Episodes

  • Sean Illing talks with technology writer and philosopher Ian Bogost about the state of social media — especially in the wake of Elon Musk's recent acquisition of Twitter. They discuss the recent but surprising history of the platforms that have come to dominate the lives of so many, and note a crucial shift that made social media what is today. Sean and Ian also talk about how Silicon Valley views "scale," whether Twitter should be treated as a public utility, and how — as a society — we might be able to quit.Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray AreaGuest: Ian Bogost (@ibogost), contributing writer, The Atlantic; professor and director of film & media studies, Washington University of St. LouisReferences: "The Age of Social Media Is Ending" by Ian Bogost (The Atlantic; Nov. 10)"The Madness of Twitter" by Ian Bogost (The Atlantic; Nov. 22)"People Aren't Meant to Talk This Much" by Ian Bogost (The Atlantic; Oct. 22, 2021)"Facebook Is A Doomsday Machine" by Adrienne LaFrance (The Atlantic; Dec. 15, 2020)Understanding Media by Marshall McLuhan (1964)The Paradox of Democracy: Free Speech, Open Media, and Perilous Persuasion by Zac Gershberg & Sean Illing (U. Chicago; 2022) Enjoyed this episode? Rate The Gray Area ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of The Gray Area. Subscribe in your favorite podcast app.Support The Gray Area by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcastsThis episode was made by: Producer: Erikk GeannikisEditor: Amy DrozdowskaEngineer: Patrick BoydEditorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. HallLearn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

  • Sean Illing talks with Dr. Gabor Maté, a physician, speaker, and bestselling author who has written on subjects like addiction, stress, and attention deficit disorder. In Maté's new book, The Myth of Normal, he argues that the Western paradigm of health is fundamentally flawed in its attempt to separate inner, emotional well-being from bodily health. Sean and Dr. Maté discuss how our society and culture can contribute to illness. They also talk about the adverse effects of trauma, the therapeutic potential of psychedelics, and parenting.

    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
    Guest: Dr. Gabor Maté (@DrGaborMate), author; physician
    References: 


    The Myth of Normal: Trauma, Illness, and Healing in a Toxic Culture by Gabor Maté, MD, with Daniel Maté (Avery; 2022)


    "Mothers Are the 'Shock Absorbers' of Our Society" by Jessica Grose (New York Times; Oct. 14, 2020)


    "'It's Life or Death': The Mental Health Crisis Among U.S. Teens" by Matt Richtel (New York Times; Apr. 23)


    Scattered Minds: The Origin and Healing of Attention Deficit Disorder by Gabor Maté, MD (Jan. 2023; Avery. Previously published as Scattered, 2000)


    "The brutal mirror: What the psychedelic drug ayahuasca showed me about my life" by Sean Illing (Vox; Feb. 19, 2018)


    "How to discipline your child and toddler, without hitting - Jordan Peterson" (YouTube; Mar. 15, 2018)


    Hold On to Your Kids by Gordon Neufeld and Gabor Maté, MD (Ballantine; 2006)


    "A Theory of Human Motivation" by Abraham H. Maslow (Psychological Review vol. 50; 1943)

     
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  • Sean Illing talks with economic historian Brad DeLong about his new book Slouching Towards Utopia. In it, DeLong claims that the "long twentieth century" was the most consequential period in human history, during which the institutions of rapid technological growth and globalization were created, setting humanity on a path towards improving life, defeating scarcity, and enabling real freedom. But... this ran into some problems. Sean and Brad talk about the power of markets, how the New Deal led to something approaching real social democracy, and why the Great Recession of 2008 and its aftermath signified the end of this momentous era.Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray AreaGuest: J. Bradford DeLong (@delong), author; professor of economics, U.C. BerkeleyReferences: Slouching Towards Utopia: An Economic History of the Twentieth Century by J. Bradford DeLong (Basic; 2022)The Road to Serfdom by Friedrich von Hayek (1944)The Great Transformation by Karl Polanyi (1944)Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy by Joseph Schumpeter (1942)"A Short History of Enclosure in Britain" by Simon Fairlie (This Land Magazine; 2009)"China's Great Leap Forward" by Clayton D. Brown (Association for Asian Studies; 2012)What Is Property? by Pierre-Joseph Proudhon (1840)The Rise and Fall of the Neoliberal Order by Gary Gerstle (Oxford University Press; 2022)Apple's "1984" ad (YouTube)The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes (1936)"The spectacular ongoing implosion of crypto's biggest star, explained" by Emily Stewart (Vox; Nov. 18)"Did Greenspan Add to Subprime Woes? Gramlich Says Ex-Colleague Blocked Crackdown" by Greg Ip (Wall Street Journal; June 9, 2007)"Families across the country are tightening their belts and making tough decisions. The federal government should do the same," from President Obama's 2010 State of the Union Address (Jan. 27, 2010)"The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte" by Karl Marx (1852)Why We're Polarized by Ezra Klein (Simon & Schuster; 2020)The Paradox of Democracy: Free Speech, Open Media, and Perilous Persuasion by Zac Gershberg and Sean Illing (U. Chicago; 2022) Enjoyed this episode? Rate The Gray Area ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of The Gray Area. Subscribe in your favorite podcast app.Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcastsThis episode was made by: Producer: Erikk GeannikisEditor: Amy DrozdowskaEngineer: Patrick BoydEditorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. HallLearn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

  • Sean Illing talks with neuroscientist Gregory Berns, author of The Self Delusion. Berns claims that the idea of a unified, persistent self is a kind of illusion, and that we are better understood as multiple selves at different moments in time, tied together by a story — which is what we call our identity. Sean and Greg also talk about whether the brain is a computer, how perception works, the limits of thinking too much about thinking, and what psychedelics can do to disrupt and change the stories we tell about ourselves.

    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
    Guest: Gregory Berns (@gberns), author; professor of psychology and distinguished professor of neuroeconomics, Emory University
    References: 


    The Self Delusion: The New Neuroscience of How We Invent — and Reinvent — Our Identities by Gregory Berns (Basic; 2022)

    More on the "Ship of Theseus" by Noah Levin


    "Facing Up to the Problem of Consciousness" by David Chalmers (Journal of Consciousness Studies 2; 1995)

    More on "The Hard Problem of Consciousness" by Josh Weisberg (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy)


    "The extraordinary therapeutic potential of psychedelic drugs, explained" by Sean Illing (Vox; Mar. 8, 2019)

     
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  • Sean Illing talks with veteran political strategist James Carville about the U.S. midterm elections — and the surprising success for Democrats that was a far cry from the "red wave" of Republican victories widely predicted by pundits. They talk about why the results differed so vastly from these expectations, what lessons both parties should be drawing from the outcomes, and whether or not the Democratic party, despite their victories, still have a systematic problem with political messaging.
    This conversation took place mid-day on Wednesday, November 9th.

    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
    Guest: James Carville (@JamesCarville), political strategist; co-host, Politics War Room podcast
    References: 


    Fall 2022 Harvard Youth Poll (Oct. 27)

    Exit poll data from ABC News and CNN



    "'Wokeness is a problem and we all know it': James Carville on the state of Democratic politics" by Sean Illing (Vox; Apr. 27, 2021)


    "GOP to use debt limit to force spending cuts, McCarthy says" by Eugene Robinson (Washington Post; Oct. 18)


    2022 abortion-related ballot measures (Ballotpedia)


    "Democrats' Long Goodbye to the Working Class" by Ruy Teixeira (The Atlantic; Nov. 6)


    "Is John Fetterman the Future of the Democratic Party?" by Michael Sokolove (New York Times; May 18)

    On Carville's role in the abortion referendum campaign in Kansas: "The Most Consequential Vote in Recent American History is Happening Today and the News Media Is Ignoring It" by Colby Hall (Mediaite; Aug. 2nd)


    "How a 10-Year-Old Rape Victim Who Traveled for an Abortion Became Part of a Political Firestorm" by Solcyre Burga (Time; July 15)


    "Democrats still have a path to keep the House — but it's tough" by Andrew Prokop (Vox; Nov. 10)

     
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  • Sean Illing talks with technologist, media theorist, and author Douglas Rushkoff, whose new book Survival of the Richest explains how the ultra-wealthy are obsessed with preparing for the end of the world — and the troubling mindset that leads many rich and powerful people down this road. They discuss the blend of tech utopianism and fatalism behind this doomsday prepping, how Silicon Valley and "tech bro" culture have incentivized a kind of misanthropy, and why the world's billionaire class can't see that the catastrophes they fear are of their own making.

    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
    Guest: Douglas Rushkoff (@rushkoff), author; professor, media studies, CUNY Queens College
    References: 


    Survival of the Richest: Escape Fantasies of the Tech Billionaires by Douglas Rushkoff (W.W. Norton; 2022)


    "Epson boobytrapped its printers" by Cory Doctorow (Medium; Aug. 7)


    "Cosmism: Russia's religion for the rocket age" by Benjamin Ramm (BBC; Apr. 20, 2021)


    The Selfish Gene (1976) and The God Delusion (2006) by Richard Dawkins

    Francis Bacon, Redargutio Philosophiarum (1608), tr. by Benjamin Farrington in The Philosophy of Francis Bacon (1964): "Nature must be taken by the forelock . . . lay hold of her and capture her" (p. 130).


    "Power changes how the brain responds to others" by Jeremy Hogeveen, et al., Journal of Experiential Psychology (Apr. 2014)


    What We Owe the Future by William MacAskill (Basic Books; 2022)


    Team Human by Douglas Rushkoff (W.W. Norton; 2021)

     
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  • Sean Illing talks with Nicole Hemmer, history professor and author of the new book Partisans. In it, she gives a reinterpretation of the Reagan presidency and what followed, and shows how the conservative political movement entangled with media figures and became what it is in the 1990s. They discuss the doomed but influential presidential campaigns of Pat Buchanan, the rise to dominance of conservative talk radio, and the enduring dangers of political violence.

    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
    Guest: Nicole Hemmer (@pastpunditry), author; professor, Vanderbilt University
    References: 


    Partisans: The Conservative Revolutionaries Who Remade American Politics in the 1990s by Nicole Hemmer (Basic; 2022)


    "The Man Who Won the Republican Party Before Trump Did" by Nicole Hemmer (New York Times; Sept. 8)


    Talk Radio's America: How an Industry Took Over a Political Party That Took Over the United States by Brian Rosenwald (Harvard; 2019)


    On the Fairness Doctrine (First Amendment Center; MTSU)


    GOP Reagan Library Debate (CNN; Sept. 16, 2015)

     
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  • Sean Illing talks with Yuval Noah Harari, historian and bestselling author, about how humanity came to be the dominant species on earth, and what our future might hold. Sean and Yuval discuss mankind's imaginative "superpower," the threats to democracy across the globe, the future of artificial intelligence — and plenty more.
    Yuval's new book Unstoppable Us adapts many of his macro-historical insights from Sapiens for younger readers, and is the first in a planned four-volume series.

    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
    Guest: Yuval Noah Harari (@harari_yuval), author; professor, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    References: 


    Unstoppable Us, Volume 1: How Humans Took Over the World by Yuval Noah Harari; illustrated by Ricard Zaplana Ruiz (Bright Matter; 2022)


    Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari (Harper; 2017)


    Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari (Harper; 2015)


    "Nationalism vs. globalism: the new political divide | Yuval Noah Harari" (TED; YouTube)

     
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  • Sean Illing talks with reporter Katie Engelhart, whose book The Inevitable is an up-close look at physician-assisted dying. This is the practice of receiving state-sanctioned medical aid to end one's life — a practice now legal in 10 U.S. states, Canada, and elsewhere around the world. They discuss the details of the procedure — including why people fight for this right and exercise it — as well as many of the moral and legal questions that it raises.
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
    Guest: Katie Engelhart (@katieengelhart), journalist; author
    References: 


    The Inevitable: Dispatches on the Right to Die by Katie Engelhart (St. Martin's; 2021)

    Brittany Maynard's legislative testimony

     
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  • Sean Illing talks with Jonathan Lear, a psychoanalyst and philosopher, about his new book Imagining the End: Mourning and Ethical Life. How can we continue to live a good life in a world beset by catastrophe, crisis, and chaos? Sean and Jonathan discuss the role of imagination and culture in the ways we make meaning in the world, the idea of mourning as a confrontation with our uniquely human ability to love, and how to turn away from the path of despair, towards hope — and to what Lear calls "committed living towards the future."Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray AreaGuest: Jonathan Lear, author; professor, Committee on Social Thought & Dept. of Philosophy, University of ChicagoReferences: Imagining the End: Mourning and Ethical Life by Jonathan Lear (Harvard; Nov. 15, 2022)Aristotle, Nicomachean EthicsSøren Kierkegaard, The Sickness unto Death (1849; published under the pseudonym Anti-Climacus)Sigmund Freud, Mourning and Melancholia (1917)"The Difficulty of Reality and the Difficulty of Philosophy" by Cora Diamond (2003)Radical Hope: Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation by Jonathan Lear (Harvard; 2008)"Envy and Gratitude" by Melanie Klein (1957; published in The Writings of Melanie Klein, Volume III, Hogarth Press; 1975)"A Lecture on Ethics" by Ludwig Wittgenstein (lecture notes from 1929-1930, published in The Philosophical Review v. 74 no. 1, 1965) Enjoyed this episode? Rate The Gray Area ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of The Gray Area. Subscribe in your favorite podcast app.Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcastsThis episode was made by: Producer: Erikk GeannikisEditor: Amy DrozdowskaEngineer: Patrick BoydEditorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. HallLearn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

  • Sean Illing talks with historian and author Peniel Joseph about his new book The Third Reconstruction, which argues that the time we're currently living in can be understood as on a continuum with the civil rights era of the '50s and '60s. and the original American Reconstruction following the Civil War. Sean and Peniel discuss the Black Lives Matter movement, the Obama presidency — and important differences between the two — as well as the dangers of American exceptionalism and the importance of maintaining hope in the ongoing fight for racial justice.
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
    Guest: Peniel Joseph (@PenielJoseph), author; founding director, Center for the Study of Race and Democracy, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin
    References: 


    The Third Reconstruction: America's Struggle for Racial Justice in the Twenty-First Century by Peniel E. Joseph (Basic; 2022)


    "DeSantis claims it was only the American Revolution that caused people to question slavery" by Graig Graziosi (The Independent; Sept. 23)


    Black Reconstruction in America by W.E.B. Du Bois (1935)


    "The Undoing of Reconstruction" by W. Archibald Dunning (The Atlantic; Oct. 1901)


    Barack Obama's Speech at the 2004 Democratic National Convention (C-SPAN; YouTube)


    The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press; 2010, updated 2020)


    Shelby County v. Holder (570 US 529; 2013), in which the Supreme Court struck down Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965


    "Harming Our Common Future: America's Segregated Schools 65 Years after Brown" by Gary Orfield, et al. (Civil Rights Project; 2019)


    Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1 (551 US 701; 2007)


    "A North Carolina city begins to reckon with the massacre in its white supremacist past" by Scott Neuman (NPR; Nov. 10, 2021)


    How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World; 2019)


    White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon; 2018)


    "Why I hope 2022 will be another 1866" by Manisha Sinha (CNN; Oct. 12)


    President Kennedy's Televised Address to the Nation on Civil Rights (June 11, 1963)

     
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  • Sean Illing talks with Reza Aslan, scholar of religions and author of multiple bestselling nonfiction works, to discuss the state of religion in America today. Sean and Reza discuss the relationship between politics and religion, why it can be hard to separate the emotional experiences of faith from the symbolic language of organized religion, and how new religious identities are being forged along principles of Christian nationalism.Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray AreaGuest: Reza Aslan (@rezaaslan), authorReferences: An American Martyr in Persia: The Epic Life and Tragic Death of Howard Baskerville by Reza Aslan (Norton; 2022)The Leftovers TV series (HBO; 2014–2017)"Can Religion & Reason Be Reconciled? | Reza Aslan & Sam Harris debate" (Jan. 25, 2007; C-SPAN YouTube)Pew Research Center Religious Landscape Study (Jan. 14, 2021)The 2020 Census of American Religion (PRRI; July 8, 2021)"'Pro-Life' Herschel Walker Paid for Girlfriend's Abortion" by Roger Sollenberger (The Daily Beast; Oct. 4)President George W. Bush's remarks on the morning of Sept. 12, 2001: "This will be a monumental struggle of good versus evil. But good will prevail." Enjoyed this episode? Rate The Gray Area ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of The Gray Area. Subscribe in your favorite podcast app.Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcastsThis episode was made by: Producer: Erikk GeannikisEditor: Amy DrozdowskaEngineer: Patrick BoydEditorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. HallLearn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

  • Sean Illing talks with war reporter and New Yorker contributing writer Luke Mogelson about his new book The Storm Is Here. In it, Luke shares his on-the-ground reporting across America — from anti-lockdown protests in Lansing, Michigan, to the uprising in Minneapolis after the murder of George Floyd — to explain how the forces that animated the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6th, 2021 came to gather strength. In this discussion, Sean and Luke talk about what happened, how it happened, and how Luke's experience at the Capitol on the 6th shaped his view of what's coming next.
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
    Guest: Luke Mogelson, author; contributing writer, The New Yorker
    References: 


    The Storm Is Here: An American Crucible by Luke Mogelson (Penguin; 2022)


    "A Reporter's Footage from Inside the Capitol Siege | The New Yorker" (YouTube; Jan. 17, 2021)


    "Michigan Sheriff Compares Lockdown Order He's Supposed to Enforce to Mass Arrest" by Tracy Connor (The Daily Beast; May 19, 2020)

     
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  • On this first episode of The Gray Area, Sean Illing talks with astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, who takes on many of our most vexing societal problems in his new book Starry Messenger. According to Neil, if we all were to adopt a more scientific approach to politics, many of our social problems would be easier to identify, talk about, and solve. In this conversation, Sean challenges that claim, and they discuss what the limits of both politics and science might be, as tools to use in crafting an improved society.
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
    Guest: Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson), astrophysicist; author 
    References: 

     Starry Messenger: Cosmic Perspectives on Civilization by Neil deGrasse Tyson (Henry Holt; 2022)


    "Neil deGrasse Tyson lets the science deniers have it: 'The beginning of the end of an informed democracy'" by Sean Illing (Salon; Oct. 20, 2015)

     
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  • Resist certainty, embrace ambiguity. The Gray Area is a philosophical take on culture, politics, and everything in between with host Sean Illing. We don’t pretend to have the answers, but we do offer a space for real dialogue. Get some cool takes on a very hot world. New episodes drop every Monday and Thursday.
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  • In this episode originally recorded in July 2021, Vox's Zack Beauchamp talks with Columbia law professor Jamal Greene about his book How Rights Went Wrong: Why Our Obsession With Rights Is Tearing America Apart. They discuss how the US obsession with rights and their protections gives too much power to judges and the courts, makes it difficult for ordinary citizens to find reasonable solutions to legitimate problems, and has made this country's legal system not only nonsensical but dangerous.
    Vox Conversations will return on Thursday, Oct. 13th — but under a new name, and with a new look. Stay tuned for The Gray Area with Sean Illing: a philosophical take on culture, politics, and everything in between.
    Host: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), Senior Correspondent, Vox
    Guest: Jamal Greene (@jamalgreene), Dwight Professor of Law, Columbia Law School
    References: 


    How Rights Went Wrong: Why Our Obsession With Rights Is Tearing America Apart by Jamal Greene (HMH Books; 2021)


    "From Guns to Gay Marriage, How Did Rights Take Over Politics?" by Kelefa Sanneh (New Yorker; May 24, 2021)


    Lochner v. New York, 198 US 45 (1905)


    Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, 584 US __ (2018)


    District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 US 570 (2008)


    "Texas's radical anti-abortion law, explained" by Ian Millhiser (Vox; Sept. 2, 2021)


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  • Sean Illing talks with former Republican strategist Tim Miller about his new book Why We Did It, which offers an inside look at Donald Trump's total capture of the Republican Party. Now a staff writer at The Bulwark, Miller shares detailed conversations he had with other party operators — who he criticizes as power- and fame-hungry enablers. He pulls back the curtain on a DC culture of identity and status, talks about the media's role in this transformation, and opens up honestly about the ways in which he and others like him are culpable.
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), Interviews Writer, Vox
    Guest: Tim Miller (@Timodc), author; writer, The Bulwark
    References: 


    Why We Did It: A Travelogue from the Republican Road to Hell by Tim Miller (Harper; 2022)


    "Unlocking the Conservative Closet" by Kerry Eleveld (The Advocate; Oct. 12, 2010)


    Losers: The Road to Everyplace but the White House by Michael Lewis (Vintage; 1998)


    "Elise Stefanik said she was one of the 'most bipartisan' members of Congress. Then she went all-in on Trump's false election claims" by Michael Kranish (Washington Post; May 12, 2021)


    "The Republican Triangle of Doom" by Sarah Longwell (The Bulwark; Sept. 27, 2021)


    "Breakfast with J.D. Vance, Anti-Trump Author Turned Pro-Trump Candidate" by Molly Ball (Time; July 7, 2021)


    "Social decay: what the conversation about Trump and the white working class misses" by Sean Illing (Vox; Nov. 1, 2016)


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    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. Hall


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  • Vox’s Marin Cogan talks with Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg about her new book On Repentance And Repair, which is about how to make amends in the modern world. They talk about the difference between repentance and forgiveness, why making amends is so important, and how a "five step plan" for repairing harm drawn from the Jewish tradition can serve as a guide even for navigating repair in modern, complex issues. And, merely apologizing . . . is not enough.
    Host: Marin Cogan (@marincogan), Senior Features Correspondent, Vox
    Guest: Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg (@TheRaDR), rabbi; author; scholar-in-residence, National Council of Jewish Women
    References: 


    On Repentance And Repair: Making Amends in an Unapologetic World by Danya Ruttenberg (Beacon Press; 2022)


    The Cost of Discipleship by Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1937)

    New Testament; Matthew 18:15–35


    "Most harassment apologies are just damage control. Dan Harmon's was a self-reckoning" by Caroline Framke (Vox; Jan. 12, 2018)

    The Mishneh Torah of Maimonides (c. 1170–1180 CE); the laws of teshuvah


    Sacred Spaces


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    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. Hall


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  • Sean Illing talks with Carrie Jenkins about her new book Sad Love, and her call to rethink the shape and boundaries of romantic love. In this far-ranging discussion about the meaning of romantic love, Sean and Carrie discuss the connection between love and happiness, what we should expect (and not expect) from our romantic partners, and whether or not loving a person must entail that we love only that person.
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), Interviews Writer, Vox
    Guest: Carrie Jenkins (@carriejenkins), writer; professor of philosophy, University of British Columbia
    References: 


    Sad Love: Romance and the Search for Meaning by Carrie Jenkins (Polity; 2022)


    "A philosopher makes the case for polyamory" by Sean Illing (Vox; Feb. 16, 2018)


    What Love Is: And What It Could Be by Carrie Jenkins (Basic; 2017)


    Nausea by Jean-Paul Sartre (1949)


    Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle (see Book I, or Book X.6-8 for robust discussion of eudaimonia)

    Marina Adshade, economist


    Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl (1946; tr. Ilse Lasch)


    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
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    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. Hall


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  • Into It is a new podcast from Vulture and New York Magazine hosted by Sam Sanders. Each week, Sam and his Vulture colleagues break down the pop culture they can't stop thinking about and help us all obsess . . . better.
    In this segment, Sam talks to New York Times columnist Tressie McMillan Cottom about the popular TV show Yellowstone and how it reflects our own identity politics.
    New episodes of Into It drop every Thursday.
    Listen on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/intoit
    Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6YRlgok1wcnIqhrQgH1Tjt?si=46df5a54f7934e17
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