Episodes

  • We had the great pleasure to visit the newly renovated Artspace studio and gallery space at The Gunnery, Woolloomooloo. Ten artists have successfully received a years free studio space. The studios are amazing, brand new and huge along with common spaces and a beautiful gallery space downstairs.

    We interviewed Leyla Stevens, Julia Gutman, Latai Taumoepeau and David M Thomas about what they will do with their year at Artscape and their art practice.

    The 10 artists taking the studios for the inaugural year are -

    Jack Ball Brian Fuata Julia Gutman Tina Havelock Stevens Jazz Money. Thea Anamara Perkins Gemma Smith Leyla Stevens Latai Taumoepeau David M Thomas


    Artspace will have an opening on Dec 15th 5.30pm and Dec 16th 11am following the government's transformation of the heritage building. Live performances, artist talks and DJ's.

  • Many thanks Lisa for your chat about all the work that goes into building a strong business with artists .

    You can find the Astute artist course on this link
    https://www.theastuteartist.com

    Lisa's instagram https://www.instagram.com/lisadoust/


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  • Conor Knight is an emerging artist currently exhibiting at Michael Reid Northern Beaches until November 25th so get online or down to the Newport gallery and see the show, El Aula, in person.

    Conor recently spent 8 months teaching in Spain painting for this exhibition. We had a great chat about learning to paint, having a mentor in his friend and previous podcast guest, Dylan Jones, and much more...

    Thanks Conor, we wish you all the best for your future art career...


  • Ochre Lawson is an artist and teacher working out of Addison Rd Studios in Marrickville. She has a deep knowledge of colour and composition through self study and curiosity, Her work is free, flowing and colourful, full of the energy of the bush, which she loves to hike through. She was once an environmental activist and her love for nature comes through in her work.

    She is represented by Jennings Kerr Gallery in the Southern Highlands.

    The group show, Pulp, opens at Jennings Kerr November 17 until December 17.

    She has a solo show next October...

    thansk Ochre!


    Ochres Art School - Art Class Sydney, get yourself along to one of her classes!

  • This weeks podcast is with the brilliant artist Carline Zilinksy. Her show opens at Nanda Hobbs Thursday 9th Novmember so go see it! She recently won the peoples choice award at the Mosman art prize, congratulations Caroline. It was a pleasure to chat with Caroline, full of energy and unapologetic passion!

    She is represented by Nanda Hobbs

    'Caroline Zilinsky is the most enigmatic of painters. She is obsessive, highly skilled, sharp witted and possesses an eye that drills into the very soul of her sitters, revealing their most intimate truths. Her unrelenting artistic drive is intoxicating—ten-hour days at the easel is the studio norm.

    When viewing Zilinsky’s paintings, one cannot be an innocent bystander. As an artist, she has the ability to metaphorically reach out and grasp the viewer, compelling us to engage in a dialogue with her protagonists. Her works inhabit an interesting place in contemporary Australian painting. She echoes many of the themes of the Australian Modernism greats and stylistically, acknowledges a debt to their introspective investigations into an uncomfortable world.

    Caroline Zilinsky was the winner of the 2020 Portia Geach Memorial Award (Australia's most prestigious art prize for portraiture by women) and in the same year won the Evelyn Chapman Art Award at S H Ervin Gallery. She is also a regular finalist in other premier art prizes including the Archibald Prize (2022), Art Gallery NSW, Darling Portrait Prize (2020, 2022) National Portrait Gallery of Australia, Canberra, the 2020 SBS Portrait Prize, the Kilgour Prize at Newcastle Art Gallery, Blake for Religious Art, the 2017 Sulman Prize and the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize. In 2009, the Muswellbrook Regional Gallery acquired her work United We Stand.'

    Thanks Caroline

  • Many thanks to Pete Codling for chatting to us on the podcast.

    You can find more about Pete on his social media https://www.instagram.com/petecodling/

    and here on the dockyard project
    https://www.instagram.com/the_dockyard_artist_residency_/

    or his website

    https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=website+pete+codling&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8


  • Susie Dureau is the first artist we have spoken to twice. She complete her masters at national Art school 2 years ago. She currently has a show on at Curl Curl Creative Space, Soundscapes, that runs until Sunday 29th October 11-4pm so get down there and check it out.

    Thanks Susie, great chat and wonderful exhibition.

    Susie Dureau website

    Spencer Finch https://www.spencerfinch.com/

  • We unpacked a lot in this interview with associate professor of UNSW Oliver Bown and Stuart Buchanan, Head of Screen programming at Sydney Opera House. they have converted data taken from the machinations of the Opera House into a digital musical experience that you can live stream for the whole month of October... The Opera House becomes a living artwork. We hope this podcast explains the way AI and art can come together to create some amazing artworks.

    Livestream runs from 1 - 31 October for 744 hours. you can find out all the information on the Sydney Opera house Website.

    'The Sydney Opera House comes alive like never before through an uncanny symbiosis of machine learning and human creativity, as the sounds and the data from the building itself are dramatically recomposed for an unforgettable 50th-anniversary performance across October.

    What will the future of performance look like? To celebrate our 50th anniversary, we’re looking ahead to ponder the weird and wonderful new ways in which technology and human creativity collaborate – by turning the Sydney Opera House itself into the star performer.

    The Interactive Media lab from University of New South Wales team up with music technologists Uncanny Valley to harness data generated by the building and turn it into music.

    Across the month of October, the resultant 744-hour generative artwork will use A.I. processes to dynamically recompose the everyday data flow of the building into a unique musical soundscape.

    Augmented with field recordings from the building, including the sounds of the Concert Hall’s Grand Organ, the work will be livestreamed on Stream, the Sydney Opera House’s streaming platform, accompanied by generative visuals, and ‘performed’ in situ at various moments during the Birthday Festival.

    Music of the Sails is a joyous celebration of a cultural icon and a dazzling glimpse into future possibilities.

    Interactive Media Lab, University of New South Wales
    The Interactive Media Lab at UNSW’s School of Art & Design researches and teaches emerging media technologies and their application in creative work.

    Uncanny Valley
    Uncanny Valley’s focus is one part musical craft, and the other sonic technology. Armed with decades of experience, they harness their diverse musical expertise and collaborate with artists and brands to create their unique sound. They utilise emerging technologies and engage audiences to tell musical stories via all mediums.'

    Thanks Natasha from the Opera House for organising and hosting.

  • Many thanks to Michelle Cawthorn multidisciplinary artist working with memory and personal experience through her distinct visual language of repetitive mark making.

    You can find out more about Michelle on her website https://www.michellecawthorn.com

    or on her instagram
    https://www.instagram.com/michellecawthorn/

    Michelle has a show on at Olsen gallery opening today Wednesday September 27th ..see this link for more details
    https://olsengallery.com/ex-works.php?exhibition_id=893

  • We covered everything in this podcast with these amazing curators and artists. We talked about science, ecology, archaeology, art, curating and much much more.

    Pippa Mott has recently taken up the mantle of Director of Woollahra Gallery in Sydney, after completing a Fulbright scholarship in NY and 8 years as a curator at MONA, Tasmania.

    Maya Martin-Westheimer is an artist, curator and founder of contemporary art publishing company, Floorplan Studio. She is also artist in residence at Woollahra Gallery until 13th September 2023.

    Thanks to you both for a great chat. Get yourself down to the gallery for the small sculpture prize opens September 28th.

  • Coco Elder - The Never Never is on at Art2Muse Gallery until 18th September.
    Bellingen Arts Trail 10-12th November

    'My artwork is based on observations of the landscape and flora, notably in Ku-Ring-Gai Chase National Park, and more recently in the Bellingen Shire. My initial study in Landscape Architecture has inspired my interest in geology and indigenous botanical landscapes. Overtime, I have witnessed the bush thrive in the wet, fight or recoil in the dry, and brought back to life after the fires. I hope to transcribe reverence for the Australian bush and to reveal the mysterious and alluring qualities of our native plants and the lie of the land.

    The natural landscape presents as an intriguing paradox. Up close, the bush is an unruly entanglement of prickly menace; from a distance, are distinct interlocking shapes that can be ordered by the eye into Cezanne's geometry. Patterns that appear on the macro level are reiterated at the micro. Whilst bodies of water lead the eye in and outwards through reflections, there is a mysterious chasm in time, yet it also appears infinite. Shadows of texture hem and define vibrations of light. I endeavour to capture some of these subtle ambiguities in my work.

    I retrace the place, coming closer to the essence of form, yet ironically remove it, by carving back through the surface. The image becomes a visual description that blends aspects of botanical documentation (like the early Australian artists); a journey through nature, (influenced by Japanese scrolls); and a personal expression through patterns of whimsy, and reflections on the past inhabitants, the Carigal and Gumbaynggirr people, whose presence are keenly felt.'

    thanks Coco for your time and good luck with the Bellingen arts trail!

  • Many thanks to Draw Space founding members - 4 of which kindly spoke to us - if you would like to find out more about these artists please find links below.

    Melinda Hunt, https://www.instagram.com/melinda.ink/?hl=en
    and Chelsea Lehmann https://www.chelseajlehmann.com
    and Daniel Press Art https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=daniel+press+art&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
    and Belinda Yee http://belindayee.com/about.htm
    and Luke Thurgate https://www.instagram.com/luke_thurgate/?hl=en
    and Jeremy W Smith https://www.jeremywsmithart.com
    and Lisa Pang https://www.instagram.com/jolibeol/?hl=en

    Also many thanks to Kristy Gordon https://www.instagram.com/kristygordon_art/?hl=en
    and Joyce Lubotzky https://www.instagram.com/joylubo/?hl=en
    who kindly spoke to us about their art current practises which was on show in Materiality https://drawspace.org




  • Our latest guests on @art.wank won it!! In 2021, an arts collective, Array Collective won this prestigious prize for their installation, ‘The Druthaib’s Ball’.

    .‘The Druthaib’s Ball, new work for Turner Prize 2021, has been realised twice over. In Belfast it was a wake for the centenary of Ireland’s partition in the Black Box (grassroots venue), and was attended by semi-mythological druids along with a community of artists and activists wearing hand-made costumes.

    At the Herbert, the event has been transformed into an immersive installation. An imagined síbín (a ‘pub without permission’) hosts a film created from the Belfast event, and a TV showing Northern Ireland Screen’s Digital Film Archive. A large canopy styled from banners provides a floating roof. The síbín is approached through a circle of flag poles, that references ancient Irish ceremonial sites and contemporary structures, and is illuminated by a dawn-to-dusk light.

    Array invite us into a place of contradictions where trauma, dark humour, frustration, and release coexist. It is a place to gather outside the sectarian divides that have dominated the collective memory of the North of Ireland for the last hundred years.’

    .We had a wonderful time chatting over zoom to two of Arrays members Sighle Bhreathnach-Cashell and Stephen Millar. Thanks for your time!

  • We interviewed artist Marilou Palazon at Sydney Road Gallery surrounded by her beautiful artworks at her solo show, Realise, which is on until Sunday 27th August. Go see the exhibition or view online. Marilou is a director of Sydney Road Gallery, a mentor, co-founder of online gallery The Brush artists Group Collective.

    'My Florals are really dramatic landscapes. I relish the simplicity of the monumental and sweeping the illogical large scale of an otherwise delicate and small subject disorientate and create a sense of awe.

    I like my viewer to fall into my images and traveling along the surface of my images. My images of flowers become more iconic, monolithic, archetypal, ultimate and prime symbols. I rejoice in this transhistorical and ancient subject matter. They always continue to fascinate me.

    Historically the flowers are emotionally and symbolically rich with content. To me they represent time, beauty , fragility, decay, cycle of life, life as a journey. I like the space of the struggle – the dichotomy of perfection and slow decline. One cannot exist and be appreciated without the other.

    There is great beauty in all these stages. Life as journey and respect for all stages of nature. To get a sense of nostalgia of what was.'

  • We interviewed artist Belinda Yee (winner works on paper and photography award), furniture designer and maker Jack Stannard (winner of the functional design award) and artist and academic Laura Fisher (part of Kandos School of cultural adaptation winner of the Interdisciplinary Collaboration award) at Manly Art gallery and Museum last week.

    'Thought-provoking works by 215 artists and designers from across Australia have been shortlisted for the prestigious annual Northern Beaches Environmental Art & Design Prize.

    Now in its third year, the Environmental Art & Design Prize brings together a community of creatives to highlight our environmental concerns and hopes across the nation. The works selected present fresh perspectives on our global climate crisis and sustainable life on earth. They will be on show in an outstanding exhibition of art and design from 4 – 27 August at Manly Art Gallery & Museum, Curl Curl Creative Space and Mona Vale Creative Space Gallery. '

    Thanks for listening



  • Many thanks to Simone for your time.

    We so enjoyed talking to you, you can find out more about Simone on her website

    https://www.simonedouglas.info/biography

    or on her social media https://www.instagram.com/simonedouglasstudio/

    Simone will be talking at National Art school this Wednesday at Art Forum.

    You can out more about Simone's last exhibition in Sydney at Artreal her in this link https://artereal.com.au/online-exhibition/an-ocean-in-your-hand/

  • Henry Curchod is a fabulous story telling artist who we have long admired who works predomentially in oil stick - we had a chance to chat with him over zoom https://www.henrycurchod.com as he is currently living in UK. You can find out more about Henry on his website instagram account. https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=henry+curchod+instagram&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8


    Henry is an eclectic and interesting artist who is a keen user or multiple perspectives inspired by Persian miniature art - also the inventor with his Uncle of the new art movement 'Monobrowism' - a combination of work that is high and low brow. The manifesto is written on to toilet paper its on Henry's instagram.

    Check out his social media to find out where and when Henry is showing his work. He currently has a work in the Sulman and will be at the Ramsay show from 27 May - 27 August https://www.agsa.sa.gov.au/whats-on/exhibitions/ramsay-art-prize-2023/henry-curchod

    Many thanks Henry for your time.


  • Kirsteen Pieterse is a sculptor who grew up near the mining pits of Glasgow and lived and worked in the bustling industrial city of Hong Kong, resulting in her amazing sculptures which integrate and contrast brutalist architecture with organic form.

    ‘The Scottish sculptor Kirsteen Pieterse, who is an artist in the Romantic tradition, draws upon the precarious relationship between man and built environments in her work....she draws attention to the regard we hold for our environment and how easily we might forget the power of nature. Modern architecture and engineering represent, in many ways, the epitome of humankind's 'taming' of the natural world, however, as Pieterse infers in her sculptures, the ramifications of such endeavours should not be neglected."”

    - Kate Bryan - Deconstructing Landscape, World Sculpture News, Volume 15 No 4, p. 42 – 45, 2009


    She is represented by Utopia Art Gallery in Sydney.

  • Many thanks to Anthony white for a great chat over Zoom all the way from France.

    His upcoming show -

    OPENING/PRIVATE VIEW:SATURDAY 15 JULY
    12PM-4PM
    FLOOR TALK WITH DR PETER HILL SATURDAY 15 JULY EXHIBITION CONTINUES 30 JULY 2023 MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA
    Please note this event is free but booking is advised: [email protected] or +61 409 409 239
    Lennox St. Gallery presents Manifestation, an exhibition of new works by Paris-based artist Anthony White. Marking a new direction for the artist, Manifestation consists of a series of 10 paintings responding to Sidney Nolan’s 1966 Eureka Stockade mural in which White reclaims the painterly gesture as a form of dissent. This is White's third solo show with the gallery, his first in the new space as Lennox St. Gallery and his first body of work made as a response to a single work of art.
    White draws on new research into the 1854 Eureka Rebellion (Australia’s only ever armed civil uprising), the personal papers of Sidney Nolan and recent protest events in France, highlighting the increasing importance of his engagement with material, concept and history. Painted in France during a period marked by widespread public protests, these ten new works continue White’s wider thinking around the painterly gesture as a form of dissent, as well as the act of civil disobedience, or, in French, Manifestation – a protest, public event, action, or object which embodies an idea.
    Following White’s recent creative fellowship at the National Library of Australia, Canberra,
    Manifestation responds to the anti-colonial spirit in Sidney Nolan’s Eureka Stockade mural which White spent time with in Canberra at ANU’s Drill Hall Gallery. Commissioned by the Reserve Bank of Australia, the mural depicts the pivotal event of the Victorian gold rush – a crucial point in Australia’s democratic history. White’s research into the papers of Sidney Nolan at the National Library, uncovered correspondence which reveals Nolan’s response to the only first hand account of the Eureka rebellion written by the Italian revolutionary Rafaello Carboni. Manifestation considers Nolan’s engagement with that European vision of the event, the legacy of Eureka and the development of a
    particular Australian psyche typified by a defence of democratic values.

    Each work incorporates an event or individual element from the Eureka battle as depicted in the Nolan mural: Hotham incorporates imagery resembling mounted policemen; Eureka Hotel and the largest work Manifest (After Eureka) 125 x 235 cm [shown above] depict the epic destruction of Bentley’s Eureka Hotel caused by a fire started by rioting miners on the 12th of October 1854. In each work White finds equivalent ways of harnessing the energy and dissenting spirit of the battle.
    “I went to the Nolan archive to capture this anti-colonial spirit inherent in some of the images of the mural to emphasize the sense of dissent but what struck me was the ethnic diversity of the period in Victoria. What I found was Chinese, Italian, African Americans, Jewish and Irish migrants revolting against the colonial government. It manifested as the Eureka Rebellion which became a crucial part of Australia’s engagement with democracy”
    In the current moment we are seeing the increasing relevance of civil disobedience in movements such as The Yellow Vests in France and groups like Extinction Rebellion protesting for climate change, increasing class inequalities or retirement ages. In my mind there is no doubt that the power of democracy is diminishing internationally and I feel we need to voice our discontent with government policies that infringe on personal liberty, especially the right to protest peacefully.” – Anthony White

    You can find out more about Anthony on his website

  • This weeks podcast is a short ramble wrapping up the season before we have a short break over the school holidays. Julie's daughter, Flo, asks us questions about Fionas experience at art school, our work, and our upcoming exhibition at Woollahra gallery at Redleaf opening July 26th 6-8pm.

    Woollahra Gallery