Episodes

  • In this episode we discuss Eric Hobsbawm's classic - and much-criticised - study of social banditry, millenarian insurrection and mob politics, 'Primitive Rebels' (1959). 

    This key text remains a touchstone for discussions of anarchism, and is often the first port of call for English speakers interested in the Spanish movement. We reflect on Hobsbawm's approach, its strengths and shortcomings, and how the book resonates with contemporary political analysis. 

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    You can keep in touch with the podcast via email: [email protected], and Facebook, Twitter and Instragram, all @abcdannyandjim.

    You can subscribe to our newsletter here: https://abcwithdannyandjim.substack.com/

    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv

    The image in this episode is an illustration of Davide Lazzaretti, leader of a mid-19th century 'millenarian' movement which is one of Hobsbawm's subjects. 

  • This episode is something a little different, a recording of a live event we held with in Liverpool in December 2021 with Joe Glenton (@joejglenton), discussing his recent book Veteranhood: Rage and Hope in British Ex-Military Life, published by Repeater. You can buy the book directly from Repeater here: https://repeaterbooks.com/product/veteranhood-rage-and-hope-in-british-ex-military-life/

    Veteranhood is a fantastic book; poignant, witty and angry, as well as highly readable. We wanted this event to be as open as possible, with a couple of readings from Joe and questions from ourselves, but mainly letting the conversation run through the audience.

    As a live event, some of the sound quality isn’t great throughout, but we hope you find it as interesting and as fun as we did at the time….

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    You can keep in touch with the podcast via email: [email protected], and Facebook, Twitter and Instragram, all @abcdannyandjim.

    You can subscribe to our newsletter here: https://abcwithdannyandjim.substack.com/

    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv

    The image in this episode is the cover art of Joe’s Book, designed by Johnny Bull

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  • *Note, this episode contains some strong language*

    In this episode we were joined by Max Farrar to discuss his forthcoming biography, 'Arthur France MBE: The Life and Times of an African-Caribbean-British Man' (Hansib 2021). Arthur France was born in the tiny Caribbean island of Nevis, where he began his activism in trade unionism and black power. After moving to Leeds in 1964 he became a key figure in the emerging black radical cultural movements in the UK through the 1960s and 70s, most notably in his work founding Leeds Carnival. 

    This was a fascinating, wide-ranging and fun conversation with Max. You can find more of Max's writings, over a lifetime of activism and reflection, at https://www.maxfarrar.org.uk/

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    You can keep in touch with the podcast via email: [email protected], and Facebook, Twitter and Instragram, all @abcdannyandjim.

    You can subscribe to our newsletter here: https://abcwithdannyandjim.substack.com/

    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv

    The image in this episode is a photograph of the early pioneers of Leeds Carnival, with Arthur France in the centre. 

  • This episode is something of a special, a recording of our first ever ‘live’ event, which was held on Friday 8 October on Zoom. We were delighted to be joined by Mike Finn and Dana Mills, to mark the recent publication of Mike’s book ‘Debating Anarchism’ (Bloomsbury 2021). 

    Mike’s book is a brilliant, provocative introduction to the debates which surround anarchist history and theory, so we felt this would be a good opportunity to explore some of these with Mike himself, and Dana, an activist and author of – amongst many other works – a brilliant biography of Rosa Luxembourg, published in 2020 with Reaktion Books. Towards the end of the conversation we opened up for some audience questions.

    If you're interested in buying 'Debating Anarchism,' you can get 35% off paperback and e-book editions when buying from the Bloomsbury website, using the following codes:

    UK: GLR TW9UK

    US: GLR TW9US

    Canada: GLR TW9CA

    Australia: GLR TW9AU

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    You can keep in touch with the podcast via email: [email protected], and Facebook, Twitter and Instragram, all @abcdannyandjim.

    You can subscribe to our newsletter here at abcwithdannyandjim.substack.com. The latest post, Revolution number Ja Danke, by Danny, explores the 1969 Summer of Soul and ‘the Black Woodstock’ and is well worth a read. 

    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv

    The image in this episode is a screenshot of Mike, Dana, Danny and Me, having a lovely time on a Friday evening. 

  • In this episode we discuss A.M. Gittlitz's 'I Want to Believe' (Pluto Press, 2020), a study of the remarkable development of a branch of Cold War Trotskyism under the direction of the Argentine J. Posadas. 

    Gittlitz combines an astute reading of the Posadist movement with humour and pathos, bringing together stories of nuclear apocalypse, 'coffee shop wankers' and armed guerrilla struggles in Latin America, resonating with present struggles around migration, science fiction, Bogdanov's dispute with Lenin, Carl Sagan, the arrival of the conquistadors in South America, memes, the Argentinian worker's movement and the X-files. Stay tuned for Jim's revelation about dolphins at the end of this conversation....

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    You can keep in touch with the podcast via email: [email protected], and Facebook, Twitter and Instragram, all @abcdannyandjim.

    You can subscribe to our newsletter here: https://abcwithdannyandjim.substack.com/

    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv

    The image in this episode is an ironic pin-badge, playing on the classic Danish anti-nuclear symbol The Smiling Sun, to fit with Posadism's adherence to nuclear apocalypse, Ufology and the position of dolphins in the revolutionary struggle. 

  • A short overview of the book Joan Puig Elías. Anarquismo, pedagogía y coherencia by Valeria Giacomoni (Barcelona: Descontrol, 2016), a biography of the anarchist teacher and leading light of the Escuela Natura who presided over the Consejo de la Escuela Nueva Unificada (CENU) during the Spanish civil war.

  • In this episode we discuss Loren Goldner's collection of essays 'Revolution, Defeat and Theoretical Underdevelopment' (Haymarket 2017), which examines the promise and failings of four revolutionary episodes in the twentieth century: Russia, Turkey, Spain and Bolivia.

    Goldner's blog 'Break Their Haughty Power' is well worth exploring, you can find it here: http://breaktheirhaughtypower.org/

    Danny discusses some of the themes we cover in last week's newsletter, which you can read here: https://abcwithdannyandjim.substack.com/p/anarchism-as-non-integration

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    You can keep in touch with the podcast via email: [email protected], and Facebook, Twitter and Instragram, all @abcdannyandjim.

    You can subscribe to our newsletter here: https://abcwithdannyandjim.substack.com/

    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv

    The image in this episode is a 1920 poster from the Soviet Industrial Propaganda Bureau, captioned 'Only a close and unbreakable union of workers and peasants will save Russia from economic destruction and starvation.' Available here: https://www.posterplakat.com/posters/PP%20416

  • In this episode we were joined by Dr Pascale Siegrist of the German Historical Institute London. Pascale is an intellectual historian whose first book project examines the ‘global’ thought of fin-de-siècle anarchists. You can find more on Pascale's research interests here: https://www.ghil.ac.uk/team/our-team/pascale-siegrist.

    For this episode we read two brilliant pieces by Pascale on anarchism and geography: ‘Historicising ‘Anarchist Geography’ in the collection Historical Geographies of Anarchism (London, 2017) and ‘Cosmopolis and Community. Élisée Reclus and Pëtr Kropotkin on Spatial and Moral Unity, 1870s to 1900s’, Global Intellectual History [published online 8 September 2020].

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    A reminder that we have recently launched a newsletter via the platform SubStack: https://substack.com/profile/34666794-abc-with-danny-and-jim

    You can keep in touch with the podcast via email: [email protected], and Facebook, Twitter and Instragram, all @abcdannyandjim. 

    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv

    The image in this episode is an orographic map of Eastern Siberia from 1875 by Peter Kropotkin, which is available in the public domain and here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orography#/media/File:Map_of_Eastern_Siberia.png

  • In this episode we take a break from our usual format - to coincide with our 1st 'birthday' we discuss the first two pieces to be published in our new newsletter: 'Ten Years on the Turn' and 'People Just Do Something', both written by Danny as reflections on the past decade of politics. We also use this as an opportunity to reflect on the past year. 

    You can subscribe to the newsletter here: https://bit.ly/3tPBcgS

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv

  • In this episode we discuss Paul Avrich's classic 'Kronstadt 1921' (Princeton University Press, 1970), marking 100 years since this pivotal event in radical history. Along the way we discuss anti-Semitism within critiques of communism, the perils of a mechanistic understanding of class struggle and historical change, the nature of Bolshevik smear campaigns, and the significance of 1921 to the prospects of internationalist socialism. 

    The book is available online here: https://libcom.org/library/kronstadt-1921-paul-avrich-0

    There are many, many pieces to recommend about the Kronstadt uprising and its suppression. A number of useful introductions are available on libcom.org, including:

    https://libcom.org/blog/kronstadt-revolt-one-hundred-years-counter-revolution-02032021 https://libcom.org/library/70th-anniversary-kronstadt-rebellion https://libcom.org/history/1921-the-kronstadt-rebellion

    See also the excellent Solidarity publication 'Kronstadt Uprising' by Ida Mett, available here: https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/ida-mett-the-kronstadt-commune. 

    Over the weekend of 20-21 March 2021 Danny participated in the conference 'Kronstadt as Revoutionary Utopia, 1921-2021 and Beyond'. The conference website hosts a wide range of pieces reflecting on the event and its legacy: https://kronstadt2021.wordpress.com/

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv

    The image in this episode is the poster Kronshtadtskaia karta bita! (The Kronstadt Card Is Trumped!) by Vladimir Kozlinskii for the Petrograd office of the Russian Telegraph Agency in 1921, available in the public domain. The image depicts a reactionary White Guard as synonymous with a Kronstadt sailor, both vanquished by RSFSR (Russian Soviet Federative Republic). Thanks to Dr Hannah Parker for her help interpreting this image. 


     

  • In this episode we're delighted to be joined by Martha Ackelsberg (Smith College, Massachusetts) to discuss her classic study of Mujeres Libres, 'Free Women of Spain,' on the 30th anniversary of its original publication. 

    Martha's work has been hugely influential in the study of anarchism, gender and the Spanish Civil War, and has shaped the work of both Danny and Jim. We were thrilled that she could join us for this discussion, which covers the history of anarchist feminism in Spain, sexism within the movement, the problems of equating gender emancipation with fighting, and the lessons of the Mujeres Libres for today's radicals. 

    You can find more about Martha's extensive work on these subjects here: smith.edu/academics/faculty/martha-ackelsberg

    In 2016 Danny and Jim were delighted to guest edit a special issue of International Journal of Iberian Studies on transnationalism and Spanish anarchism, featuring a brilliant article by Martha on the links between radical feminists in Spain and Argentina. The journal is available here, or you can get in touch with the show for access. 

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W 

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv 

    The image in this episode isa photograph of a Mujeres Libres section during the Spanish Civil War, which is available in the public domain

  • In this episode we discuss Marie Fleming's 'The Geography of Freedom' (Black Rose Books, 1988), a study of anarchist geographer Elisée Reclus who was a key figure in the 19th century movement. 
    We are very grateful that Black Rose provided us with this book to discuss. Black Rose have been publishing alternative, radical works from their base in Montreal since the 1970s, and operate a range of brilliant initiatives, including a pay-what-you-can solidarity e-bookshop. They recently hosted a conference on Peter Kropotkin, inspired by their recent publication of Kropotkin's Siberian diaries. You can watch this event on their YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/blackrosebooks
    Keep an eye out for their new website, which will stress digital availability and access to many titles, with the option to buy a copy. This will be launched soon on their existing domain: https://blackrosebooks.com/. You can also follow Black Rose on Twitter @blackrosebooks
    For more on Reclus, see the edited works published by PM Press: https://www.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=565 and the work of Dr Pascale Siegrist: https://www.ghil.ac.uk/team/our-team/pascale-siegrist.
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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W
    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv
    The image in this episode is Reclus' 'Great Globe', designed for the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris.

  • In this episode we were delighted to be joined by our friend, colleague and comrade Dr Matthew Kerry (University of Stirling) to discuss his book 'Unite Proletarian Brothers!: Radicalism and Revolution in the Second Spanish Republic' (Institute of Historical Research, 2020), which is available to everyone as an Open Access publication here: bit.ly/3is39X9

    We discuss radicalism, fascism, the state and proletarian unity during the 1930s, exploring why and how the mining valleys of northern Spain erupted into revolution in October 1934, in what can be seen as the last attempt to seize state power through mass insurrection by the working class in Europe. 

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://bit.ly/35ToW4W

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://bit.ly/35Nd6cv

    The image in this episode is the poster 'Aprieta fuerte compañero!' ('Squeeze tightly, comrade!') created by Germán Horacio Robles in 1936 and available in the public domain. 

  • A short overview of the new book by Agustín Guillamón, La matanza del cuartel Carlos Marx. Bellaterra, mayo de 1937 (Serra de Tramuntana: Calumnia, 2020), which details the investigation into the torture and murder of twelve anarchists during the Barcelona May days, 1937.

  • In this extra special festive bonus episode we join Pearson Bolt of the excellent Coffee with Comrades podcast to chat with Professor Ruth Kinna (Loughborough University) about her recent publication 'The Government of No One' (Pelican, 2019). We really enjoyed this opportunities to go in-depth into theory and history with one of the most prominent and lucid scholars of anarchism in the world. Many of Ruth's works are available for free here: https://repository.lboro.ac.uk/authors/Ruth_Kinna/1252950 and at Dog Section Press: https://dogsection.org/
    If you enjoy our podcast do check out Coffee with Comrades, a brilliant show with over 100 episodes covering current events, theory, and action through a radical lens. You can subscribe to the show on your podcast app, follow on Twitter @coffeewcomrades and find the show here: https://www.coffeewithcomrades.com/. 
    Thanks to everyone who has tuned in to our show over this year, we've been amazed by the interest that our DIY show chatting about radical history has generated. A special thanks to all those who have joined us on the show: Constance Bantman, Ole Birk Laursen, Frank Jacob, Kathy Ferguson, Alan McGuire of the Sobremesa podcast, and Pearson and Ruth from this episode. We have several more interviews lined up for the new year, and if you have a work you'd like to discuss, have any recommendations for us, or have an idea for an ABC Bitesize, giving a summary of a foreign-language work to an English audience, then get in touch! Our email is [email protected], and you can follow us on Twitter and Facebook, both @abcdannyandjim. 
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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho
    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png
    The image in this episode is a photograph of Jim's cat, Nye, enjoying 'The Government of No One'. 

  • In a break from our usual set up, this episode features Danny and Jim speaking to Alan McGuire of the Sobremesa podcast about the history of anarchism in Spain. 

    Sobremesa is weekly podcast which covers subjects about contemporary Spanish society, politics and history, you can subscribe using your usual podcast app and find more information here: alanmcguire.com/the-sobremesa-podcast/ and via the show's Twitter account: @Sobremesacast. We're really grateful to Alan for inviting us on, so do subscribe and support this great new podcast. 

    Given the scope of the subject, and the fact that we love talking about it, this is an extra-long episode, so settle in....

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png

    The image in this episode is a poster by Josep Obiols for the collectivised transport industry of the CNT, produced in Barcelona, 1936. This image is available in the public domain. 

  • In this episode we were delighted to be joined by Professor Kathy Ferguson (The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa) to discuss her fascinating work on anarchist printing over the turn of the twentieth century. Along the way we discuss the formative role that creating print had in anarchist communities, the value of considering the 'materiality' of radical politics, and reflect on the relationship between media and movements in the current context. 

    Kathy's book 'Anarchist Letters' will be published in the near future, until then you can discover more of her work here: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kathy_Ferguson. We particularly recommend her article 'Anarchist Printers and Presses: Material Circuits of Politics' which was published in Political Theory in 2014. 

    Some of Kathy's other work includes Emma Goldman: Political Thinking in the Streets (2011) which has a companion website here: www2.hawaii.edu/~kferguso/

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png

    The image in this episode is a photograph of Tom Keell and Alfred Marsh in the Freedom office at 127 Ossulston St in 1927, which is available in the public domain and here: https://freedompress.org.uk/history/

  • In this episode we discuss Julius S. Scott's 'The Common Wind: Afro-American Currents in the Age of the Haitian Revolution,' an extraordinary text which began life as a PhD thesis in the 1980s, and has gained an almost cult reputation amongst scholars of transnational radical history until it's publication with Verso in 2018. 

    You can watch a video featuring  Scott, Robin Kelley, Peter Linebaugh and Marcus Rediker celebrating the launch of the book in 2018 at the University of Pittsburgh here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlSXrxFXSsw

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png

    The image in this episode is a photograph of the statue 'Le Marron Inconnu',  in Port au Prince, Haiti (2012), which is available in the public domain here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Marron_Inconnu#/media/File:Le_Marron_Inconnu,_Haiti_2012.jpg

  • In this episode we discuss David Roediger's 'Seizing Freedom' (Verso, 2014), a brilliant account of the radical upheavals brought by the US Civil War and the self-emancipation of slaves in the 1860s.  Along the way we discuss the concept of revolutionary  time, the meaning of tragedy, and the errors of liberal history. 

    Danny has previously spoken about Roediger and his notion of revolutionary time on the podcast 'Soul y Vida' with comrade Gloria Dawson, which you can listen to (along with some boss tunes) here: https://www.mixcloud.com/SoulyVida/shut-it-down-2-revolutionary-time/

    Jim mentions the 3-part series on the life and death of John Brown by 'The Dollop,' a US history-comedy podcast. First episode available here: https://allthingscomedy.com/podcast/the-dollop, episodes 438-430. 

    Danny mentions Steve Smith's reflections on the historiography of the Russian Revolution. You can read an interview with Smith on this subject here: https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/publishing/review/29/long-look-russian-revolution/

    Danny also mentions the latest issue of 'Insurgent Notes,' which includes a 1879 interview with Karl Marx, which you can read here: http://insurgentnotes.com/2020/09/who-was-karl-marx/

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png

    The image in this episode is Winslow Homer's 'Near Andersonville' (1866) which is available in the public domain and here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Winslow_Homer_-_Near_Andersonville_(1866).jpg

  • This episode is a conversation with Frank Jacob (Nord University, Norway) about his forthcoming book 'Emma Goldman and the Russian Revolution:  From Admiration to Frustration,' which will be published with De Gruyter later this year (print ~November; Open Access digital ~December): https://www.degruyter.com/view/title/570450. 

    We discuss Goldman's life, her intellectual contribution to the anarchist movement and her evolving views on the Russian Revolution. We finish by reflecting on what this episode can tell us in the present day and our hopes for a better world. 

    For those with German, Frank's book '1917: Die Korrumpierte Revolution' is available Open Access here: https://www.buechner-verlag.de/buch/1917-die-korrumpierte-revolution/

    Frank has written extensively on the history of revolution, the left and migration (amongst many other themes), much of which is available Open Access. See his CV here: https://nord.academia.edu/FrankJacob

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    The podcast music is Stealing Orchestra & Rafael Dionísio,  'Gente da minha terra (que me mete um nojo do caralho).' Reproduced from the Free Music Archive under a Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) 3.0 International License, available here:https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Stealing_Orchestra__Rafael_Dionsio/_Rafael_Dionsio_-_Uma_Desgraa_Nunca_Vem_S/Gente_da_minha_terra_que_mete_um_nojo_do_caralho 

    The podcast logo is an adapted version of the Left Book Club logo (1936-48), reproduced, edited and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. Original available here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Left_Book_Club_logo.png 

    The image in this episode is 'Emma Goldman: 31 décembre 1919 - identité judiciaire,' which is available in the public domain and here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Emma_goldman_1919.jpg.