Episodes

  • Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    The world is now in the midst of the great green transition. Countries are looking for ways to reduce their emissions, and grow their economies in a way that will not harm the environment. But according to the Asian Development Bank, developing economies in Asia are finding it difficult to finance a green, inclusive recovery.  

    In this episode, The Straits Times’ environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss the sustainability investment gap in Asia, and how to narrow it, with Ms Valerie Kwan, who oversees corporate and investor initiatives at the Asia Investor Group on Climate Change (AIGCC).

    Highlights (click/tap above):

    01:31 The current investment gap in Asia 

    05:12 Reasons behind sustainability investment gap 

    07:48 Standards on what constitutes green investments: Why this is important 

    13:33 What is blended finance?

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis and Hadyu Rahim

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

    Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:

    Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf

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    Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV 

    Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts

    Feedback to: [email protected]

    Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB

    Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2

    Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6

    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    ---

    Discover ST's special edition podcasts:

    Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wuJa

    The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia: https://str.sg/wuZ2

    Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wuZB

    Invisible Asia: https://str.sg/wuZn

    ---

    Discover more ST podcast series:

    Asian Insider: https://str.sg/JWa7

    Health Check: https://str.sg/JWaN

    In Your Opinion: https://str.sg/w7Qt

    Your Money & Career: https://str.sg/wB2m

    SG Extra: https://str.sg/wukR

    #PopVultures: https://str.sg/JWad

    ST Sports Talk: https://str.sg/JWRE

    Bookmark This!: https://str.sg/JWas

    The Big Story: https://str.sg/wuZe

    Lunch With Sumiko: https://str.sg/J6hQ

    Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL

    Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!

    #greenpulse

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

  • Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    In May, the World Meteorological Organisation released a report that detailed how four key climate change indicators set new records in 2021. Three of them relate to the ocean: sea level rise, ocean heat and ocean acidification. 

    Global mean sea level reached a new record high in 2021, the upper 2,000m of the ocean is warming at a rate that is irreversible on timescales of hundreds to thousands of years, while the open ocean pH - a measure of acidity - is likely to be the lowest it has been for at least 26,000 years. Greenhouse gas concentrations also reached a new global high in 2020, when the concentration of carbon dioxide - the main greenhouse gas driving climate change - reached 413.2 parts per million globally, or 149 per cent of the pre-industrial level.

    In this episode, The Straits Times environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss the role of the ocean in keeping our planet cool, with Professor Benjamin Horton, a climate scientist and director of the Earth Observatory of Singapore at the Nanyang Technological University. 

    Highlights (click/tap above):

    01:57 How important is the ocean to the global climate? 

    03:00 Does climate action matter, when climate impacts like sea level rise are irreversible? 

    07:00 What are the impacts of a warmer ocean? 

    11:55 Why is the ocean becoming more acidic? 

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis and Hadyu Rahim

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

    Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:

    Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf

    Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaY

    Spotify: https://str.sg/JWag

    Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV 

    Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts

    Feedback to: [email protected]

    Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB

    Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2

    Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6

    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    ---

    Discover ST's special edition podcasts:

    Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wuJa

    The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia: https://str.sg/wuZ2

    Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wuZB

    Invisible Asia: https://str.sg/wuZn

    ---

    Discover more ST podcast series:

    Asian Insider: https://str.sg/JWa7

    Health Check: https://str.sg/JWaN

    In Your Opinion: https://str.sg/w7Qt

    Your Money & Career: https://str.sg/wB2m

    SG Extra: https://str.sg/wukR

    #PopVultures: https://str.sg/JWad

    ST Sports Talk: https://str.sg/JWRE

    Bookmark This!: https://str.sg/JWas

    The Big Story: https://str.sg/wuZe

    Lunch With Sumiko: https://str.sg/J6hQ

    Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL

    Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!

    #greenpulse

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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  • Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    Nuclear energy is a controversial source of energy that is gaining prominence globally,  including in Singapore as a potential solution to tackling climate change. Nuclear is considered a clean form of energy as the generation process does not release any greenhouse gases, unlike the traditional mode of energy generation from burning fossil fuels. 

    But following the nuclear disasters in Chernobyl in 1986 and Fukushima in 2011, how safe is this form of energy now? In this episode, The Straits Times environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss these questions with Dr Matthew Lloyd, a research fellow at the Singapore University of Technology and Design, who does research on materials that can be used in the nuclear process.

    Read the article here: https://str.sg/wBTR

    Highlights of conversation (click/tap above):

    01:13 How do nuclear reactions generate energy? 

    03:30 Why is nuclear energy considered clean, and how safe is it? 

    10:10 Why is nuclear fusion considered safer than fission?

    13:35 How do small modular reactors contribute to safety of nuclear energy?

    15:56 Are rising energy prices causing countries to warm to the idea of nuclear power?

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Hadyu Rahim and Eden Soh

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

    Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:

    Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf

    Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaY

    Spotify: https://str.sg/JWag

    Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV 

    Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts

    Feedback to: [email protected]

    Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB

    Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2

    Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6

    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    ---

    Discover ST's special edition podcasts:

    Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wuJa

    The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia: https://str.sg/wuZ2

    Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wuZB

    Invisible Asia: https://str.sg/wuZn

    ---

    Discover more ST podcast series:

    Asian Insider: https://str.sg/JWa7

    Health Check: https://str.sg/JWaN

    In Your Opinion: https://str.sg/w7Qt

    Your Money & Career: https://str.sg/wB2m

    SG Extra: https://str.sg/wukR

    #PopVultures: https://str.sg/JWad

    ST Sports Talk: https://str.sg/JWRE

    Bookmark This!: https://str.sg/JWas

    The Big Story: https://str.sg/wuZe

    Lunch With Sumiko: https://str.sg/J6hQ

    Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL

    Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!

    #greenpulse

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

  • Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    The world’s top climate science body recently (April 4) released a how-to guide for reducing greenhouse gas emissions fuelling climate change. Turns out, humanity has many tools at its disposal, from greener buildings, to renewable energy to nature-based solutions, such as planting mangroves. 

    Green solutions can also help nations meet their development goals, says the report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Working Group III, which focuses on mitigating, or reducing emissions. 

    The problem is that the amount of planet-heating emissions, especially from burning fossil fuels, pumped into the air keeps rising and this is pushing up global temperatures. The IPCC makes clear that for global average temperatures to be capped at 1.5 deg C, a key Paris Agreement goal, emissions need to start to fall quickly immediately. 

    The worrying outlook comes as many nations are scrambling for fossil fuel supplies because of supply shocks. 

    In this episode, ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss the findings of the report with one of its lead authors,  Professor Jim Skea from Imperial College in London. Prof Skea, co-chair of Working Group III, tells us about the solutions at hand, including the likely need for machines that suck CO2 out of the air, and the imperative to start cutting emissions now. 

    Highlights of conversation (click/tap above):

    02:54 What are the key messages in the IPCC’s Working Group III report?

    04:43 What will the role of new technology be in reducing emissions? 

    06:42 Will cutting emissions help advance developmental goals?

    12:25 The WGIII report rounds up the IPCC’s sixth assessment report. How should policy makers respond? 

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Hadyu Rahim and Eden Soh

    Edited by: Eden Soh

    Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:

    Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf

    Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaY

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    Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV 

    Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts

    Feedback to: [email protected]

    Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB

    Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2

    Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6

    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    ---

    Discover ST's special edition podcasts:

    Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wuJa

    The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia: https://str.sg/wuZ2

    Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wuZB

    Invisible Asia: https://str.sg/wuZn

    ---

    Discover more ST podcast series:

    Asian Insider: https://str.sg/JWa7

    Health Check: https://str.sg/JWaN

    In Your Opinion: https://str.sg/w7Qt

    Your Money & Career: https://str.sg/wB2m

    SG Extra: https://str.sg/wukR

    #PopVultures: https://str.sg/JWad

    ST Sports Talk: https://str.sg/JWRE

    Bookmark This!: https://str.sg/JWas

    The Big Story: https://str.sg/wuZe

    Lunch With Sumiko: https://str.sg/J6hQ

    Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL

    Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!

    #greenpulse

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

  • Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.In this episode, The Straits Times environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty talk about how the reinsurance industry can push for greater climate action.They speak with Mr Mark Senkevics, head of the property and casualty underwriting hub in Asia, Australia & New Zealand for Swiss Re. This episode is brought to you by Swiss Re: https://www.swissre.com/Highlights (click/tap above):02:50 What is the role of reinsurance companies in dealing with climate change and how influential can they be?05:48 Reinsurance companies also pay out when disaster strikes; what are the payout trends for natural catastrophes across Asia?07:10 What is the role of climate change in causing natural catastrophic events, such as floods? 10:15 Why 85 per cent of economic losses from natural catastrophes in Asia are still not insured, when compared with advanced economies13:00 How vulnerable is the Asia-Pacific region to floods, and why governments need to address the poor flood protection gapRead Swiss Re’s sigma report: https://str.sg/w7mbNatural Catastrophe/Climate Risk insights: https://str.sg/w7mECatNet® solution: https://str.sg/w7maProduced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Hadyu Rahim, Teo Tong Kai and Eden SohEdited by: Hadyu RahimSubscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:Channel: https://str.sg/JWafApple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaYSpotify: https://str.sg/JWagGoogle Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV Website: http://str.sg/stpodcastsFeedback to: [email protected] Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMBRead her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu---Discover ST's special edition podcasts:Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wuJaThe Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia: https://str.sg/wuZ2Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wuZBInvisible Asia: https://str.sg/wuZn---Discover more ST podcast series:Asian Insider: https://str.sg/JWa7Health Check: https://str.sg/JWaNIn Your Opinion: https://str.sg/w7QtYour Money & Career: https://str.sg/wB2mSG Extra: https://str.sg/wukR#PopVultures: https://str.sg/JWadST Sports Talk: https://str.sg/JWREBookmark This!: https://str.sg/JWasThe Big Story: https://str.sg/wuZeLunch With Sumiko: https://str.sg/J6hQDiscover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPLFollow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!#greenpulseSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

  • Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    In March, a digital platform that allows businesses to buy and sell carbon credits was launched by Singapore-based carbon exchange and marketplace Climate Impact X (CIX). This development comes amid growing interest in carbon credits from companies looking to reduce their carbon footprint.

    By buying one carbon credit from elsewhere, emitters can offset one tonne of greenhouse gas emissions from their total emissions. But will this promote greenwashing among corporations? And how effective are carbon projects at removing carbon from the atmosphere?

    In this episode, The Straits Times environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss the voluntary carbon market with Mr Mikkel Larsen, the chief executive of Climate Impact X (CIX) - a Singapore-based carbon exchange and marketplace.

    Highlights (click/tap above):

    01:37 Who is buying carbon credits? 

    02:49 How carbon credits from nature-based projects benefit the global environment? 

    7:38 Can the supply of carbon credits catch up with demand? 

    10:40 Are emissions reductions from carbon credits reliable? 

    14:00 How can platforms like CIX’s help to prevent corporate greenwashing?

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Hadyu Rahim and Eden Soh

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

    Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:

    Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf

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    Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV 

    Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts

    Feedback to: [email protected]

    Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB

    Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2

    Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6

    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    ---

    Discover ST's special edition podcasts:

    Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wuJa

    The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia: https://str.sg/wuZ2

    Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wuZB

    Invisible Asia: https://str.sg/wuZn

    ---

    Discover more ST podcast series:

    Asian Insider: https://str.sg/JWa7

    Health Check: https://str.sg/JWaN

    In Your Opinion: https://str.sg/w7Qt

    Your Money & Career: https://str.sg/wB2m

    SG Extra: https://str.sg/wukR

    #PopVultures: https://str.sg/JWad

    ST Sports Talk: https://str.sg/JWRE

    Bookmark This!: https://str.sg/JWas

    The Big Story: https://str.sg/wuZe

    Lunch With Sumiko: https://str.sg/J6hQ

    Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL

    Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!

    #greenpulse

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

  • Synopsis: The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    Record heatwaves, floods and storms. The headlines bear witness to a world facing greater weather extremes threatening people and nature. A major report from the UN’s top climate science body last month underscored the growing risks. As the world gets hotter, climate change impacts are intensifying, affecting ecosystems, people, settlements, and infrastructure.

    In its report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC, said there was clear evidence of increases in the frequency and intensity of climate and weather extremes, including hot extremes on land and in the ocean, plus heavy rainfall events, drought and fire weather.

    Climate change has caused substantial damage, and increasingly irreversible losses, to the natural world, including coral reefs and some forests. Climate change is also driving increased food insecurity and contributing to humanitarian crises. And unless greenhouse emissions are quickly reined in, the impacts will only accelerate, placing more people and nature at greater risk.

    With such a worrying outlook, the IPCC report outlines the importance of adapting to climate impacts but finds such efforts are patchy and in need of greater funding and coordination. In this episode, ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss the findings of the report with one of its lead authors, Dr Chandni Singh, Senior Research Consultant at the Indian Institute for Human Settlements in Bangalore. She tells us more about the vital need to boost adaptation efforts but also the limits. 

    Highlights (click/tap above):

    01:18 Dr Chandni on big findings about Asia from the report

    04:21 How is climate change affecting human societies? 

    07:13 How are natural ecosystems going to be affected by climate change? 

    09:50 Which segments of society are more vulnerable to climate impacts? 

    16:10 What are soft and hard limits to adaptation?

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Teo Tong Kai and Paxton Pang

    Edited by: Teo Tong Kai

    Follow Green Pulse Podcast episodes out here every first and third Monday of the month:

    Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf

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    Feedback to: [email protected]

    Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB

    Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2

    Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6

    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    ---

    Discover more ST podcast series:

    Asian Insider Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWa7

    Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN

    ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE

    #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad

    Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas

    Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ

    Discover BT Podcasts: http://bt.sg/podcasts

    Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

  • Synopsis: The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    Singapore’s new carbon tax rate for 2024 and beyond was announced by Finance Minister Lawrence Wong during the Budget on Feb 18. The aim is for emissions to dwindle to net zero by or around 2050.

    The carbon tax hike will be done in phases to give businesses more certainty, the Government said. The current rate of $5 per tonne of emissions will be in place until 2023. It will go up to $25 in 2024 and 2025, and $45 in 2026 and 2027, before reaching $50 to $80 per tonne by 2030.

    How will this help Singapore achieve its climate targets? ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss this carbon tax hike with OCBC Bank economist Howie Lee.

    Highlights (click/tap above):

    01:22 Why observers were surprised by Singapore's new carbon price

    02:39 How does Singapore's carbon price compare with the rest of Asia Pacific

    03:12 How a carbon price helps to reduce emissions

    06:50 What will the impact of a carbon tax on consumers be?

    08:34 The link between the carbon tax, and the global carbon market

    Read Budget 2022: Singapore's carbon tax could increase to $80 per tonne of emissions by 2030: https://str.sg/wsLK

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Fa'izah Sani & Teo Tong Kai

    Edited by: Teo Tong Kai

    Follow Green Pulse Podcast episodes out here every first and third Monday of the month:

    Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf

    Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaY

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    SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/

    Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts

    Feedback to: [email protected]

    Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB

    Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2

    Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6

    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    ---

    Discover more ST podcast series:

    Asian Insider Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWa7

    Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN

    ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE

    #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad

    Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas

    Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ

    Discover BT Podcasts: http://bt.sg/podcasts

    Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

  • Synopsis: The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    Conserving a forest instead of cutting it down for other uses is becoming increasingly attractive to land developers, as more companies and countries eye such projects as sources of carbon credits to offset their emissions. 

    But a new study by researchers at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has found that protecting forests in South-east Asia can yield many more benefits, other than just the profits from the sale of carbon credits. Communities around a healthy forest with a wide diversity of wild pollinators, for example, can benefit from higher agricultural yields.

    In this episode, The Straits Times environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss the co-benefits of such projects with Dr Tasya Vadya Sarira, a postdoctoral researcher at the NUS Centre for Nature-based Climate Solutions. 

    Highlights (click/tap above):

    01:38 What are the benefits of forests other than taking in planet-warming carbon dioxide?

    02:50 Are these benefits unique to forest conservation projects?

    03:46 A recent study mapped out where in South-east Asia, forests with benefits are located. What sparked it? Where are these forests?

    06:53 How are co-benefits reflected in the carbon price currently?

    08:58 Why is it important to recognise co-benefits?

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Hadyu Rahim and Teo Tong Kai

    Edited by: Teo Tong Kai

    Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:

    Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf

    Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaY

    Spotify: https://str.sg/JWag

    Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV 

    SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/

    Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts

    Feedback to: [email protected]

    Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB

    Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2

    Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6

    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    ---

    Discover more ST podcast series:

    Asian Insider Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWa7

    Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN

    ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE

    #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad

    Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas

    Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ

    Discover BT Podcasts: http://bt.sg/podcasts

    Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

  • Synopsis: The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    One of the most important climate change indicators is one that rarely gets headlines -ocean temperatures. Yet, the world’s oceans are heating up, absorbing huge amounts of energy caused by global warming.

    Last year was the hottest for the world's oceans in recorded human history, according to a study led by an international team of scientists who track the data. It was the sixth consecutive record year. What does this mean for humanity and why should we be concerned?

    In this episode, The Straits Times environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss the growing alarm over hotter oceans with Dr Kevin Trenberth, from the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder Colorado. 

    Highlights (click/tap above):

    1:15 How hot have oceans become?

    5:25 How much could global temperatures have risen without the oceans; human activities causing ocean acidification 

    8:26 Implications of a warmer ocean for marine biodiversity? 

    9:23 What about sea level rise and storms? 

    12:58 How long will the ocean retain the heat for? 

    Read more on the study: https://str.sg/wdjW

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Fa'izah Sani and Hadyu Rahim

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

    Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:

    Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf

    Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaY

    Spotify: https://str.sg/JWag

    Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV 

    SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/

    Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts

    Feedback to: [email protected]

    Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB

    Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2

    Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6

    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    Read ST's Climate Code Red site: https://str.sg/3pSz

    ---

    Discover more ST podcast series:

    Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7

    Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN

    ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE

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  • Synopsis: The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    During the COP26 Glasgow climate change conference in 2021, the need to help developing countries adapt to changing weather patterns and extreme events wrought by climate change was a key issue of discussion. But what does adaptation mean in the climate change discourse, and why is it important? 

    In this episode, The Straits Times environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss this with Dr Arjuna Dibley, a researcher at the Oxford Sustainable Law Programme and a co-author of a recent UN report on adaptation. 

    Highlights  (click/tap above):

    00:59 What is adaptation, and why is it important? 

    03:19 What are some examples of adaptation? 

    05:11 How much would it cost to adapt to climate change? 

    11:08 What are the key points of contention when it comes to global discussions on adaptation? 

    Climate change discussion at COP26: https://www.straitstimes.com/world/carbon-copy-no-consensus-yet-for-adaptation-loss-and-damage-finance-at-cop26

    UN report on adaptation: https://www.straitstimes.com/world/europe/un-urges-countries-to-finance-and-implement-plans-to-adapt-to-climate-impact

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis and Hadyu Rahim

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

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    Read ST's Climate Code Red site: https://str.sg/3pSz

    ---

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  • Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    In 2021, climate change made its mark around the world. North America sizzled in an unprecedented heat wave. Floods inundated China and Europe. Super Typhoon Rai pummelled the Philippines, leaving destruction in its wake. Scientists say the situation could get a lot worse if efforts to reduce the amount of planet-warming emissions are not taken immediately, and Asia is already one of the regions of the world most vulnerable to the changing weather patterns. 

    In this episode, we hear directly from people living in Singapore, China, Malaysia, India, the Philippines and Thailand, as they express their thoughts on how their lives could be impacted in 2022. 

    Then, ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty chat with Mr Joy Singhal, the head for Disaster, Climate and Crisis, at the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

    Highlights (click/tap above):

    01:45 What do people in Asia think the climate crisis will be like in 2022? 

    03:40 What gives them hope?

    07:13 How has Asia experienced climate change this year?

    09:15 The human impacts of climate disasters

    12:30 What is the Red Cross’ outlook for Asia in 2022? 

    14:10 How is the Red Cross helping vulnerable communities cope with climate impacts?

    16:12 At the frontlines of climate disaster, how does Mr Singhal cope with eco-anxiety? 

    Voice clips across Asia thanks to ST’s correspondents:

    Danson Cheong, China correspondent

    Debarshi Dasgupta, India correspondent

    Nirmala Ganapathy, India bureau chief

    Raul Dancel, Philippines correspondent

    Shannon Teoh, Malaysia bureau chief

    Tan Hui Yee, Indochina Bureau Chief

    Audrey Tan, environment correspondent in Singapore

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis and Hadyu Rahim

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

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    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

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    ---

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  • Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    A set of rules on carbon markets was agreed on at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow in November, allowing countries to cooperate with one another to achieve their climate targets. Instead of focusing solely on reducing emissions within their own borders, countries now have the option of buying carbon credits generated elsewhere to offset their emissions. But what would this all mean for the private sector, and for countries like Singapore, which is too small to host any significant emissions reductions projects nor be a large buyer of carbon credits?

    In this episode, environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty speak with Ms Elizabeth Beall, climate and sustainability practice lead at advisory firm Global Counsel, on the role of the private sector in international carbon markets and how Singapore is poised to be a leader in carbon services. 

    Highlights (click/tap above):

    04:13 What do corporations that buy offsets stand to gain beyond claiming credit for sustainability efforts?

    06:08 How will the COP26 outcome on carbon markets change the corporate appetite for carbon credits?

    09:23 Will the private sector see greater governmental intervention in voluntary carbon markets?

    12:23 Singapore aspires to be a carbon services hub. What does this mean?

    13:42 What are the changes in the private sector that the recent outcome is expected to spur?

    Listen to Ep 66: Article 6 - Rise of the carbon markets? - https://omny.fm/shows/green-pulse-1/article-6-rise-of-the-carbon-markets-green-pulse-e

    Carbon credits explained: https://www.straitstimes.com/world/carbon-copy-tricky-carbon-market-rules-struggle-to-get-off-the-ground

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis and Hadyu Rahim

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

    Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:

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    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    Read ST's Climate Code Red site: https://str.sg/3pSz

    ---

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  • Green Pulse Ep 66: Article 6 - Rise of the carbon markets?

    18:59 min

    Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    At the recent COP26 climate talks in Glasgow, Scotland, negotiators from nearly 200 nations concluded discussions on Article 6 of the Paris Agreement. This relates to carbon markets, and whether countries can trade carbon credits to meet their climate pledges — known as nationally determined contributions (NDCs).

    The discussions, six years in the making, also established rules on who emissions savings accrue to, if one nation pays to set up a green initiative - say a wind farm instead of a coal plant - in another country.

    But what exactly are these new rules and markets and what are some of the concerns that still remain?  To help explain what it all means for governments and investors, ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty speak with Mr Richard Saines, who is partner at Pollination, a specialist climate change investment and advisory firm.

    Highlights of conversation (click/tap above):

    1:13 What is the difference between existing voluntary and compliance carbon markets, and how will the outcome at COP26 change them? 

    5:56 What is the key provision under Article 6 that ensures carbon credits are not double counted?

    6:45 How does Article 6 help countries cooperate to find cheaper ways to cut their emissions, while ensuring an overall reduction in concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere?

    8:50 What is the potential of nature in yielding new emissions-reductions projects?

    15:46 With the rules for international carbon trading agreed on at COP26, how soon can countries start buying credits to meet their climate goals?

    Carbon credits explained: https://www.straitstimes.com/world/carbon-copy-tricky-carbon-market-rules-struggle-to-get-off-the-ground

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis and Hadyu Rahim

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

    Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:

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    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    Read ST's Climate Code Red site: https://str.sg/3pSz

    ---

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  • Green Pulse Ep 65: Grace Fu says clear communication with citizens key in Singapore's COP26 climate pledges9:47 minsSynopsis: At the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty were with the Singapore media delegation at COP26, as Minister for Sustainability and the Environment Grace Fu gave her take on the outcome of the United Nations climate talks.0:00 Highlights of conversation (click/tap above):0:45 While there was no total happiness all round, COP26 was a good foundation to "operationalise" the Paris Agreement1:08 More still needs to be done for small island states; adaptation and loss and damage remain hurdles2:10 Overall reaction of AOSIS (Alliance of Small Island States) to COP26 outcome; Singapore is also a member of AOSIS3:00 Climate crisis effects in Singapore include more intense rainfall; must convince and encourage Singaporeans to take collective action4:33 Ms Fu on the pledges Singapore made, in reference to the Singapore Green Plan 2030 that charts the country's pathways to cut emissions, and how the Government intends to communicate plans clearly with citizens6:00 Ms Fu reveals COP presidency's direction to make this process as inclusive and transparent as possibleRevisit our COP26 coverage here: https://omny.fm/shows/green-pulse-1/playlists/green-pulse-at-cop26-glasgowProduced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Fa'izah Sani and ST Video teamEdited by: ST Video team & Hadyu RahimSubscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:Channel: https://str.sg/JWafApple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaYSpotify: https://str.sg/JWagGoogle Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV Website: http://str.sg/stpodcastsFeedback to: [email protected] Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMBRead her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMuRead ST's Climate Code Red site: https://str.sg/3pSz---Discover more ST podcast series:Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaNST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRELife Weekend Picks Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa2#PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWadBookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWasLunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQDiscover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPLFollow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

  • Green Pulse Ep 64: Climate advocate Xuan Zihan on youth in global climate policy-making

    3:15 min

    Synopsis: At the ongoing COP26 climate conference in Glasgow, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty speak with climate advocate Mr Xuan Zihan, a University College of London student union representative and its co-chair of Conference of the Youth at COP26 in Glasgow.

    They discuss the following points:
    Why youths should be involved in national and global policy-making starting at COP26 (1:10)
    Calling for more ambitious climate governance proposals (1:42)
    Using climate finance to hold countries more accountable (2:15)

    Read also:

    Singapore youth give 18 recommendations for tackling environmental crisis: https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/environment/singapore-youth-give-18-recommendations-for-tackling-environmental-crisis

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Fa'izah Sani and ST Video team

    Edited by: ST Video team & Hadyu Rahim

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    ---

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  • Green Pulse Ep 63: Palau President on why climate justice is needed for countries that continue to use more carbon

    17:14 min

    Synopsis: At the ongoing COP26 climate conference in Glasgow, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty speak with the President of the Pacific island state of Palau, Surangel Whipps Jr.

    He is representing AOSIS (Alliance of Small Island States), which, since 1990, has represented the interests of the 39 small island and low-lying coastal developing states in international climate change, sustainable development negotiations and processes.

    Singapore is also a member of AOSIS. This alliance closely resembles the countries it represents on the global stage, but often punches far above its weight, negotiating historic global commitments to cut greenhouse gas emissions, among other achievements.

    They discuss the following points:
    Why a number of islands, whole cultures, will disappear like the dinosaurs if the world does not achieve the COP26 aim to cap global warming at 1.5 deg C above pre-industrial levels (2:13)
    Why it's critical for countries not to operate in silos, but share green technologies (3:40)
    Why the world is suffering a slow death now, with ports and farms overrun with water, crops destroyed, corals dying, more frequent storms seen in Palau and Singapore (4:58)
    Helping small islands go with renewable energy and with infrastructure to cope with rising sea levels (8:23)
    Supporting the climate justice issue: Why countries should be held accountable and pay compensation for using more carbon and for damage they're causing (10:27)
    Climate finance issue: Are developed countries willing to cough up the US$100 billion needed for the climate adaptation costs of developing countries (12:08)
    Is AOSIS' voice finally being heard at the COP climate conference? (13:25)
    Mr Whipps Jr recounts the story of the Palau legend and why there is hope for the world to change its ways now (14:24)

    6 key issues at COP26: https://str.sg/3pT7

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Fa'izah Sani and Hadyu Rahim

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

    Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:

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    Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu

    Read ST's Climate Code Red site: https://str.sg/3pSz

    ---

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  • Green Pulse Ep 62: Much ado over carbon markets, credits and COP26 negotiations

    14:13 min

    Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    One of the key issues negotiators will discuss at the UN climate conference COP26 (from Oct 31 to Nov 12) is on Article 6 of the Paris Agreement. This relates to carbon markets, and whether countries can trade carbon credits to meet their climate pledges — known as nationally determined contributions (NDCs).

    It will also establish rules on who emissions savings accrue to, if one nation pays to set up a green initiative - say a wind farm instead of a coal plant - in another country.

    In this second of a two-part series on what COP26 means for the Asean region, ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty speak with Ms Melissa Low, a research fellow at the National University of Singapore’s Energy Studies Institute, about this contentious issue. 

    They discuss the following points:
    What is Article 6 of the Paris Agreement? (0:48)


    Singapore has also announced plans to build a carbon credit exchange: what is the issue of the double counting of carbon credits (4:04)
    Use of units generated before 2020 to meet nationally determined contribution targets, also known as the Clean Development Mechanism transition (7:30)
    Singapore’s Minister for Sustainability and the Environment Grace Fu has been invited to co-facilitate discussions on this contentious topic: What this means and why choose Singapore? (10:18)
    What if countries fail to sort out Article 6 negotiations at COP26? (11:40)

    Listen to Part 1 - What COP26 means for Asean: https://omny.fm/shows/green-pulse-1/implications-for-asean-at-cop26-green-pulse-ep-61

    6 key issues at COP26: https://str.sg/3pT7

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis, Fa'izah Sani and Hadyu Rahim

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

    Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps:

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    Read ST's Climate Code Red site: https://str.sg/3pSz

    ---

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  • Green Pulse Ep 61: Implications for Asean at COP26

    16:27 min

    Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    Nations are gathering in Glasgow, Scotland, for two weeks from Oct 31 to hammer out key details of how the 2015 Paris Agreement can be implemented. The meeting, called COP26, is touted as a key one in helping to set the world on the right track in reducing the impacts of climate change. Key issues to hammer out include those related to climate finance and urging countries to set more ambitious climate pledges, called nationally determined contributions (NDCs) to do more to reduce emissions. 

    In this first of a two-part series on what COP26 means for Asean, ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty talk to Ms Melissa Low, a research fellow at the National University of Singapore’s Energy Studies Institute, on key issues for the region that will be discussed at the climate conference. 

    They discuss the following points:
    What does the call for more ambitious climate targets mean for the region? (1:28) 
    What kinds of help do countries in Asean need to build greener economies? (3:40) 
    Which countries in the region are most impacted by the loss and damage wreaked by climate change? (7:25) 
    Beyond climate targets and net-zero pledges, what else matters in the effort to reduce emissions to avert climate change? (11:43) 
    How high are the stakes for South-east Asia at COP26? (13:25) 

    Listen to Pt 2 - Much ado over carbon markets, credits and COP26 negotiations: https://omny.fm/shows/green-pulse-1/much-ado-over-carbon-markets-credits-and-cop26-neg

    6 key issues at UN climate conference COP26: https://str.sg/3pT7

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis & Fa’izah Sani

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

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    ---

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  • Green Pulse Ep 60: Saving biodiversity: It should be in our nature

    17:36 min

    Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change.

    The world is full of amazing plant and animal life, without which humans could not survive. Nature, from forests to coral reefs, to soils and grasslands, provides humanity with food and materials to live. Yet nature is under great threat from our rush for resources to grow our economies and cities.

    About one million species are now threatened with extinction, the United Nations’ biodiversity panel says, with three-quarters of the land-based environment and about 66 per cent of the marine environment significantly altered by human actions. This week, delegates from around the world met virtually to discuss a new global deal for nature to limit the damage caused by environmental destruction, pollution and climate change. 

    In this episode, ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty talk to Dr David Cooper, who is deputy executive secretary, for the UN Convention on Biological Diversity. Dr Cooper is speaking to us from Kunming in China, which has been hosting this week’s talks, the first round of discussions before a major in-person meeting in Kunming from April 25 to May 8, 2022.

    They discuss the following points:
    What is the aim of the in-person COP15 biodiversity talks next year, and how will this month’s virtual meet help in establishing a global deal for nature? (1:22) 
    What are the threats confronting biodiversity on land and in the sea today? (3:30)
    How bad is the situation now? (4:48) 
    Why biodiversity conservation needs to involve more than just environment ministers (7:20)
    What are the links between biodiversity and climate? (9:45)
    A carbon price is one policy tool to dealing with the climate crisis. What about putting a price on nature to help with biodiversity conservation? (13:07)
    What can individuals do to help tackle the climate and biodiversity crises? (15:28) 

    Produced by: Audrey Tan ([email protected]), David Fogarty ([email protected]), Ernest Luis & Fa’izah Sani

    Edited by: Hadyu Rahim

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    Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN

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    Life Weekend Picks Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa2

    #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad

    Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas

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