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  • Paul Ainsworth is the founding director of the Lincoln Institute, which is a leadership and development organisation for veterinarians and veterinary teams. He is a highly sought after executive coach, facilitator and key note presenter.  Paul is a graduate of the Australian Defence Force Academy, University of New South Wales, the Royal Military College Duntroon and was awarded the prestigious Sasakawa Leadership Scholarship by the Australian Graduate School of Management’s Executive MBA program.
    As an infantry officer Paul has seen international service in 5 foreign countries, culminating in leading an international military observer unit in one of the words harshest environments. Paul has safely lead teams out of crossfire, negotiated the release of hostages, reopened international borders that had been closed due to hostile acts and provided humanitarian relief to communities suffering oppression.
    On resigning his commission, he was appointed Director of Property at ALDI Foods where he oversaw the roll-out of a large number of supermarkets. His appointment as their first Director in Australia ensured his place in establishing the culture of one of the world’s largest food retailers.
    Paul has over 30 years of leadership experience across all socio-economic and geopolitical boundaries making him highly sought after as an instructor and facilitator to all levels of business.

    In this episode Paul tells us epic stories about leadership success and failures. He talks about fear, and the antidote to fear, the art of mindful transitioning as the solution to burnout, having difficult conversations, but more importantly how to prevent the need for difficult conversations. We discuss the biggest challenges a new leader will face in their role and how to avoid those pitfalls, plus how senior leaders can help new leaders fill with roles successfully, and much much more.

    For the show notes or to check out our guests’ favourite books, podcasts and everything else we talk about in the show, click on the webpage link on the episode page wherever you listen to us, or visit the podcast website at thevetvault.com.

    Connect with us by leaving us a voice message on our episode page on the anchor app (https://anchor.fm) and hitting the record button, via email at thevetvaultpodcast@gmail.com, or just catch up with us on instagram. We’d love to hear from you!

    If you like what you heard, then please help us to spread the word by subscribing to the podcast (it’s free!), and by telling your friends about us.

  • What do you do when you are facing something overwhelming? That surgical procedure, that difficult conversation, that business idea... are you spurred into action, or do you feel paralysed? In this quickie Dr Rob shares his thoughts on facing up to the scary and sometimes seemingly insurmountable obstacles on the road to success.

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  • Our guest for this episode is a true veterinary virtuoso, so much so that’s it’s hard to pick just one single job title for him. Dr. Adam Christman is a practicing small animal veterinarian in the same practice where he started his veterinary career as a 14 year old kennel hand, as well as at a local animal shelter, but his veterinary journey has taken him on many interesting paths. These include completing an MBA, regular public speaking, a career in media, social media influencer, published author, Disney aficionado, and most recently to his new role as the veterinary director for DVM 360 and the Fetch conferences. We start our conversation with Adam with an important topic that is very close to my heart: Daschunds! 

    However, the episode does not peak here as you might expect - we cover a wide range of other topics, like Adam’s secrets for when you’re feeling stuck in your career and how to make sure you have a smooth relationship with one of the most precious resources in practice: your nurses. We talk personality types, the brand that is YOU, maintaining energy levels and much much more. Did we mention the daschunds? 

    For the show notes or to check out our guests’ favourite books, podcasts and everything else we talk about in the show, click on the webpage link on the episode page wherever you listen to us, or visit the podcast website at https://thevetvault.com/. If you have a question that you’d like us to answer with the help of our guests, leave us a voice message by going to our episode page on the anchor app (https://anchor.fm) and hitting the record button, via email at thevetvaultpodcast@gmail.com, or just catch up with us on instagram. (https://www.instagram.com/thevetvault/) We’d love to hear from you! If you like what you heard, then please help us to spread the word by subscribing to the podcast (it’s free!), and by telling your friends about us.

  • If you did a little victory dance - and let’s face it, we all did - when it was announced that vets are an essential service during the early days of the covid outbreak, then perhaps we should talk about how you value yourself and the services you offer? Dr. Shibly joins us again to talk about value: how most vets shoot themselves in the foot on a daily basis when it comes to demonstrating value to our clients, and strategies to fix this. Listen carefully for the two words you should never use in front of your clients!

  • Dr. Alex Hynes is a force of nature: whether she’s on the floor in the emergency hospital, leading her team as a company director, showcasing our profession to the world on the Bondi Vet television show, mentoring the thousands of young vets who look up to her, or taking care of her daughter, you can’t help but be inspired by her passion and energy when she crosses your path.

    In our long awaited episode with Alex we talk to her about where she finds her motivation and whether she ever has bad days. Alex gives us a master class on connecting with our clients: what they need from us, how to effectively give them what they need and how to demonstrate value in what you do. We talk about how things are different during the time of Covid-19 and how you and your business can stand out as a shining light in these potentially dark times.

  • Dr. Dan Phillips earned his veterinary degree from North Carolina State University in 2011 and then completed an internship focused on small animal emergency and internal medicine at Tufts Cummings College of Veterinary Medicine.
    Since then he’s been working as a small animal practitioner near Chicago, and for the last 4 years has served as the primary extern and preceptor director for his group of practices. I had to look up what a preceptor is, and google summarises it as someone who teaches, supports, counsels, coaches, evaluates, serves as role model and aids in the socialization to a new role, which is a pretty good description of Dan’s passion. In fact, he feels so strongly about the importance of mentoring that he partnered with Drs. Dan Markwalder and Adam Conroy from Markroy consulting and the 7S society to create a new venture called Vet Mentor Solutions. With VMS they aim to mentor confident, effective and productive veterinarians through a comprehensive video library of practical small animal techniques and client communication skills.
     
    In this episode Dan demonstrates why he’s qualified to help guide the next generation of vets into the profession: we cover topics like how to effectively give feedback, how to avoid worrying about being judged when you put your opinions out there, teaching to learn, and why goal setting is one of the most important skills you need to develop. We put Dan’s mentoring skills to the test when we ask him how to ask for a pay increase, and Dan gives one of the best summaries we’ve ever heard of how to select the practice you want to work in, and how to interview for culture. His explanation, like all of the content in this episode, won’t just resonate with young vets, but also serves as a useful reminder for practice owners and managers about what to keep in mind when creating positions for less experienced vets.

  • We talk COVID government bail-outs, financial strategies and HR do’s and don’ts in another business and leadership episode, with Paolo Lencioni - vet turned accountant and veterinary financial management guru. Paolo’s company - APL accountants, helps veterinarians manage every aspect of their business through through careful financial monitoring and tailor-made advice, so he has his finger on the pulse of veterinary business and has a wealth of knowledge to share. He gives us his insights into how to plan and react to save your practice during these tricky times.

    Some of the information relating to government financial support is specific to Australia, but a lot of the thinking and strategies discussed in this episode are universal, so there’s definitely still value here for our non-Australian listeners.
    If you need some guidance for you business get in touch with APL accountants at https://aplaccountants.com.au.

  • Welcome to the Vet Vault business and leadership series with veterinary practice owner and business coach Dr Shibly Mustapha. In this series we’ll explore ways to make veterinary practice sustainable and profitable.

    Shibly is an owner of a multi-practice group in Australia. He is actively growing his business, and shares with us the same up-to-date lessons and a no-excuses approach that inspires his own coaching clients.

    In our first episode of this new series we start with the elephant in the room: Covid-19 is disrupting businesses everywhere, including veterinary practices. But is it as bad as it seems? Will it affect your business? How do we respond to it, and are there potentially things to be gained from all of this? To check out the show notes click on the webpage link on the episode page wherever you listen to us, or visit the podcast website at https://thevetvault.com/.

    If you have a question that you’d like us to answer you can leave us a voice message by going to our episode page on the anchor app (https://anchor.fm) and hitting the record button, via email at thevetvaultpodcast@gmail.com, or just catch up with us on instagram. (https://www.instagram.com/thevetvault/) We’d love to hear from you!

    If you like what you heard, then please help us to spread the word by subscribing to the podcast (it’s free!), and by telling your friends about us.

  • One message that we hear time and time again from our guests here at the VetVault is that success, or happiness, or fulfilment or performance or whatever you want to call it, starts in your head. In this episode we explore what’s happening inside that head of yours, and how we can influence it for the better.

    Veterinarian, public speaker and coach Dr Katie Ford graduated from the University of Liverpool in the UK in 2012 and gained her certificate in medicine in 2016.

    Externally she was very successful: she had a great career, she was a successful clinician who was loved by clients, she was one of the youngest vets ever to pass the certificate synoptic exam. The future looked bright, but internally things were a bit more complicated. She was at the mercy of her perfectionist imposter brain. That voice inside her head, the one that keeps you at work hours and hours after your shift ended while you double and triple check everything, was telling her that she was a fraud, and that she would never be good enough.

    With the power of mindset, consciousness and an understanding of the internal workings of her brain, Katie turned her life around. She has trained in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT), Broadband Consciousness and also completed programmes under the father of personal development himself, Bob Proctor of the Proctor-Gallagher Institute.

    Katie is passionate about positivity in practice, awesome workplace culture and career fulfilment. She currently practices as a locum veterinary surgeon across the North West, finding joy in meeting and influencing her colleagues in practice and though official coaching for vets and nurses on a 1:1 and group basis.

    Join us as we talk to Katie about imposter syndrome - what it is and how to identify and deal with it, about ways to train your mind and trick your body through visualisation, why we should be happy to sometimes be a failure, how to celebrate your wins without depending on them for your self-worth, and much more.

    For the show notes or to check out our guests’ favourite books, podcasts and everything else we talk about in the show, click on the webpage link on the episode page wherever you listen to us, or visit the podcast website at https://thevetvault.com/.

    If you have a question that you’d like us to answer with the help of our guests you can leave us a voice message by going to our episode page on the anchor app (https://anchor.fm) and hitting the record button, via email at thevetvaultpodcast@gmail.com, or just catch up with us on Instagram. (https://www.instagram.com/thevetvault/) We’d love to hear from you!

    If you like what you heard, then please help us to spread the word by subscribing to the podcast (it’s free!), and by telling your friends about us.

  • The first time you meet Dr. Charles El-Hage, you’ll think to yourself: “who the heck was that guy?! There’s something about him that makes me want to speak to him a some more.” And then, when you ask someone about him you’ll see their face light up with a smile, and they’ll say, “oh that’s Charlie, he’s great. Let me go introduce you.” So, let’s introduce you...

    When he’s being Dr. Charles El-Hage he is a Lecturer in Veterinary Clinical Medicine and Surgery at the University of Melbourne. After decades in large animal practice he returned to the Equine Centre where he worked as a clinician for three years, and then later as a lecturer whilst completing his PhD.
    He has a range of equine interests including virology, immunology, toxicology, endocrinology, parasitology and theriogenology. He is currently researching infectious conditions of horses and immunological responses. In 2016 he completed a PhD, and he has published original research and reviews on multiple equine diseases.

    When he’s being Charlie he’s an inspiration to scores of students, a front-line charity worker and champion for animals in developing countries around the globe, more recently in Indonesia, he’s a traveller, adventurer, father, competitive long distance runner and friend to many.

    Travel with us through Charlie’s career as we talk about bad bosses, great clients, creating connections, his charity work, his thoughts on finding the best place to give your gifts to the world, mindset, and much much more.

  • Today we're digging deep into the Vault to bring you this slightly alternative view from Dr Oliver Liou. We can get very focused on being high achievers and all round awesomeness, but is that always good for us? In this Vet Vault quickie Oliver talks about the flip side of being exceptional, and how to deal with the fallout of becoming 'too good' at your job. 

  • In this episode we tackle a subject that is not necessarily directly veterinary related, or is at least not limited to our profession, but still a critical topic to discuss because of the impact that it will have on all of us, and more importantly, because of the impact that veterinarians can have on it: climate change.
    If you’ve ever looked around your workplace and thought to yourself: “ This can’t be good for the environment. I really should do something about it.”, or if you are concerned about climate change, but you’re not sure where to start, then this episode is for you. 
    We speak to Ben Cox, a founder and a driving force behind an exciting new charity called Veterinarians for Climate Action. Ben comes from a sustainability, engineering and business background and is passionate about climate change because of the impact it will have on future generations and the natural environment.  He helped to create Veterinarians for Climate Action as his tool for taking action and inspiring others to do so. 
    VfCA’s mission statement is to inspire the veterinary profession to advocate for and achieve climate action within and beyond our industry. This will benefit both our profession and the animals we care for, ensuring a sustainable future for all. 
    In this episode Ben explains to us why we as vets are important in this arena, and how we can be particularly valuable and have a big impact in the push for action on climate change. We talk about what they are doing through the charity; what we can do, including how to have conversations about climate change; what influences the public’s opinion on the matter and how we can change it, and what we can do on a practical level in our own workplaces. 
    Ben is practical, pragmatic and hopeful, and definitely someone who you can put your support behind. 
    Please enjoy, Ben Cox, and get ready to make a change. 
    Check out Ben and his team here (https://www.vfca.org.au/home), and follow them on Facebook. 
    For the episode show notes or to explore  our guests’ favourite books, podcasts and everything else we talk about in the show, click on the webpage link on the episode page wherever you listen to us, or visit the podcast website at https://thevetvault.com/
    If you have a question that you’d like us to answer with the help of our guests you can leave us a voice message by going to our episode page on the anchor app (https://anchor.fm) and hitting the record button, via email at thevetvaultpodcast@gmail.com, or just catch up with us on Instagram. (https://www.instagram.com/thevetvault/) We love to hearing from you!
    If you like what you heard, then please help us to spread the word by subscribing to the podcast (it’s free!), and by telling your friends about us. 

  • We were introduced to Dr. Dan Markwalder when we interviewed to Dr. Cody Creelman, who kept referring to him as one of the best mentors out there. Seeing as we’re all about mentoring here we knew that we had to have him on the show, and Dr. Dan certainly has the experience to make him an absolute mentoring guru:

    He founded his first hospital at age 28, and has grown that business into an eighteen practice success story with the help of good partnerships and through fantastic mentoring relationships. He still practices in the clinics that he owns, and he is still passionate about mentoring veterinarians of all ages in all aspects of their careers. Dan speaks throughout the United States to veterinarians and practice managers on the importance of developing a culture of mentoring at a practice level, and frequently lectures to both SCVMA and VBMA chapters at numerous veterinary colleges throughout the United States. 

    He also the Mark in Markroy Consulting - a consulting service that offers coaching and workshops on aspects of practice management like leaderships skills, bridging generational gaps the practice, and team culture. Dan’s most recent venture, Vet Mentor Solutions, aims to share the mentoring model that has been so instrumental in assisting many new graduate veterinarians to achieve their individual goals, as well as help them in raising their personal production, with the greater global veterinary community though an on-line mentoring platform (vetmentorsolutions.com) 

    Dan’s insights in this interview on what mentoring actually means, and how we can, and should, apply it in our own workplaces has given me a lot to think about in my own workplace. And if you’ve ever wondered about whether you should consider practice ownership you really need to hear what Dan has to say on the topic. He discusses topics like choosing your business partner, setting the culture of your practice, what it looks like to be a good practice owner, and much much more.

    To see the show notes or to check out our guests’ favourite books, podcasts and everything else we talk about in the show, click on the webpage link on the episode page wherever you listen to us, or visit the podcast website at https://thevetvault.com/.

    If you have a question that you’d like us to answer with the help of our guests you can leave us a voice message by going to our episode page on the anchor app (https://anchor.fm) and hitting the record button, via email at thevetvaultpodcast@gmail.com, or just catch up with us on instagram. (https://www.instagram.com/thevetvault/) We’d love to hear from you!

    And if you like what you hear, then please help us to spread the word by subscribing to the podcast (it’s free!), and by telling your friends about us. 

  • For people who are feeling overwhelmed: that’s normal. One of the main messages I want to get out to the vets is to normalise the enormity and the depth of emotion that they’re going to experience. Because it’s new. And to not pathologise it. 

    We live in a world where when we have an emotion we almost want to give it a Broadway musical: “Why am I feeling sad today? Let’s focus on that sadness.”  But in actual fact - it’s not a healthy way to deal with day tot day emotions. So when people are going to bed and they are reliving what they’ve experienced and they are fatigued and they’re thinking:  “My goodness, I’ve get to get up and face this again tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow…” and on top of that they’ve lost their own properties, or they’re still at risk of loosing their properties.

    To feel overwhelmed - can I just say: A HUNDRED PERCENT NORMAL!

  • Welcome to our third and final episode talking about dealing with trauma, loss and grief in a crisis situation, and specifically as it relates to the bushfire catastrophe that we are currently experiencing in Australia, with our super-star social worker Liz Crowe. In this episode Liz speaks to us about the weeks and months after the firestorm has passed: what happens once the crisis has abated and the world has stopped talking about it, but the victims, and those who went to help them, are left to pick up the pieces and deal with what they had experienced? The advice from this episode goes far beyond this particular situation: Liz gives some invaluable input into burnout and compassion fatigue in everyday life, and how to deal with it. 

    Here are those resources again if you want to read more about Liz' work:

    https://lizcrowe.org/about/

    https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-1-liz-crowe-for-st-emlyns/

    https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-2-st-emlyns/

    Treatment advice for burn wounds and smoke inhalation: https://www.animalemergencyservice.com.au/news/vetapedia/emergency-burns-info/

    The Australian Veterinary Association Benevolent Fund to provide assistance to affected veterinarians: https://www.ava.com.au/donate/

  • Welcome  to the next installment of our bushfire special series with Liz Crowe. 

    In part two Liz tells us how we can best support someone who is caught up in a challenging situation, like the fires that our Aussie vets and thousands of other workers are currently dealing with. Watching our friends an colleagues give so much of themselves is inspiring, but sometimes we feel powerless to help if we aren’t right there on the front lines. Liz gives us the best answer I’ve heard so far on how we can be useful from afar.

    Here are those resources again for listeners who need help during this challenging time:

    Treatment guidelines for burn wounds and smoke inhalation:  https://www.animalemergencyservice.com.au/news/vetapedia/emergency-burns-info/

    Liz's blog on wellbeing, part one:  https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-1-liz-crowe-for-st-emlyns/

    Part two:  https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-2-st-emlyns/

    And if you want to help your colleagues financially - The Australian Veterinary Association's Benevolent Fund:  https://www.ava.com.au/donate/

    Liz Crowe is  an Advanced Clinician Social Worker who has worked extensively for 20 years with individuals, families and children impacted by grief, loss, trauma, crisis and bereavement. She’s worked in intensive care, emergency departments, cancer wards and all areas associated with children’s health.  In her current job in a children’s intensive care unit she is exposed daily to death, violence, trauma and illness and is now recognised as one of the most experienced counsellors in this field in Australia. Liz is passionate about assisting the community to understand the breadth of loss and grief and how to support yourself, your children, partners, family and friends during times of change and sadness. 

    https://lizcrowe.org/about/

  • This is a special episode that we’re rushing out as a resource to our colleagues who are caught in the apocalyptic bushfire crisis that Australia is currently experiencing, but also for anyone who wants to support those in the crisis but feel unequipped to do so. Beyond the current crisis - we also believe that the advice from this episode’s spectacular guest will be a valuable resource to anyone who ever finds themselves in a crisis situation, or regularly deals with traumatic situations that puts them at risk of  compassion fatigue, burnout, and dark days in general. 

    Our guest is Liz Crowe. Liz is  an Advanced Clinician Social Worker who has worked extensively for 20 years with individuals, families and children impacted by grief, loss, trauma, crisis and bereavement. She’s worked in intensive care, emergency departments, cancer wards and all areas associated with children’s health.  In her current job in a children’s intensive care unit she is exposed daily to death, violence, trauma and illness and is now recognised as one of the most experienced counsellors in this field in Australia.  Liz is passionate about assisting the community to understand the breadth of loss and grief and how to support yourself, your children, partners, family and friends during times of change and sadness, which is why we really needed to speak to her at this time. 

    As expected from someone with such a depth of knowledge in their field we had a lot to talk about. We wanted to make sure that anyone who is currently in the thick of the action with limited leisure time for things like listening to podcasts could snatch a few moments to listen to this, so we’re deviating from our usual long form format and chopping the podcast into shorter episodes, starting with what to do while you are in the midst of a catastrophe such as this one. 

    A few useful resources:

    Treating burn wounds and smoke inhalation: https://www.animalemergencyservice.com.au/news/vetapedia/emergency-burns-info/

    Liz' blog on dealing with grief and burnout = part one:  https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-1-liz-crowe-for-st-emlyns/

    Part two:  https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-2-st-emlyns/

    More about Liz:   https://lizcrowe.org/about/