Episodes

  • In covering the end of widespread reproductive freedom in the United States, the CBC goes the both-sides route. At what point should something be considered a human-rights issue and no longer subject to debate?


    And the Convoy — or at least something similar — is set to rematerialize in Ottawa. What has the media learned since last time, and are we any closer to putting our finger on a diffuse movement that’s very different to different people? Jonathan Goldsbie fills in for Jesse and Rachel Cairns co-hosts. 

    Links:
    CBC's the Current segment re: Roe v. Wade
    Dr. Jennifer Gunter Tweet re: appearance on CBC
    Stephanie Gray Google Talk
    MPP Bhutila Karpoche Tweet re: Evictions
    Jonathan Goldsbie's Tweet re: Toronto Councilor
    The Conversation piece re: Roe v. Wade
    National Post piece re: Freedom Convoy
    Vice piece re: Freedom Convoy
    The Tyee piece re: Freedom Convoy

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  • Universities across Alberta have experienced huge funding cuts over the last three years. Come fall, students will be paying for that with huge tuition increases (some as high as 104%). But these changes are bigger than just dollars and cents, they beg the question: What is the point of getting a post-secondary education?

    Freelance journalist Oumar Salifou reports on the impacts seen in Alberta and host Jesse Brown interviews Alberta's minister of higher education. 

    Featured in this episode: Anita Cardinal, law student at the University of Alberta; Reginald Wiebe, assistant professor of English at Concordia University of Edmonton; Dave Lamont, a caretaker at the University of Calgary; Brenda Austin-Smith, president of the Canadian Association of University Teachers; Demetrios Nicolaides, Alberta's minister of higher education 

    Further reading:
    Some Alberta post-secondary institutions left relatively unscathed while U of A funds slashed, new data shows, CBC News
    Post-secondary students grapple with increased tuitions as a result of provincial funding cuts to education, The Globe and Mail
    Budget 2021: Post-secondary sees further cuts, 750 job losses, The Calgary Herald
    'A turning point:' After years of cuts, Alberta budget signals growth for U of A, The Edmonton Journal

    Alberta universities voice mixed feelings about budget 2022, Global News

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  • A scandal in Canada's sacred sport. And can journalists do more to unpack the crypto craze and crash? Emilie Nicolas fills in for Jesse and Julian McKenzie co-hosts. 

    Links:
    TSN piece re: Hockey Canada 
    CBC story re: freezing Hockey Canada Assets
    Rick Westhead interview with Kyle Beach
    LA Time piece re: Amy Kaufman
    Globe and Mail piece re: bitcoin

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  • A Canadian scientist wanted to demonstrate how he could use DNA barcoding to distinguish between different strains of cannabis; a pretty valuable thing to be able to do during the weed marketing gold rush.

    To prove it, he just took a graph of U.S. arrest data, changed the title, and said 'here, here's my evidence.'

    He did a lot more than that. And it might have all gone unnoticed, if not for some meddlesome researchers. Senior producer Sarah Lawrynuik gets into it.

    Featured in this episode: Charles Piller, investigative journalist for Science Magazine; Ken Thompson, post-doctoral fellow at Stanford University; Paul Hebert, director of the University of Guelph's Centre for Biodiversity Genomics

    Further reading:
    Failing the test, Charles Piller, Science
    Controversial supplements researcher not guilty of misconduct, Canadian university concludes, Charles Piller, Science

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  • In the midst of a climate crisis, why do we continue to report business news as usual? And is Minister Mendicino being mendacious over the Emergencies Act when he says police advised the government to invoke it? John Woodside, climate reporter for Canada's National Observer co-hosts. 

    Links:
    Globe and Mail piece re: Ambitious oil emissions
    National Post piece re: anti-oil agenda and affordable food
    CP24 piece re: Toronto Police Service

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  • Of the more than 1,400 Starbucks stores in Canada, only a single location in Victoria, B.C. has a union. One former barista spoke to Canadaland about the working conditions that led baristas to organize for better protections - and how the flurry of anti-union messaging from Starbucks HQ was still not enough to deter the workers. 

    But companies across Canada and the U.S. have been employing these types of tactics for decades to prevent their workers from unionizing: including persistent messaging, hiring third-party crisis management firms, and even shuttering stores completely. 

    Do these new unionized workers stand a chance? Cherise Seucharan reports. 

    Featured in this episode: Izzy Adachi, former Starbucks worker; Pablo Guerra, organizer with United Steelworkers; Mitch Thompson, journalist; David J. Doorey, professor of labour law at York University

    Correction: An earlier version of this episode incorrectly identified the Victoria Starbucks location as the first location in Canada to unionize. While it is currently the only location that is unionized there were a number of stores that unionized in the ‘90s and 2000s. These locations are no longer unionized for a number of different reasons.

    Further reading:
    Only one Starbucks in Canada is currently unionized, and it’s in B.C. Why is Starbucks so afraid of unions?, Toronto Star
    A ‘Gen U’ of young Starbucks baristas is powering a growing push to unionize, CNBC
    LEAKED AUDIO: Amazon Union Buster Warns Workers ‘Things Could Become Worse’, Vice News
    Walmart has everything - except unions,The Walrus 
    Union-Bashing Is on the Menu at Tim Hortons, Mitchell Thompson, Jacobin

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  • Devenir propriétaire d’une maison n'est désormais plus qu'une chimère pour toute une génération de Canadien‧ne‧s. Et qu’est-ce qui s’est passé avec la couverture médiatique de l’élection ontarienne ? Emilie Nicolas anime cet épisode de Détours avec Émilie Gougeon Pelletier.

    English: Owning a home is now no more than a pipe dream for a whole generation of Canadians. And what happened with the Ontario election media coverage? Emilie Nicolas hosts this episode of Détours with Émilie Gougeon Pelletier. 

    Liens : 

    Radio-Canada sur la viabilité financière des grandes villes

    Tweet NTV Kenya sur la variole simienne

    Global News sur les dépenses du parti Libéral en Ontario

    Sondage Radio-Canada sur les priorités des Franco-Ontarien‧ne‧s

    Le Devoir sur l'absence de chef bilingue en Ontario

    Le Devoir sur le désintérêt des Ontarien‧ne‧s pour la politique provinciale

    Commanditaire :Oxio

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  • Finding misinformation in the Quebec government's misinformation campaign on Bill 96. And why Tiktokers are speaking out against Bill C-11. Lela Savić co-hosts. 

    Links:
    CBC article re: Bill 96
    Globe and Mail Opinion piece re: Bill 96
    Washington post Opinion piece re: Bill 96
    New York Times piece re: Bill 96
    CBC piece re: Jacob Hoggard

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  • Ostensibly the idea was to do media criticism. That is what the article in the National Post, The Year Of The Graves, set out to do; to hold the press to account and to correct errors that occurred in the reporting of the discoveries of unmarked graves at former Indigenous residential schools.

    But that was not its impact.

    Featured in this episode: Terry Glavin, author of Year Of The Graves and National Post columnist; Karyn Pugliese, executive editor at National Observer; Robert Jago, freelance writer and entrepreneur.

    Further reading:
    The year of the graves: How the world’s media got it wrong on residential school graves, Terry Glavin, National Post
    Pushing through residential school denial no easy task, Niigaan Sinclair, Winnipeg Free Press
    Truth before reconciliation: 8 ways to identify and confront Residential School denialism, The Conversation
    Fighting 'denialists' for the truth about unmarked graves and residential schooling, Kisha Supernant and Sean Carleton, CBC News

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  • Denials of the unmarked graves at residential school sites push through to the mainstream. And a new report shows that journalists' mental health is in jeopardy. Dani Paradis co-hosts. 

    Links:
    New York Post article re: graves
    National Post article re: graves
    Toronto Star article re: Genocide deniers
    Taking Care report
    Toronto Star article re: CBC reporter with PTSD

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  • A field report from coast Salish territory on the irreconcilable conflict between the Tsleil-Waututh Nation and the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion project. There are 73 remaining Southern Resident Killer Whales in existence. The Tsleil-Waututh Nation consider the survival of these orcas and the survival of their people to be the same thing. The government insists a compromise can be met. The Tsleil-Waututh reject this notion, and many are prepared to die in defense of their "wolves of the sea". Brandi Morin reports.

    Further reading:
    Losing language, children, culture: Parallels drawn between endangered orcas and Indigenous experiences, CBC News
    Ottawa approves new $10B loan guarantee for the Trans Mountain pipeline project, Canadian Press
    Indigenous land defender sentenced to jail time over Trans Mountain pipeline protest, CTV News
    Trans Mountain pipeline insurers dropping like flies, National Observer
    UN committee criticizes Canada over handling of Indigenous pipeline opposition, Canadian Press
    Trans Mountain pipeline expansion cost climbs 70%, now $21.4B, Canadian Press

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    Thank you to Gordon Dick of Tsleil-Waututh Nation for the use of his music Coast Salish Anthem in this episode.

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  • A glowing opinion piece about Doug Ford has us wondering how he miraculously overturned his sinking approval ratings. And why Jesse can't report on the Online News Act anymore. Stephen Maher co-hosts. 

    Links:
    Toronto Star Opinion piece re: Doug Ford
    Globe and Mail piece re: Gas prices and Doug Ford
    IndigiNews Open Letter
    Globe and Mail Opinion piece re: RCMP

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  • Sometimes investigative journalism begins with an anonymous tip. Sometimes it begins with an access to information request for secret government documents. In this case, Marcello Di Cintio started his investigation because he had an article reprinted without permission. But the story he walked away with in the end was so much better than he could have imagined. 

    Featured in this episode: Marcello Di Cintio, Calgary-based journalist and author.
    Vancouver Public Library’s Story City project: Interview with Pia Tofini-Johnson

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  • The many, many opinion pieces on why Pierre Poilievre shouldn't fire the head of the Bank of Canada. And why some Canadians insist on bragging about how we're better than America while ignoring the hate being brewed here. Ryan Thorpe co-hosts.

    Links:
    Campbell Clark Globe and Mail Opinion piece re: WEF conspiracy
    Andrew Coyne Globe and Mail Opinion piece re: Pierre Poilievre 
    Halifax Examiner piece re: Portapique mass shooting
    Fox News piece re: Jordan Peterson departing Twitter
    Blog TO piece re: Simu Liu's Juno speech
    Bashir Mohamed Tweet re: Vancouver Sun replacement theory

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  • Operation Medusa has become the most celebrated battle in recent Canadian history. It was hailed as a stroke of military genius that may have vanquished the Taliban once and for all.

    But the soldiers and commanders who were on the ground in 2006 have a different story to tell. A rushed battle. Flawed intelligence. And generals putting political considerations ahead of Canadian lives.

    And even though Canada had defeated the Taliban on the battlefield, that didn’t mean they were winning the war.

    Featured in this episode: Cpl. Sean Teal, Canadian Armed Forces; Bruce Moncur, veterans advocate and former reservist; Lt.-Gen. Omer Lavoie, Canadian Armed Forces; Adnan R. Khan, journalist and contributing editor at Maclean's; Eugene Lang, fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute

    Further reading:
    Operation Medusa: The Battle For Panjwai, Adam Day, Legion Magazine
    Afghanistan veteran recounts brutal battle, Stephen J. Thorne, Legion Magazine
    It’s time for a hard look at Operation Medusa, Adnan R. Khan, Maclean’s
    The Unexpected War: Canada In Kandahar, Janice Gross Stein and Eugene Lang

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  • Des chefs de plusieurs nations autochtones s’opposent à l’adoption de la loi 96 au Québec, une loi qui, parmi d’autres conséquences, aura un impact sur les personnes nécessitant des services publics dans une langue autre que le français. Et est-ce qu’il y a une différence entre la façon dont les médias francophones et anglophones couvrent la course à la chefferie du Parti conservateur ? Emilie Nicolas anime le tout premier épisode de Détours avec Romeo Saganash.

    English: Leaders from several Indigenous nations oppose the adoption of Bill 96 in Quebec, a law that, among other consequences, will have an impact on people requiring public services in a language other than French. And is there a difference between the way the French and English media are covering the Conservative leadership race? Emilie Nicolas hosts the very first episode of Détours with Romeo Saganash.

    Liens : 

    TVA Nouvelles sur la loi 96

    Montreal Gazette sur la position de Nakuset contre la loi 96

    Patrick Lagacé dans La Presse en réponse à Nakuset sur la loi 96

    Commanditaire :Oxio

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  • The canucksploitation is egregious in Mike Myer's new Netflix show the Pentaverate. And the chairman of Post Media absolutely had to write an opinion piece in the National Post defending Patrick Brown. Jesse's back in the saddle and Mel Woods co-hosts.  

    Links:
    Trailer for the Pentaverate
    Xtra piece re: Gerald Hannon tribute
    Canadaland statement re: Canadalandback
    National post opinion piece re: Paul Godfrey
    National post piece re: Patrick Brown

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  • With the seemingly imminent repeal of Roe v. Wade in the United States, it's time to refamiliarize ourselves with Canada's long fought history for abortion access. And explore how that story is anything but ancient history, with one provincial ban being overturned as recently as four years ago.  Today's episode features just a few of the people who have been on the frontlines of that fight as well as a historian who studies nothing but reproductive justice.  

    Featured in this episode: Christabelle Sethna, professor in the Feminist and Gender Studies Faculty of Social Sciences University of Ottawa; Deb Miller, retired family lawyer and abortion access advocate; Colleen MacQuarrie, professor of psychology at the University of Prince Edward Island and abortion access advocate; Autumn Reinhardt-Simpson, PhD candidate at the University of Alberta and abortion doula.

    Further reading:
    Why Canada's Roe v. Wade didn't enshrine abortion as a right, CBC News
    Roe v. Wade is on the brink — and Canada could be pulled into U.S. brawls over abortion law, CBC News

    Trudeau renews pledge to protect abortion rights in Canada, but unable to offer timeline, The Globe and Mail

    Why Canada’s conservatives are keeping quiet on abortion, Politico

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  • With the imminent upheaval of abortion rights to the south, Canada’s media reflects on the state of things here at home. And going by headlines, you’d think Canada’s ban on gay men giving blood was repealed - but you’d be only somewhat correct. Jeopardy! champ Mattea Roach joins Canadaland news editor Jonathan Goldsbie to look at rights, laws, and how the media mediates our understanding of both. 

    Links:
    Toronto Star piece re: Abortion access in Canada
    Toronto Sun piece re: Kinsella on overturning Roe v. Wade
    Xtra piece re: New blood donation policy
    Vice piece re: Gay blood donation ban

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  • Did you know during a recent storm the City of Winnipeg released 60 million litres of raw sewage into the Red River? Did you know the City of Morden, Manitoba almost ran out of potable water during the extreme drought last summer?

    Climate change has already started wreaking havoc on the water systems of the Prairies and that is having substantial impacts on cities across Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and adapting is going to cost Canadians billions. This week, senior producer Sarah Lawrynuik will explain why.

    Featured in this episode: Brandon Burley, mayor of Morden; Santokh Randhawa, deputy city manager of Morden; Bill Buhay, associate professor at the University of Winnipeg; Frank Frigo, City of Calgary water resources engineer; Dave Sauchyn, the director of the Prairie Adaptation Research Collaborative (PARC); Raven Sharma, manager of utilities for the City of Selkirk; Duane Nicol, chief administrative officer for the City of Selkirk; Saman Razavi, associate professor at the University of Saskatchewan.

    Further reading:
    Weekend deluge could produce worst conditions since Flood of the Century, provincial officials warn, Winnipeg Free Press
    ‘It was hard enough before’: Manitoba’s drought, worsened by climate crisis, is upending Prairie life, The Narwhal

    Alberta wrestles with its most critical resource: water, The Narwhal
    60 million litres of raw sewage released into Red River during storm, Winnipeg Free Press
    Construction on long-awaited Springbank reservoir to protect Calgary area from floods is officially a go, CBC News
    Sask. gov't announces $4B project to double irrigable land in province, CBC News
    Selkirk opening state-of-the-art wastewater treatment plant in 2021, CTV News

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