Episodes

  • In this episode we discuss Marie Fleming's 'The Geography of Freedom' (Black Rose Books, 1988), a study of anarchist geographer Elisée Reclus who was a key figure in the 19th century movement. 
    We are very grateful that Black Rose provided us with this book to discuss. Black Rose have been publishing alternative, radical works from their base in Montreal since the 1970s, and operate a range of brilliant initiatives, including a pay-what-you-can solidarity e-bookshop. They recently hosted a conference on Peter Kropotkin, inspired by their recent publication of Kropotkin's Siberian diaries. You can watch this event on their YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/blackrosebooks
    Keep an eye out for their new website, which will stress digital availability and access to many titles, with the option to buy a copy. This will be launched soon on their existing domain: https://blackrosebooks.com/. You can also follow Black Rose on Twitter @blackrosebooks
    For more on Reclus, see the edited works published by PM Press: https://www.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=565 and the work of Dr Pascale Siegrist: https://www.ghil.ac.uk/team/our-team/pascale-siegrist.
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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W
    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv
    The image in this episode is Reclus' 'Great Globe', designed for the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris.

  • In this episode we were delighted to be joined by our friend, colleague and comrade Dr Matthew Kerry (University of Stirling) to discuss his book 'Unite Proletarian Brothers!: Radicalism and Revolution in the Second Spanish Republic' (Institute of Historical Research, 2020), which is available to everyone as an Open Access publication here: bit.ly/3is39X9

    We discuss radicalism, fascism, the state and proletarian unity during the 1930s, exploring why and how the mining valleys of northern Spain erupted into revolution in October 1934, in what can be seen as the last attempt to seize state power through mass insurrection by the working class in Europe. 

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv

    The image in this episode is the poster 'Aprieta fuerte compañero!' ('Squeeze tightly, comrade!') created by Germán Horacio Robles in 1936 and available in the public domain. 

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  • A short overview of the new book by Agustín Guillamón, La matanza del cuartel Carlos Marx. Bellaterra, mayo de 1937 (Serra de Tramuntana: Calumnia, 2020), which details the investigation into the torture and murder of twelve anarchists during the Barcelona May days, 1937.

  • In this extra special festive bonus episode we join Pearson Bolt of the excellent Coffee with Comrades podcast to chat with Professor Ruth Kinna (Loughborough University) about her recent publication 'The Government of No One' (Pelican, 2019). We really enjoyed this opportunities to go in-depth into theory and history with one of the most prominent and lucid scholars of anarchism in the world. Many of Ruth's works are available for free here: https://repository.lboro.ac.uk/authors/Ruth_Kinna/1252950 and at Dog Section Press: https://dogsection.org/
    If you enjoy our podcast do check out Coffee with Comrades, a brilliant show with over 100 episodes covering current events, theory, and action through a radical lens. You can subscribe to the show on your podcast app, follow on Twitter @coffeewcomrades and find the show here: https://www.coffeewithcomrades.com/. 
    Thanks to everyone who has tuned in to our show over this year, we've been amazed by the interest that our DIY show chatting about radical history has generated. A special thanks to all those who have joined us on the show: Constance Bantman, Ole Birk Laursen, Frank Jacob, Kathy Ferguson, Alan McGuire of the Sobremesa podcast, and Pearson and Ruth from this episode. We have several more interviews lined up for the new year, and if you have a work you'd like to discuss, have any recommendations for us, or have an idea for an ABC Bitesize, giving a summary of a foreign-language work to an English audience, then get in touch! Our email is abcwithdannyandjim@gmail.com, and you can follow us on Twitter and Facebook, both @abcdannyandjim. 
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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho
    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png
    The image in this episode is a photograph of Jim's cat, Nye, enjoying 'The Government of No One'. 

  • In a break from our usual set up, this episode features Danny and Jim speaking to Alan McGuire of the Sobremesa podcast about the history of anarchism in Spain. 

    Sobremesa is weekly podcast which covers subjects about contemporary Spanish society, politics and history, you can subscribe using your usual podcast app and find more information here: alanmcguire.com/the-sobremesa-podcast/ and via the show's Twitter account: @Sobremesacast. We're really grateful to Alan for inviting us on, so do subscribe and support this great new podcast. 

    Given the scope of the subject, and the fact that we love talking about it, this is an extra-long episode, so settle in....

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png

    The image in this episode is a poster by Josep Obiols for the collectivised transport industry of the CNT, produced in Barcelona, 1936. This image is available in the public domain. 

  • In this episode we were delighted to be joined by Professor Kathy Ferguson (The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa) to discuss her fascinating work on anarchist printing over the turn of the twentieth century. Along the way we discuss the formative role that creating print had in anarchist communities, the value of considering the 'materiality' of radical politics, and reflect on the relationship between media and movements in the current context. 

    Kathy's book 'Anarchist Letters' will be published in the near future, until then you can discover more of her work here: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kathy_Ferguson. We particularly recommend her article 'Anarchist Printers and Presses: Material Circuits of Politics' which was published in Political Theory in 2014. 

    Some of Kathy's other work includes Emma Goldman: Political Thinking in the Streets (2011) which has a companion website here: www2.hawaii.edu/~kferguso/

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png

    The image in this episode is a photograph of Tom Keell and Alfred Marsh in the Freedom office at 127 Ossulston St in 1927, which is available in the public domain and here: https://freedompress.org.uk/history/

  • In this episode we discuss Julius S. Scott's 'The Common Wind: Afro-American Currents in the Age of the Haitian Revolution,' an extraordinary text which began life as a PhD thesis in the 1980s, and has gained an almost cult reputation amongst scholars of transnational radical history until it's publication with Verso in 2018. 

    You can watch a video featuring  Scott, Robin Kelley, Peter Linebaugh and Marcus Rediker celebrating the launch of the book in 2018 at the University of Pittsburgh here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlSXrxFXSsw

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png

    The image in this episode is a photograph of the statue 'Le Marron Inconnu',  in Port au Prince, Haiti (2012), which is available in the public domain here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Marron_Inconnu#/media/File:Le_Marron_Inconnu,_Haiti_2012.jpg

  • In this episode we discuss David Roediger's 'Seizing Freedom' (Verso, 2014), a brilliant account of the radical upheavals brought by the US Civil War and the self-emancipation of slaves in the 1860s.  Along the way we discuss the concept of revolutionary  time, the meaning of tragedy, and the errors of liberal history. 

    Danny has previously spoken about Roediger and his notion of revolutionary time on the podcast 'Soul y Vida' with comrade Gloria Dawson, which you can listen to (along with some boss tunes) here: https://www.mixcloud.com/SoulyVida/shut-it-down-2-revolutionary-time/

    Jim mentions the 3-part series on the life and death of John Brown by 'The Dollop,' a US history-comedy podcast. First episode available here: https://allthingscomedy.com/podcast/the-dollop, episodes 438-430. 

    Danny mentions Steve Smith's reflections on the historiography of the Russian Revolution. You can read an interview with Smith on this subject here: https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/publishing/review/29/long-look-russian-revolution/

    Danny also mentions the latest issue of 'Insurgent Notes,' which includes a 1879 interview with Karl Marx, which you can read here: http://insurgentnotes.com/2020/09/who-was-karl-marx/

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png

    The image in this episode is Winslow Homer's 'Near Andersonville' (1866) which is available in the public domain and here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Winslow_Homer_-_Near_Andersonville_(1866).jpg

  • This episode is a conversation with Frank Jacob (Nord University, Norway) about his forthcoming book 'Emma Goldman and the Russian Revolution:  From Admiration to Frustration,' which will be published with De Gruyter later this year (print ~November; Open Access digital ~December): https://www.degruyter.com/view/title/570450. 

    We discuss Goldman's life, her intellectual contribution to the anarchist movement and her evolving views on the Russian Revolution. We finish by reflecting on what this episode can tell us in the present day and our hopes for a better world. 

    For those with German, Frank's book '1917: Die Korrumpierte Revolution' is available Open Access here: https://www.buechner-verlag.de/buch/1917-die-korrumpierte-revolution/

    Frank has written extensively on the history of revolution, the left and migration (amongst many other themes), much of which is available Open Access. See his CV here: https://nord.academia.edu/FrankJacob

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here:https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho 

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png 

    The image in this episode is 'Emma Goldman: 31 décembre 1919 - identité judiciaire,' which is available in the public domain and here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Emma_goldman_1919.jpg.

  • This episode is a conversation with Ole Birk Laursen about his work on the fascinating Indian anarchist M.P.T. Acharya. We discuss Acharya's life in Europe, the USA and India, as well as his views on Indian nationalism and figures including Mahatma Gandhi and founder of the Indian Communist Party M.N. Roy. 
    For more on Ole and his work see his excellent website: https://olebirklaursen.wordpress.com/about/
    Ole's edited collection of Acharya's essays 'We are Anarchists!' is available from AK Press: https://www.akpress.org/we-are-anarchists.html
    See also 'Lay Down Your Arms,' a collection edited by Ole of anti-militarist, anti-Imperialist, radical essays from the 1930s, available from AK Press: https://www.akpress.org/lay-down-your-arms.html
    You can also follow Ole on Twitter @OleBirkLaursen and receive extracts from M.P.T. Acharya’s life and work @MPTAcharya1
    In the episode Ole mention's Nick Heath's biography of Acharya on libcom, available here: https://libcom.org/history/acharya-mpt-1887-1951
    A new biography of Acharya's wife, Magda Machman is available from Academic Studies Press: https://www.academicstudiespress.com/modernbiographies/magda-nachman

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here:https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho
    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png
    The image in this episode is 'M.P.T. Achayra,' which is available in the public domain. 

  • In this episode we are joined by Dr Liz Stainforth (University of Leeds) to discuss Kristin Ross's Communal Luxury (Verso, 2015). Together we talk about the appeal of utopian history, the relationship between ideas and actions and the value of reclaiming of public space. 

    An interview with Ross in which she discusses her approach to the history of May '68 is available here: https://towardsautonomyblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/23/interview-with-kristin-ross-may-68-beyond-artificial-commemorations-and-remembrances/

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here:https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png

    The image in this episode is 'Barricade de la Place Blanche défendue par des femmes pendant la semaine sanglante', available in the public domain here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Commune_de_Paris_barricade_Place_Blanche.jpg

  • This is the first episode of ABC Bitesize, a subseries of the Anarchist Book Club. Inspired by a tweet by the famous youtuber anarchopac, the idea is to provide overviews of radical history books that are currently unavailable in English.

    Episode 1 is based on Dieter Nelles, Harald Piotrowski, Ulrich Linse and Carlos García's book Antifascistas alemanes en Barcelona (1933-1939) (Barcelona: Virus, 2019).

    The book tells the story of the Deutsche Anarchosyndikalisten (DAS) group, and includes a much expanded version of Dieter Nelles's essay 'The Foreign Legion of the revolution: German anarcho-syndicalists and volunteers in anarchist militias during the Spanish civil war', available at: https://libcom.org/library/the-foreign-legion-revolution

    A transcript of this episode is available on request.

  • In this episode we discuss Silvia Federici's seminal work 'Caliban and the Witch,' which calls for us to examine the development of capitalism through the eyes and the body of women in the early modern era. Along the way we discuss the idea of modernity; the relationship between theory, politics and history; and the claim that Federici's recent work could be read as justifying transphobia in the present day.////

    A thread on Federici's use of sources on the witch-hunts mentioned early in the episode can be found here: https://libcom.org/blog/witch-hunts-transition-capitalism-20122011////

    The article 'Federici vs Marx' by Gilles Dauvé, mentioned by Danny in the epsiode can be found here: https://libcom.org/library/federici-versus-marx-gilles-dauve////

    One of several reviews of Federici's 'Beyond the Periphery of the Skin' which critiques the apparent transphobia of this more recent work can be found here: https://www.full-stop.net/2020/05/28/reviews/cory-austin-knudson/beyond-the-periphery-of-the-skin-silvia-federici/////

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here:https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho////

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png////

     The image in this episode is 'Einblattdruck zu einer Hexenverbrennung in Derenburg (Grafschaft Reinstein)' (1555), available in the public domain here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Zeitung_Derenburg_1555_crop.jpg////

  • This episode is our first with a guest, the brilliant scholar of French & transnational anarchism Dr Constance Bantman (University of Surrey, @ConnieLorene). Constance joined us to speak about her forthcoming book, 'Jean Grave and the Networks of French Anarchism,' which examines the life, work and connections of one of the most influential anarchists of the late 19th/early 20th century. Our discussion takes us through many aspects of Grave's activism: including his personal relationships, his internationalism & role in solidarity campaigns, his controversial position on the First World War & his educational work. 

    Constance was written widely on turn-of-the-century anarchism and beyond. You can see her full bibliography here: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/people/constance-bantman

    An open-access version of her article 'Jean Grave and French Anarchism: A Relational Approach (1870s-1914)' which informed this discussion can be found here: https://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/841830/

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License.

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here

    The image in this episode is a police mugshot of Jean Grave taken by Alphonse Bertillon in 1894, which is in the public domain and can be found here: https://bit.ly/2NLcScQ

  • In this episode of ABC with Danny and Jim we discuss Paul Gilroy's The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness (Verso, 1993). Our discussion follows this book's navigation through black culture and modernity, reflecting on thinkers from WEB du Bois to Hegel as well as Gilroy's rich investigation of black music. Along we way we discuss the concept of diaspora, the perils of black ethno-nationalism and the importance of Gilroy's work to the present moment.  

    Danny's brilliant mix of music inspired by Paul Gilroy's work (ft. Curtis Mayfield, Steel Pulse, William DeVaughn, Aretha Franklin, Hugh Masekela & many more) is available here: https://bit.ly/3edP1hk

    The interview between Gilroy and Tommie Shelby for Transition can be found here: https://bit.ly/2zQUo7i

    For an accessible introduction to Hegel's master/slave dialectic and its impact on racial politics (discussed in both the episode and the book) see: https://bit.ly/2CpwG2W

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License.

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here

    The image in this episode is Slaveship Collage  by George Bayard III, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Slaveship_painting.jpg

  • In this episode of Anarchist Book Club we discuss Steve Wright's 'Storming Heaven: Class Composition and Struggle in Italian Autonomist Marxism' (Pluto, 2017). Our conversation takes us through the roots of autonomism and its relationship to the PCI (Italian Communist Party) in post-war Italy, into reflections on the practice of work-place inquiry and the efforts to build a useful theory of class struggle and political change from this approach. We also reflect on the value of a historical approach, often lacking in in workerist theory and journals, with the notable exception of the journal Primo Maggio. We conclude by discussing the legacy and continuing relevance of autonomism in the present day.
    Some contemporary applications of workerism mentioned in the show:

    AngryWorkers recent publication Class Power on Zero Hours: https://pmpress.org.uk/product/class-power-on-zero-hours/. See also https://classpower.net/intro/
    Notes from Below: https://notesfrombelow.org/, and their recent free ebook with Workers Inquiry Network on the COVID-19 crisis: 'Struggle in a Pandemic': https://notesfrombelow.org/issue/struggle-pandemic

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License.
    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here
    The image in this episode is 'Manifestazione di lavoratori in sciopero durante l'autunno caldo' (1969), an image in the public domain available here: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sciopero_autunno_caldo.jpg

  • In this episode we discuss Maia Ramnath's 'Decolonising Anarchism' (AK Press, 2011), an account of radical groups and individuals involved in the Indian independence movement and its post-colonial successors: from bomb-throwers and Californian bohemians to peasant collectivists and syndicalist educators; from Mahatma Gandhi to the dissident communist martyr Bhagat Singh. Throughout we probe how a 'Western' ideology such as anarchism might translate in a colonial context, asking whether Ramnath's distinction of a Big 'A' Anarchism (i.e. clearly defined anarchist movements and ideology) and 'Little a'  anarchism (i.e. groups and ideas of a broader tradition of which anarchism is a part) helps us to see a common history which would otherwise be obscured. Our conversation then moves onto the question of nationalism and what role, if any, it can play in anarchist politics.  For Ole Birk Laursen's work on M. P. T. Acharya and anarchist anti-colonialism see his website: https://olebirklaursen.wordpress.com/about/ 

    We are asking listeners who are able to make a contribution to the These Walls Must Fall Coronavirus Solidarity Fund: https://detention.org.uk/coronavirus-solidarity-fund/ and/or the Liverpool Migrant Solidarity Network: https://bit.ly/3g2BAC8

     ----------- The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License. The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here The image in this episode is 'Wall painting of Shaheed Bhagat Singh; Rewalsar, Himachal Pradesh' (2010) by John Hill, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license. The original can be found here

  • In this episode we discuss Domenico Losurdo's 'War and Revolution: Rethinking the Twentieth Century,' trans.  Gregory Elliott (Verso, 2020), an extended critique of historical revisionism which stretches from Edmund Burke to Niall Ferguson, via Ernst Nolte, Hannah Ardent and Francois Furet. We question the value of Losurdo's approach, including his treatment of counter-revolution in France and Stalinist Russia, before moving onto a wider conversation on neo-Stalinism in the contemporary left. 

    A biography of Losurdo from Jacobin magazine can be found here

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License.

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here

    The image in this episode is 'Nagykörút - Rákóczi út kereszteződése, a Sztálin-szobor darabolása' by Róbert Hofbauer (1956), licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

  • In this first episode of Anarchist Book Club with Danny and Jim, we discuss Eric Laursen's  'The Duty to Stand Aside' (AK Press 2020), which explores the relationship between George Orwell and the pacifist, anarchist and doctor Alex Comfort, who became famous in the 1970s as the author of 'The Joy of Sex'. We use this as a starting point to discuss the shifting politics of George Orwell, from his time fighting in the Spanish Civil War, to his wartime work with the BBC and his post-war denunciation of key figures in the British Left, including Comfort. 

    A summary of Laursen's book can be found here

    A discussion by Barry Pateman on the splits within British anarchism during WW2 can be found here 

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License.

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here

    The image in this episode is Alexander Comfort by Howard Coster, 1943, held at the National Portrait Gallery and reproduced under a Creative Commons Licence.