Episodes

  • Across the United States, millions of families are confronting a seemingly impossible question: When dementia changes a relative, how much should they accommodate their new personality and desires?

    Katie Engelhart, a writer for The New York Times Magazine, tells the story of one family’s experience.

    Guest: Katie Engelhart, a writer for The New York Times Magazine.

    Background reading:

    The Mother Who Changed: A Story of DementiaKatie Englehart has reported on dementia for years, and one image of a prisoner haunts her.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • The era of hybrid work has spawned a new kind of office culture — one that has left many workers less connected and less happy than they have ever been.

    Emma Goldberg, a business reporter covering workplace culture for The Times, explains how mixing remote and office work has created a malaise, as workers confront new challenges and navigate uncertainty, and employers engage in a wave of experiments.

    Guest: Emma Goldberg, a business reporter for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    Emma Goldberg reflects on her evolving beat as tens of thousands of employees return to the office.From March: Office Mandates. Pickleball. Beer. What will make hybrid work stick?

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • Missing episodes?

    Click here to refresh the feed.

  • On Tuesday, Donald J. Trump beat Nikki Haley in New Hampshire. His win accelerated a push for the party to coalesce behind him and deepened questions about the path forward for Ms. Haley, his lone remaining rival.

    Jonathan Weisman, a political correspondent for The Times, discusses the real meaning of the former president's victory.

    Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a political correspondent for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    Donald Trump’s win in New Hampshire added to an air of inevitability, even as Nikki Haley sharpened the edge of her rhetoric.Here are five takeaways from the New Hampshire primary.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • Nominations for the Oscars are announced on Tuesday and “Oppenheimer,” a film about the father of the atomic bomb, is expected to be among the front-runners.

    Catie Edmondson, a congressional correspondent for The Times, explains how the film sent her on a quest to find the secret story of how Congress paid for the bomb, and what it reveals about the inner workings of Washington.

    Guest: Catie Edmondson, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    Watching “Oppenheimer,” a journalist wondered: How did the president get the $2 billion secret project past Congress?What to expect from the Oscar nominations.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • In the International Court of Justice, South Africa is accusing Israel of committing genocide in Gaza.

    Amanda Taub, a human rights lawyer-turned-journalist at The Times, walks through the arguments of the case, and the power that the rules of war have beyond any verdict in court.

    Guest: Amanda Taub, writer of The Interpreter for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    What might happen next in the genocide case against Israel.With its accusations against Israel, South Africa is challenging the Western-led order.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • Liz Flatt drove to Austin, Texas, mostly out of desperation. She had tried talking with the police. She had tried working with a former F.B.I. profiler who ran a nonprofit dedicated to solving unsolved murders. She had been interviewed by journalists and at least one podcaster. She had been featured on a Netflix documentary series about a man who falsely confessed to hundreds of killings.

    Although she didn’t know it at the time, Flatt was at a crossroads in what she had taken to calling her journey, a path embarked on after a prayer-born decision five years earlier to try to find who killed her sister, Deborah Sue Williamson, or Debbie, in 1975. It was now 2021.

    She had come to Austin for a conference, CrimeCon, which formed around the same time that Flatt began her quest, at a moment now seen as an inflection point in the long history of true crime, a genre as old as storytelling but one that adapts quickly to new technologies, from the printing press to social media. Flatt met a woman who would later put her in touch with two investigators who presented at the conference that year: George Jared and Jennifer Bucholtz. They were podcasters, but Jared was also a journalist and Bucholtz an adjunct professor of forensics and criminal justice at the for-profit American Military University. Their presentation was on another cold case, the murder of Rebekah Gould in 2004, whose killer they claimed to have helped find using a technique that has quickly become a signature of the changing landscape of true crime: crowdsourcing.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

  • On its surface, the case before the Supreme Court — a dispute brought by fishing crews objecting to a government fee — appears to be routine.

    But, as Adam Liptak, who covers the court for The Times explains, the decision could transform how every industry in the United States is regulated.

    Guest: Adam Liptak, a Supreme Court correspondent for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    How a fight over a fishing regulation could help tear down the administrative state.The case is part of a long-game effort to sap regulation of business.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • Attacks by Houthi militants on shipping in the Red Sea, a crucial global trade route, once seemed like a dangerous sideshow to the war in Gaza. But as the attacks have continued, the sideshow has turned into a full-blown crisis.

    Vivian Nereim, the Gulf bureau chief for The Times, explains what cause is served by the Houthis’ campaign.

    Guest: Vivian Nereim, the Gulf bureau chief for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    Undeterred by strikes by American and British forces, the Houthis targeted more ships in the Red Sea.Washington is grappling with how to stop a battle-hardened foe from disrupting shipping lanes critical for global trade.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • Concerned about the effect on diversity, many colleges have stopped requiring standardized tests. New research suggests that might be a mistake.

    David Leonhardt, a senior writer for The Times, discusses the future of SATs and why colleges remain reluctant to bring them back.

    Guest: David Leonhardt, a senior writer for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    The misguided war on the SATFrom Opinion: Can the meritocracy survive without the SAT?

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • At the Iowa Republican caucuses on Monday night, Donald J. Trump secured a runaway victory. The only real drama was the fight for second place.

    Reid Epstein, who covers politics for The Times, takes us inside one of the caucuses, and Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter, walks us through the final results.

    Guest: Reid J. Epstein, a politics correspondent for The New York Times, and

    Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    A letdown for Ron DeSantis: His campaign is running low on cash and faces tough tests ahead.Why coming in second can be a win in early-state contests.Here are five takeaways from Trump’s crushing victory.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • Arrowhead Stadium, the home of the Kansas City Chiefs, the N.F.L.’s defending champions, is a very loud place. During a 2014 game, a sound meter captured a decibel reading equivalent to a jet’s taking off, earning a Guinness World Record for “Loudest crowd roar at a sports stadium.”

    Around 11 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 7, Brian Melillo, an audio engineer for NBC Sports’ flagship N.F.L. telecast, “Sunday Night Football,” arrived at Arrowhead to prepare for that evening’s game against the Detroit Lions. It was a big occasion: the annual season opener, the N.F.L. Kickoff game, traditionally hosted by the winner of last season’s Super Bowl. There would be speeches, fireworks, a military flyover, the unfurling of a championship banner. A crowd of more than 73,000 was expected. “Arrowhead is a pretty rowdy setting,” Melillo said. “It can present some problems.”

    Broadcasting a football game on live television is one of the most complex technical and logistical challenges in entertainment. Jody Rosen went behind the scenes of the mammoth broadcast production.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

  • On Monday, Iowa holds the first contest in the Republican presidential nominating process and nobody will have more on the line than Ron DeSantis. The Florida governor staked his candidacy on a victory in Iowa, a victory that now seems increasingly remote.

    Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The Times, and the Daily producers Rob Szypko and Carlos Prieto explain what Mr. DeSantis’s challenge has looked like on the ground in Iowa.

    Guest: Shane Goldmacher, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    A weak night for Donald Trump? A Ron DeSantis flop? Gaming out Iowa.From December: Mr. Trump was gaining in Iowa polling, and Mr. DeSantis was holding off Nikki Haley for a distant second.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • A recent string of attacks across the Middle East has raised concerns that the war between Hamas and Israel is spreading, and might put pressure on other countries like Iran and the United States to get more involved.

    Eric Schmitt, who covers national security for The Times, discusses the risk that the conflict is becoming an even wider war, and explains the efforts underway to prevent that.

    Guest: Eric Schmitt, a national security correspondent for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    Attacks have heightened fears of a wider war for the Middle East and U.S.After a Red Sea barrage by the Houthis, a militant group in Yemen, the U.S. and its allies are considering how to retaliate.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • Donald Trump has consistently argued that as a former president, he is immune from being charged with a crime for things he did while he was in office.

    Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times, explains what happened when Trump’s lawyers made that case in federal court, whether the claim has any chance of being accepted — and why Trump may win something valuable either way.

    Guest: Adam Liptak, a Supreme Court correspondent for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    Trump’s immunity claim in court.Analysis: Trump says his acquittal by the Senate in his second impeachment trial makes him immune from prosecution.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • Across the United States, hundreds of towns and cities are trying to get guns off the streets by turning them over to businesses that offer to destroy them.

    But a New York Times investigation found that something very different is happening.

    Mike McIntire, an investigative reporter at The Times, explains the unintended consequences of efforts by local officials to rid their communities of guns.

    Guest: Mike McIntire, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    The guns were said to be destroyed. Instead, they were reborn.Gun control, explained.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • Tonight, millions of Americans are expected to tune in to watch one of the biggest sports events of the year, college football’s national championship game. On the field, the game will be determined by the skill of the players and coaches, but behind the scenes, secretive groups of donors are wielding enormous influence over what fans will see.

    David A. Fahrenthold, an investigative reporter for The Times, discusses the shadowy industry upending college football, and how it has brought amateur athletics even closer to the world of professional sports.

    Guest: David A. Fahrenthold, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    The best teams that money could buy.A shift that allows booster groups to employ student athletes has upended the economics of college football and other sports while giving many donors a tax break.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • Fifty years ago, eight Americans set off for South America to climb Aconcagua, one of the world’s mightiest mountains. Things quickly went wrong. Two climbers died. Their bodies were left behind.

    Here is what was certain: A woman from Denver, maybe the most accomplished climber in the group, had last been seen alive on the glacier. A man from Texas, part of the recent Apollo missions to the moon, lay frozen nearby.

    There were contradictory statements from survivors and a hasty departure. There was a judge who demanded an investigation into possible foul play. There were three years of summit-scratching searches to find and retrieve the bodies.

    Now, decades later, a camera belonging to one of the deceased climbers has emerged from a receding glacier near the summit and one of mountaineering’s most enduring mysteries has been given air and light.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

  • In a landmark ruling last summer, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned nearly 50 years of precedent and banned the use of affirmative action in college admissions.

    The decision eliminated the most powerful tool for ensuring diversity on America’s college campuses and forced college admission officers and high school seniors to figure out what the college admissions process should look like when race cannot be taken into account.

    Jessica Cheung, a producer on “The Daily,” explains how, over the past year, both students and college officials have tried to navigate the new rules.

    Guest: Jessica Cheung, a producer on “The Daily” for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    The first high-school seniors to apply to college since the Supreme Court’s landmark decision have had to sort through a morass of conflicting guidance.From June: The Supreme Court rejected affirmative action programs at Harvard and U.N.C.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • A puzzling new pattern has taken hold on American roads: pedestrian traffic deaths, which had been on the decline for years, have skyrocketed.

    Emily Badger, who covers cities and urban policy for The Upshot at The New York Times, discusses her investigation into what lies behind the phenomenon.

    Guest: Emily Badger, who covers cities and urban policy for The Upshot at The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    Why are so many U.S. pedestrians dying at night?The exceptionally American problem of rising roadway deaths.More theories on the rising pedestrian deaths at night.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

  • Yesterday, we went inside Donald Trump’s campaign for president, to understand how he’s trying to turn a mountain of legal trouble into a political advantage. Today, we turn to the re-election campaign of President Biden.

    Reid Epstein, who covers politics for The Times, explains why what looks like a record of accomplishment on paper, is turning out to be so difficult to campaign on.

    Guest: Reid J. Epstein, a politics correspondent for The New York Times.

    Background reading:

    In South Carolina, Democrats see a test of Biden’s appeal to Black voters.Political Memo: Should Biden really run again? He prolongs an awkward conversation.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.