Episodes

  • Join Annie and Jenny deep in the Cairngorms, as they climb Ben Avon, but the summit isn’t the goal, instead, they take a detour to an astounding rock formation called Clach Bhan, or in English, the Women’s Stone. This rock formation overlooks the surrounding glens, and has been a place of pilgrimage for hundreds of years. Pregnant women from miles around would undertake an arduous trek to this point and ask the stone for a safe childbirth. But why this stone, three-quarters of the way up a mountain? What caused it to be here? Why are there numerous bowl-shaped holes, perfect for sitting? And most importantly, what drew women to this spot, in search of solace and safety? This episode is sponsored by WeeBox - go to www.weebox.co.uk and enter the code ‘Story10’ for an exclusive discount!You can support Stories of Scotland on patreon, visit www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland to join up!Some of the music you heard in this episode was beautifully played by Nicky Murray and Chloe Rodgers.References:Aberdeen Press and Journal. Old North Country Superstitions. 1877.Gordon J, Wignall R, Brazier N, Bruneau P, ‘Cairngorms, A landscape Fashioned by Geology’, Scottish National Heritage, 2006.Mason D. Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Inverness, volume xiv, 1887-1888. Inverness: Gaelic Society of Inverness; 1889.Northern Scot and Moray & Nairn Express. A Highland Village in the 18th Century. 1911.Sinclair J. Statistical Accounts of Scotland. Edinburgh: William Creech; 1794.Smith A. The history and antiquities of new and old Aberdeen. Aberdeen: A. Murray; 1882.

  • Annie and Jenny discover how Skye’s greatest mountains are the remains of an ancient volcano. We unravel rich Scottish folklore about Beinn na Caillich: the Mountain of the Old Woman. We discuss the lore of giant women who battled across the sea with giant boulders. 
    Learn about Saucy Mary, a lost Norwegian Princess and, a fake Norwegian Princess. If you love Skye, this episode is filled with magical mountain lore. 

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    This is part of the Radical Mountain Women, funded by the Royal Society of Literature.
    References:
    Anderson, J., 1873. Notes of some Entries in the Iceland Annals regarding the Death of the Princes Margaret. Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 10. 
    Finlayson, J. (Contributor), Maclean C. I. (Fieldworker), 1955. Mar a fhuair Beinn Na Caillich aim, SA1955.169, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh. 
    Gordon, S., 1927. A Peak in Skye: Beinn na Cailliche. The Scotsman. 
    Hull, E., 1927. Legends and Traditions of the Cailleach Bheara or Old Woman (Hag) of Beare. Folklore, 38.
    Kallestrup, L. and Toivo, R., 2017. Contesting Orthodoxy in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Cham: Springer International Publishing: Palgrave Macmillan.
    Macculloch, J. and Scott, W., 1824. The Highlands and western Isles of Scotland in letters to Sir Walter Scott. London.
    MacKay, J., 1905. How Beinn na Caillich got its name. Celtic Monthly, Glasgow, 13. 
    Mackenzie, D. A., 1905. A Highland Goddess. The Celtic Review, 7, no. 28. 
    Whyte, A., 2021. The Cailleach in Place-Names and Place-Lore. Journal of Scottish Name Studies, 14.

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  • Jenny and Annie explore the far edge of the Outer Hebrides, St Kilda. We look at the wonders of climbing the stacks of St Kilda, and the seabirds that create a symphony.
    We see through the eyes of Evelyn Heathcote, as she spends the night in a sea cave with a group of Gaelic psalm-singing St Kildans. We examine the folklore and landscape of this unique and special place. 

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    This is part of the Radical Mountain Women, funded by the Royal Society of Literature. Some of the music you heard in this episode was beautifully played by Nicky Murray and Chloe Rodgers.
    A special thanks to the School of Scottish Studies Archives for letting us use these Gaelic Psalm recordings:
    Salm 68, Contributor: John MacLeod, Fieldworker: Thorkild Knudsen, SA1963.44.A2, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh. [https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/74853]
    Salm 118, Contributor: James Smith, Fieldworker: Thorkild Knudsen, SA1964.103.B3, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh. [https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/75665]

    References:
    CANMORE, ‘St Kilda, Hirta, The Amazon’s House’, https://canmore.org.uk/site/3960/st-kilda-hirta-gleann-mor-the-amazons-house
    C. Maclean, ‘Island on the Edge of the World - The Story of St Kilda’, Cannongate Publishing, 1977. 
    E. J. Clegg & J. F. Cross, ‘Aspects of neonatal death in St Kilda, 1830-1930,  Journal of Biosocial Science, 1994. 
    G. F. Geddes, ‘The Amazon's House, Hirta, St Kilda – A Conservation Statement’, unpublished report for the National Trust for Scotland, RCAHMS Mss 6341, 2011.
    E. Heathcote, ‘A night in an Ocean cave’, World Wide Magazine, Vol 5, 1900. 
    E. Heathcoat, ‘A summer Sojourn in St Kilda’,Good Words, Vol  42, 1901.
    N. Heathcote, ‘Climbing in St Kilda’, Scottish Mountaineering Club Journal, Vol 6, 1901.
    ‘More About St Kilda Underground Houses,’ The Scotsman, 1928.
    National Trust for Scotland on St Kilda, a World Heritage Site: www.nts.org.uk/visit/places/st-kilda
    National Records of Scotland, ‘Stories from St Kilda’ https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/research/learning/features/stories-from-st-kilda
    P. Stride, ‘St Kilda, the neonatal tetanus tragedy of the nineteenth century and some twenty-first century answers’, Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, 2008.

  • With the 140th Anniversary of the Battle of the Braes, Jenny and Annie set out to try to understand this crucial fight for land reform in Scotland. 
    We look back to March 1882, when crofters of the Braes area of Skye tried to petition Lord MacDonald to let them have common grazing on the hill of Ben Lee. Lord MacDonald refuses this request, condemning the future of this crofting community into further poverty.  

    Standing up for their rights, the crofters protest through a rent strike. This leads to the Battle of the Braes on 19th April 1882, a violent moment in Scotland’s complicated history with land. 

    We consider how land is at the heart of economic and cultural survival for the Highlands and Islands communities, and why we should never forget the Battle of the Braes. 

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    With thanks to Iona Fyfe for recording the song ‘Battle o the Braes.’

    Find Iona Fyfe at https://ionafyfe.com/ 

    This is the second episode of our new series, Radical Mountain Women, funded by the Royal Society of Literature. Some of the music you heard in this episode was beautifully played by Nicky Murray and Chloe Rodgers.

    References:
    Andy Wightman, The Poor Had No Lawyers: Who Owns Scotland and How They Got It, Birlinn, Edinburgh, 2015
    ‘Battle o the Braes,’ Brechin Advertiser, May 1882
    Crofting Commission: https://www.crofting.scotland.gov.uk/
    Ewen A. Cameron and Andrew Newby, ‘Alas, Skyemen are imitating the Irish’: A note on Alexander Nicolson's ‘Little Leaflet’ concerning the Crofters' Agitation.The Innes Review, 2004
    ‘Furious Attack On and By the Police,’ Dundee Courier, April 1882
    James R Coul, Crofters’ Common Grazings in Scotland, The Agricultural History Review, British Agricultural History Society, 1968
    John MacGrath, The Cheviot, the Stag and the Black Black Oil, Bloomsbury, 2017
    Màiri Mhòr Nan Òran, Òran Beinn Lì, 1887
    ‘The Land Agitation in Skye,’ Inverness Courier, April 1882

    ‘The Revolt in Skye: Furious Fighting Between the Police and the People, Painful Scenes, Arrests of Crofters,’ Dundee Evening Telegraph, April 1882

    We used digital transcripts of the Napier Commission documents, available here: https://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/research-enterprise/cultural/centre-for-history/research/research-alliances/the-napier-commission/

  • In this episode, Annie and Jenny continue their exploration of the women found in the margins of the Scottish Mountaineering Club Journal. It’s Edinburgh in the early 1900s, and a climbing expedition up the Salisbury Crags is derailed when the public notice that there are women climbing alongside the men. Determined, the women keep climbing, but are forced to the edges of the day.
    This is the beginnings of The Scottish Ladies Climbing Club, founded by Jane Inglis Clark. Jane was the definition of trailblazing and believed that everyone, regardless of gender, deserved to explore the outdoors.
    The geologic significance of the Salisbury Crags as well as the ancient mythology swirling around Arthur’s seat are uncovered in this trip to Auld Reekie.
    This is the second episode of our new series, Radical Mountain Women, funded by the Royal Society of Literature, and is inspired by the writing of the Scottish Mountaineering Journal. Some of the music you heard in this episode was beautifully played by Nicky Murray and Chloe Rodgers.

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    References:
    Karen Stockham, ‘It went down into the very form and fabric of myself: Women’s Mountaineering Life-Writing 1808-1960,’ PhD Thesis, University of Exeter, 2012
    National Library of Scotland, ‘Aiming High: About Jane Inglis Clark,’ https://reveal.nls.uk/aiming-high/about-jane-inglis-clark/
    William Inglis Clark, ‘Some Climbs on the Salisbury Crags,’ Scottish Mountaineering Club Journal, Vol.6, Edinburgh, 1900

  • Slightly frog-throated Annie and Jenny interview Highland author Jennifer Morag Henderson about her new book, Daughters of the North.

    Daughters of the North explores the life of Jean Gordon, from the Far North of Scotland who lived from 1546 to 1629. We learn of the Far North of Scotland during the reign of Mary Queen of Scots, the industries of Sutherland, and some intrigues of the Early Modern court. We share a love of archives, historical research, and the falconry display of Dunrobin Castle.

    Content warning: this episode contains some sensitive discussions of death and sexual violence, listener discretion is advised.

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland 

  • Join Jenny and Annie as they climb uphill on the West Coast of Scotland to explore the beautiful Beinn Sgritheall. We look at legends of the Glenelg brochs, Dun Telve and Dun Troddan, which reveal ancient folklore of giants, feasting women, revenge, and a very bad hair day. 
    We adventure up the beautiful Scottish rural mountain of Beinn Sgritheall, and spend some time thinking about why hillwalking is so enthralling. 
    This is the first episode of our new series, Radical Mountain Women, funded by the Royal Society of Literature, inspired by the writing of the Scottish Mountaineering Journal.

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland 

    References:
    Dun Telve, Dun Troddan and Dun Grugaigon Canmore, The National Record of the Historic Environment: https://canmore.org.uk/site/11798/dun-telve, https://canmore.org.uk/site/11797/dun-troddan, https://canmore.org.uk/site/11772/dun-grugaig-glenelg
    Caithness Broch Project: https://www.thebrochproject.co.uk/
    NatureScot: History of Scotland’s woodlands: https://www.nature.scot/professional-advice/land-and-sea-management/managing-land/forests-and-woodlands/history-scotlands-woodlands 
    Ordnance Survey Maps at the National Library of Scotland: https://maps.nls.uk/os/
    Stuart Piggott, Scotland Before History, Thomas Nelson & Sons, 1958
    Thomas Murchison, ‘Glenelg, Inverness-Shire: Notes on a Parish History,’ Transactions of the Gaelic Society for Inverness, 1942-1950
    William Douglas, ‘Ben Screel,’ Scottish Mountaineering Club Journal, Vol. 1, Edinburgh, 1891

  • Jenny interviews marvellous author Sue Lawrence and we learn about the women, castle and ghost that inspired her new book, The Green Lady. Jenny and Sue discuss Fyvie Castle in the 16th century and question how early modern women could try to gain control of their own lives.

    Sue, who has written multiple Scottish cookbooks gives us a cheeky variation of a Scottish classic recipe, Cullen skink at the end of this episode!

  • Are the Scottish Borders a rebel stronghold? Join Annie and Jenny as they examine the often-overlooked stories of the Border Reivers: the families of raiding, plundering, land-burning, outlaws. 

    Jenny explores her ancestry roots in the Scottish Borders, to discover she comes from a family of bloodthirsty brigands. We look at Border clans, curses and, calamities as we unpick the ballad of Johnnie Armstrong. 

    This episode is sponsored by Scotland Shop. If you are tempted to check out some of Scotland Shop’s beautiful tartan garments and fabrics, please follow this link to Scotland Shop. https://hubs.ly/H0-0fjl0

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland 

    References:

    Alistair Moffat, The Reivers, Birlinn, Edinburgh, 2008.

    ‘Johnny Armstrong’ broadside ballad, National Library of Scotland Collections: digital.nls.uk/english-ballads/archive/74893315

    John Veitch, The Tweed, and Other Poems, James MacLehose, Glasgow, 1875.

    Katherine Anne Groundwater, The Middle March of the Scottish Borders, 1573 to 1625, University of Edinburgh: era.ed.ac.uk/handle/1842/24651 

    ‘The Ballad Poetry of Scotland,’ Alloa Advertiser, Feb 1879.

    Claire Etty, Tudor Revolution? Royal control of the Anglo-Scottish border, 1483-1530, Durham University: etheses.dur.ac.uk/1283/ 

    Walter Scott, Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, James Ballantyne, Kelso, 1802.

  • Jenny and Annie learn about the geology of the Scottish Lowlands, and travel as a wee grain of sand through half a billion years of geologic movement, ending up within the River Tweed. 

    In more recent history, we unravel Arthurian legends to explore the story of Merlin, the wizard of the wilds. A real cornucopia of Celtic mythologies and folklore. 

    This episode is sponsored by Scotland Shop. If you are tempted to check out some of Scotland Shop’s beautiful tartan garments and fabrics, please follow this link to Scotland Shop. https://hubs.ly/H0-0fjl0

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    References:
    Alexander Pennecuik, A Geographical, Historical Description of the Shire of Tweeddale,  Edinburgh, 1715.
    Francis H. Groome (ed.), Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland, Edinburgh, 1901.
    H. L. D. Ward, Lailoken (or Merlin Silvester), Romania, Vol. 22, No 88.
    ‘How Tweed Got Its Name: Homespuns that have been famous for a thousand years,’ Dundee Evening Telegraph, August 1940. 
    J. S. Blackie, Merlin and Kentigern, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, 1885. 
    J. S. P. Tatlock, Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Vita Merlini, A Journal of Mediaeval Studies, Vol. XVIII, July 1943.
    Lauchlan MacLeanWatt, Scottish Life and Poetry, James Nisbet & Co., London, 1912. 
    ‘Merlin’s Grave,’ Peeblesshire Advertiser and County Newspaper, January 1992.
    ‘Merlin’s Mysterious Death: His Last Resting Place,’ Cambria Daily Leader, July 1890.
    ‘Obituary: The Tramp Poet,’ Aberdeen Press and Journal, August 1925.
    Walter Scott, J. W. Lake, The Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott, J. Crissy, Philadelphia, 1835.

  • Join Annie and Jenny as they get in the festive mood and journey back to the Yuletide crimes of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The reformation resulted in the banning of many celebrations, including yuletide festivities. Those caught celebrating were brought before the Kirk Sessions, and this resulted in strangely detailed records of the celebratory practices of the time. Guising and cross-dressing, dancing, eating goose, and baking bread were all punishable by law, listen in to find out more about each tradition.
    This episode is sponsored by Scotland Shop. If you are tempted to check out some of Scotland Shop’s beautiful tartan garments and fabrics, please follow this link to Scotland Shop. https://hubs.ly/H0-0fjl0
    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland
    References:
    Barbara Hector, Is Hogmanay Dying Out? Not in Rural Scotland, Aberdeen Press and Journal, December 1932.
    Dictionaries of the Scots Language: https://dsl.ac.uk/
    Digitised Kirk Session Minutes, National Records of Scotland: https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk
    Margo Todd, Profane Pastime and the Reformed Community: The Persistence of Popular Festivities in Early Modern Scotland, Journal of British Studies, 2000.
    Margo Todd, The Culture of Protestantism in Early Modern Scotland, 2002.
    Robert Crammond, The History of the Sufferings of the Church of Scotland from the Restoration to the Revolution, Vol 1, Blackie, Fullarton & Co., 1828.
    William Crammond, Steven Ree (ed), The records of Elgin, 1234-1800, The New Spalding Club, Aberdeen, 1903.

  • Annie and Jenny share some lighthearted folklore on the theme of tartans and plaids! Tartan eels, ghosts and fairies: this is a jolly voyage into rich Scottish mythology. 

    This episode is sponsored by Scotland Shop. If you are tempted to check out some of Scotland Shop’s beautiful tartan garments and fabrics, please follow this link to Scotland Shop. https://hubs.ly/H0-0fjl0

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    Listen out for the Scots words 'burn' meaning stream and 'bairn' meaning child!

    References:
    Donald MacMartin (contributor), Hamish Henderson (Fieldworker), SA1965.159, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh, (https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/42141)
    ‘Ghost Story of a Hooded Maiden in Argyllshire,’ Dundee Evening Telegraph, September 1910
    Mary Cirsty Fleming (contributor), Ian Paterson (Fieldworker), SA1973.122, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh, (https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/42141)
    Mary Cirsty Fleming (contributor), Ian Paterson (Fieldworker), SA1976.172, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh, (https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/66029)
    ‘Treasure Trove at Falkirk, Burgh Man Unearths Vase of Roman Coins,’ Falkirk Herald, August 1933
    ‘The Smugglers of the Border,’ Leith Burghs Pilot, August 1875
    William Scott, ‘Fairy Bells,’ Southern Reporter, March 1924
    W. W. Gibbons, ‘Folklore and Legends of Scotland,’ London, 1889

  • Do you want to know the secrets of the bees? So do we! In this bonus episode, Jenny and Annie speak to author Diana Gabaldon known for her bestselling Outlander series of novels. We are celebrating the highly-anticipated release of Go Tell the Bees That I am Gone on November 23rd 2021. Diana discusses her interest and research into Scottish heritage, culture, and folklore. 

    This episode is sponsored by Scotland Shop. If you are tempted to check out some of Scotland Shop’s beautiful tartan garments and fabrics, please follow this link to Scotland Shop. https://hubs.ly/H0-0fjl0

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    References:

    Bygone Bee-Keeping, Alloa Advertiser - Saturday 05 December 1874.

    Edith Sellers, Superstition without rhyme or reason, The Queen (London Newspaper), September 1899.

    Old Bridal Customs, Dundee Courier, January 1950.

    Serving Bees at a Funeral, Drogheda Journal, or Meath & Louth Advertiser, September 1826.

    William Sharp, The winged destiny: studies in the spiritual history of the Gael, 1910.

  • In this bonus episode, Jenny and Annie speak to Scottish actor Graham McTavish. Graham has had an incredibly successful acting career and is well-known for many of his roles including Outlander, the Hobbit films, Castlevania, and the forthcoming Game of Thrones prequel, House of the Dragon.

    While working on Outlander, Graham became good friends with Sam Heughan and together they have created the TV Series Men in Kilts and are soon to release a follow-up to their globally bestselling book Clanlands. On November 23rd 2021, the Clanlands Almanac will be released. The Clanlands Almanac is a celebration of the Scottish seasons, folklore, and heritage. Taking readers through a calendar year, the Clanlands Almanac inspires us to feel the seasons change again.

    Listen out for the marvelous Scots toast: “Here’s tae us. Wha’s like us? Gie few, and they’re a’ deid!“

    This episode is sponsored by Scotland Shop. If you are tempted to check out some of Scotland Shop’s beautiful tartan garments and fabrics, please follow this link to Scotland Shop. https://hubs.ly/H0-0fjl0

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland
    Many thanks to artist Kerry Douglas for designing our new cover art! Find Kerry at https://www.instagram.com/tufftay/

  • In this episode, Annie and Jenny tell some truly terrifying tales from the Borders of Scotland. We’ve all heard something go bump in the night that’s made the hairs on our neck stand on end, and while sometimes it’s as innocent as an open window in the attic, other times it can be as dastardly as the devil. These spooky tales from the archives explore the rolling moors of the Borders, haunted towers, and decrepit mansions. So come and join us as we peek behind the veil, and then quickly run away, too scared to look back.

    This episode is sponsored by Scotland Shop. If you are tempted to check out some of Scotland Shop’s beautiful tartan garments and fabrics, please follow this link to Scotland Shop. https://hubs.ly/H0-0fjl0

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    References:
    ‘A Ghost,’ ’Jedburgh Gazette, September 1873
    ‘A Haunted Berwickshire Spot?,’ Berwickshire News and General Advertiser March 1924
    John W Cockburn (contributor), Alan Bruford (Fieldworker), SA1966.019, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh, (https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/25084?l=en )
    ‘The Haunted House at Fairnilee,’ The Southern Reporter, August 1875
    ‘Tit-Bits of Border History and Romance,’ Southern Reporter, August 1873

  • Join Annie and Jenny as they go back to the witch panics of Early Modern Scotland. We examine the witch trial of Elizabeth Bathgate from Eyemouth, and look at what witchcraft trials reveal about superstitions and paranoia of times past. 

    This episode is sponsored by Scotland Shop. If you are tempted to check out some of Scotland Shop’s beautiful tartan garments and fabrics, please follow this link to Scotland Shop. https://hubs.ly/H0-0fjl0

    References:

    James Maidment, The Spottiswoode Miscellany: A Collection of Original Papers and Tracts, Illustrative Chiefly of the Civil and Ecclesiastical History of Scotland, Vol. 2, 1845.

    John Graham Dalyell, The Darker Superstitions of Scotland illustrated from history and practice, 1834.

    Julian Goodare, Women and the witch-hunt in Scotland, Social History, Vol 23, 1998.

    Lauren Martin, Witchcraft and Family: What can Witchcraft Documents Tell us About Early Modern Scottish Family Life?, Scottish Tradition, Vol. 27, 2002. 

    Lizanne Henderson, Witch Belief in Scottish Coastal Communities, Chapter in The New Coastal History, 2017.

    Survey of Scottish Witchcraft Database by Julian Goodare, Lauren Martin, Joyce Miller and Louise Yeoman, ​The University of Edinburgh, http://www.shca.ed.ac.uk/

    Zoey Lorne, The Construction and Regulation of Gendered Crime in Scottish Witchcraft Cases, 1560-1661, PhD Thesis from the University of Lethbridge, 2017.

  • Join Annie and Jenny on a trip to the Cèilidh house, as they discuss the magic of this old tradition. We blether about some old cèilidh lore, exploring how cèilidhs keep communities connected. We look at how the cèilidh house sometimes develops its own lore of ghosts, magic and wonder. 

    Stories of Scotland is an award-winning Scottish history podcast, proudly recorded in the Highlands. We research our heritage and mythology podcast using archives, books, museum objects, and oral histories from across Scotland.

    References:

    Captain Dugald MacCormick (contributor), Calum Iain Maclean (Fieldworker), TAIBHSE A THÀINIG GU TAIGH ANNS AN ROBH CÈILIDH, SA1953.050, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh (https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/2981)

    Donald MacLean (contributor), Donald Archie MacDonald (Fieldworker), FEAR AIG NACH ROBH SGEULACHD AIG CÈILIDH, SA1975.31.A2, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh (​​https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/62058)

    Reisebilder, Marion; A Highland Cèilidh of 35 Years Ago, Northern Chronicle and General Advertiser for the North of Scotland, 02 Dec 1908. 

    Scots Language Centre Website: www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/id/5263Traditional Arts and Culture Scotland Website: https://tracscotland.org/

  • Content warning: Discussion of death and funerals.
    Join Annie and Jenny as they explore the curious Highland beliefs of the second sight. In this second part on the glorious mountain of Schiehallion, we learn about the time Robert the Bruce sought sanctuary at Schiehallion, a piper tempted by the fairy hill, and the superstitions of second sight in Rannoch. Be captured by the fairies in this enchanting episode!

    Stories of Scotland is an award-winning Scottish history podcast, proudly recorded in the Highlands. We research our heritage and mythology podcast using archives, books, museum objects, and oral histories from across Scotland.

    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    Transcripts of oral histories:
    Transcript 1, Schiehallion, festival days and sheep sheering:
    Perthshire local: Well, the young people, so they tell me, and this is before my time, but the young people used to gather and they would set off up the hill to the back of Schiehallion. And there was a wishing well there and they used to put coins in there and wish for luck and that sort of thing. (Clang of grandfather clock from original recording.)
    Dr Betsy Ross: And they did this on May Day?
    Perthshire local: Yes, all on May Day, the first of May, aye. On Halloween Night and before that of course we had to gather all the sticks and old bracken and things and have something to make a blaze. And it was usually up on the hillside. And we all used to gather round and set fire to the thing and it was a giant spectacle and you saw it for miles around. And then we went home and would be dooking for apples and cracking hazelnuts and things like that. Well we just went to the different houses and never went too much, round all the different houses in the village. We had four people. They usually got danced the Highland Reel and I played the melodeon (a type of accordion) and of course we always got something. They gave us something. 
    I heard that they used to do that, there were so many people, you see. Sheep-shearers are very scarce today but at that time there would be twenty maybe thirty, nearer thirty gathering at a shearing. And when the sheep had been shorn they would start competing amongst themselves and throwing the hammer and putting the stone, but that’s all a thing of the past. 
    Goodness me, have you got it on? 
    Dr Betsy Ross: Yes 

    Transcript 2, Schiehallion Song:

    Sound me the name on the pipes wildly screaming,
    Splendour of tartan, and clashing of steal, 
    Grey skies above and the pipes wildly screaming,
    Schiehallion forever to hearts that are leal.

    Raging from Rannoch, the blast fiercely stinging,
    I see the air from Glen Lyon in the snow,
    Yet in my ear old Schiehallion is singing,
    Songs of a summer I spent long ago. 

    Oh how the name of Schiehallion can brighten,
    Longings and hopes that are dimmed with the years,
    Dark be the day but its burden will lighten,
    When that old hill comes again through my tears.

    Speak the dear name when my vision is dimming,
    For all life's turmoil dies down in my ears.
    When all my soul the dark waters are stealing,
    And heavens high hills to me shall appear.

    Then I remember Schiehallion in her glory,
    Purple and rosy a’ dying of the day,
    Write in a word and I still heart the story:
    Schiehallion, Schiehallion, Schiehallion always!

    References:
    Aaron Arrowsmith, Map of Scotland, London, 1807, https://maps.nls.uk/joins/747.html 
    John Gregorson Campbell, Witchcraft & Second Sight in the Highlands & Islands of Scotland, Glasgow, 1902
    John Sinclair, Schiehallion: A Posy of Rannoch Poesy, Stirling, 1905.
    Mrs Helen Strathearn missing: Dundee Courier, 29 October 1902. 
    Rev Dr. Marshall, Historic Scenes in Perthshire, Dundee Courier, 11 April 1879.
    Schiehallion, Dundee Courier, 22 December 1926.
    The Aberfeldy Mystery, Dundee Courier, 12 December 1902. 
    Unknown person (contributor), Betsy Ross (Fieldworker), SA1978.153-154, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh (https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/88935 and https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/89039)
    WAF Browne, Second-Sight, or Deuteroscopia, Journal of psychological medicine and mental pathology, 1876.

  • Annie and Jenny hike up Schiehallion, one of Scotland’s most famous peaks. This astounding mountain is home to world changing history. This episode includes an oral history with a squeaky rocking chair. Located in the heart of Scotland, Schiehallion was the site of an intricate experiment that weighed the world. It’s unique conical shape drew astronomers, physicists, mathematicians and geologists together in the 18th century to calculate the earth’s mass for the first time, causing an earthquake in the warring schools of geology.

    Mountaineering in the Scottish Highlands can be dangerous, especially in the winter, but an excerpt from the Scottish Mountaineering Journal opens up the Scottish Wilderness and all it’s beauty during this time.

    Stories of Scotland is an award-winning Scottish history podcast, proudly recorded in the Highlands. We research our heritage and mythology podcast using archives, books, museum objects, and oral histories from across Scotland.
    You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland

    References:
    CA Sage, Schiehallion Poem, Dundee Evening Telegraph, 1910.
    James G Scott (Contributor), Calum Iain Maclean (Fieldworker), SA1958.99, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, University of Edinburgh. (https://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/track/37020)
    John Sinclair, Schiehallion: A Posy of Rannoch Poesy, Stirling, 1905.
    Joseph Gibson Scott, Schiehallion, Scottish Mountaineering Journal, the Scottish Mountaineering Club, Edinburgh, 1895.
    Herbert Trench (published by name FHT), Schiehallion poem, Westminster Gazette, 1897.

  • Jenny and Annie learn about the MacMhuirich bardic family and the significance of bards in the Gaelic dominium. This tremendously fun episode takes us back to Medieval Ireland, to look at the time when the seeds of the MacMhuirich dynasty were sown in Scotland.

    We recite some English translates of MacMhuirich poetry and look at the stories behind their compositions.

     References:
    Robert Crawford, Clan Donald’s Call to Battle At Harlaw (2008), read the full version at: https://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/poem/clan-donalds-call-battle-harlaw/
    Elanor Hull, A textbook of Irish Literature (1906).
    Martin Martin, A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland (1703).
    Derek Thompson, The MacMhuirich bardic family, The Poetry of Niall MacMhuirich, and Niall Mòr MacMhuirich all published in the Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Inverness (1960-1976).