Episodios

  • Positive community outcomes are what drive this Central Otago sheep & beef farmer who has found herself supporting the diversity of opinion towards environmental progress.

    Emma Crutchley, farming with her husband in the Maniototo, has a wide range of experience from a career in agronomy to governance in water management aware that her biggest strength she offers is facilitating challenging conversations.

    "I've learned that you have a limited time so don't spread yourself too thin. Try and find the spot where you can use your skillset to have the biggest influence with the time you have available to contribute," Emma Crutchley.

    As this week's Sarah's Country Sister, Emma has many pleas for the farming sector to come together around the various strategies to achieve environmental excellence and that outside thinking is needed.

    Tiaki Maniototo is an example of Emma's involvement in sourcing $4.5million in government funding to plant 90,000 native plants, 200km of fencing, preserve the rare native fish and enhance recreational areas for all of the community to access the newly planted areas.

    Sarah & Emma discuss how projects can bring the wider community together on their shared values bridging the divide so they have a collective sense of achievement and connection to their catchment.

    Click here to read Emma's Kellogg's report "Water sharing in a water-short catchment"

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

    Thank you so much to our mates at Farmlands for supporting us this season!

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

  • Did you know that New Zealand farmers in their 40's are having heart attacks?

    It's time to reframe what it means to be a top farmer. It's not about what people think of you as the stress unbalances the economics of your farm and life.

    Being a Triple-A farmer is assessing, adapting, and adjusting your farm to have a holistic approach to wellbeing. From the books to the bed, being successful is having your physical, mental, social, and business wellbeing in order right across the board.

    In this week's Opinion Maker, Sarah discusses the fundamentals of having a balanced life as every aspect is interconnected. Physical pain creates fatigue which leads to poor mental performance and ultimately business performance.

    Throughout this episode, Sarah talks to others involved in a unique new program, FarmFlex, from a rural accountant, personal trainer, environmental consultant, insurance advisors.

    In this week's Opinion Maker, Sarah discusses the fundamentals of having a balanced life as every aspect is interconnected. Physical pain creates fatigue which leads to poor mental performance and ultimately business performance.

    Throughout this episode, Sarah talks to others involved in a unique new program, FarmFlex, from a rural accountant, personal trainer, environmental consultant, insurance advisors.

    In this episode, we learn about great tips and advice from:

    - Elle Perriam, founder of Will to Live NZ Charitable Trust, supports farmers with free private phycologists and what she's discovered about the fundamentals of stress.

    - Erica Van Reenan, managing director AgFirst Manawatu, in how she's learned that to achieve good environmental and business outcomes people are at the heart of decision making.

    - Rahui Corbett, partner at rural accountancy, Morrison Creed on how to cashflow forecast in uncertain times.

    - Matt Wells, wellness coach at The Rec Room, hits home the importance of physical health on overall performance and reducing fatigue from niggly injuries.

    - Pierre Schroeder, the principal adviser at Thrive, highlights the value of human resources in your farming operation and how putting yourself & people first can save you money.

    For more information about FarmFlex launching on 5th November 2021, visit https://www.facebook.com/Farmflex2021 or contact the team at Thrive.

    Thank you so much to our mates at Farmlands for supporting us this season!

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

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  • Cherry-picking facts and non or discounted 'accounting' is happening everywhere across the conversation of climate change and food production.

    One New Zealand scientist wants the narrative to include the full energy analysis of our food production which doesn't look good for plant-based proteins or vertical farming.

    Craig Anderson's webinar "Is energy the Achilles heel of agriculture" has caught many people's attention and highlighted the opportunity to focus on the full life cycle analysis, instead of just greenhouse gas emissions.

    As this week's Change Maker, Sarah learns more about the observations Craig is making when we shift our thinking to the energy or calorie profile of food.

    "The green revolution of agriculture has seen more energy/per kg used to produce 1kg of calories. Whilst we can all make reductions on farm, lot of that is coming from the process after the farm-gate. New Zealand has an opportunity to reframe the story," explains Craig.

    More resources as explained in the podcast:

    - Craig's presentation - watch here

    - Craig's latest opinion piece on Newsroom 'The energy dilemma of eating' - read here

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

    Thank you so much to our mates at Farmlands for supporting us this season!

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

  • What has been polarising the New Zealand farming community for some time is a word!

    Yep, that's right. The word 'regenerative'. Unable to be pigeonhole or tamed by certification. So why do we care so much about it?

    It's because the principles of regenerative resonate so deeply with New Zealand's essence of how we naturally care for the environment that we have become so passionate about our identity being under threat.

    In the Regenerative Agriculture Market Scan & Consumer Insights report released this week, showed here is a significant opportunity for New Zealand to position itself to take advantage of the global regenerative agriculture trend, according to research commissioned by Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) and New Zealand Winegrowers (NZW).

    In this week's Opinion Maker, Sarah discusses how we can lead the world with our farming practices on the groundswell surrounding the word, 'regenerative.'

    This episode features the report's author, Mike Lee from Alpha Food Labs (USA), Steve Smith, Chair of Primary Sector Council and representing the NZ Winegrowers as well as Beef + Lamb NZ's Market Development Manager, Nick Beeby.

    For more information about Sarah's Country, visit www.sarahscountry.com

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

    Thank you so much to our mates at Farmlands for supporting us this season!

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  • Did you know over 200,000 treated and broken timber vineyard posts every year discarded wood destined for landfills?

    Greg Coppell found himself looking to fence off his farm on a shoestring budget and Stu Dudley his mate works in the viticulture industry which was the onus for creating REPOST, this great company in Marlborough recycling what has been a waste product for the vineyard industry into a new life of farms repurposing posts as a cheap, no-fuss fencing solution for fencing off waterways on farms across the country.

    This truly is saving money and the environment as Sarah's Country's Change Maker this week!

    For more information on REPOST visit, https://repost.co.nz/about/

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands for partnering with us this Spring. As NZ's largest farmer-owned co-operative head to shop.farmlands.co.nz for your knowledge & advice across the country.

    visit www.sarahscountry.com

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  • She oozes passion for our food storytellers to lead the next generation of New Zealand's identity as a proud food-producing nation. But she says there is no time to rest on our laurels and we must come together around our proposed national food strategy, Mana Kai, for which she is on the steering group for.

    "We have had the moral and environment high ground for so long. The push back that we are better than the rest of the world is really dangerous as other countries can frog-jump us with our complacency," Angela Clifford, Eat NZ.

    This week's Change Maker is Angela Clifford, founder of Eat New Zealand, a non-profit organisation on a mission to be the bridge of the New Zealand food movement dedicated to connecting people to our land, through our food.

    Eat New NZ is a collective of chefs, producers, media, tourism, and event operators, who have all been inspired to create a national platform to promote and champion our best food, drink, and culinary tourism opportunities.

    Sarah & Angela discuss opportunities to capture our national & indigenous values with our own form of geographical indicators, provenance & terroir.

    Angela, along with her wine-maker husband spent 15 years in the Barossa Valley, Australia deeply involved in the storytelling through wine events & farmer markets. When they returned home to North Canterbury, where Nick was involved in the establishment of Greystone Wines, Angela spread her wings to wrap the food of the region together with the wine involving chefs, tourism, and media.

    Now in 2021, Eat New Zealand is holding the next installment of the Food Hui in Christchurch 1-2 November to discuss how we can incorporate a values-based framework or national food strategy into our food system, the development of food communities through local food networks, and regenerative food tourism to understand how they’ll play an important role in our food security and food celebration moving forwards.

    Thanks to our mates at Farmlands for partnering with us this Spring. As NZ's largest farmer-owned co-operative head to shop.farmlands.co.nz for your knowledge & advice across the country.

    visit www.sarahscountry.com

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

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  • We are heavily assuming if you are reading this article you are already well educated on the nutrition and climate science that supports grass-fed, pasture-raised beef and lamb from New Zealand.

    But to also go on to assume that just because consumers may be wealthy and educated, doesn't necessarily mean they will choose to purchase red meat as often as they once did. They have been afforded the privilege of having a food identity.

    You can throw all of the complex science at the human health vs planetary health debate or the plant vs meat debate, but it will mean nothing without cohesive global storytelling as this week's guests from around the world highlight.

    Over the course of 3 months, Sarah Perriam has been collecting interviews from experts across the globe for this very special Opinion Maker episode to try and answer the burning question for New Zealand's sheep & beef farmers, "How does meat compete with the negative narrative globally?"

    This episode features :

    Prof. Frederic Leroy, Professor of Food Science and Biotechnology Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium, presented at both the 2019 Red Meat Sector Conference (NZ) and presented at Multiscapes, the international virtual conference in 2021 (NZ) and explains the complex, binary discussion surrounding meat. Fiona Windle, Head Nutritionist at Beef + Lamb NZ who highlights the ever-evolving narrative towards meat that lacks nutritional importance when discussing climate change off the back of the Barnsley report published in 2021 that illustrates substituting meat from the average diet would lead to only a 3-4% decrease in an individual's lifetime global warming impact.Anne Mottet, Sustainable livestock development at United Nations Food & Agriculture Organisation, France, discusses balancing the Sustainable Development Goals of nutritional needs as discussed at the 2021 UN Food Systems Summit with the climate needs on the table at 2021 UN COP26. Kate Gower-James, Aitkens Ranch based in San Francisco about the US Wholefoods consumer, the trends of food identity, trusting your meat marketer to keep up with the latest consumer trends, and how positioning accredited storytelling on meat is important.Laura Ryan, the co-founder of the Global Meat Alliance, has rallied the global red meat community to work together on the common challenges, collaborating through COVID in the lead-up to COP26.Dave Courtney, Silver Fern Farms chief customer officer discussing their research and pilot for carbon-neutral meat and regenerative agriculture and how NZ sheep & beef farmers can prepare themselves for these trends.
  • From farm to fork, food is the least digitized supply chain. However, with the recent advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and big data analytics, and for the first time in human history, it’s now practical to digitize agriculture and its supply chain.

    The billion-dollar space race is allowing connectivity to sensors like never before which will transform how we collect data in areas without cellphone coverage.

    This week's Change Maker is Dr. Sara Spangelo, Founder & CEO of Swarm who are rumored to have just sold their company to Elon Musk's SpaceX, about how New Zealand is leading the pack in buying up low-cost satellite technology.

    Rural connectivity in New Zealand, but also globally, is renowned for being unreliable and frequently nonexistent. Ground-based network solutions like cellular and point-to-point networks have limited range, where their signals only travel a few dozens of kilometers. But then satellite has been really expensive, until now. Swarm created the world’s tiniest satellites in orbit which you can purchase a small compact low-power tile to collect data from any sensor.

    "There are so many wonderful companies in New Zealand doing agriculture and IoT. New Zealand is the one country that we have sold the most devices so far. There is a huge interest because you are forward-thinking towards innovation and technology," Sara Spangelo, Swarm

    By deploying internet-connected sensors and robotics into the field data can be continuously collected to monitor crop and soil health, detect pests, and automate tasks like irrigation, fertilizing, and harvesting.

    Growers can now make data-informed decisions about production to optimize for profitability and market-driven volume. These technologies also significantly reduce the waste of precious resources like water.

    Dr. Sara Spangelo worked on small satellites and autonomous aircraft at the University of Michigan and was a lead systems engineer at both NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) and Google X. She holds a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Michigan and in 2017 was a Top 32 Canadian astronaut candidate.

    For more information on how Swarm is being used in agriculture, visit https://swarm.space/applications/agriculture

  • This is the one episode in nearly 900 episodes where I teared up editing it!

    Meet one of my great mates, Anna. As an open-minded, intelligent, technologically advanced sheep & beef farmer in her 30's she is trumped, not at why change is needed, but how.

    Anna Fisher, a passionate farming mother of 2-under-5 gives an authentic insight into life on farm navigating the rise in demands from every level and why farmers took to the streets in protest.

    "Most of our friends in the farming industry are pretty upbeat sort of people. You don't ever see them angry or down and out but now they are saying, geez, I've had enough. There are just so many pressures on farming, you feel like a minority that people just hate you," explains Anna.

  • Want to understand the proposed changes to the freshwater farm plan and intensive winter grazing rules? Are these changes more workable for land-owners, how will improvements be measured and audited, what on-farm tools will be used?

    Bryan Smith, Chief Advisor for Freshwater from the Ministry for the Environment presented as part of this Livestream Q & A on Sarah's Country about the proposed changes to the freshwater regulations on Wednesday 22nd September 2021, prior to submissions closing on 7th October 2021.

    The panel featured Sam McIvor (CEO - Beef + Lamb NZ), Sam Lucas (Head of Agronomy at Farmlands), and Kate Scott (Director - Landpro) to dive into if the new changes.

    Watch the show on Sarah's Country on YouTube.

    Contact the show: sarah@sarahscountry.com

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  • Sarah is super excited about the future of wool after this episode - it is truly wool reimagined!

    New Zealand scientists at the Wool Research Insitute (WRONZ) have been exploring new uses for strong wool - nature's miracle fibre that is costing farmers to shear for animal health reasons.

    The game-changing development is the patented technology to break down the fibre into unique particles, powders and pigments with global export potential for applications as diverse as cosmetics, printing, luxury goods, and personal care.

    "One of the massive advantages is by taking wool down to a particle level, we can create a particle that frankly feels fantastic against your skin, still has moisture absorption capability and still takes colour really well. We've attempted to maximise the strengths and the unique properties of wool whilst getting rid of maybe some of the things that have made it a challenge and in modern markets,"explains Tom Hooper, Wool Source.

    This week's Change Maker is the CEO of the newly formed Wool Source, Tom Hooper who will lead the WRONZ initiative with the goal of the three-year programme aims to prove the commercial viability of the new deconstructed wool particle products.

    For more information on the show, visit www.sarahscountry.com

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  • Curious about how 'those bureaucrats in Wellington' think? Sarah Perriam, host of Sarah's Country uncovers the nurturing nature of the woman with one of the hardest jobs in the primary sector right now.

    With policy flying out the door at pace from Minister Parker, her team has been elevated within the Ministry for the Environment as they have realized to achieve the outcomes they need to work with farmers and growers on the ground and provide better feedback loops.

    Sarah has an in-depth yarn to Sara Clarke, Director - Policy Implementation and Delivery at MfE understand the humanity behind the women tasked with implementing climate and freshwater, the Overseer review, and intensive winter grazing regulations being rolled out and she wants to do this with relationships across the sector to work together to see progress.

    "We need to have all parties in the room leading this change in order to design something that's going to land well and be implementable at the end of the process, potentially to something like emissions pricing, which ultimately will affect 20 to 30 thousand farms across New Zealand," says Sara Clarke.

    To learn more about the show, visit www.sarahscountry.com

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

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  • It goes without saying when you are in a relationship, the ultimate glue to the longevity of that relationship is trust.

    New Zealand is a trading nation exporting 95% of our products and is the largest industry geographically so there are multiple relationships to keep the trust to the highest possible level to continue to exist.

    In this week's Opinion Maker series, Sarah dives into the world of technology that has the potential to digitally connect with all farms in New Zealand, ultimately returning more value to food & fibre produced to high standards.

    Alongside that, there is fatigue on-farm and across the supply chain in ticking boxes for compliance barriers, duplication is strangling innovation and siloed powerhouses of data have refused to allow farmers data to talk to other devices.

    Sarah talks across the primary sector to unearth the progress being made to answer the looming question "How do we turn compliance into value with trust & transparency?"

    This episode features :

    Maury Leyland Penno, Chair of Trust Codes and former Fonterra executive who handled the crisis management of the botulism scare in infant formulaGreg McSkimming, in his role with the newly incorporated NZ Farm Assurance Plan body that his company, Silver Fern Farms works alongside dozens of other red meat & wool companies to bring a cohesive single assurance to consumers of on-farm practicesBrent Paterson, founder of My Enviro and Hawke's Bay farmer and agri-business professional on the launch of his digital farm environment plan that will simplify information required by regulatorsJefferson Harcourt, founder of Eco Detection, a real-time automated water quality monitoring tool.Semaine Cato, co-founder of Trust Alliance NZ, with Chris Claridge where she works in the blockchain with her company Trackback to validate the data across the supply chain.

    Watch the presentation about the Trust Alliance NZ from the 2021 Primary Industries Summit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1c5xRslgg8

    To learn more about Sarah's Country and listen to past episodes, visit www.sarahscountry.com

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  • Parents for generations have tried to preach to their children that apples are packed with good nutrients, yet lunchboxes plenty have been returned with the trusty snack.

    From the orchard gate in New Zealand through to the packaging of its product in Japan, RockitTM apple is not only the world's first snack-size apple but also a brand and business model that will make you sit up and take notice of how great brands are created by more than just great marketing.

    "It's high in antioxidants, high in Vitamin C with a huge amount of daily fibre and it's kind of an underpinning story. But what will really connect with consumers is how relevant it is to them in their daily lives and then you've got a really winning formula," Julian Smith, Rockit.

    This week's Change Maker is the General Manager of Global Marketing for Rockit, Julian Smith who brings to the Hawke's Bay-based company his experience with Jazz Apples, Les Mills as well as over 10 years working under New Zealand food & fashion brand guru, Brian Richards

    Sarah discusses with Julian:

    - Their unique vertically integrated value chain at Rockit and differentiating marketing strategy

    - How they work to optimize their systems on a daily basis to work with their orchard managers to produce a world-class product

    - How they are managing the global licensing of Rockit to scale up and plan for the rise of counterfeit products

    - Why they chose to focus on the Japanese market first and their partnership with Costco

    - His learnings on how products marketed with great stories can achieve price premiums

    For more information on the show visit, www.sarahscountry.com

    Subscribe to Sarah’s Country on the podcast and if you love us, please leave a review!

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  • A short message from Sarah Perriam to share the excitement of being back with three new episodes every week from Monday 13th September in partnership with Farmlands Co-operative.

  • Rural mental health can now benefit from a simple, effective Kiwi invention that attracted crowds at Fieldays. Farmers find it hard to get off-farm due to the tie of feeding their working dogs daily, as the Manawatu farmer-turned-inventors knows personally so he set out to do something about it!

    I wondered about heading to the coast for a fish for the weekend, with the hope the manager could feed my dogs for me. He mentioned he had a bit on with family, so that made my decision for me - I wasn't going to go away.

    With the vision to ‘feed freedom’ for both the farmer and the dog, Gerard along with his partner Claire created Durafeed, an automatic dog feeder.

    As a Change Maker this week in Sarah's Country, Gerard discusses:

    How he vividly remembers a stinking hot day in the sheep yards, back in December 2016, when he was working with the dogs to push sheep up the race for processing, that the idea of an automated dog feeder, known today as Durafeed, first came to mind.The real challenge for farmers both employees and employers alike, to get off farm to spend time with their family and take a break is the reason there is so much interest in such a simple innovation.The process of developing the Durafeed automatic dog feeders and the route to commercialising the invention for dog owners to purchase.

    About Gerard Richards:

    A rural Manawatu born and bred farmer, Gerard, along with partner Clare and their young daughter, are currently leasing a hill country block in Northern Horowhenua, where they're farming sheep and beef.

    He's always had an interest in working with animals, as they always find a way of keeping him on his toes and teaching him something new from season to season. Gerard's connection to the land runs deep, having had previous roles on a cattle ranch in Australia, in the live export industry as a stockman for 4 years at sea but his heart was firmly at home, eventually coming back to NZ to get his feet back on solid ground with a team of dogs.

    Learn more about the Feeder

    Contact Gerard: feedingfreedom@durafeed.nz

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  • The early findings of a survey show that New Zealand sheep farmers' are feeling they are hamstrung to meet the expectations of ‘transitioning to sustainability’ until the information collected and the wider system they operate in can tell the full picture.

    The government’s role is to create an environment where businesses can solve problems. If great businesses and farming is one of New Zealand’s largest businesses, gets out and shows how it’s done, then the policy can be led by that.

    Lincoln University Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce economics researcher and research & development lead at Webtools, Jemma Penelope’s fascinating combined experience in and passion for policy, ecology, commerce and technology pair beautifully to be researching solutions for the New Zealand sheep industry.

    As a Change Maker this week in Sarah's Country, Jemma discusses:

    Her research survey asks New Zealand sheep farmers what a sustainable future looks like beyond the farm gate which is collecting a range of perspectives.Farmers can’t be sustainable behind the farm-gate, if the system beyond the farm gate they are operating in doesn’t support change.Feedback so far from the survey is that farmers feel that the information collected doesn’t reflect the full picture of the positive contribution sheep farming makes to tell the full story.

    About Jemma Penelope:

    Jemma Penelope is an economics and accounting researcher, currently undertaking her second Master in Commerce and Management. Combining her earlier academic career in biology, conservation and environmental markets with her subsequent commercial experience in accounting and business management today she specialises in sustainability via impact business and social entrepreneurship – where the commerce tools of business, economics and accounting are used to address and solve this generations’ complex and challenging social and environmental issues. She compliments this through her role in political party management, speaking to her interest in the macro-level changes required on national and international levels to bring political and economic solutions to issues of sustainability in business and industry.

    Complete the survey (closes mid-August 2021)

    Connect with Jemma on LinkedIn

    Contact Jemma: jemmapenelope@gmail.com

    Connect with Jemma on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jemmapenelopemisjp/?originalSubdomain=nz

    For more information on Sarah’s Country: www.sarahscountry.com

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  • It turns out, according to new research, that Kiwis - urban and farmers - share similar views on what sustainable farming looks like.

    They both share concerns that big retailers, like supermarkets and regulators, are putting pressure on producers and holding back a healthy food system with more and more Kiwis ready to shop with their farmers in mind whether buying direct, at farmers markets or labelled NZ-grown.

    "Urban and rural dwellers have a similar vision for sustainable farming. They don’t just agree on the issues, but also on the solutions!” says Dr Turner.

    As a Change Maker this week in Sarah's Country, Dr James Turner, Our Land and Water science leader & senior AgResearch scientist, shares the insights:

    The research by the Our Land and Water National Science Challenge and Open Farms (a nationwide Open Farm day event), suggests that direct relationships between farmers and citizens could be a pathway towards more sustainable farming practices.Urban and farmer respondents generally share a vision of more diverse landscapes, fewer chemical inputs, and farming practices that improve soil and water health.These findings support Ministry for Primary Industries research that found the divide between urban and rural attitudes to farming is smaller than perceived.Urban and farmer respondents agreed that the biggest barrier to sustainable farming is the purchasing and pricing power of large market players, like supermarkets.At 29%, purchasing food directly from the farm was ranked as the most effective sustainable food action customers could take, followed by buying NZ grown food at 21%.Visiting a farm builds a connection between those who grow and those who eat food. On-farm experiences also positively change how people view sustainability in farming, perceive the complexity of farming and encourage more considered food purchasing behaviour.

    For more information visit:

    A longer-form version of the release & infographic at the Our Land and Water website.The Farmers’ Market NZ study comparing supermarket/market prices, as referenced above and in the release.The Consumer NZ submission to the Commerce Commission echoes the concerns raised by survey respondents.

    To watch the show, visit www.sarahscountry.com

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  • Following Covid Consumers like never before are wanting to stay healthy and are searching for ethically produced foods that have quantified health benefits and New Zealand’s natural product has a huge opportunity to capitalise on this trend.

    “The interesting opportunity is how to develop a branded ingredient from New Zealand primary produce that has quantified health benefits. We have a programme that takes the concept right through to commercialization, everything from evaluating what the IP situation might be like through to all of the regulatory hurdles and how to access global markets,” explains Samantha Gray, BioEquitas.

    As a Change Maker this week in Sarah’s Country, Samantha Gray explains:

    BioEquitas works with small start-ups to large global brands on branded ingredients to branded products and she sees the next big opportunity is how to create a branded ingredient from NZ primary produce.Their programme supports right through to commercialization, everything from evaluating what the IP situation might be like through to all of the regulatory hurdles and possible deals of developing a product that can access global markets. Samantha is on the board of Natural Health NZ and is doing a lot of work on regulatory reform to encourage further innovation.

    For information visit, https://www.bioequitas.co.nz/

    To watch the show, visit www.sarahscountry.com

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  • Having known Abby France for over a decade as a friend, this episode provides an insight into two 30-something females having an honest yarn about how they see the future of New Zealand's primary sector.

    In this fortnight's Sarah's Country Sisters, Abby discusses her work with farmers attitude towards risk in FMG, resilient communities in her work as a Rural Support Trust trustee and community event organiser and her passion for the deer industry as a former young farmer with her husband Dave.

    Sarah & Abby discuss women's roles changing in the sector and the need for younger voices in governance.