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  • Last week, on the last day of the annual meeting of the American Association of Law Libraries, the nationwide organization of law librarians and legal information professionals, Elizabeth Adelman took office as the association’s new president. A key focus of her term will be on increasing the pipeline of those coming into the profession and working to enhance diversity within both the AALL and the profession at large.

    As she comes into office, the AALL has just adopted a strategic plan that sets out five goals for 2022-2023. In addition to increasing the pipeline and enhancing diversity, the plan also calls for championing excellence among legal information professionals, providing expanded opportunities for professional growth; and advocating for issues that impact legal information professionals.

    In her day job, Adelman is vice dean for legal information services and director of the Charles B. Sears Law Library at the University of Buffalo School of Law. An AALL member for 21 years, Adelman has a law degree from Albany Law School, a master’s degree in library science from the University at Buffalo.

    In this conversation recorded live at the AALL annual meeting in Denver, Adelman and host Bob Ambrogi talk about her plans for her year in office and her thoughts on the state and future of the profession.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

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    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

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  • For 28 years, John Mayer has been executive director of the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction, or CALI, a non-profit consortium of some 200 law schools that describes itself as “the innovative force pushing legal education toward change for the better.” Along the way, CALI’s mission expanded to include addressing access to justice, primarily through its development, in partnership with Chicago-Kent College of Law, of A2J Author, an expert system designed to help self-represented litigants complete court forms and navigate legal processes.

    In this episode of LawNext, Mayer joins host Bob Ambrogi to discuss the history and mission of CALI and to share his thoughts on the use of technology to enhance legal education. They also talk about how and why A2J Author was developed and how it is used by courts and legal services organizations to help those who are without legal representation. Mayer also shares his thoughts on the future of innovation in law and on the future of CALI.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

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  • It was a mighty bold move for the legal technology company Mighty. After seven years in business serving personal injury lawyers, the company recently pivoted to launch Mighty Law, a law firm that directly competes against those PI firms by offering lower fees, greater transparency, and tech-driven efficiencies.

    For founder and CEO Joshua Schwadron, the move was motivated by what he sees as the misaligned incentives of PI lawyers. Rather than pass along to their clients the savings that they realize from using technology, he believes, the fee and cost structure for PI firms incentivizes them to inflate settlements and drive up costs.

    Seeking to provide PI plaintiffs with lower fees and greater transparency, Schwadron, who is also a lawyer, has converted his tech company into a dual-entity structure. The law firm, Mighty Law, will represent the clients, while a separate tech and services company, Mighty, will support the law firm’s operations and also provide services and support to clients to assist them in what Schwadron calls their post-accident journey.

    On this week’s LawNext, Schwadron joins host Bob Ambrogi to talk about why he made this pivot and what he believes it means for consumers and the PI industry.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • Sang Lee believes that algorithm-based assessments can help law firms make better, more ethical and less-biased decisions when hiring associates and laterals. The SaaS company she founded in 2019, Thine, leverages custom hiring algorithms and industrial and organizational (IO) psychology to create assessments that it says can reduce inconsistencies in how law firms evaluate candidates, promote equity, and create pathways to greater diversity.

    A research report commissioned by Thine last year found that there is a widely held belief among legal professionals that traditional recruiting processes are stale and limiting. Having spent more than 20 years working in legal recruiting and coaching, Lee has clear ideas about why that is so, how assessments can help reimagine the recruiting process, and what else law firms should do to improve their hiring and retention and achieve a more diverse workforce.

    Lee was an associate at LeBoeuf Lamb in 1998 when she pivoted into recruiting. In 2004, she founded her own attorney search firm, and then in 2013, founded Volta Talent Strategies, where she continues to provide talent-related coaching, training, and consulting to law firms. A first-generation Korean-American, Lee was named to the Fastcase 50 in 2021 and to the Global Top 100 Leaders in Legal Strategy and Consulting by Lawdragon in 2021. In 2019, she was honored by the Girls Scouts Council of Greater New York as a Woman of Distinction.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • LawVu is a New Zealand company that says it is revolutionizing legal operations by waging war on a multiplicity of point solutions and providing in-house legal teams with the first truly connected platform for matter, contract and spend management.

    LawVu recently conducted a survey of in-house lawyers and legal operations professionals and found that 77% of them spend more than an hour a day just jumping between systems in order to get a complete view of their work. It also found that 90% of in-house legal teams use three or more software vendors, yet say their biggest technology pain point is the lack of integration among these platforms.

    Our guest today on LawNext is Sam Kidd, who cofounded LawVu together with Tim Boyne in 2015 and is now its CEO. He recently returned home from an extended visit in the U.S., where he is preparing to open an office in Seattle. The U.S. is LawVu’s biggest market, he says.

    He talks about why he believes multiple point solutions are holding back legal departments, how LawVu addresses that problem, and what is ahead for the company.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • The law practice management platform Litify is unique in several ways. For one, it is built on top of Salesforce, the sales and marketing automation platform used by many Fortune 500 companies. For another, it was developed by a team of people who came out of Morgan & Morgan, the largest plaintiffs’ law firm in the United States.

    Since its launch in 2016, Litify has raised $50 million in Series A funding, acquired the e-billing company LegalStratus, and expanded its customer base to include a range of mid-to-large sized law firms and corporate legal departments, and has even developed an off-the-shelf solution for smaller firms. It recently announced a major partnership with global legal services provider Epiq.

    Joining this episode of LawNext is Ari Treuhaft, chief operating officer at Litify and formerly head of product at Morgan & Morgan, where he oversaw the firm’s transition to the Litify platform. He explains why Litify considers itself a new category of legal tech, one that enables both outside counsel and in-house legal teams to operate on the same platform. He also lays out future plans for the company, and shares his thoughts on recent developments in the practice management market.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • As this episode is being released, news is breaking that is likely to have a profound impact on the law practice management market: AffiniPay, the parent company of the electronic payments platform LawPay, has acquired the law practice management company MyCase, along with several other practice management products that MyCase acquired over the past year. Just ahead of today’s announcement, the CEOs of the two companies sat down for an exclusive podcast interview with LawNext host Bob Ambrogi to answer questions about the deal. They discuss how the deal came about, what it means for each company’s customers, and what its impact might be on the broader market. Joining Bob are: Dru Armstrong, who became CEO of AffiniPay in July 2021. With degrees in both law and business from the University of Chicago, she was previously CEO of Grace Hill, a company that provides software for owners and operators of real estate properties. Jim McGinnis, who was named MyCase CEO in January 2021, after having most recently been EVP/GM of Wolters Kluwer’s Tax and Accounting North America Professional Segment. Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • If ever there was a process ripe for disruption, notarization would seem to be it. A function that may date back to Ancient Egypt, it has changed little for centuries still typically done in person, on hard-copy paper, using physical seals, and recorded in written ledgers.

    Pat Kinsel, founder and CEO of Notarize, believes society has grappled for too long with how to scale this simple process of authenticating signatures. His company is striving to do that, both for consumers who need a one-time notarization and for businesses for which notarizations are part of the normal course.

    Since its founding in 2015, Notarize has become the category leader in transforming this traditional paper-based process into a digital one. Along the way, it has raised $213 million, grown to nearly 500 employees, and was recently ranked 24th on the Financial Times’ list of The Fastest Growing Companies of 2022.

    Kinsel, who is also a partner at the venture capital firm Polaris Partners, was previously cofounder and CEO of Spindle until it was acquired by Twitter in June 2013. Earlier, he was at Microsoft incubating new concepts and bringing them to market. He serves on the board of Lob and was the lead investor in Drizly.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • Lawyers are largely limited to practicing law in the states in which they are licensed. But now, calling that rule anachronistic, the Association of Professional Responsibility Lawyers has asked the American Bar Association to amend the model rules that govern law practice to allow lawyers admitted in any U.S. jurisdiction to practice law and provide legal advice to clients anywhere in the country.

    “Our proposal advocates that a lawyer admitted in any United States jurisdiction should be able to practice law and represent willing clients without regard to the geographic location of the lawyer or the client, without regard to the forum where the services are to be provided, and without regard to which jurisdiction’s rules apply at a given moment in time,” APRL President Brian Faughnan said in a letter to ABA President Reginald M. Turner.

    On this episode of LawNext, Faughnan joins host Bob Ambrogi to discuss why APRL has concluded that the change is critical to a “21st Century approach to the practice of law.” They discuss the APRL study and report that called for replacement of the current Rule 5.5 of the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, APRL’s proposed new version of 5.5 that would allow multi-jurisdictional practice, and why Faughnan believes there is a strong likelihood that the ABA will at least give strong consideration to the change.

    In his day job, Faughnan is a shareholder in the Tennessee law firm Lewis Thomason, where his practice includes representing lawyers and law firms in disciplinary matters.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • No one has worked harder, worked longer or had more success at the cause of making government information accessible to the public than Carl Malamud and his organization Public.Resource.Org. From putting the SEC’s EDGAR database online in 1993 – effectively shaming the SEC into putting it online itself two years later – to his 2020 U.S. Supreme Court victory defeating the state of Georgia’s claim of copyright in its official legislative code, to his 2022 federal court win allowing him to publish private-industry technical standards that are incorporated by reference into thousands of federal, state and local laws, Malamud has devoted his career to freeing the law.

    On this episode of LawNext, Malamud joins host Bob Ambrogi to recap some of the significant milestones of his more-than 30-years of battling government bureaucracies. Among the topics they discuss: how his 1993 publication of the SEC’s EDGAR database on the Internet became a turning point for government information online; how his work with Aaron Swartz – the younger computer programmer who later killed himself after being indicted by the U.S. attorney – and other to open access to PACER documents led to creation of the RECAP database of free PACER filings; how his publication of Georgia’s official legislative code led to a watershed Supreme Court ruling; and why, in recent years, he has turned his attention to India, of which he said, “If there is to be a revolution in access to knowledge, it has to be in India.”

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • Last week, Filevine, the Utah-based case management company, raised $108 million in a Series D funding round. Founded in 2014 with an original focus on litigation and personal injury law, the company has been steadily expanding its platform into other areas of law practice — including larger firms, insurance defense, corporate legal, and government — and it plans to use this funding to further fuel that expansion.

    Filevine’s cofounder and CEO Ryan Anderson is this week’s guest on LawNext in an episode recorded the day the company announced this latest raise. Before starting Filevine, Anderson was a founding partner at a western-states law firm focused on personal injury, mass torts and employment class-actions.

    In his work as an attorney, Anderson says, he was constantly bombarded with urgent tasks and problems. Rather than continue being bombarded, he decided to turn his attention to building a system that would help solve the problems. He teamed up with a group of software engineers who shared his vision for cloud-based collaboration and clean, intuitive design, and in the basement of his law firm, Filevine was born.

    Since then, the company has expanded to nearly 400 employees, made two major acquisitions — first of Lead Docket, a lead tracking and intake management product, and then of Outlaw, a contract and document editing platform — and, in just the last year, brought on more 700 new customers.

    Listen to our interview to learn more about Filevine’s story and what Anderson believes lies ahead for the company.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • For 23 years, Pro Bono Net has been working to harness the potential of technology to connect pro bono attorneys to those most in need of their services and to provide legal tools to help individuals advocate for themselves. In 2021 alone, the non-profit helped more than 8.4 million people connect to a legal resource and helped self-represented individuals create more than 900,000 legal documents and court forms.

    It does this through state-level programs such as LawHelp.org, which connects people to legal aid programs and self-help tools, and TenantHelpNY.org, which helps tenants avoid eviction; national programs such as Citizenshipworks.org, which helps people apply for citizenship, and OlmsteadRights.org, which provides legal resources for people with disabilities; and tools such as LawHelp Interactive, which is used by programs across the country to help individuals create legal documents.

    Our guest today, Mark O’Brien, cofounded Pro Bono Net together with Michael Hertz, and has been its executive director since 2005. They saw the potential for technology to be a “force multiplier” for solving the problems of delivering justice in the United States, O’Brien says in the interview, but it was never just about the technology, but rather about how technology could be an enabler of human capacity.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • In his day job, Jonathan Pyle is the contract performance officer at Philadelphia Legal Assistance, where he is responsible for compliance, reporting, and implementing new uses of technology to analyze, streamline, and expand service delivery. But in the legal tech world, Pyle is better known as the developer of Docassemble, a free and open source document assembly application that has been widely adapted for a range of applications.

    Pyle developed Docassemble as a tool for automating the practice of law. It is used to create guided interviews that can be used for document assembly or for other uses, such as helping users find legal resources or obtain legal information. It has been used to power such products as Upsolve, a free service that assembles Chapter 7 bankruptcy forms, and the document-assembly platform Documate.

    Pyle joins host Bob Ambrogi to discuss how he came to develop Docassemble and why he released it as open source software. He also shares examples of how it has been used in the legal market and describes his plans for further development.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • She has been called the patron saint of solo and small law firms. For two decades, Carolyn Elefant has helped solo and small firm lawyers start and build their law practices. You know her as the creator of MyShingle.com, the longest-running blog on solo and small law firm practice, and she just released the third edition of her book that is a bible for lawyers going off on their own, Solo by Choice: How to Start a Law Firm and Be the Lawyer You Always Wanted to Be.

    Elefant joins host Bob Ambrogi to share her insights and advice on starting and building a practice and to talk about what is new in this latest edition of her book. They talk about the reasons a lawyer would start their own firm, the biggest mistakes lawyers make when starting out, how to decide on a practice area, how to bring in clients, and whether solo and small firm lawyers can achieve success and a good living.

    In addition to writing Solo by Choice, Elefant is coauthor of the ABA book, Social Media for Lawyers: The Next Frontier, and the self-published book, The Legal ClauseIt: Plug & Play Engagement Agreements and Power Pacts for Small Law Firms. She has been listed as an Energy and Environmental Super Lawyer for Washington, D.C. since 2012, and has been named an ABA Legal Rebel (2010), a Fastcase 50 Innovator (2011) and an ABA Woman of Legal Tech honoree (2014).

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • As head of managed services and analytics at Wolters Kluwer ELM Solutions, Jeffrey Solomon oversees a database that tracks over $150 billion in legal spend data. Legal departments are able to use this data in multiple ways, including to benchmark outside firms’ billing rates and to evaluate staffing of legal matters.

    In this episode of LawNext, Solomon joins host Bob Ambrogi for a deep dive into how corporate legal departments are using data and analytics to drive more strategic decision-making around setting and managing legal budgets and legal spend. They also talk about how access to this data is shaping corporate clients’ conversations with their outside firms around efficiency and use of technology.

    Solomon oversees a team at Wolters Kluwer that leads innovation initiatives through ideation, market research, development, and go-to-market for a portfolio of AI-powered products and managed services. He has been with ELM Solutions since 2013. Before that, he was with TyMetrix, which Wolters Kluwer acquired in 2003.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • As Time By Ping, a company devoted to helping lawyers break free from timekeeping, announces its Series B raise of $36.5 million, cofounder and CEO Ryan Alshak joins LawNext for an exclusive interview about the financing, the company, and its mission to help lawyers break free from timekeeping and get back time in their days.

    As Alshak shares in the interview, the roots of the company’s mission are very personal to him. Soon after starting the company, his mother fell ill with cancer, causing him to balance managing a startup and spending time with her. After her death in 2018, he found inspiration for the company’s mission: to give people back time in their days to be with the people who are important to their lives.

    He wrote about his mother and how she inspired him in a moving 2018 essay, “Life is not waiting for the storm to pass, it’s learning how to dance in the rain.”

    In our LawNext interview, Alshak describes how Time By Ping’s time-automation software can free lawyers from manual timekeeping. He also discusses how this latest financing round will help the company pursue its longer-term vision, which is to rebuild the model for how lawyers work from selling time to selling outcomes, and eventually to focus their effort on creative work in ways that best leverage their most important asset.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Legalweek 2022, returning in person to New York City March 8-11, 2022, Legalweek will bring together thousands of legal leaders for a week-long program featuring TED-style focus talks, workshop boot camps, and panel sessions across 21 tracks and 74 sessions. Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • Is there a better way to train lawyers to draft and negotiate contracts? Laura Frederick thinks so. This former Tesla and BigLaw commercial contracts attorney is the founder of How to Contract, a learning platform that trains lawyers and professionals how to draft and negotiate contracts in the real world. She is also managing attorney of her own firm, Laura Frederick Law, in Austin, Texas, where she focuses on drafting and negotiating vendor supply, services, and technology agreements.

    As a lawyer in the technology transactions group at law firm Morison & Foerster and then as an inhouse commercial counsel at major corporations including Tesla, Frederick saw how hard it can be for younger lawyers to learn the skills they need to effectively draft and negotiate agreements.

    In August 2020, she began posting daily contracting tips on LinkedIn. Her tips were so popular that she turned them into a book, ​​Practical Tips on How to Contract: Techniques and Tactics from an Ex-BigLaw and Ex-Tesla Commercial Contracts. Out of the tips and the book emerged the idea for How to Contract, where she provides practical training on contracting. In January 2022, she held her first How to Contract conference, with nearly 400 attendees.

    Frederick joins host Bob Ambrogi to share her innovative approach to teaching contract skills, and she shares her thoughts on the current array of contracting technology products on the market.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Legalweek 2022, returning in person to New York City March 8-11, 2022, Legalweek will bring together thousands of legal leaders for a week-long program featuring TED-style focus talks, workshop boot camps, and panel sessions across 21 tracks and 74 sessions. Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • In this second of a two-part interview, we continue our conversation with Jeffrey Carr, a trailblazing general counsel who describes his career as decades spent on the radical fringe of reforming legal services delivery. Many of his ideas for revamping legal departments, once viewed as radical, have now become mainstream.

    As general counsel at FMC Technologies in the early 2000s, Carr disrupted how legal departments hire and compensate outside counsel, creating models that today are considered standard operating procedure at many companies.

    After retiring from FMC in 2014, he went on to work with Valorem Law, one of the earliest law firms to focus on making alternative fee arrangements the norm. Valorem became the progenitor of ElevateNext, the law firm affiliate of the global law company Elevate. Carr returned to a GC role in 2019 at Univar Solutions, where he sought to build the law department of the future. Now retired, he teaches, writes, and pursues his hobby of driving race cars.

    Last week, in part one of the interview, Carr spoke with host Bob Ambrogi about how he landed on the “radical fringe” of reforming legal services, and he discussed some of the trailblazing initiatives he created at FMC, including the Alliance Counsel Engagement System, or ACES, a method of hiring outside counsel so unique that he was encouraged to patent it.

    In this second installment of the interview, Carr discusses another of the initiatives for which he is known, the Litigation Value Challenge, which came to be emulated by the Association of Corporate Counsel and many of its members. Carr and Ambrogi also dive into his recent post at Bill Henderson’s Legal Evolution blog, Four Waves of Change in #LawLand, in which he lays out his framework for making the legal system better.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Legalweek 2022, returning in person to New York City March 8-11, 2022, Legalweek will bring together thousands of legal leaders for a week-long program featuring TED-style focus talks, workshop boot camps, and panel sessions across 21 tracks and 74 sessions. Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote.

    If you enjoy listening to LawNext, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts.

  • One of the most innovative general counsel ever, Jeffrey Carr describes his career as decades spent on the radical fringe of reforming legal services delivery. Yet many of his ideas for revamping legal departments, once viewed as radical, have now become mainstream.

    As general counsel at FMC Technologies in the early 2000s, Carr disrupted how legal departments hire and compensate outside counsel, creating models that today are considered standard operating procedure at many companies.

    After retiring from FMC in 2014, he went on to work with Valorem Law, one of the earliest law firms to focus on making alternative fee arrangements the norm. Valorem became the progenitor of ElevateNext, the law firm affiliate of the global law company Elevate. Carr returned to a GC role in 2019 at Univar Solutions, where he sought to build the law department of the future. Now retired, he teaches, writes, and pursues his hobby of driving race cars.

    In this first of a two-part interview, Carr joins host Bob Ambrogi to talk about how he landed on the “radical fringe” of reforming legal services and to discuss some of the initiatives he created at FMC, including the Alliance Counsel Engagement System, or ACES, a method of hiring outside counsel so unique that he was encouraged to patent it.

    They also discuss Carr’s recent post on the Legal Evolution blog, Four Waves of Change in #LawLand, in which he lays out his framework for making the legal system better.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote. Woodpecker, legal document automation for solo and small firms.

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  • Two years into the pandemic, what has been its impact on e-discovery and what lies ahead for the industry? The 2022 State of the Industry Report takes a deep dive into these questions, surveying lawyers, consultants, software and service providers, and others to paint a picture of where the industry is today and what trends will dominate in the year ahead.

    Joining us on LawNext to discuss the report is Doug Austin, who conducted the survey and wrote the report. Austin, publisher of the blog eDiscovery Today, is an established e-discovery thought leader with over 30 years of experience providing e-discovery best practices, legal technology consulting and technical project management services to commercial and government clients.

    This is his second year surveying the state of the industry, with sponsorship from EDRM. Topics the report covers include remote work by e-discovery professionals, attendance at legal technology conferences, use of predictive coding, issues around data from mobile devices and collaboration apps, top e-discovery and e-discovery business trends for the year ahead, and the top challenges not being talked about.

    Thank You To Our Sponsors

    This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.

    Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote. Woodpecker, legal document automation for solo and small firms.

    A reminder that we are on Patreon. Subscribe to our page to be able to access show transcripts, or to submit a question for our guests.