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  • Ever wonder about the considerations that go into a healthcare facility’s much-needed renovation? Or a hospital’s expansion project that requires a brand new wing? Join 2021 APIC President-Elect Linda Dickey and Jayson Karas, a union carpenter, for a discussion on the subtle yet vital role that Infection Preventionists (IP) play during a construction/renovation project in a healthcare facility. We also touch on some of the challenges and IP encounters while ensuring infection prevention and control (IPC) best practices during an undertaking of this nature.

    Hosted by:

    Silvia Quevedo

    About our Guests:

    Linda Dickey, RN, MPH, CIC, CPHQ, FAPIC

    Linda Dickey was Sr. Director, Epidemiology & Infection Prevention at UCI Health and will be the 2022 President-elect for APIC. Linda’s background includes serving on the Facilities Guidelines Institute (FGI) committee to develop design criteria for health care facilities. She has also taught for over 15 years for the American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE) in courses related to healthcare design, construction and water management and has served on the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 188 committee to establish the standard for Legionella management. Linda’s clinical experience is in adult critical care and over 25 years of experience in epidemiology & infection prevention and quality, patient safety. She earned a nursing degree from the University of South Carolina and her Master in Public Health degree from the University of South Florida. Linda is currently an independent consultant.

    Jayson Karas

    Jayson Karas is a Business Representative and the ICRA Coordinator for the North Central States Regional Council of Carpenters. He is a Union Carpenter of 23 years and is a proud member of the UBC: United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America.
    He has spent 15 of his 23 years as a Carpenter working in healthcare construction. He has a strong passion for learning as well as sharing his experiences that he acquired working in the field with others. He has the privilege of working with members of the APIC Community as a representative of the UBC, an APIC Strategic Partner in 2020 and continuing that partnership in 2021. He serves on several UBC ICRA Committees in helping further the UBC’s desire to develop and deliver much needed healthcare construction curriculum and training to contractors, tradespeople, and healthcare professionals in the United States and Canada. Jayson is also a proud veteran after serving 8 years in the United States Navy.

  • During the COVID-19 pandemic, personal protective equipment (PPE) has become as essential to everyday life as shoes, though masking guidelines for use haven't been so straightforward and often times confuse the public. The supply of PPE has been a challenge and educating healthcare workers on what they need to wear and under what circumstances is no easy task for Infection Preventionists. Dr. Darlene Carey and Georgine Kruedelbach join us this month to discuss what PPE is, the different types of equipment available, and where PPE falls under the ‘Hierarchy of Controls’.

    Hosted by:

    Silvia Quevedo

    About our Guests:

    Georgine Kruedelbach MSN, RN, CIC

    Georgine is the Director of Infection Prevention and Performance Improvement at Naples Community Hospital Healthcare System in Naples, Florida. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, she earned her nursing diploma from St. Alexis Hospital School of Nursing. Her nursing career launched at The Cleveland Clinic hospital and with military veterans at the Louis Stokes VA Medical Center, as a critical care and behavioral health nurse. Relocating to Florida, she joined the Emergency/Trauma/Decon team at Lee Health System. While earning her advanced degree at Nova Southeastern University, she found a passion in public health and joined an African medical mission trip to pursue that passion. The last fourteen years have been spent as an Infection Preventionist with the goal of improving the health of the Naples community. Her interests include coastal water health in Southwest Florida, reducing risks from medical devices, and building relationships with the healthcare team.

    Darlene Carey, DNP, RN, NE-BC, CIC, FAPIC

    Dr. Darlene Carey currently serves as the System Director of Infection Prevention and Control at Northside Hospital Gwinnett and Duluth campuses. She also served as the recent national chair of the Practice Guidance Committee for the APIC-Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, liaison to the CDCs HICPAC-Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, and the APIC liaison to SGNA representing the Practice Guidance Committee from 2016-2018. An experienced senior level nurse professional, Dr. Carey has successfully led collaborative teams in achieving a transformational vision. Highly motivated in leading teams, her approach is strategic and collaborative and creates measurable and sustainable results. She has passion for leadership, quality, infection prevention, and process improvement; her collaboration with all disciplines of the healthcare team creates an environment for improved quality, reduced costs, and desired patient outcomes. Her systems-level thinking and approach to process improvement promotes culture change, improves practice, and provides for optimal patient outcomes.

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  • This past year is one for the history books, and it is important to carry the lessons we learned into 2021 before closing out this chapter. Traditionally, a new year brings a fresh start for everyone, and while we resolve to accomplish personal goals, we must also recommit ourselves to the tried-and-true basics of infection prevention and control. We are kicking off 2021 with incoming APIC President Ann Marie Pettis, who joined us for a discussion on ways we can remain vigilant with infection prevention practices post-pandemic. This episode highlights proper PPE handling, a rededication to antimicrobial stewardship, and introduces APIC’s new #PreventtheSpreadPledge campaign.

    Hosted by:

    Silvia Quevedo, CAE

    About our Guest(s):

    Ann Marie Pettis, RN, BSN, CIC, FAPIC, APIC President

    Ann Marie Pettis has more than 30 years of experience as an infection preventionist and she is proud to have had her certification in infection control since 1986. Most of her career has been in university and community acute care settings. Currently, she is Director of Infection Prevention for UR Medicine in Rochester, NY. She is the IP consultant for three ambulatory surgery centers and has experience consulting in both long-term and acute care. Ann Marie was a founding leader of her local APIC chapter in which she has held a variety of positions such as legislative representative and President and she continues as an active member. She received the Chapter Leadership Award in 2006. Ann Marie was also co-chair and chair of the Western New York Infection Control Organization and a member of the New York State Advisory Committee. Her involvement with national APIC, in a variety of elected and volunteer positions, has been particularly rewarding and has included Communications, Research, Annual Conference Planning, and Nominating and Awards committees. She was the APIC representative to the SHEA Compendium sections on CAUTI and CLABSI and served as a mentor for the HRET CAUTI Fellowship program. Ann Marie has lectured extensively at local, state, national, and international venues and has published in several peer review and trade journals. Most recently she is proud of being in the first group of colleagues awarded the Fellow of APIC designation.

  • There is a reason we like to open windows or get outside for some "fresh air." Air quality and ventilation are a big deal when we try to stop the spread of viruses that can travel in the air. It can be daunting and scary, but fear not, because Dr. Hilary Babcock and Kate Gase, infection preventionist, break down the science of airborne and droplet disease transmission. In this episode, they inform us on the factors that determine how infectious a virus or bacteria may be given various environmental factors. They emphasize the importance of following what science tells us about preventing the spread of diseases.

    Hosted by:

    Silvia Quevedo

    About our Guest(s):

    Dr. Hilary Babcock, MD, MPH

    Dr. Hilary Babcock is a Professor of Medicine in the Infectious Diseases division at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis and Medical Director of the Infection Prevention and Epidemiology Consortium and Occupational Infection Prevention for BJC HealthCare, a multi-hospital system in St Louis. She is also an associate hospital epidemiologist at Barnes Jewish Hospital.

    She is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). She is the immediate past-President of SHEA. She has been a member of HICPAC (CDC’s Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee) since 2013 and is currently co-chair of the committee. She is a CDC funded investigator studying healthcare-associated infections and respiratory viral infections in healthcare settings.

    Kathleen Gase, MBA, MPH, FAPIC, CIC

    Kathleen (Kate) Gase is the Director of Patient Safety, Quality and Care Coordination at Barnes-Jewish St. Peters and Progress West Hospitals in the St. Louis, MO area. She has previous work experience with BJC HealthCare, the New York State Department of Health and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Kate earned her undergraduate degree at Washington University in St. Louis, her Master’s in Public Health at Hunter College in New York City, and returned to Wash U to complete her MBA. She is certified in Infection Prevention and Epidemiology, a Fellow of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) and is currently serving on the APIC Board of Directors.

  • Water is the most critical substance for all of us including those microscopic critters. The 5 Second Rule talks to expert, Dr. Janice Stout about what pathogens lurk in our water systems and when left unchecked can cause all kinds of problems for us. We all know to be on the alert when traveling but who knew that sinks, showers and ice machines can be a source of waterborne pathogens. This episode is timely given recent news of natural disasters like hurricanes and flooding that impact local water supplies as well as those created by poor management of municipal water systems.

    Hosted by: Silvia Quevedo

    About our Guest(s):

    Janet E. Stout, PhD

    Dr. Janet E. Stout is president and director of Special Pathogens Laboratory, and research associate professor at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. An infectious disease microbiologist, Dr. Stout is recognized worldwide for seminal discoveries and pioneering research in Legionella. Her expertise includes prevention and control strategies for Legionnaires’ disease in building water systems. Dr. Stout’s more than 30 years of research is published in peer-reviewed medical and scientific journals. She has also authored textbook chapters on Legionella and Legionnaires’ disease, including the Legionella chapter in the APIC Text. An advocate for prevention, Dr. Stout assisted in developing the first Legionella prevention guideline (1993) in the United States, which continues to serve as a model for national and global health agencies and organizations. Additionally, she serves on the ASHRAE Legionella standard committee for Legionella Guideline 12 and the SPC 188 committee for ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 188-2015 Legionellosis: Risk Management for Building Water Systems, the first U. S. standard passed in June 2015. Dr. Stout also serves on the board of directors for the Cooling Technology Institute.

  • The global COVID-19 pandemic has been especially difficult for those working in healthcare. Infection preventionists working tirelessly behind the scenes are feeling the pressure just as much as clinical providers. Two infection preventionists share their experiences.

    Hosted by:

    Silvia Quevedo

    About our Guests:

    Rebecca Alvino RN, MS, CNS, CIC, CNOR
    Infection Preventionist Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Prevention | Department of Quality, UCSF Health

    Rebecca Alvino is an infection preventionist at UCSF Health, specializing in perioperative and procedural infection prevention. Originally beginning her career in public health during the early years of West Nile virus in Upstate New York, Rebecca became a surgical nurse in 2005—building the foundation for her knowledge and skills in perioperative and procedural infection prevention.

    Rebecca joined UCSF Health in 2013 as an infection preventionist, and concurrently continued her work as a surgical nurse on a per diem basis until COVID-19 arrived at UCSF Health in early February 2020, when her work shifted exclusively to infection prevention and control. In addition to her work as an infection preventionist and as a surgical nurse, Rebecca periodically works as an academic coach with the University of Texas-Arlington for their RN-to-BSN program.

    Rebecca graduated from the University at Albany, State University of New York with a bachelor’s degree in human biology, St. Joseph’s College of Nursing in Syracuse, New York with an associate’s degree in nursing, and the University of California, San Francisco with her master’s degree specializing in advanced public health nursing and minor in global health. She was inducted into Sigma Theta Tau in 2013, and is a member of several professional organizations, including AORN and IAHCSMM. She is the infection prevention advisor for the California Central Service Association, and an active member of APIC, where she serves as a director for the board of the San Francisco Bay Area chapter and is a member of the APIC’s Annual Conference Committee.

    Barbara A. Smith, RN, BSN, MPA, CIC, FAPIC is a Nurse Epidemiologist at the Mount Sinai Morningside and Mount Sinai West campuses in New York City. She is the infection prevention consultant for Mount Sinai International currently advising Taikang Xianlin Drum Tower Hospital in Nanjing, China. She is an independent infection prevention consultant for multiple ambulatory practices including surgical, endoscopy and dialysis centers in the metropolitan region. Ms. Smith recently served on the Board of Director for the national Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). She is a member of APIC’s COVID Task Force which was convened to provide expertise to the members and the public about prevention of COVID in healthcare and community settings. She is a clinical editor of the APIC Text Online. She serves on the Advisory Board of Medical Reserve Corps of New York City and the American Council for St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo. She serves on the clinical advisory board of COVID SMART and Healthcare Laundry Accreditation Council.

  • There really are no excuses not to engage in advocacy. Associations like APIC make it easy for members to write their state and federal lawmakers by creating all sorts of scripted letters, and other tools. Sarah Smathers of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia explains why telling your story to your elected officials helps them understand the problems you face and allows them to make a difference for you. Advocacy, like infection prevention is everyone's business.

    Hosted by:

    Silvia Quevedo

    About our guest:

    Sarah Smathers, is the System Director of Infection Prevention and Control at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). She is Immediate Past President of the Delaware Valley/Philadelphia Chapter of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), Chair of the APIC Public Policy Committee and Adjunct Professor at Drexel University’s Dornsife School of Public Health. Sarah is serving as part of the Infection Prevention Advisory Group for the Solutions for Patient Safety (SPS) network and is on the steering committee to create the first Delaware County Health Department. Sarah has worked at CHOP since 2006, has been certified in Infection Control since 2010 and became an APIC Fellow in 2016. She has presented at national conferences including Children’s Hospital Association (CHA), APIC, SHEA and IDWeek and has published on the epidemiology and prevention of infectious diseases. Sarah has master in public health degree from the University of Michigan in Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology.

  • You go out with friends or family, and you’re not feeling so great soon after. What’s your go-to culprit? Probably food poisoning. This episode sheds light on how an American dietary staple became a deadly nightmare.

    Kären Bally, RN, BSN, CIC has been with Ascension Via Christi for more than 20 years, serving as the Director of Infection Prevention for the past five years, including various interim roles as needed. Kären is active in both local and national APIC and is currently the president of the Wichita APIC Chapter. Kären has been recognized within the medical committee with several awards, for example Health Care Hero Award and CBIC Champion Award. Kären is married to Craig and has 2 children, Grace and Grant, whom she enjoys hanging out with at Grand Lake in Oklahoma each summer.

    Hosted by:

    Hannah Andrews and Silvia Quevedo

  • It's true, "getting old ain't for wimps (especially during a global pandemic!)" Nursing home residents and healthcare workers who care for them in these facilities are the "biggest losers" in the fight against COVID-19. The elderly and those living with chronic illness are at most risk for severe illness and death. Learn about the challenges facing this care setting and the opportunities for better infection prevention and control for the future.

    Hosted by:

    Silvia Quevedo

  • The questionable concept of the “5 Second Rule” is one we have all grown up with. You drop a food item on the floor that you really-really wanted and as a grade-schooler, you were very likely to get ready to pick it up and put it in your mouth. Meanwhile, your Mom is shouting “noooooo” from across the room. In this episode, we dive into the history behind this “rule” and if it really holds up.

    Co-Host: Marie H. Wilson, MSN, RN, CIC, is the Manager of Infection Prevention & Control at Methodist Dallas Medical Center in Texas. She draws upon her experience as a critical care nurse and public health nurse specialist in her daily work to help improve the safety of care and the environment for all within her facility. Her special interests in her daily work include IP professional development, outbreak investigations and data analytics. On the local level, she’s currently serving at the Chapter President for APIC-DFW (Chapter Number 005). She’s also been a member of the Communications Committee for headquarters since 2018. Connect with Marie on Twitter @mhwilsonrn

    Guest: Nicole Nomides, MT(ASCP), MS, CIC, FAPIC is currently Manager of Infection Prevention & Epidemiology at Michigan Medicine in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Nicole has been working as an infection preventionist for over 15 years, with experience covering all levels of patient care. Nicole has served as a board member for the APIC-Great Lakes Chapter as Chapter President, Secretary, Bylaws Chair, Program Co-Chair, and Nominating Committee member. She received the APIC Chapter Leadership Award in 2013. Ms. Nomides has served on the APIC Membership Services Committee and was recently elected to the APIC Nominating and Awards Committee. She has also been a speaker and poster presenter at multiple national and local professional conferences. Infection Prevention is Nicole’s passion and Germs Rule!

  • We hear so much about how hand washing is one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick, but is that all hype? Listen to “5 Second Rule” to get all your questions answered about the one healthy habit everyone can and should do.

    Dr. Elaine Larson is an international expert in infection prevention, antimicrobial resistance, and hand hygiene, and is the only infection preventionist to receive the designation Living Legend from the American Academy of Nursing. Her contributions have changed the way healthcare is delivered by emphasizing the importance of infection prevention and hand hygiene for all health professionals. The interdisciplinary nature of her work is evident in the breadth and wide dissemination of her 500 scholarly publications. She has served on prestigious national advisory groups and grant review panels, and generously mentored countless clinical research nurses. Currently Professor Emerita Epidemiology and Anna C. Maxwell Professor Emerita of Nursing Research at Columbia University, Dr. Larson was also the editor of the American Journal of Infection Control from 1995 - 2019.

    Hosted by:

    Hannah Andrews and Silvia Quevedo

  • When you enter a hotel room, the bed is made, the toiletries are unopened, and fresh towels are ready for you. We know housekeeping cleans each room after every guest, but what does that include? And how does this compare to the job of Environmental Services in healthcare settings? In this episode, we want to use the concept of “hotel clean vs. hospital clean” to remind members of the public and healthcare workers why we focus in on certain types of cleanliness, particularly in healthcare.

    Frank Myers, MA, CIC, FAPIC is the Interim Director Infection Prevention & Clinical Epidemiology at UC San Diego Health. He has worked in the field of infectious disease epidemiology and control for over 30 years. He has been published over 40 times on the subject and done countless press, radio and television interviews. Frank is a well known lecturer on the subject both in the US and internationally.

    Hosted by:

    Hannah Andrews and Silvia Quevedo

  • When you think of an extreme outbreak, Ebola, Zika, measles, come to mind, diseases that plague the news (no pun intended). Novel Coronavirus, or COVID-19, is our newest concern, and as conditions evolve, each day brings new information. In this episode, we will review the current state of COVID-19, the supply of personal protective equipment (PPE) and important preventative measures to be taken by both healthcare workers and the public.


    Jessica Silvaggio Rosende, MPH, CIC, CSSGB is an infection preventionist at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena, CA after having worked as an infection preventionist at University of California Los Angeles and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Before becoming an IP, Jessica worked as an applied epidemiology fellow with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) focusing on infectious diseases and healthcare associated infections in Los Angeles County. Professionally, Jessica is interested in multidrug-resistant organisms in healthcare settings, emerging infectious diseases, antimicrobial stewardship and emergency preparedness. She is President of the Greater Los Angeles Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology chapter and President-Elect of California APIC.

    Sharon Vanairsdale, DNP, APRN, ACNS-BC, NP-C, CEN, FAEN, FAAN is the Program Director for the Serious Communicable Diseases Unit at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, GA. As the Program Director, she manages unit readiness and hospital preparedness for patients with Ebola and other special pathogens. In her role, she helps coordinate clinical operations, staff safety, and patient outcomes. She has been involved in the care of patients with Ebola virus disease and Lassa Fever. Dr. Vanairsdale is also the Director of Education within the National Ebola Training and Education Center, a federally funded collaborative between Emory, Nebraska Medicine, and New York Health and Hospital-Bellevue. Prior to the 2014 Ebola outbreak, she was the Clinical Nurse Specialist in the Emergency Department at Emory University Hospital.

    Hosted by:

    Hannah Andrews and Silvia Quevedo

  • Think all bugs are scary? Just like Dorothy’s journey through Oz, you will learn how bad (or good!) these bugs really are and better understand how to fight them when necessary.

    Lynn Slonim Fine PhD, MPH, CIC, FAPIC is an Infection Preventionist at the University of Rochester Medical School in Rochester, NY. Lynn has worked in Infection Prevention for over 15 years and has been certified in Infection Control since 2001 and was elected a Fellow of APIC in 2016. She has served as a section editor on the APIC Text Online and was a contributing author in APIC’s “The Infection Preventionists Guide to the Laboratory.” In addition to serving on the Board of Directors of her local APIC Chapter, she served on National APIC’s Education Committee and is currently a faculty member for APIC’s Epi Intensive, Epi 101, and CIC Prep courses. She is currently serving on APIC’s Research Committee, and teaches Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Clinical Microbiology at several local colleges in Rochester.

    Hosted by:

    Hannah Andrews and Silvia Quevedo

  • If there’s something strange in your neighborhood, like an outbreak of norovirus, do you know how it gets investigated? Listen in to hear how public health officials serve as disease detectives to keep communities and populations safe.

    Lisa Guli, MPH, is a Program Epidemiologist for the Arlington County Public Health Division. She has over 15 years of experience working in domestic and international public health programs, primarily focusing on Communicable Disease Epidemiology and Program Monitoring and Evaluation. She also served as a Peace Corps volunteer in rural Honduras for two years. Lisa loves using data and numbers to craft the “human story”.

    Evelyn Poppell, RN, MPA, is a Bureau Chief for Environmental Health and Communicable Diseases for Arlington County Public Health Division. She has been an APIC member since 2001 and previously Infection Preventionist at local hospital. Evelyn has 26 years of public health work in Virginia, and the only things infectious in her life that she appreciates are kindness and tolerance

    A special thank you to Lisa and Evelyn's colleague Tea Hess, RN, MPH, Clinical Program Manager Communicable Disease Program, for her work on the content of this podcast episode.

    Hosted by:

    Hannah Andrews and Silvia Quevedo

  • No one likes being in the hospital, but it’s even scarier when it feels like a second home. Listen to this personal account of how one mother navigated the health system to protect her child from infections following a tragic accident that required repeated lengthy hospital stays.

    Hosted by:

    Hannah Andrews and Silvia Quevedo

  • So what exactly is antimicrobial resistance and why should you care? Hint: it’s not just about giving chickens antibiotics. Join us while we shed some light on what causes resistance, where it stands today, and how you can protect your future self by understanding when or when not to ask for antibiotics.

    Marc-Oliver Wright, MT (ASCP), MS, CIC, FAPIC is an infection preventionist at the University of Wisconsin University Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin. Marc has worked as part of an infection prevention team since 1999 and has served as an officer and member of the board of directors for APIC. He has over 40 publications in the American Journal of Infection Control, Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Emerging Infectious Diseases, among others and currently serves on the editorial board for the American Journal of Infection Control and the APIC Text Online.

    Hosted by:

    Hannah Andrews and Silvia Quevedo

  • Vaccines have become a hot topic, and that doesn’t appear to be changing any time soon. In this episode, we dispel many circulating myths about vaccines and share the benefits of vaccines not just for the vaccinated, but those around them.

    Patricia (Patsy) Stinchfield, MS, CPNP, CIC is a board certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner with over 30 years in Infectious Diseases who specializes in vaccines and vaccine preventable diseases. She is board certified in infection prevention and control. Patsy is the Senior Director of Infection Prevention & Control and the Children’s Immunization Project at Children’s Minnesota. She is a widely recognized specialist in vaccine-preventable diseases, having served as the first Nurse voting member (2004-2008) of the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) where she continues as a liaison representing the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. She is a long-time member of the CDC’s ACIP Influenza Working Group, the Pediatric Schedule group and is on the recently formed Combination Vaccine working group. She is a regular national and international lecturer in pediatric vaccine related topics including “The burden of influenza on children in the United States”, and has published on vaccines including Measles Hospitalizations at a United States Children’s Hospital 2011-2017, Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, June 2019, and An outbreak of measles in an undervaccinated community.

    Hosted by:

    Hannah Andrews and Silvia Quevedo

  • Join us while we talk to infection preventionists to learn the facts about infection prevention, the truth about some common myths, and tips to keeping yourself and the people around you safe. Brought to you by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.