Episodes

  • Best Advice from Best in Show Judge, Roz KramerRoz Kramer, Best in Show judge for Westminster Kennel Club last week, joins host Laura Reeves with advice, stories, suggestions and tips for all exhibitors.On judging Best in Show at Westminster[caption id="attachment_12915" align="alignleft" width="255"] Kaz Hosaka, winning BIS at WKC with the Miniature Poodle, Sage.[/caption]“You know, you're sequestered and so you don't really know who you're getting and they come in the ring one at a time and it was one gorgeous dog after another.“I mean, all of them showed like a million bucks. They all looked wonderful, fabulous condition. And it gave me goosebumps. It really did. I was so happy and so thrilled.On her mentors“I have had three incredible mentors for me Annie (Rogers Clark), Janey and Bob (Forsyth). I had so much respect for the three of them. Annie, she was such a teacher in many ways. I never worked for any of them, but you saw them at shows all the time and they'd give you little hints or little suggestions all the time and or you’d just sit and listen to them and you'd learn.On how newer exhibitors can succeed“You should stick around (after showing in the ring), learn your history of your breed, learn who the greats of the breed were, learn your pedigrees, figure out who the best multiple breeders of your breed, and it wouldn't matter if they're ones on the west coast and ones in Texas and ones in Maine. Seek those people out, learn the best you can. And then if you get a dog, don't be afraid to go, not just ask other breeders for help on trimming or showing.“I'm telling you, you go to most of these handlers, it doesn't matter who they are, they are more than willing to help. We need the new people in the sport and everybody knows it and I think that what people also need to do is don't think that you're better than everybody else, be kind and caring to people because you know something, we all have to ask for help at some point in our lives and don't be afraid to.“You know one of the ways that I learned when I was a kid is my mentor on the Scotty's John Sheehan. He'd trim the show side and then he'd say ‘okay now you trim the other side. Copy that.’“(There) is the conditioning part. And it was a teaching tool to me that you do this day after day, hour after hour, and don't stop. And it's going to pay off."(It's) hard work and don't stop, even though you may get discouraged. Keep pushing on because you know what, it pays off in the long run and it gives you so much joy and reward."And you know what the best part of it is the dogs. You're spending time with our best friends ever. I mean, I don't know where my life would be without the dogs themselves, seriously.“It's artistry, and I think people prefer the quick fix and the easy fix. I think that people should give themselves a challenge, prove what they can accomplish and they might be surprised."[caption id="attachment_12912" align="alignleft" width="310"] Kramer's Etsy shop features home decor and fashion items like this pillow cover.[/caption]Visit Kramer's Etsy shop to see her beautiful breed specific designs on home decor and fashion items. 

  • The New Voice of Westminster Kennel ClubHost Laura Reeves is joined by Valerie Nunes-Atkinson, handler, breeder and the new color commentator at Westminster Kennel Club.“So I think one of the reasons why I've been brought in is because of some of the things that you mentioned, being a handler, having lived it and been there. So I'm hoping to bring the insight from that perspective, from the handler's perspective, the excitement of it, what goes on a little bit behind the scenes, but then also from a breeder perspective, you know, having bred dogs that have done well there and bred dogs for decades.“Jason has been a breeder and a handler and a judge, but he's more from the judge's perspective and the historical importance of the breeds and details of the breeds. And I hope to bring a little bit of the other type of knowledge. And Chris is our fun guy that asks interesting questions.“You learn how to listen to someone in your ears and still talk… It's something, I will say it's something to get used to. So they're talking in your ear. ear and they're counting you down. So literally we have about 20 seconds after the announcer gives all the breed details on that particular breed to make a point about something and keep it somewhat interesting.“Twenty seconds is a long time, but it's really not a long time. So to be concise and get your message across and be done before he starts going into the next breed. So they're counting you down as you're talking and trying to make your point in these 20 seconds and you have to be done by the time they get to one. Otherwise, someone might be screaming in your ear.“So learning that and learning how to go back and forth between the three of us and not step on each other, so that you're not talking over the other person.“There's a huge learning curve and we'll see because, you know, it basically scares the, you know, what out of me to be doing this. And I really considered not doing it. But my dad always told me, and this was before he passed, he said, ‘If you're not doing something that is scary and challenges you and really scares you, you're not growing.’ So you've got to live your life. You've got to push yourself and reach for other goals. And so I'm doing it.“And that's where I think, you know, through this broadcast and through Jason and Chris, I mean, we hope to, you know, give breed details. We hope to give breed information to the general public. That'll be interesting that maybe allows them to think about other breeds and hopefully maybe even learn how to find a preservation breeder.“I think being able to, for my role, step in and maybe tell some little tidbits of stories or experiences that I've had that might bring other people in to say, ‘Hey, maybe I could try that or that sounds fun.’ Or maybe they don't even know about things we're talking about like the agility. trial that's gonna be there as well. There's other sports within AKC that the general public can do wth their dogs, which is very exciting. And I think it's a way to bring everybody else, the general public into a scene, what else you can do with your dogs?”

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  • Expert Tips for Expanding Puppies' MindsDr. Marty Greer, DVM joins host Laura Reeves for their ongoing conversation about raising puppies. This month they’re talking week four, when the puppies’ minds are exploding with new sensory input.[caption id="attachment_12902" align="alignleft" width="528"] From Dr. Greer's "Canine Reproduction and Neonatology"[/caption]“When the puppies first open their eyes, first open their ears, we should have gentle lighting, we should have gentle sounds,” Greer said. “We shouldn't just have this loud TV with Rambo on. So, you know, things like just have the lights starting to come up, their vision isn't great, their hearing isn't great, but it went from almost nothing to something and so we want to ease them into that world.”Four weeks is when many puppies are introduced to solid food. Mothers of wild canids vomit for their puppies as their introduction to solid food. Laura describes making puppy food the “consistency of dog vomit.”Marty recommends shallow water bowls for puppies to prevent drowning hazards, as well as Lixit bottles for smaller breeds.100 experiences in 100 days“I try to do a lot of variation in the enclosure. I have a rabbit hutch that's got a two story ramp on it so they can go in and out of doors and up and down the ramp. I have all kinds of little beds that have holes and places for them to go. Honestly the best toys are the kids’ toys that I pick up at garage sales. So you pick up, you know, baby walkers and all kinds of toys and they're brightly colored and they're hard plastic. They're not durable enough for the aggressive chewer or adult dog. So you probably don't want them in with mom if you've got a lab that eats everything, but they're fun. They make interesting noise and you can do variability.“I think both Sophia Yen and Ian Dunbar, veterinarians that talk a lot about behavior and development, talk about a hundred experiences in a hundred days.“I have a series of 11 bath mats that are all different sizes, shapes, colors, textures. The mesh ones I put under the puppies when they're really young because the urine runs through and so they stay dry. When you're in that transition period between when mom stops cleaning them, that two to four week transition period when they start urinating on their own, they stay dry and it doesn't soak into a pad directly on their skin so it's cleaner and neater.“And those again can go in the washing machine. But I went to Walmart during COVID and they had 11 styles of bath mats. They had some with bristles, they had some that were shiny, some with round holes, some with square holes, some were dark colored, some were light colored. Just this whole variety and again I throw them in my washing machine when they get soiled and then I hang them to dry. And I have two sets so that they can rotate through. And you've just given now a puppy 11 different surfaces, so of the 100 experiences you need to do in 100 days, you just did 10 percent of them, with a bath mat.” 

  • Eye Emergencies Can Go From 0 to 60 in a BlinkHost Laura Reeves is joined by veterinary ophthalmologist Stacey Halse for a deep dive on eye emergencies in our dogs.[caption id="attachment_12861" align="alignleft" width="385"] Dr. Stacey Halse, veterinary ophthalmologist, with one of her Dobermans.[/caption]“Eyes are a very unique structure when it comes to every other organ, well, most other organs in the (dog’s) body,” Halse said. “They have what you call the fancy word for is a blood aqueous barrier. It kind of protects the inside of the eye from the rest of the immune system. The eye itself is called an immunoprivileged site. And so when things go wrong and the regular immune system kind of gets into the eye, it can go very wrong very quickly.“And so emergencies can go from, oh, it's just a little scratch, just... to suddenly you're like, "Oh, now the eyeball's melting out of the face." And so that's always very scary, both for an owner and a dog.”Eye Infections in Newborns“One of the biggest things that you can do is get that eyelid open even though the eyes are only supposed to open at about two weeks old, you don't want that material to stay in there. And so if it's not draining yet, warm compressing and just gently massaging those eyes open to get that material draining because if it stays in there, it's going to ruin the eye. It's going to cause scar tissue that can affect the puppy for the rest of its life. And I haven't seen it a ton, but in the worst case. case scenarios, usually the shelter dogs that are kind of not brought in to care, but they can lose their eye. And so outside of medications, just getting that eye open is really the most important part.”Steroid CautionsGenerally, any ulceration or scratch of the eye’s surface should NOT be treated with steroids.“If there's an ulcer there and you don't know because you don't have the staining and all this stuff, you just wanna be cautious and kind of just do the topical antibiotics. In general, something like neopolybac, which a lot of people have, or a topical drop, most often if I'm prescribing it, I'll use Tobromycin because you only need something that's superficial. But I feel like a lot of the time people have neopolybac in the dog world.“You just have to make sure there's no steroid in it. So the two steroids that can be a neopolybac is hydrocortisone or dexamethasone. Dexamethasone probably the most common, but hydrocortisone is the one that's most commonly missed because people are just looking for dexamethasone on the thing. And one little trick that I teach students as well as owners is that if there's a pink strip on the box, it's a steroid. Tan is antibiotic, pink is steroid.Corneal Ulcers“The cornea is only about 0.8 millimeters thick, so it's super, super thin. And so an infection anywhere else, not a huge deal. An infection on the surface of the eye can be very bad very quickly. You can lose the eye within 24 hours. I've had one in the hospital that I was medicating aggressively and then we still lost the battle. And it like developed an ulcer in the hospital. This was like during my residency and we started treating right away and we still lost it.“I don't wanna freak everyone out but that's the worst case scenario. - If there's a little bit of squinting, and if you ever see a divot on your dog's eye, just take it in.” 

  • Westminster Kennel Club Fashionista AdviceHost Laura Reeves is joined by Veronica Wolfe of Best In Show Clothes, talking about that *perfect* WKC outfit, hair, nails, makeup and more.“So, you know Westminster, it is the premier dog sport event of the year,” Wolfe noted. “It is the second oldest sporting event in the nation only behind the Kentucky Derby and then only by two years. It's been going on since 1877. So you have to give some respect to the event. Very prestigious, limited number of dogs, the juniors invitation only.“There's a few factors you need to consider. One is the event, of course. You know, and how do you get ready and how do you dress for Westminster? My first thought would be the way you get ready and appropriate for really any dog show. You're representing your breed. If you have a kennel, you're representing your kennel. If you're a handler, you're representing your client's dogs. If you're an assistant, you're representing your handler,“So everybody should look professional, okay? So you need to have professional clothing and you need to have all the support factors that we talked about in our first podcast. You're going to be on national television by all the possibilities. If you're not on national television, then I'm sure your breed's going to be on YouTube, right? Yes. So have those good shoes on. Have the good support wear on. Don't skip the pantyhose on this one, that kind of thing.“But you also need to consider the weather. You need to consider the location. Everything's not indoors anymore. So let's run down a couple of those things.“The temperatures in May and New York are gonna be 71 high day, 54 low. That's average. So if you've got an eight a.m. ring time and now they're outdoors, right? You need to consider that. You need to dress appropriately for that eight a.m. ring time. If you've got to change later on because woohoo, you made it to groups, then you can plan for that. But consider the weather.“It can be humid and it can be hot in May also so you'll want to consider that when you're debating between the Tahari suit versus the wool blend St. John. It can also be wet. The average rainfall in that area in May is 3.9 inches to give you an idea. In eastern Washington, that's like a quarter of our rainfall for the year. So prepare for that. Bring a raincoat. You don't want to, you know, have that beautiful suit or a silk blend suit, get water on it. So the weather you need to consider, the time of day, once the schedule comes out, you need to consider for what you're wearing.“And then you've got groups and the finals for juniors, moves indoors. I would say be mindful that that indoor carpet is green. You might want to consider what you're wearing with that. I'd be careful of wearing a similar green. - One giant green blob. With that color, a lot of people love to wear purple to Westminster 'cause Westminster's purple and gold. But then a lot of people are wearing purple. So you need to be aware of that.“I think blue and green always go really well together. Depending on your dog if you're of the mindset that you prefer to really stay in the background, grays, blacks and tans can go nicely with that color carpet. Certain red tones if you do the blue based reds and not the orange based reds, I think the blue based reds almost leaning towards burgundy would be okay with that.“You want to present a very professional image without distracting from the dog and that the dog should be the center of attention. If you love bling and you want to wear it great. There is a love of bling in the dog show world and I sell a lot of bling online and in my booth. If you're not careful, I think it can be distracting.“And juniors, can I address you a minute? Because I have a junior. You know, you or your parents do not need to go out and buy a six hundred to a thousand dollar suit for this show There are gorgeous Taharai, Le Suit, Casper. All those. You can...

  • Neonates Deep Dive: Caring for the Dam and HypocalcemiaDr. Marty Greer, DVM joins host Laura Reeves for a continuation of their ongoing conversation about neonates. The discussion today includes hypocalcemia and eclampsia, how much calcium to supplement and when.“For some bitches, you need to continue (calcium supplementation) until the puppies are weaned,” Greer said. “It depends on the size of the bitch and the size of the litter. The smaller the bitch and the bigger the litter, the more you need calcium. It tends to be... in small breed bitches that develop hypocalcemia, eclampsia, that that tends to be an issue.“We don't see it in Labs, Goldens, Rottweilers, you know, the big dogs, but in the little dogs, and you know, I mean little dogs usually under 10 or 15 pounds, dachshunds, terriers, some of those small breeds, we can see hypocalcemia. In those cases the bitch will start to run a low grade fever. The first symptoms are going to be that she starts walking kind of goose-stepping like real stiffly, associated with the calcium becoming too low and then her muscles developing this tetany.“When the puppies are growing at about that two to three week time period, when the puppies are really growing fast, is when the demands of the calcium become the greatest on those small breed bitches and they just don't have the ability to mobilize enough calcium from their bones, their vitamin D levels are trying, but they just don't have the ability to mobilize calcium quickly enough.“And this is why you don't want to give calcium prior to the time that the bitch goes into labor and has her puppies. If you give it during the entire pregnancy, then you tell her parathyroid gland, "You know what, you can just take a vacation. "You don't have to worry about this, just hang out." And then their calcium doesn't mobilize adequately.“So you want them on a normal amount of calcium in their regular dog food, and then once they whelp, then that's when you can start adding the additional calcium in gel form, in tablet form, in powder form to the diet along with the puppy food to make sure she gets adequate amounts of calcium.“The powder, the gel, those are all going to be fine and safe because the GI tract is going to only absorb and the body's only going to take in so much. So you're okay to be pretty aggressive. Now there's definitely some things that you have to be concerned about if you're giving (calcium) by injection. But if you're giving oral in the powder or the tablet form, you know the petcal or the revival or the whatever product you want to use, those are all absolutely fine to give. You have to really screw up to give too much. But it does make a big difference and you basically titrate it until you see the effect that you're looking for.Greer touches on a variety of different topics in this wide-ranging conversation, so check out the entire podcast here.

  • Show Safe Launches for the Dog Sport CommunityHost Laura Reeves is joined by Mary Dukes, Lindsay Fetters and Carissa Shimpeno to discuss their new grassroots launch of Show Safe. The organization encourages all exhibitors to take the Safe Sport program and offers a lapel pin to those who complete it.“I knew about Safe Sport through my daughter, who's a professional horse trainer,” Dukes said. “And safe sport is a congressionally mandated program for all Olympic sports that came in after the multitude of abuses in gymnastics, swimming, diving, I could go on. So anyway, I was familiar with it because my daughter shows horses and since equestrian events are an Olympic sport, she has to take safe sport and a re -up every year. I got it in for the registered handlers program and then I always had wanted to expand it. I advocated to expand it to at the very least junior judges, but while I was an employed by the AKC I was never able to get that done.“Everybody has a story. Everybody has a story to varying degrees. I feel like mine is relatively minor in the big scheme of things, but everybody has a story of being inappropriately touched, inappropriately propositioned, all that.”“Historically when something happens people react and everybody wants to do something,” Fetters said. “But I feel like a lot of people put it off on somebody else. ‘The government needs to do this, the AKC needs to do this’… It's like we're upset about something, but we're saying it needs to be somebody else's mission.“I sort of was reflecting on what can we do, what can I do, what can you do, what can we do as a fancy because I think if anybody can be united over something it's united over protecting our children.“I don't know a single person who would disagree with the mission of let's do better for our next generation but it's hard to invoke change. It's hard to start a movement, it's hard to unite people as just one solo person, especially in our sport.“My idea was basically, let's do a grassroots movement. Let's control what we can control. And let's let people know that this training and this option is out there. And instead of mandating or instead of controlling somebody or demanding somebody do it, because I think that that immediately puts somebody on edge, like let's say, ‘okay, look, this options out here, let's pursue it. And if you do, we want to let other people know we want to let juniors know. We want to let other people in our sport know that we've had this training and we're here to be a listening ear and we're here to provide support.”“I guess I would have to say my biggest learning experience in what works and what doesn't work started last year,” said Shimpeno. “When we had a handler who had been to prison for raping his minor assistant and he was returning to the world of dogs. In my mind I thought well what a beautiful way to show the young people of our sport that we actually have their back. Why don't we try and make some kind of policy within AKC that says, you know, if you've been convicted of X, Y and Z, that we can't stop you from coming to the dog shows, we can't stop you from existing and we can't make you a better person. But we can send a message to our little people and men and women around the sport in general just saying this is not what we're about. We're going to take a stand and we're going to draw a line in the sand.“A year ago, Mary actually said, you know, why don't we stop asking AKC to do this? And we do something ourselves. And my response in that moment was like, ‘because that's not right.’ We have to be the better people, like we have to make them do what's right. That mindset got me exactly nowhere at all.“We have this large portion of people out there that are just stuck in the injustice of...

  • Tools to Help Protect Vulnerable Victims[caption id="attachment_12816" align="alignleft" width="335"] Pam Bruce, judging in Orlando.[/caption]Host Laura Reeves is joined by Pam Bruce, a 32-year veteran of the Toronto Police Department where she was a sex crimes investigator. Pam was also Canada's first acknowledged expert in this field.With recent arrests that have dramatically impacted the purebred dog world, everybody's asking what the American Kennel Club is doing. Pam is the individual who has trained all of our AKC reps, staff and board members already.Her presentation from which today’s podcast is drawn will be available to everyone in Canine College starting this month. Today's episode is an excerpt of this critically important presentation. Watch the full conversation HERE.“We can all be empowered by knowledge,” Reeves said, “and the knowledge that Pam has to share is what is going to make us all more able to handle the situations that we've been handed.”“Sex assault itself (is) intimate sexual contact with a person without their consent,” Bruce said. “And a young person does not have the capability of offering consent, the same as somebody that's vulnerable. (It may be) accompanied by force or even threat of force …“It’s not for sexual gratification of an offender. It's all about power and control. But the big problem for us in our sport is it's living in the gray areas, and that comes from non-reporting. The first time an offender was caught is not the first time they offended. And when you speak to the experts about this, they say on the low end, the average of sex assaults that have been committed before an offender has been even on their radar is at least seven.“So let me just drill down a bit with vulnerable victims. A vulnerable person can be identified as someone who belongs to a group within our society, so think of dog shows, that is either oppressed or more susceptible to harm.“Anyone under the age of 18 years, or an older (person) who has an impairment due to physical, mental, or emotional function. One who is unlikely, unable, or incapable to report grooming, sexual abuse, physical abuse, or neglect situations.“Now let it not be lost on anyone that the offender is the one that chooses the victim. And it's often for that exact reason that that person has a lack of capability and if they do have capability or someone to assist with that reporting, will they be believed? We must report on their behalf or assist them to do so.“The bigger issue for us and for society is what about the undetected offenders? Due to non -reporting, we don't know what we don't know. Child victims know their offender 94 percent of the time.“These people are our village, but there are victims in our village and offenders in our village and we know them, we love them. We believe we know their full being, but does anyone ever really know anyone?“'Grooming behaviors' is the idea of a perpetrator forming relationships with children. If you see an adult and they're really not friendly with a set of parents, but they're spending a lot of time around their children, I periscope up right away. I want to know why or if it's somebody vulnerable, someone disabled. If they're helping them, that's wonderful. But there is a line that should not be crossed, which is the next point, testing boundaries. Perpetrators will try to test boundaries on your child's comfort level."

  • Kelly Lyn Marquis Shares Her Insights from the Masters[caption id="attachment_12798" align="alignleft" width="368"] Kelly Lyn Marquis in the ring.[/caption]Host Laura Reeves is joined by Kelly Lyn Marquis to discuss the stories in Marquis' new book Behind the Scenes of Best in Show: Intimate Moments with the Masters."When I started writing (the book)," Marquis said, "I was seeing some dissension, sometimes some frustration where I would hear people saying things about handlers doing all the winning and you know I really really wanted to show all of the work that goes into those wins."And even even for many of us that you see in the book, for so many of the masters, it's not about the wins. Actually, not one of them, not one of them, mentioned about the win being something that matters to them. It's the behind the scenes things that matter to them whether it's making their clients happy or the connection that they have with that dog. And that was a motivation.In her conversation with Michael Scott, Marquis admits struggling to understand his thinking."...(T)o Michael, it is his job to handle the dog to the (best of his) ability and to bring that dog to the right judges. And he knows his judges well. He knows what they like, as did Gwen (DeMilta). (B)ut Michael's job was to handle. Well, there wasn't the messiness that I would see in Gwen, and that also was active in myself as well."So when I interviewed Michael and Michael said, 'My job is to handle the dog and to bring it to the right judges. Period.' And he even went on to say that, 'Look, it's a game.' And that really triggered me 'cause I thought, 'No, this is serious business!' And it isn't that Michael doesn't take it seriously, but he's very clear on what his role is as a handler."That was one of the things that really struck me interviewing Michael, was if Michael had been my mentor and if I operated and navigated the dog show world with Michael's mindset, how might my... my life be different? So that is one of the values that I think a reader can get from reading this book where when you see where someone's priorities are and how that shapes how they navigate the world..."When it comes to the passion and the emotional attachment, I always give credit to the owner handlers and let them know that when it comes to my own dog, I have to have another handler show it because it gets messy."One of the things that I love about handlers that I think is a lesson for, well, even for ourselves to bring out into the world, but we're masters of our emotion. It's like you, okay, we look at this, what do I need to be? How do I need to show up for this dog?"And we're very clear about that. We have a very clear role and we're able to be in integrity and we're also able to look at that dog and go, okay, what's going on with you? You and I, we need to... make this work. We don't have the luxury to have an emotional moment,"Which also gets me thinking about another motivation for my book. I wanted to show our humanity because when we're at a dog show, we need to be in business mode. We're not showing our... our feelings."You know, Michelle Scott talks about how difficult it can be for her at times, managing her expectations and how she knows she wants to make people happy. And it can be so disappointing when you're not able to make that person happy. But we can't show that we have to show up and we have to be professionals. But it doesn't mean that we don't feel things. It just means that we're in business mode, we can't be getting caught up in those places, but we do have feelings just like everyone else."Another motivating factor for me is this is our community. I'm looking around it it's scary it looks like a dying community. I believe that this is an underlying theme in my book as well is that we are people. There are people at the ends of those leads and...

  • What to Do at WKC from the Queen of Queens[caption id="attachment_12785" align="alignleft" width="353"] Host Laura Reeves and Denise Flaim at Crufts '24.[/caption]Denise Flaim, lifelong resident of Queens, joins host Laura Reeves with a personal guided tour of what to do while at Westminster Kennel Club, slated for May 11, 13-14 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Queens.“Queens is not like Manhattan, first of all,” Flaim said. “Queens scares people, I think because like all the boroughs, it's not laid out in a grid pattern …. OK, so there are street names, the streets curve and all this. Well, you know, New York is the city of neighborhoods. And if you know the neighborhood, you can find your way around. So I'm going to give you a couple of neighborhoods to go to.“Let me preface this by saying don't drive anywhere people. OK? First of all, you're not going to find parking. Second of all, you have a 37% chance of being involved in an incident of road rage... And then you've got to know how to parallel park.... So take an Uber. They're everywhere.[caption id="attachment_12783" align="alignright" width="437"] The Parkside in Queens is a historic Italian restaurant.[/caption]“First of all, you've got the Parkside restaurant, OK? Parkside Restaurant is probably one of the few remaining white tablecloth, red sauce, old Italian restaurants. It's phenomenal. You go in there, you order a glass of wine or carafe of wine and you get your eggplant parm. And it's going to be very New York. It's going to be lots of neighborhood guys. It's going to be a typical New York City Italian restaurant. The likes of which has basically been eradicated off the face of the earth. But this is the real deal.[caption id="attachment_12782" align="alignleft" width="536"] Bocce games in Spaghetti Park are quintessential New York.[/caption]“After you have your amazing meal at the Parkside, you're going to go one block to the Lemon Ice King of Corona, from which that television show got its name, and apparently it's been featured on The King of Queens or whatever. You're going to order. You don't have to just have a lemon ice. You could have a spumoni ice. You can have a chocolate ice. It goes on forever and ever. Pistachio, my personal favorite. Then you're gonna take your ice …. and you're going to go across the street to what is called Spaghetti Park. In the right weather, you will find the Bocce courts above, with septuagenarian and octogenarian Italian men in their slouchy sweaters and their caps playing Bocce. You will then not disturb the bocce play just because that's not going to end well. You're not going to ask to play, but you're going to watch because really, that, is New York.“Now for something completely different. Flushing, Queens. You can go to Chinatown in Manhattan. But just as amazing is the Chinatown in Flushing, Queens. And I want you to go to a place called the New World Mall … on your right you're going to see this Asian supermarket that's got everything. I don't want you to be distracted by the supermarket. You can get that on the way up. I want you to go down the escalator. To the subterranean food court that has every (food) you could possibly want, every cuisine.“It has Chinese, Japanese, Thai, Vietnamese, Taiwanese. You name it, it's there. You can get pho. You can eat bullfrog. There are all the amazing Chinese aunties making hand done dumplings, hand rolled. Bubble tea, the whole thing. OK? It is amazing. You would never know that it is there.

  • At-Home Early Cancer Detection Test Hits the MarketChan Namgong, founder of Oncotect, joins host Laura Reeves for a very personal discussion of the value of early cancer detection for our dogs.Namgong launched his company in 2019 in the aftermath of his mother’s cancer diagnosis. He already knew that dogs can detect human cancer by scent. But then he learned about a group of scientists that discovered that small nematodes can detect cancerous metabolites in urine in human medicine.“What's amazing about these small nematodes is that they have very high sense of smell,” Namgong said. “They have more olfactory receptors than dogs, despite their small size. So what we have done is we've developed a platform where we are using (nematodes) to detect cancerous metabolites in dogs’ urine that contains the cancerous metabolites.“(Nematodes) are small worms, and the scientific name of them is C. elegans. And C. elegans is actually, you know, if you are a scientist or biologist, it's a model organism. It's widely used in different disciplines of science. In pharmacology, chemistry, biology, you know, cancer cells, stem cell research, environmental study, because we know everything about these worms. In fact, C. elegans was the very first multi-cell organism that was ever DNA sequenced. And the way we utilize them is we can actually measure the intensity of the olfactory neuron in their head.“We can categorize pets as low, moderate or high risk of cancer. Oncotect is a screening test, not a diagnostic test. So, this is meant to be proactive and preventive measure. And then if there's any risk, moderate or high risk, we'll bring you back to your veterinarian for further consultation, diagnostic tests such as x -rays or ultrasound to really confirm or deny a cancer suspicion or to identify the type and location.“Prevention of cancer is almost impossible because we don't know what's really truly causing cancer. But your best strategy is find it early and treat it quickly. Diagnosing a cancer is like a putting a puzzle together. You’ve got to bring different pieces of information to really look at a big picture.“We have primarily focused on the four most common treatable canine cancers. They are lymphoma, melanoma, hemangiosarcoma and mast cell tumors. And the reason why we focus on those four is because just due to the limited resources that we have.“We've tested over 700 dogs in the last year or so. And among those 700 dogs, we have detected TCC, bladder, prostate, liver, soft tissue. So we've detected other cancer types, but the reason why we are not making claims for them is because we haven't run a large enough sample size to publish any scientific paper on them, which we plan to do this year.”     

  • Managing Your New Puppies’ Critical First 72 HoursDr. Marty Greer, DVM joins host Laura Reeves to discuss managing the critical first 72 hours with new puppies.A recurring theme with breeders and new litters is the term “fading puppy.”“(Fading puppy) is basically we're just lumping a bunch of stuff together and calling it fading puppy,” Greer said, “because we don't necessarily have a confirmed diagnosis. We may not have a diagnosis yet. We may never have a diagnosis, but it is not a diagnosis. It's just a description of a puppy that fails to thrive. And I think that a better term is failure to thrive rather than fading puppy because it's more clear that it's not really a term of diagnostics.“I think a lot of owners and veterinarians tend to kind of throw up their arms and say, ‘well, it's a sick puppy. I don't really know what to do with it.’“Well, there's a lot of things you can do. Diagnostically, you can do almost everything to a small puppy that you can do to a big dog. Now of course the bigger the puppy gets, the easier it is to do the diagnostics. But if you choose to pursue some of these diagnostics, it's not that difficult. You can do an x -ray, you can do an ultrasound, you can do blood work. At the very least, do a glucose level.“Worst case scenario, you lose a puppy. Don't just put it in the freezer and walk away, take it to your veterinarian, ask them to either open it up for you or send it in for diagnostics.“We've found things that are clearly one -offs. We've seen like the puppy doesn't have an intestinal tract, a large intestine. Okay, that's not gonna affect every puppy in the litter. But if you have herpes, if you have adenovirus, if you have distemper, if you have E. coli, if you have all these different kinds of diseases, the faster you can get a specific diagnosis and get a specific treatment put together, the better.”Greer observed that puppies who fail to thrive may present as crying constantly or weak and not moving with the “swarm” of the litter. Dehydration and low body temperature are common and correctible issues that can knock a puppy down and even out in the first 72 hours.Test hydration by monitoring urine color, Greer recommends, and be prepared to administer subcutaneous fluids if needed. Listen to the full episode as she walks listeners through this process and more.

  • CRUFTS! Preview with breeder, exhibitor, judge Sharon Pinkerton[caption id="attachment_12769" align="alignleft" width="329"] Sharon Pinkerton with one of her 66 champion GWP.[/caption]Sharon Pinkerton, Bareve GWP, joins host Laura Reeves to preview the Crufts dog show held in Birmingham, England on March 7-10.Pinkerton, who was raised with Greyhounds and English Cocker Spaniels, will judge Spinoni Italiano and the Breeders Competition finals at the show.“Originally launched on 15 January 2009, the prestigious breeders' competition, sponsored by Agria Pet Insurance, gives breeders the opportunity to showcase their skills and knowledge as a breeder,” according to the Crufts website. “Each year a number of qualifying heats take place at general and group championship shows. Teams compete to gain points by being placed between 1st - 4th.The top 40 teams will qualify for the final at Crufts, of which two positions will be for the breeders’ competition winners from the European and world dog shows.”“I've judged German Wirehaired Pointers (at Crufts) a long time ago. And I've also judged Hungarian Wirehaired Vizslas. But this has been a little while since I've been asked to judge at Crufts. And certainly the first time I've been asked to do anything like the breeders (competition).“It is still quite a new competition. I'm probably the first true exhibitor that's been asked to judge it. The last four years have been top all-rounders where they've had breeding experience but they are more considered now to be an all-round judging person as such rather than still a breeder exhibitor. So I feel quite special really to be at that level.“I think that's what I'm looking forward to most is actually doing that because I know it's such an achievement to be asked. When I first got the email invite and I opened it and looked and I just thought no this is a mistake people like me we don't get invited for these sort of things. I dutifully sent it back thinking it would just come back saying ‘I’m really, really sorry Sharon, but it was wrong.’ But it came back as yes, you're now confirmed.”Sharon decided German Wirehaired Pointers were the breed for her and acquired one from the second litter ever born in the UK. Since the mid ‘70s she has produced 66 champions, of which 12 are full champions, where the dogs have proven their ability in the field as well as the show ring.“Dogs that have a job to do are considered to be show champions until they've actually been out in the field to prove their gun dog worthiness,” Pinkerton said, “plus of course the Border Collie which is the only herding breed that are show champions until they actually go and prove their ability to herd.[caption id="attachment_12768" align="alignright" width="425"] Champion Bareve Blaauboskom JW in the field.[/caption]“So all the gun dogs, no matter what breed they are, are all show champions unless you then go out into the field and prove that they are capable of doing the job that they were bred to do. And then we can proudly knock off the show bit and then they become full champions.Listen in to the entire interview for more details and insights about the famous Crufts dog show. 

  • Gatekeeping Within Our Breeds: A Conversation with the PatronsHost Laura Reeves is joined by members of the Pure Dog Talk Patrons group in an extended deep dive on the question of gatekeeping within our breeds. Members of this private group share their opinions, thoughts and mitigations on placing dogs, using limited registration, educating puppy buyers and more.Spinning off a podcast conversation several years ago with Amanda Kelly on the topic of are we protecting our breeds into extinction, Laura and the members of the group discuss the various perspectives on the topic.“This is a group where we talk about a lot of things and very rarely do we share those things into the public realm,” Laura noted. “But we all thought this was a pretty important topic and that we all had things we wanted to say about it and we wanted to share that with the larger Pure Dog Talk community as a podcast."One side of the conversation is the position that we have a lot of problems with new people coming to dogs and you have a new person who's excited to do it and the gatekeeping is preventing them from doing so.On the other side of the discussion is the opinion shared by a long-time breeder in the group.“I do not want my only okay, mediocre dogs in the conformation ring. That is not my goal. I don't care how many champions I do or don't finish as a kennel,” Karyn Cowdrey said. “What I care about is that what represents my kennel be of, in my opinion, sufficient quality. I would be proud to have kept it I would be proud to walk into the ring with it and honestly if I deem it show ring worthy to me then it's breeding quality and I keep my name on that dog until at least a certain amount of criteria are met by that person if they're a new person.”Education of new and potential buyers was also frequently mentioned in the dialogue.“I'm very big on education,” Sandy MacArthur said. “And I can give an example and I will not name the person nor the breed, but there's a person who went in the dog world and was looking for a ‘breeding pair’ … this was 30 years ago in the 90s… emailing everybody ‘I'm looking for a breeding pair’… We all know that's an instant red flag and this person got put on everybody's do not sell list.“Someone in the breed she was interested in decided to take this person out to lunch and have a conversation. By the end of the conversation at lunch, she sold that person a bitch on a co -owned contract. This person put all the work into it, all the research, drove everywhere every weekend, did everything right, and 30 years later is a well -known dog person. Let's just say that. Somebody took their time to pull them aside 'cause they didn't know. They thought that what you do is you get a breeding pair. They had no idea.”If you would like to join these types of conversations, as well as support the work of the podcast in education and mentoring, please visit the website and sign up to join us! Go to https://puredogtalk.com/patron/ to learn more.

  • WKC Inside Scoop with Don Sturz, Tell YOUR Stories[caption id="attachment_12756" align="alignnone" width="2290"] Don Sturz and host Laura Reeves sit down at the Rose City Classic to discuss the 2024 Westminster Kennel Club dog show and plans for the future.[/caption]Dr. Donald Sturz joins host Laura Reeves to discuss this year’s Westminster Kennel Club dog show at the Billie Jean King Tennis Center in Queens, NY and plans for the future.This year the club will celebrate the 90th anniversary of Junior Showmanship, Sturz noted, while the show is dedicated to the memory of Dave Helming. Sturz describes the search for new turf, new bracing over the courts for the outdoor rings, a gelato stand, an outdoor bar and new ticketing resources for evening events.“We want to be respectful and pay homage to the history and the tradition of Westminster, but at the same time, attempt to move forward and remain relevant,” Sturz said. “Always keeping the experience for the dogs and the exhibitors as the priority. And it's not always easy to juggle that.“Will we ever be back in Madison Square Garden? That's what you all want to know. Everybody wants to know, will we ever go back to the Garden?“Okay, so my standard answer has been for the past year, never say never. Remember, I grew up in this. I showed at Westminster for the first time when I was 10 years old … I've moved to calling it Westminster because we're not calling it the Garden … so I'd like to get back to being able to say “the Garden” so it is something that we're working on.“The fact of the matter is Madison Square Garden was remodeled and when they did that remodeling it's what took away all that space. So there's no way to have a daytime event. So that's how we ended up with the Piers. So then that thing called covid hit and during that time Pier 92 fell into the water … so that's gone. Pier 94 is actually being remodeled and will no longer be an exhibition space. It's going to be smaller spaces for individual businesses and so on.“So the Piers are off the table. (We) really basically looked at every possible venue in New York City or the metropolitan area. You know, we went to Newark … we had to exhaust everything, right? We also went a little further out into Queens, to the Nassau border and looked at an arena there. And all of these, we kind of looked at it from a space point of view, like, how would it work, right? In Manhattan itself, it's very limited as to what venues… like, there's really only one.“We're going to be in one of those kinds of venues that's going to, hopefully, afford us the opportunity to then be back at Madison Square Garden in the evening. So, watch for that.“The plan is to try to find something for ‘25 that is also ‘26 because we just need to stop moving. We need our home.“There's lots of fabulous events in our sport, but there is nothing in the world like Westminster. There's something magical about that event. That's something that we consistently commit ourselves to is the Westminster experience, right? Creating that magic.“So. I think Westminster is in a really great place. I think it's a pivotal moment for Westminster.”

  • Puppy Evaluation System Developed by a Woman Ahead of Her Time[caption id="attachment_12746" align="alignleft" width="360"] Virginia Apgar, who named the newborn evaluation system.[/caption]Dr. Marty Greer, DVM joins host Laura Reeves for their ongoing puppy discussion. This month Greer shares the story of Virginia Apgar, who named a now-famous newborn evaluation system after herself.Apgar was a human anesthesiologist who graduated from medical school in the 1930s, Greer noted.“She was the first female anesthesiologist admitted to the College of Anesthesiology back in an era where there were no women doctors. There were no women a lot of things. So she was truly remarkable, Greer said.“In that era, a lot of babies were born to mothers that were sedated or anesthetized. And so (Apgar) developed a scoring system to analyze the babies and it has stuck for the last 70 years and it's very impressive that it's something that people talk about every day, still using the word APGAR. The acronym stands for: appearance, pulse, grimace, activity and respiration.”The system was adapted for small animal veterinary use by a vet on staff at the University of Minnesota.[caption id="attachment_12752" align="alignright" width="550"] Parameters for APGAR scoring.[/caption]“The advantage of a numerical score,” Greer added “is that it gives you something that you can measure and compare litter to litter, puppy to puppy within the litter over the course of time. And we have some really good data from Neocare, which we talked about last time, about what the relationship with the APGAR score and the survival of these puppies will be. So it's actually super cool that you can take all this information and turn it into something that you can use at home, you can use at your veterinary clinic, and that your veterinary clinic can help you with. So I would encourage people to learn to do APGAR scores. It's not hard, it's not mysterious. It's really pretty straightforward on what to do with it.[caption id="attachment_12753" align="alignleft" width="480"] Treatments for common whelping issues.[/caption]“The value of this is when you go home (from a csection, for example) and you have a puppy that had an APGAR score of a four and a puppy that had an APGAR score of a nine, that you know the puppy with the four needs a lot more attention to have the kind of survival rates that one would hope for. We always hope for a hundred percent (survival), but reality is 100% is probably not a realistic goal.“Each of the five parameters, appearance, pulse, grimace, activity and respirations gets a score of a zero, one, or a two. So collectively, if you get twos on all five of your items, you have a score of a ten.“It's really simple to do. It doesn't require high level assessment and like I said, a lot of us probably are intuitively already doing this. When you have puppy born, if it's fish breathing and gasping and gaping, that's not good. But, if it's got nice pink color and it's wailing and it's crying and it's wiggling and it's pink and it's all those things, you know that you've got a puppy that's in pretty good shape. But it's just nice to be able to give it a more numerical sign because that gives you data to work with.“The average puppy is gonna be seven and up. It does give you a numerical score. The value of this is knowing that from the Neocare information, that's from the University at the Toulouse -France Veterinary School, the puppies with an APGAR score of less than seven have a 22-fold increased risk of death in the first eight hours after they're born.“And they also know...

  • Pro Tips on Changing the Conversation from Ian Lynch[caption id="attachment_12739" align="alignleft" width="373"] Ian Lynch with his newest Dawin Poodle, Portia.[/caption]Canadian Kennel Club spokesperson Ian Lynch joins host Laura Reeves to talk about changing the conversation on purebred dogs with the general public.Lynch, a broadcaster in his day job, brings his passion for purebred dogs to the CKC as their public spokesman. He describes his lifelong obsession with the sport, obtaining the Dogs in Canada Annual magazine and creating a “vision board” with pages from the book taped to his wall.His first dog as an adult was a Dawin standard poodle.“I used to get “Dogs in Canada” annuals and I used to put all the pictures on my walls because I love these dogs. And I had a picture on my wall in 1995. It was an Allison Alexander in a red dress, holding Dawin High Falutin, who was the number one dog and has all these records to this day. His name was Lutin, I believe his call name. And it's funny because as I get older, I realized that I was making a vision board because now I have a Dawin dog.[caption id="attachment_12740" align="alignright" width="266"] Ian Lynch and Allison Alexander, from vision board to friends.[/caption]“And I'm friends with Allison Alexander and she's the greatest person alive. So, it's so funny that like, you know, that you hear almost like manifestation stuff and I didn't know what I was doing. But as a kid, I used to always have the picture of the Dawin dog and I used to tell my parents, ‘I'm gonna have a dog just like that one day.’Don't just talk. Listen!Lynch recommends we just talk to people about dogs. And not just talk, listen also! On topics from training to doodles, listening to what people say gives you a chance to address their actual concerns and increase buy in to the information you do have to share.“The easiest way for me, I think, to start talking to people about purebred dogs is to talk to everyone who has a dog.“For example, there's this lady on my street. She has this pitbull mix. And this dog was so reactive to my dogs all the time. I mean jumping in midair. And then, I noticed that from a distance, she taught the dog the look at me, you know, the treat out. And I stopped her and I said, ‘Sorry to bother you, I just want to congratulate you and let you know that I've noticed how good you're doing with this dog and how far your dog has come.’ And she says to me, ‘Oh my God, thank you. I've always admired your dogs. What kind of dogs are they? Are they show dogs? Where are dog shows? Where can I learn more about these dogs?’ Simply talking to people about dogs.“The way I think a lot of times, I'm lucky I have a radio show. I can infuse dogs. I got the mic. I got the platform. But we can all infuse dogs into our life at all times. When you have people over, my dogs are generally always well-groomed and bathed, basically weekly, but you want to make sure your dogs will look good if people are coming over.“They smell good, they're cuddly. I'm a big proponent of best self and make sure your dogs are their best self when people come over and, you know, people ask questions. Another thing we have to do is when we talk to people about dogs is we have to let people talk as well.“We know a lot about dogs. We want to voice our opinions, but we have to let people talk.”

  • Breed Type First: Mary Dukes on Judging Dogs[caption id="attachment_12717" align="alignleft" width="409"] Mary Dukes in her handling days heyday.[/caption]Legendary handler, rep and now judge Mary Dukes continues her conversation with host Laura Reeves. Today they talk about judging, handling and all-time favorite dogs.“I’m a type-first girl all the way,” Dukes said, quoting the notable Anne Rogers Clark common wisdom to sort first on type and then reward the soundest of the typical dogs. “I’m forgiving of leg faults, especially on the down and back. As long as it doesn’t offend me, it’s probably good enough.“I do firmly believe this. A good judge can see right through a poor handling job. Sometimes it's frustrating. I watched a breed in Orlando. It wasn’t a hound breed but a breed that I'm very familiar with and it was so frustrating because it's an owner -handled breed for the most part and the best dogs in there were being tragically handled. It was so frustrating because there was a dog in there that's beautiful and every time the judge looked at him (the handler) wasn’t even trying to do anything with him. His legs were everywhere. You know, all she was doing was feeding him basically.“And I thought, God, if you could just rack him up once, just rack him up once and pull him up over his front and break him over, (the judge) just needs to see it once.“I might be the one that will turn into Frank Sabella. I mean, not in terms of swapping dogs or anything, because he did that to me a million times, but I know he got in trouble for it. But in terms of, ‘Here's what I want you to do. Can you go from this corner to that corner on a loose lead? Can you do that?’ If they give me five steps, we're golden.“At the end of the day, it’s putting up the best dog."Pro tip: Pacing“It's all about throwing them off balance when you take the first step. I always like to go into them because they learn pretty quick. A lot of people they jerk (the dog) and then ‘let's go.’ Well, then the dog starts anticipating that. I just would turn them into me and then just bump them. Just bump their shoulder as you start your down and back.”[caption id="attachment_12718" align="alignleft" width="482"] Ch. Aroi Talk of the Blues, 'Punky', shown with handler Corky Vroom. Judge Anne Rogers Clark “discovered” Punky in 1975, when she made her Best of Breed from the Puppy class at the Greyhound Club of America specialty in Santa Barbara. Punky was the Top Dog of all breeds in 1976.[/caption]Mary’s fantasy best in show line up would be judged by Michelle Billings. It would feature Mick, the Kerry Blue who shows up in most judges’ all-time best line ups, but many of her other choices are more esoteric and focused on dogs she knew personally. From Iron Eyes, the Bouvier to Scarlett Ribbons, the Italian Greyhound. Listen in to hear her personal choice for Best in Show.

  • Mary Dukes: An Evolution from Owner to Professional to Rep to JudgeHost Laura Reeves is joined by Mary Dukes, legendary Whippet breeder, professional handler, AKC Executive Field Representative and now judge.[caption id="attachment_12711" align="alignleft" width="400"] A 1991 advertisement for Dukes' handling services.[/caption]Dukes has spent a lifetime involved in working with animals. From showing horses to training elephants to showing dogs. Her work with the zoo animals instilled in her an absolute dedication to animal husbandry.NO Dirty Dogs“There are no shortcuts in animal care. Period,” Dukes said. “In zoo animals, you have to be even more on top of it because wild animals don’t have a tell that they’re sick. In the wild, any tell that they are sick or injured is going to make them dead. So they are really good at masking that. If you are sloppy or dirty or messy there is no room for you in the animal business.“I’ll put this on blast right now, if someone walks into my ring with a dirty dog, we’re going to have a problem. There is no excuse to show a dirty dog. I won’t hold it against the dog, but the handler might get an earful.”AKC Registered Handler ProgramDukes was an early member of the AKC Registered Handler Program. As a rep, Dukes was a coordinator of the RHP. She joined RHP because they demanded insurance, inspections, so “I wanted to put my money where my mouth was.”RHP is not a guarantee the handler is going to win with your dog, Dukes said.“The whole point of the program is so the people have a place to start looking where we had done some of the ground work for you. You know they (they handlers) are insured. You know their vehicle is inspected for safety and cleanliness. You know their kennel has been inspected by AKC kennel inspectors. You know they’ve signed a code of ethics.“RHP members have to have a contract. They have to bill in a timely fashion. The bill has to be itemized. A lot of the trouble you see, most of it is because the expectations weren’t clear. If you have a contract, it’s[caption id="attachment_12710" align="alignright" width="392"] Dukes is still actively involved with horses. Her vacations frequently involve riding in exotic locales.[/caption]right there in black and white.Safe Sport“One of the newest requirements is SafeSport. All RHP members have to take the training as a condition of membership.“Safe Sport is a congressionally mandated program for every Olympic sport.“There’s been a lot of abuses in every sport. Basically, Safe Sport is making you aware of what to look for. If you see a situation that you suspect might be something, it gives you tools. Because we aren’t an Olympic sport, we don’t have access to the mechanics of the national organization.“It automatically makes everyone (who’s had the training) mandatory reporters. If you put it out in the open more, it’s harder for someone to creep around. I would like to see it spread out to judges, especially juniors judges.”Join us next week for part two of this fantastic conversation. Learn what Dukes is looking for in a dog and hear about her fantasy Best in Show lineup.

  • BernerGarde Leads the Way in Open Sharing of Health InformationHost Laura Reeves is joined by Lori Jodar, president of the BernerGarde Foundation, to discuss this legendary program.BernerGarde has been collecting health and pedigree data on the Bernese Mountain Dog for nearly 30 years. The founder of this concept began in the 1960s gathering information on 3x5 cards. The non-profit foundation was created in the 1980s and now includes 215,000 dogs’ information.“The mission of BernerGarde has always been genetic, genetic, genetic,” Jodar said. “And because of that, we've been able to stay on course. The Parent Club, the Bernese Mountain Dog Club of America, and the BernerGarde Foundation have remained very good partners throughout the years. So that's a good thing.“The most expensive thing that we have done to date is to start a repository. We started a DNA and tissue repository.“We knew we wanted to study this malignant histiocytosis. So in 2006, we partnered with Michigan State University, Dr. Vilma, we call her Dr. Vilma. And she's a brilliant researcher, as well as being a professor at Michigan State University Veterinary School, and she has managed a repository for us. We have 4,000 unique dogs in the repository, and I don't know how many tumors we have, but not that many, but like 1,000, we use for research.“It's very expensive, very, very expensive, but what has morphed out of that is there's a group in France that has been studying histiocytic sarcoma for a long time, and they are finding some answers. So, we have shared DNA with them, tumor submissions with them. We're about to send several hundred DNA samples to them for their continuing research.“The database that we have is so vibrant and vital to the community. I don't think I can overstate it. It's become part of everybody's life. And if they complain about anything, they... they being the community of breeders, they complain about anything, it's that there's never enough information.“Through this database, there's health records. We divide the health records into what we call anecdotal and diagnosed. So, to be diagnosed, you have to have veterinary support, a pathology report or veterinary report to actually have a diagnosed condition. And then we do all the health certs, you know, we get a quarterly thing from OFA on hips and elbows and whatever they're doing.“We also have, you know, about 50% of the dogs in the database now are not US, they're from Europe and Australia and Canada. So, we needed to learn how to interpret all of those records like through the FCI in Europe. And oh it's a lot. So, we have database operators all over the world now. We have about 30 of them and they're kind of the in-between, between the people that want to submit information.“We are so focused on accuracy that I think that has given us legitimacy, actually, that focus.“If you got a bitch and you are looking for a stud, you can go to our database. We have a stud-finder and you can put in parameters. What the age is, do they need their hips, do they need their elbows, do they need DM, do they need whatever it is that you feel you need for your breeding. And then, we'll just... spit out a list of stud dogs.“You can also do trial pedigrees. We also do COIs, Coefficient of Inbreeding, for every dog. You can put five pictures of your dog in there.”