, and Anna will explain why she really hates this movie. 

    Email: slatemoney@slate.com

    Podcast production by Jessamine Molli.

    Twitter: @felixsalmon, @Three_Guineas
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  • This week, host Rumaan Alam taps into the well of creativity that is Austin Kleon, author of books like Steal Like an Artist and Show Your Work! In the interview, Austin talks about his distaste for the “guru” label and the uncertainty it takes to be a teacher and student of creativity. He also weighs in on whether creativity is teachable and sprinkles the whole conversation with quotes and other nuggets of wisdom from his favorite writers and thinkers. 
    After the interview, Rumaan and co-host Isaac Butler hear from a listener who’s trying to find a good writing group. 
    In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Austin talks about his email newsletter and what he plans to work on next. 
    Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675.
    Podcast production by Cameron Drews.
    If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now to help support our work.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • On the Spoiler Special podcast, Slate critics discuss movies, the occasional TV show, and, once in a blue moon, another podcast, in full spoiler-filled detail. This week, Slate’s movie critic Dana Stevens is joined by Slate features editor Jeffrey Bloomer and New York Times correspondent Ruth Graham to spoil Saint Maud, the feature film debut from writer and director Rose Glass. 
    In this extremely eerie horror film, we meet Maud, (played by Morfydd Clark) a reclusive young nurse charged with the hospice care of Amanda, (Jennifer Ehle) a former dancer who has been diagnosed with cancer. At first, they find commonality in their religious beliefs. But will Maud’s newfound faith guide her and Amanda toward a path of healing? Or is something more sinister at play? 
    Note: As the title indicates, this podcast contains spoilers galore.
    Email us at spoilers@slate.com.

    Podcast production by Morgan Flannery. 
    Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and access to exclusive shows like Dana Stevens’ classic movies podcast Flashback. Sign up now to listen and support our work.

    Hosts
    Dana Stevens is a movie critic at Slate.
    Jeffrey Bloomer is Slate’s features editor.
    Ruth Graham is a New York Times correspondent. 

    You can read Jeffrey Bloomer’s review here
    You can reach Dana Stevens review here
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  • This month, Christina, Bryan, and Rumaan are first joined by June Thomas to discuss Jeremy Atherton Lin’s new book Gay Bar, their own personal histories with gay bars, and if such queer spaces have a future. Then they’re joined by Autostraddle’s Shelli Nicole to talk about the Lex app, a text-based dating app aimed at queer, trans, and gender-nonconforming people. They discuss how the app got its start, the ways it’s changed in just one year, and if queer women will ever have an app that’s just for sex.  
    This podcast was produced by Daniel Schroeder.
    Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • This week Steve and Dana are joined by Jessica Winter, editor at the New Yorker and author of the upcoming novel, The Fourth Child. They kick off the show by discussing Saint Maud, the critically acclaimed horror film by Rose Glass. Then they dig into the #FreeBritney movement and dissect a televised documentary by the New York Times that covers Britney Spears' legal battle with her father. After that, Slate's pop music expert Chris Molanphy joins the show to discuss Olivia Rodriguo's hit song Drivers License, which shot to the top of the Billboard Hot 100. Chris is the host of the Hit Parade podcast.
    In Slate Plus, Julia joins Steve and Dana to talk about the Gina Carano controversy and weigh in on whether her firing from The Mandalorian was justified.
    Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Rachael Allen.
    Email the hosts at culturefest@slate.com
    Slate Plus members get a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest and access to exclusive shows like Dana Stevens’ classic movies podcast Flashback. Sign up now to listen and support our work.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • Welcome to Slate Money Goes to the Movies, a miniseries in which Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski, and a different guest each week discuss popular business-themed movies. 

    This week, Felix and Anna are joined by Taffy Brodesser-Akner to discuss the 1993 film Indecent Proposal starring Demi Moore, Woody Harrelson and Robert Redford. They get into topics like whether there can possibly be a feminist read of this film, the moral value of money and why Taffy quotes this movie all the time in her professional life. 


    Email: slatemoney@slate.com

    Podcast production by Jessamine Molli.

    Twitter: @felixsalmon, @Three_Guineas, @EmilyRPeck

    Taffy Brodesser-Akner is an author and a journalist for New York Times Magazine.
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  • This week host June Thomas discusses the art of set decoration with Beth Kushnick. Beth has worked on dozens of film and TV projects including The Good Wife, The Good Fight, and the new EPIX series Bridge and Tunnel. In the interview she talks about how she sources items and finds authentic furniture and accessories for period pieces. She also explains how physical items can add complexity and biographical details to the characters we see in movies and on television. 
    After the interview, June and co-host Rumaan Alam talk about Beth’s experience working during the pandemic. Then June talks to Slate writer and editor Dan Kois about a book deal he just landed. 
    Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675.
    You can follow Beth on Instagram @bakhomedecor where you can see photos from Bridge and Tunnel and other shows. Her podcast is called Decorating the Set: From Hollywood to Your Home with Beth Kushnic‪k‬.
    Podcast production by Cameron Drews
    If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now to help support our work.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • Quick, what was the only No. 1 album by Jimi Hendrix? How about the first No. 1 by Billy Joel? Jackson Browne? Pat Benatar? Pearl Jam? Lady Gaga?
     
    In all cases, the answer isn’t obvious—it’s not the album you know best, the one with the most hits on it. It’s the album after that classic that goes to No. 1. And there’s no better example than AC/DC, the Australian-by-way-of-Scotland hard rock band that’s sold more than 20 million copies of Back in Black. But it was their next album (can you name it?) that topped the Billboard album chart.
     
    Chris Molanphy has coined a term for this weird chart phenomenon: He calls it The AC/DC Rule. Just as less-good movie sequels open better at the box office than classic first installments, follow-up albums often chart higher than their slow-growing but hit-packed predecessors. Some of the rock and pop legends who fell prey to this chart phenomenon might surprise you…might just leave you shook all night long.
     
    Podcast production by Asha Saluja.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • Steve, Dana, and Julia kick things off by discussing Minari, the semi-autobiographical movie by the filmmaker Lee Isaac Chung that focuses on a Korean family trying to build a life for themselves in rural Arkansas. After that, New York Magazine writer Mark Harris joins the show to to talk about his new biography of the director Mike Nichols. Then the hosts pick apart the latest Chrissy Teigan controversy and offer opinions about wealth, celebrity, and privilege during the pandemic.
    In Slate Plus, the hosts remember the brilliant and charming actor Christopher Plummer who passed away last week at age 91.
    Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Rachael Allen.
    Slate Plus members get a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest and access to exclusive shows like Dana Stevens’ classic movies podcast Flashback. Sign up now to listen and support our work.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • This week, host Isaac Butler talks about movement, music, and space with choreographer Annie-B Parson. In the interview, Annie-B discusses her long-time collaborative relationship with musician David Byrne and her work on his live show American Utopia, which was filmed and can now be streamed on HBO Max. Annie-B also talks about Big Dance Theater, a company she founded, which combines multiple disciplines to produce innovative stage performances.
    After the interview, Isaac and co-host Rumaan Alam discuss Annie-B’s openness to inspiration and the way she looks closely at the world around her. 
    In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Annie-B tells the story of how she met her husband and frequent collaborator Paul Lazar. She also previews her upcoming book. 
    Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675.
    Podcast production by Cameron Drews.
    If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now to help support our work.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • On the Spoiler Special podcast, Slate critics discuss movies, the occasional TV show, and, once in a blue moon, another podcast, in full spoiler-filled detail. This week, Slate’s TV critic Willa Paskin is joined by Slate writer and podcast host Nichole Perkins to spoil Bridgerton, the new period drama series on Netflix, produced by Shonda Rhimes. 
    In this re-imagined adaptation of the romance novels by Julia Quinn, eight close-knit siblings of the powerful Bridgerton family attempt to find love. But the age-old question remains: will they? Or won’t they? 

    Note: As the title indicates, this podcast contains spoilers galore.
    Email us at spoilers@slate.com.

    Podcast production by Morgan Flannery. 
    Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and access to exclusive shows like Dana Stevens’ classic movies podcast Flashback. Sign up now to listen and support our work.

    Hosts
    Willa Paskin is a Slate TV critic.
    Nichole Perkins is the writer and host of Slate’s new podcast This is Good for You. 
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • Stephen, Dana, and Julia begin this week's show by talking about Locked Down, the rom-com heist movie starring Anne Hathaway and Chiwetel Ejiofor that's set during the early days of the pandemic. Then they discuss Derek DelGaudio's In & Of Itself, a Frank Oz directed stage performance that's part magic show and part meditation on personal identity. The filmed version is now available to stream on Hulu. For their third segment the hosts weigh in on a controversy in the film criticism world about a review of the movie Promising Young Woman, which they talked about in last week's show.
    In Slate Plus, the hosts chat about the pandemic's affect on casual friendships. Their inspiration was Amanda Mull's article in The Atlantic, titled The Pandemic Has Erased Entire Categories of Friendship.
    Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Rachael Allen.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • This week host Rumaan Alam talks to writer Damion Searls, who translates literature from German, French, Dutch, and Norwegian into English. In the interview, Damion argues that the work of translating is more creative than technical, and he breaks down what it means to preserve the best qualities of foreign works. 
    After the interview, Rumaan and co-host June Thomas talk about their own experiences with literary translations. 
    In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Damion lists some of the works he’d like to translate in the near future. 
    Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675.
    Podcast production by Cameron Drews.
    If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now to help support our work.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • This week Stephen, Dana, and Julia start by discussing Promising Young Woman, the revenge thriller starring Carey Mulligan and written and directed by Emerald Fennell. Then Slate culture writer Karen Han joins the show to talk about the French heist series Lupin, which has been firmly situated on Netflix's top 10 list since it premiered. After that, the hosts reflect on a recent article in the New York Times Magazine by Justin Metz titled, How Nothingness Became Everything We Wanted.
    In Slate Plus, the hosts wonder whether the end of the Trump presidency has really hit them yet.
    Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Rachael Allen.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • This week host June Thomas talks to musician, conductor, and singing coach Kathleen Kelly. In the interview, Kathleen describes her daily musical practices and explains the tricky work of accompanying singers on piano. She also describes the qualities every great conductor needs. 
    After the interview, June and co-host Rumaan Alam talk about what happens when countries adequately fund the arts. 
    In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Kathleen plays one of her favorite piano pieces, and then June and Kathleen try to define “talent.” 
    Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675.
    Podcast production by Cameron Drews.
    If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now to help support our work.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • On the Spoiler Special podcast, Slate critics discuss movies, the occasional TV show, and, once in a blue moon, another podcast, in full spoiler-filled detail. This week, Slate’s movie critic Dana Stevens is joined by Slate staff writer Karen Han to spoil Promising Young Woman, the feature film debut from writer and director Emerald Fennell. 
    In this visually captivating world, we meet Cassie, (played by Carey Mulligan) a wickedly smart and tantalizingly cunning young woman, living a secret double life by night. But is she a hero? Or a morally corrupt villain? 

    Note: As the title indicates, this podcast contains spoilers galore.
    Email us at spoilers@slate.com.

    Podcast production by Morgan Flannery. 
    Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and access to exclusive shows like Dana Stevens’ classic movies podcast Flashback. Sign up now to listen and support our work.
    Hosts
    Karen Han is staff writer at Slate.
    Dana Stevens is a movie critic at Slate.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • This month, Christina, Bryan, and Rumaan discuss the New Year’s drama in Puerta Vallarta, the Instagram account that popped up to shame gay people for traveling during COVID, and if shaming ever works as a health and safety tactic. Then they interview Torrey Peters about her new book Detransition, Baby. They talk with her about writing for a trans audience and expecting cisgender readers to keep up, why so much adult queer fiction resembles YA, and how elephants fit into it all.
    This podcast was produced by Daniel Schroeder.
    Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices