Episodes

  • In this week’s episode of Newsroom’s weekly politics podcast, we look at the PM’s foot-in-mouth over low-level business types, scrutinise Scrutiny Week and work out what species we should pay up to save

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    Recommendations:

    Tim – A good look in The Guardian at the political weaponising of videos of Joe Biden – and Donald Trump to a degree – looking old and bewildered

    Marc – The New York Times article about key editorial figures at the Washington Post’s involvement in British phone-hacking scandals

    Laura – Marc Daalder’s article on David Seymour’s Snapchat interactions with school kids

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    Raw Politics will be available wherever you get your podcasts every Friday, and you can watch it on YouTube.

  • In this week’s episode of Newsroom’s weekly politics podcast, we look at the chance of a Labour rebound, NZ's climate retreat and problems for Act.

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    Recommendations:

    Laura – A documentary from the late Stuff Circuit team on Chinese interference in New Zealand

    Tim – An American corporate/conservative view on the import of the European elections, by Gerard Baker, ex editor of the Wall St Journal

    Marc – Laura Walters' interview with Labour leader Chris Hipkins predicting a 'very good chance' of a return in 2026

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    Raw Politics will be available wherever you get your podcasts every Friday, and you can watch it on YouTube.

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  • In this week’s episode of Newsroom’s weekly politics podcast, we look at the allegations against Te Pāti Māori over the misuse of personal data, and unpick the party’s political strategy.

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    Recommendations:

    Tim – Professor Chris Jackson’s commentary for Newsroom on the flaws in the Government’s failed promise to fund 13 new cancer drugs from this Budget.

    Marc – Bill McKibben’s latest newsletter on record heat: Intensity.

    Laura – David Wallace-Wells' New York Times newsletter on what’s driving the American – but also global – school attendance crisis

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    Raw Politics will be available wherever you get your podcasts every Friday, and you can watch it on YouTube.

    newsroom.co.nz

  • In this week’s episode of Newsroom’s weekly politics podcast, we peer over a fiscal cliff and search for the hits and misses of Budget 2024.

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    This week's recommendations:

    Laura - Joel MacManus' hilarious Spinoff Budget debate sketch from the House

    Marc - Tim Murphy's view on Newsroom of Nicola Willis' big Budget speech

    Tim – Tova O'Brien's story from the Budget lock-up revealing Willis overstated a crucial tax number

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    So many numbers, so many claims and counter claims, and so much planned so far into the future that we might never see it bear fruit. This week's Raw Politics tries to sift the real from the risible in this year's Budget and to judge whether the coalition will get political bouquets or brickbats from the voting public.

    First, the panel of Newsroom political editor Laura Walters, senior political writer Marc Daalder and co-editor Tim Murphy run their abacuses over the Budget's costly, broad-based tax cuts. Are the sums 'meaningful' as the finance minister hoped, or just 'not meaningless' for people's back pockets.

    Then we look at one aspect that Nicola Willis surely can't be happy about – a big increase and stubbornly high budget deficits for the next few years and a net debt refusing to budge down below her 40 percent of GDP target for the entire forecast period.

    We have a go at the game of find-a-pithy-name for the Budget, examine the political hypocrisy of ongoing 'fiscal cliffs' and nominate the big things conspicuous by their absence.

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    newsroom.co.nz

  • National promised a “back pocket boost” when it unveiled a tax package before the election, and now in Government in tough economic times its Budget next week will sort the easy promises from reality.

    The tax bracket changes and other in-work and family payment adjustments might need to land with a thump rather than a flutter for hard-pressed Kiwi households – but that isn’t easy to achieve.

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    Recommendations:
    Tim - A great exchange in the House on housing between Kieran McAnulty and Chris Bishop. Watch here.
    Emma - David Seymour’s inner circle, by Audrey Young in the Herald.
    Marc - The Return of Evan Price, by Emma Hatton on Newsroom.


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    The Raw Politics panel this week, Newsroom senior political writer Marc Daalder, politics and business writer Emma Hatton and co-editor Tim Murphy, look ahead to a Budget that will put the confident Finance Minister Nicola Willis and her new Labour counterpart Barbara Edmond to the test.

    The panel weighs the gains and losses from the mass layoffs in the public service as the coalition parties make good on their promise to cut what they called a bloated sector. Do back-office cuts really allow those in the front line to keep doing their jobs effectively? The example of the corporate world would suggest not.

    Our reader question asks why the National-led Government axed the first home grant suddenly (spooked by a Newshub scoop that it was going). And the panel discusses former PM Bill English’s radical proposals to change our public housing landscape. The bottom line is we won’t have as many state houses, or as much Crown-owned housing land after this process is underway.

  • In this week’s episode of Newsroom’s weekly politics podcast, the Press Gallery office patches in the Christchurch studio to discuss a big law and order announcement and Shane Jones’ undeclared dinner.

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    Read more:

    Jones’ undeclared dinner had two more mining industry attendees https://newsroom.co.nz/2024/05/15/jones-undeclared-dinner-had-two-more-mining-industry-
    attendees/

    Mega-prison’s missing business case
    https://newsroom.co.nz/2024/05/14/mega-prisons-missing-business-case/

    Health negotiators told to put sovereignty ahead of stopping pandemics
    https://newsroom.co.nz/2024/05/16/health-negotiators-told-to-prioritise-sovereignty-over-stopping-pandemics/

    Strapped down, blindfolded, held in diapers: Israeli whistleblowers detail abuse of Palestinians in shadowy detention center.
    https://edition.cnn.com/2024/05/10/middleeast/israel-sde-teiman-detention-whistleblowers-intl-cmd/index.html

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    Produced by newsroom.co.nz

  • Exhausted by the general election campaign, horrified by the twilight zone of coalition negotiations, distracted by the silly season and waiting for the honeymoon to begin, Raw Politics has been in hibernation since October.

    From today, we’re back. Our weekly political video show and podcast returns for a second season, and in a week with ups and downs for almost all the parties in Parliament.

    With our anchor, our rock, Jo Moir having graduated to a higher class of audio banter at RNZ, Raw Politics is led by Newsroom political editor Laura Walters, with co-editor Tim Murphy and senior political writer Marc Daalder.


    This week:
    We do a fast rewind on the missing six months of this three-way coalition’s gestation and early days.

    We look at Act leader David Seymour’s deft politics on school lunches and daft politics in using ‘woke’ to describe sushi.

    Then the panel analyses the separate meltdowns of the Greens Julie Anne Genter and Corrections Minister Mark Mitchell.

    Our reader question on how much MPs get paid also focuses attention back on the double-dipper from NZ First, MP Jamie Arbuckle, who wanted to keep both his parliamentary salary and that from his councillor duties in Marlborough.

    And we end with recommendations for you to read, watch or listen to over your weekend.


    Raw Politics will be available wherever you get your podcasts every Friday morning, and you can watch it on YouTube here.

    Newsroom.co.nz

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: How good a PM might Christopher Luxon be, why Chris Hipkins shouldn't think of quitting, the Greens and Te Pāti Māori the big winners, and silence from Winston.


    Raw Politics signs off for 2023 with our panel's take on the government that might emerge from an election that had something for everyone, other than the Labour Party.

    Some raw takes: National's victory is a remarkable turnaround but hardly an epic triumph, the Greens' three seats will be a longer-term guarantee of making it back to Parliament, Te Pāti Māori stunned and buried the old wisdom that Labour is the party of tangata whenua.

    The Raw Politics panel looks at the first week of shadow governing among the three parties of the centre-right and concludes the public will probably welcome the political silence after such a raucous campaign.

    We argue why Chris Hipkins should hold his nerve and stay on and see what kind of Opposition leader and possible election contestant in 2026 that he could be. And we look at who else might follow Andrew Little off the party list and out the parliamentary door in the early days of this term.

    We have some final recommendations: things we read or listened to this week that are well worth your while catching up on over the long weekend - including an analysis of Labour's demise, a report from a sad night at Lower Hutt, and a poignant New York Times commentary from an Arab member of Israel's parliament on the war with Hamas.


    Every week for almost seven months leading to the election, Newsroom editors and political journalists have talked through the big issues and scrutinised politicians’ performances in a lively, 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: The final polls and what to expect on Saturday evening, plus how long it might take for a new government, and our nominations for best and worst political plays, and individual performers.


    It's almost time for a curtain call.

    The Raw Politics season nears its end, with the penultimate episode trying to make sense of the latest polls and how that will affect the timing and formation of the next government.

    Our podcast panel asks whether Chris Hipkins is realistic in hoping for a change from late polling to ballot box which could emulate 2020's 10-point movement between the two major parties. The problem for him was that that big movement actually saw the poorer performing party (National in 2020) going sharply down and the better performing party (Labour back then) going up. Which, if emulated, wouldn't help the Hipkins-Labour cause.

    We ask how long the country might wait for coalition talks to be started, negotiated and then signed off. One key date could see the governmental purist Winston Peters put things on pause until mid-December, but it could be that the preliminary negotiations are sorted progressively. Worst comes to worst, a Parliament without a new government might have to meet before December 21 and a caretaker PM Hipkins might see in the New Year.

    To wind up this campaign, in a quick fire summary, the Raw Politics team each nominate their best and worst plays by the parties, and their best (and worst) performers.


    Every week, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders. Watch Raw Politics on YouTube, or download or listen to it as a podcast on Spotify, or via Apple Podcasts.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: We ask if Covid and isolation has sucked the life out of Labour and Chris Hipkins' campaign, we wonder if fringe parties might do a deal to send their voters to NZ First and ask what's been eating National campaign chair Chris Bishop.

    Every week, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: We look at what common wins might await New Zealand First and Act if National needs them both post-election; Plus How good are the Greens in the polls, and do overseas votes count for much?

    Much of the focus of the political week has been on the three parties of the centre-right bloc, given National's Christopher Luxon accepting he might have to negotiate post-election with New Zealand First.

    Two and a half weeks out from an election, the governing party was partly in the background, other than the stirring performance by leader Chris Hipkins in the Newshub leaders' debate.

    The Raw Politics panel analyses what might emerge from post-poll talks involving the three centre-right parties and we highlight a couple of policies where Act and New Zealand First have common ground and could end up in a pincer movement forcing National to adopt harder-right approaches than it is promising.

    The panel also looks at the relatively fact-free TV debate and Hipkins' high-octane pressure on Luxon, and Luxon's relatively strong response.

    Plus, with this week's polls not only confirming New Zealand First in the mix but also highlighting a strong campaign showing by the Green Party, Marc Daalder explains how the Greens have been quietly wooing a growing support base.

    Our reader question asks if the overseas vote, which opened this week, really matters for our overall election result.

    And this week's recommendations are all unashamedly in-house with Newsroom content – our Election Fringe Festival guide to the minor, minor parties; a look at the age, longevity and records of Winston Peters and our summary of that rollicking Newshub leaders' debate.

    Every week, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders. Watch Raw Politics on YouTube, or download or listen to it as a podcast on Spotify, or via Apple Podcasts.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: We ask why Labour leader Chris Hipkins has failed to fire, as his party would have hoped, in this campaign so far. Plus: this week's debate, the latest polls and how relatively good economic news changes things in the run-up to election day.


    Every week, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders.

    Watch Raw Politics on YouTube, or download or listen to it as a podcast on Spotify, or via Apple Podcasts.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: Who to believe over the state of the nation's books, and why the public might not even care; Plus What's eating the Act Party as its historic highs in the polls fade at a critical time?


    Both major political parties used the opening of the books this week to claim that their theories on the state of our economy and their solutions deserve your vote. Things are either hopeful or dire, depending on the colour of your election rosette.

    Our panel debates whether the numbers matter to individual voters or if they're so intent on 'change' that they won't take Grant Robertson's advice and be careful what they wish for.

    The same can be said for economists picking holes in National's tax policy to levy foreigners for purchasing homes costing more than $2m. Voters seem to have taken any wrong assumptions or calculations by National in their stride so far, according to the polls. National seems to be getting the benefit of a great collective shrug, and an impatience for the country to try something, anything else.

    Later in the podcast we examine the ebbing away of Act's poll numbers – from 15 or 16 percent weeks ago in some polls to now be sitting at 11 or 10 in major polls. Which is still mighty good for a party that's best election result was 7.6 percent 2020 and 7 percent in 1999 and 2002.

    We discuss if Act peaked too early – with leader David Seymour out on the campaign all year, and if his controversial 'jokes' and questionable candidates on Act's list might have made people think twice. Or, if National just got better and squeezed its centre right alternative.

    Act hold its own campaign 'launch' on Sunday, weeks after its rivals, and one panelist thinks Seymour will want a theatrical impact to grab back some attention.Our reader question is whether Christopher Luxon can hold his own in a debate, with the first one due next Tuesday on TVNZ, despite his talking down his chances. And do those debates even move the dial in NZ politics?

    This week's recommendations include an RNZ series on the pre-election wishes of devastated areas of the East Coast, a toe-to-toe interview between TVNZ's Jack Tame and Christopher Luxon and a Newsroom profile of a new face almost certain to make it to Parliament for Act.


    Every week, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders.

    Watch Raw Politics on YouTube, or download or listen to it as a podcast on Spotify, or via Apple Podcasts.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: Lame attack ads, how the infiltration the Labour campaign launch backfired, who's got all the money and how are they spending it - and why did Christopher Luxon discard his ceremonial Pasifika necklace?

    One week down in the election campaign proper, and the Raw Politics panel looks at who's got off to the best start.

    The two main parties got diverted almost from the outset by so-called 'attack' ads and whether things are turning too personal already, but the content of most of the messages on display this week was both tame and lame.

    National and Act continue to pull in the big bucks, with the blue side raking in almost four times as much as Labour in the $20,000-plus donations category, and the two parties of the centre-right are saturating the social media channels as Labour and the Greens deploy digital funds more tactically.

    A reader question focused on one fleeting moment at National's launch, wondering why National leader Christopher Luxon removed a Pasifika necklace presented to him as a show of respect immediately before he strode on the stage to launch the party's campaign.

    Every week, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders.

    Send your burning political questions to [email protected] and we’ll endeavour to find the answer and explain the issues.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: Tax, fiscal holes, and disinformation. Plus: With just 43 days until the election, how is the campaign shaping up?

    Raw Politics ponders how National’s $14.6 billion tax plan landed both politically and in real terms for those who will benefit from the proposed tax relief. Then we cast forward to the campaign launches this weekend in Auckland where Labour and National will lay out their visions for the country if in government after October 14.

    Newsroom Pro editor Jonathan Milne was one of two journalists to get his hands on the Castalia report that National commissioned to get its t’s crossed, i’s dotted, and maths analysed ahead of its announcement on Wednesday.

    Milne notes National was transparent in saying where its numbers differed from Castalia’s and says it’s worth remembering the analysis was commissioned by the leader’s office and on Christopher Luxon’s terms.

    Political editor Jo Moir and senior political reporter Marc Daalder then explain the manic vibe in Parliament in the final week with press conferences and counter press conferences, potshots followed by allegations of disinformation, and some MPs no doubt contemplating whether they’ll ever be back in the building.

    Then there’s the rush of legislation being rammed through the House in the final days before everyone packs up their lockers, throws on their backpacks, and heads out into the campaign field.

    Some of us are exhausted and the campaign hasn’t even begun, while others seem exhilarated. Moir and Newsroom co-editor Tim Murphy will be at the major parties’ campaign launches on Saturday and Sunday to provide our readers with the latest political news and analysis.

    This week's recommendations include Act Party’s number 16 on the list being so confident he’ll be in Parliament he told Newsroom’s Emma Hatton he’s put his business up for sale (with a caveat), an international look at tax cuts, and a colourful Herald piece from press gallery legend, Audrey Young.

    Every Friday, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: The latest 1News poll confirms Labour really is the underdog now. Plus: Will National's 'diverse' party list lead to a diverse caucus after the election?

    Raw Politics tries to make sense of a wild political week in which a senior National MP threw in the towel with some glancing blows and faint praise, one of his colleagues was found guilty of being "objectively threatening" at Parliament, and the Prime Minister finally embraced the position of underdog.

    National's party list 'reveal' left leader Christopher Luxon tongue-tied when asked if gender had played a role in the selections, but the sidelined MP Michael Woodhouse had no such hesitancy in revealing the disadvantage that he and some of his colleagues might have felt as diversity took centre stage.

    The panel analyses the latest 1News-Verian poll, the one that showed the gap between the major parties opening to 8 points and Labour dipping officially under the 30 percent mark. It confirms a trend that's basically been building since late last year, except for the blip of a brief honeymoon of bonfires when Chris Hipkins took over from Jacinda Ardern in the first quarter of 2023.

    Later in the podcast, we answer a question on whether departing MPs took Newsroom co-editor Tim Murphy's advice from Raw Politics last week on what not to say in their valedictory speeches. Marc Daalder wishes some of the high-minded democratic ideals on display in MPs' final 15 minutes of fame had been exhibited more openly in the rest of their careers.

    This week's recommendations include a recent Beehive insider's insights to the approaches National and Labour are taking into the campaign, a big-read in the New Yorker about Mr X, Elon Musk, and an almost-live, automatically updating set of charts and tables on Newsroom displaying polling and political donations data.


    Every Friday, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: What's wrong with Labour governing by focus group, if its GST and parental leave policies help it win back support? And National is about to release its party list for the election with little room to diversify its team.


    Raw Politics pulls back the curtains on Labour's blitz of populist policy announcements - to discover that while they're 'in it for you', they're also in it to win. If that means running on things they think are popular, they'll be no brainers, despite the views of experts, opponents and even some of their own party members.

    The removal of GST from fresh fruit and veges, extension of partner parental leave, the Covid-19 rule relaxation and another multi-billion dollar packaging of transport measures have thrust Labour from managers to campaigners and there'll be little turning back.

    On the eve of National's big reveal of its party list rankings for October 14, the panel discovers there's little room for the party to diversify the top end of who it's offering for election. A combination of needy incumbents and a likely gain of electorate seats means few plumb list places are up for grabs.

    Later in the podcast, we answer a question on what the departing MPs giving valedictory speeches in Parliament this week will be remembered for.

    This week's recommendations include a courtroom report from Newsroom - where else? - on the appeal by three donors to the National Party who were found guilty in a serious fraud prosecution, an innovative analysis of the possible/probable gender imbalance of a new Parliament, and a revealing look at the high flying Chinese former foreign minister who was, quietly, disappeared.



    Every week, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders.

    Watch Raw Politics on YouTube, or download or listen to it as a podcast on Spotify, or via Apple Podcasts.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: Why is it so hard to believe any party when they promise tens of billions of spending in NZ over many decades? And, we ask if it really matters to get to 100 percent renewable energy in this country.


    Raw Politics takes on two big, bold but unlikely spending goals outlined by the Government this week - the multi-billion dollar plan for cross-harbour tunnels in Auckland and the billions to be spent on wind and solar energy to meet an 'aspirational' climate target.

    Labour is certainly not ceding territory to National this campaign on investing big-time in roading, but its tunnel plan costing up to $45 billion left many in the city in Tui advertisement territory, with the two-word reaction of 'Yeah, Right'. The panel looks at parties' records of following through on such big bold visions and asks if the big numbers are just props to impress the uninformed.

    Later in the podcast, our climate writer Marc Daalder explains the Government's song and dance act this week in revealing that it has persuaded giant funds manager Blackrock to get its clients behind a $2 billion investment in renewable energy here. New Zealand is already one of the highest in the world for renewables as a proportion of energy output and, overall, electricity use accounts for under 5 percent of the country's total emissions.

    This week's recommendations from the panel include a strong academic opinion piece on Newsroom over both major parties' obsession with roads, a Herald investigation into John Tamihere and Te Pāti Māori, and a story in which a party leader suggests an interviewer might have been high.


    Every week, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders.

    Watch Raw Politics on YouTube, or download or listen to it as a podcast on Spotify, or via Apple Podcasts.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: National rolls out its tried, trusted – and a bit exaggerated – spend-up on roads, Labour promises to patch things up, and the polls reflect a new reality with NZ First.

    Raw Politics drives over National's future roads of national significance and analyses why the party keeps going back to that policy well, election after election. There must be polling data beyond the urban areas of public transport that promises electoral gain for the party, and our provincial highways are relatively poor quality and unsafe.

    Labour continues to hold back its election policies, leaving the field open to other parties for now and lowering its profile and impact in critical weeks ahead of formal campaigning. A strange vote in Parliament this week might, Newsroom's political editor Jo Moir suggests, point to one big policy being developed on paid parental leave.

    Later in the podcast, senior political reporter Marc Daalder outlines the current trends in the major political polls and we weigh the still-small-but-growing support being recorded for New Zealand First. Is this the result of a whole new group of people, with different political drivers, swinging in behind Winston Peters' party for 2023?

    Our question asks why so many MPs are suddenly ending up before Parliament's privileges committee.

    And this week's recommendations from the panel include a smart and easy-to-read RNZ data package on the polls, donations and spending data, a New York Times Magazine long read on the origins of Covid and a Stuff column appealing for a safe campaign for Māori this election.

    Every Friday, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders.

  • This week on the Raw Politics podcast: What are the longer-term ramifications for Labour of minister Kiri Allan's arrest and resignation? Plus a big reversal on climate policy, and how to handle opinionated public board members.

    Raw Politics examines how the Kiri Allan saga leaves Labour this close to the election.

    Newsroom co-editor Tim Murphy suggests it might be a point where a shapeless campaign for Labour has to urgently take shape, with the caucus and party unified in the face of being written off.

    And we talk about the unique sensitivities in politics, more than other workplaces, of dealing with private and public instances of individuals suffering mental health issues.

    Later in the podcast, political writer and climate policy expert Marc Daalder leads us through the significance of Cabinet this week back-tracking on its previous decisions on the Emissions Trading Scheme settings. We discuss what that means for our wider climate commitments and how, if at all, it changes the climate policy equation for other parties in the upcoming election.

    Our question is whether appointees to public boards should be prevented from speaking out publicly, and how many restrictions they should face.

    Every Friday, Newsroom editors and political journalists talk through the big issues and scrutinise politicians’ performances in a lively 25-minute show aiming to take viewers and listeners inside the actions and motivations of our elected leaders.