Episodes

  • We are back with another solo episode on the podcast. Today, Corinne is diving into the (sometimes thorny) topic of motherhood. This time, the context is in agriculture.

    This isn’t about advice, and it’s not a how-to. This is simply a personal reflection on how Corinne wound up raising babies at Late Bloomer Ranch, and her general philosophy around parenting.

    In this episode, Corinne dives into:

    A holistic approach to parenting, and life The interconnectedness of ranching and motherhoodHer personal resistance to getting married, and having childrenHer background and early preference for urban lifeHow farming came into her life by accidentThe Late Bloomer Ranch Story with Corinne and Elliana The ways that farming healed her, and her life in recovery When things started to shift, and how she knew she actually did want to have children The similarities of motherhood and farmingHow Corinne thinks about the core principles of holism in parenting Accepting all feelings with boundaries and limitsDealing with overwhelmAsking for helpJoys of children connecting with the more-than-human worldBringing children into all aspects of the birth-death cycle Lastly, tips for selecting livestock for your own small acreage and homestead endeavors.

    This episode was brought to you by Late Bloomer Ranch. Be sure to check our farm-raised yarn, flower essences, and BloomBoxes available to ship in the continental USA.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Dani Beinstein is back on the podcast today, gracing us with her ever-growing wisdom and grace. The topic du jour is change, from the inside out, and adapting to life as it is showing up right now.

    In some ways, change is inevitable— “the only constant is change”, as the cliche goes. Yet, on the other hand, letting go of challenging behaviors and patterns can be incredibly difficult and sometimes completely impossible. Where do these truths meet?

    If you’ve ever woken up and looked in the mirror and felt tired of your own self-deceptions, this episode is for you. It’s not a discussion about how to improve productivity or how to break old habits— this is a soul-deep discussion of who we really are at our core, and how we can come into deeper communion with that truth.


    Corinne and Danielle discuss:

    Danielle’s near death experience, and how it shifted her orientation from being “ethereal, to rooted” How relationship has also changed her perspective on the world, and the natural world The role of the body in change, and how cultural conditioning has alienated the body Danielle’s belief that we get the lessons we need, in whatever form they will be most effective Soul contracts, and how to explore them Resisting the urge to reach for certainty, and to rush through life How we are all “renting”, at the end of the dayDanielle’s love for her dogs, and how they open up the exploration of loving with the awareness that this too shall pass The role of resourcing ourselves to be steady through massive upheaval The power of ritual to initiate, or guide us through, radical change Danielle’s role in interpreting charts to see where the soul contracts and karmic patterns live Outer planets— Saturn, Neptune, Uranus, Pluto— and what they might mean in an astrological chartLooking at the role of the massive, tectonic, technological shifts in our society today Danielle’s experience coming of age in the time of the creation of the modern internet The Alphabet Versus the Goddess by Leonard ShlainRasputin by Douglas SmithHow we’ve lost interest in what is trueUsing technology with intention

    Interested in connecting with Danielle? Find her online www.daniellebeinstein.com and on instagram @danibeinstein. She is available for one-on-one astrological counseling sessions and new moon circles in Nashville and on Zoom.

    This episode was brought to you by Late Bloomer Ranch. Be sure to check our farm-raised yarn, flower essences, and BloomBoxes available to ship in the continental USA.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

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  • Dani Beinstein is back on the podcast today, gracing us with her ever-growing wisdom and grace. The topic du jour is change, from the inside out, and adapting to life as it is showing up right now.

    In some ways, change is inevitable— “the only constant is change”, as the cliche goes. Yet, on the other hand, letting go of challenging behaviors and patterns can be incredibly difficult and sometimes completely impossible. Where do these truths meet?

    If you’ve ever woken up and looked in the mirror and felt tired of your own self-deceptions, this episode is for you. It’s not a discussion about how to improve productivity or how to break old habits— this is a soul-deep discussion of who we really are at our core, and how we can come into deeper communion with that truth.

    Corinne and Danielle discuss:

    Fundamental change requires we take stock of our present reality, no matter how painfulHow life’s events can catalyze big changesGrief and how powerful it can be in facilitating massive shiftsRites of passageConducting a personal inventory Temporary and topical change The idea of “pulling a geographic” Humility and asking for help during tumultuous times The power of bearing witness, and being witnessedHow critically important relationships are in our own growth and evolutionThe Story of Us The Phantom TollboothIsis by Bob DylanThe key differences between changes we initiate versus changes that are forced upon us Dani’s experience getting in touch with her own reactivity, and leaving the self-policing behind The messy nature of entanglement, and accepting our deeper humanity The critical role humor plays in our own personal evolution For more on Dani’s near death experience, the nature of soul contracts, and more— check out part 2 of this episode.

    Interested in connecting with Danielle? Find her online www.daniellebeinstein.com and on instagram @danibeinstein. She is available for one-on-one astrological counseling sessions and new moon circles in Nashville and on Zoom.

    This episode was brought to you by Late Bloomer Ranch. Be sure to check our farm-raised yarn, flower essences, and BloomBoxes available to ship in the continental USA.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Today’s guest is Lauren Palmer of Bloomsbury Farm in Smyrna, Tennessee. Bloomsbury Farm is a diversified organic farm, with a host of vegetables, fruits, flowers, events, and even a small school onsite. It’s a cornucopia in a beautiful and romantic area of the country, less than an hour outside of Nashville.

    On today’s show, Lauren walks Corinne through the evolution of her farm business, how she has grown as a farmer and entrepreneur, and all the things that keep her excited for new growth. Lauren shares the importance of leaning on her amazing team, the important role of her family members in building out her bigger vision, what she loves most about her multi-faceted farm business, and so much more. It’s a great conversation for anyone who is looking to diversify their farm, or is interested in small-scale farming in general!

    Corinne and Lauren discuss:

    Lauren’s family farming background“In the worst-case scenario, we are all gonna eat” The evolution of Bloomsbury Farm in collaboration with chefs and farmers’ market customers Why Lauren likes to leave all the proverbial doors open, and keep things fresh and moving on her farm The importance of trusting amazing staff Employee appreciation and the “Bloomsbury Hug” The changes at Bloomsbury farm over the years, and how that brought everyone closer togetherThe challenges of growing sprouts, and the growth that came from overcoming the challengeLauren’s experience of her own creativity in her marketing and displaysBloombury Events and how that came into creationWhen selling kale at $4/bunch isn’t cutting itHow Lauren has balanced risks and rewards with agritourism at Bloomsbury FarmThe challenges in farming that have made Lauren a better business owner, mother, friend, etc. Why Lauren decided to add Bloomsbury School The evolution from summer camp to schoolLauren’s role in learning the new curriculum and stewarding the school project The ways that Lauren’s family share their skills and perspectives to help her develop new projects and programs How Lauren crowdsources ideas and filters them through her own intuition The ways Lauren unwinds to stay fresh and inspired on her farm Lauren’s hopes and dreams of creating a cookbook, or coffee table book in the future


    Find Lauren and Bloomsbury Farm online and on instagram!

    This episode was brought to you by Late Bloomer Ranch. Be sure to check our farm-raised yarn, flower essences, and BloomBoxes available to ship in the continental USA.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Do you just love local flowers? Are you a designer or grower yourself? This episode is for you.

    Ellen Frost is a floral designer, and owner of Local Color Flowers in Baltimore, Maryland. Over the past 16 years, Ellen built a business from a passion for flowers and a connection to local farms in her area. Through several key changes and evolutions, Ellen has taken her original concept of arranging local, wedding florals for friends into a multi-faceted business with both brick-and-mortal and online offerings.

    Through the story of the growth of her business, Ellen also illuminates how she built up personal confidence in her craft, resisted the endless push to scale her business, developed her own supply chains, and found her voice as an educator. It was such an illuminating episode for us, and we know you will learn so much from Ellen, too.

    Corinne and Ellen discuss:

    Why Ellen was initially attracted to working with local flowers Ellen’s journey from working with affordable housing development to a custom flower shop focusing on local productionEllen’s intention to make local flowers available for any wedding at any budget The differences in flower quality and pricing with local versus commercial flowers How Ellen spends just as much time educating clients, as she does designing Factoring employee wages, land access, and environmental inputs create higher pricing in flower marketsEllen’s practice for choosing clients, and helping them understand her businessGrowing into confidence in her craft, and learning to say “no” to opportunities that are not the right fitHow Ellen navigates the potential pitfalls of working with smaller, local producersEllen’s journey building relationships with farmers in the mid-Atlantic Building a supply chain from zeroWhy seeing the long-game is essential Ellen’s experience as an entrepreneur learning the floral businessGetting out of the growth-at-all-costs mindset, and Ellen discovering her sweet-spot in terms of scaleThe way Ellen has added more educational opportunities in her business, and how that has accommodated her changing vision and needsThe excitement Ellen sees burgeoning around local flowersThe three flowers Ellen *always* purchases locally Ellen’s free weekly newsletter— you want to subscribe!

    If you want to connect with Ellen Frost (and trust us, you do), there are a few places to find her online: Local Color Flowers, Ellen Frost’s personal site, and instagram.

    Find her newsletter here

    This episode was brought to you by Late Bloomer Ranch. Be sure to check our farm-raised yarn, flower essences, and BloomBoxes available to ship in the continental USA.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Today we are doing something a little bit different: taking time to reflect on some of the major lessons from a year of podcasting, and interviewing incredible guests.

    Corinne is on the mic today, solo, unpacking the major takeaways from the formative episodes on the podcast. Taking the time to look back and review is a life hack that always leads to big breakthroughs and improvements. Using that same tool to assess the podcast, and field some questions from our regular listeners, is the name of the game today.

    The concept of taking stock of your experience, right nowHow being present with our challenges is not always the same as being challenged in the presentLeaning into the discomfort of a growth edgeMaking decisions from a place of response instead of reactionSeeing the challenges in life as opportunities for wholenessHow the values we have are not always reflected in our actionsPractices for coming into communion with our values, and being more whole-heartedWhy deep, soul-level self-care is importantThe ways that we convince ourselves that our nourishment isn’t important How outsourcing our personal responsibility to care for ourselves can seem easierWhy gadgets and hacks will not replace true self-careThe joy of connecting with your natural environmentStarting with exactly where you are, physicallyHow the place where we live can often mirror the same principles we work through on daily basis The birth > growth > death cycle on a macro and micro scale Podcast guest feedbackUpdates on the Late Bloomer Ranch farm incubatorHow Late Bloomer Ranch approaches crop planningAdvice for those new to crop planning, a loose frameworkHow and why children are important on the farm Here’s to another great year!


    This episode was brought to you by Late Bloomer Ranch. Be sure to check our farm-raised yarn, flower essences, and BloomBoxes available to ship in the continental USA.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • For some, in the digital age, life feels faraway and disconnected. As if each and every part of life comes from a separate factory, Amazon’ed right to our front doors. Today’s guest, Grace Gurganus, wanted to connect the dots and have a more immediate connection with her lived experience. She set out to make an impact in her local food system in southern Oregon, and experienced a radical change in lifestyle and career.

    Grace is a mobile butcher, meaning she earns her keep traveling from farm to farm and slaughtering animals onsite. It wasn’t the life she expected to have, but the life she found from following her heart and trusting the process along the way. On today’s episode, Corinne and Grace not only discuss the story of how Grace wound up on the “kill truck”, but also how her work experience has shaped her life and healed some deep wounds. It’s a powerful conversation for anyone interested in getting to the heart of the matter— the line between life and death, and how by doing challenging things, life becomes easier.

    Corinne and Grace talk about:

    Grace’s circuitous journey to become a mobile butcher How Grace’s vision transitioned from a future of being the butcher cutting meat, to the butcher performing on-farm slaughterThe power of Grace showing up, and being willing to learnGrace’s first day on the “kill truck”Grace’s relationship to her empathy, in context with her workSlowdown FarmsteadStart a Farm Where flowery language meets the lived experience “There’s no practice cow”Why Grace is always going to be the person who slaughters her own livestockWhat is lost when we prioritize efficiency over everything else in animal agricultureHow Grace embraces the varying shades of morality in her workThe reason doing hard things made Grace’s life so much easier The ways butchering brings Grace home to herselfGrace’s journey with her mother’s cancer diagnosis, and eventual deathWalking through the fears around losing loved ones, and learning to let goThe way Grace feels her mother’s essence in her everyday lifeThe power of beginning change right in your own community


    Connect with Grace on instagram @gracieg_goodkarmafarm

    This episode was brought to you by Late Bloomer Ranch. Be sure to check our farm-raised yarn, flower essences, and BloomBoxes available to ship in the continental USA.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Creating something beautiful requires talent, humility, and grit. In our digital world, we often want to gloss over the less glamorous parts of the process, and focus exclusively on the end-product, the perfected image of a job well done. But, underneath any craft or creation is a story of a maker, and how they developed their unique gifts.

    Christy Sing Robertson, today’s guest, wasn’t always a hatter. In fact, the decision to create custom hats came later in life by way of an intuitive pull. Since starting on her journey, Christy has created not only a custom hat company focused on premium-quality bespoke hats, but also a new way of life and flow for herself and her family.

    On today’s episode, Christy generously walks us through her journey in finding her creative passion, her commitment to timelessness and quality, how she overcame adrenal burnout, and all the ways that connecting with her boundaries and non-negotiable needs have driven her to grow personally and professionally.

    Christy and Corinne discuss:

    What’s the ethos of Sing Hat CompanyChristy’s intuitive nudge to take a hat making apprenticeship How Christy chose to trust her process in making a big pivot and developing her craft The humility to learn something new, and put the time in to learn The way Christy imprints her personal style and interest in timelessness in her hatsHow COVID changed the trajectory of Sing Hat Company for the better Why making a hat the slow way is better The ways obstacles in business can be gateways to creating better outcomesChristy’s journey learning to appreciate imperfections, and creating balance in her life Boundaries in business and why they matterHow Christy has learned to care for herself on a deeper level, so she can better care for her family Christy’s choice to have her business revolve around her family life, and not the other way aroundThe ways mothering and motherhood can reflect internal healing and personal growth They ways Sing Hat Company has taught Christy how to motherChristy’s experience with adrenal burnout Where Christy finds her inner creativityChop Wood, Carry Water by Rick FieldsThe War of Art by Stephen PressfieldThe systems Christy uses to make her creativity flow betterEpisode with Meghan Wallace JamesChristy’s flow working independently and also connecting with other makersFind Christy at the Old Salt Festival!

    Connect with Christy online at SingHatCo.com!

    This episode was brought to you by Late Bloomer Ranch. Be sure to check our farm-raised yarn, flower essences, and BloomBoxes available to ship in the continental USA.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • What does it mean to feel fulfilled, feel secure? Today’s guest, Sena Maria, has a few ideas to get you started on your path of low-anxiety living and radical nourishment. It all starts with real, whole, animal-based foods.

    Sena Maria is a mineral nutritional balancing practitioner, and she’s going to walk you through why animal foods matter, how to learn to trust your body’s cravings again, and become more resilient and healthy overall. Instead of overly-complicated instructions with ingredients from far-off places, Sena encourages her clients to look towards foods that excite them, and to plug in ingredients from responsible small-farms raising animals the right way. The results are nothing short of radical, and today’s episode is definitely worth a listen if you find yourself feeling run-down, under-fed, or restricted by food.

    Sena and Corinne discuss:

    Why we need to focus on nutrient density instead of calorie density in foodWhy meat is important, and the magic of minerals How plant-only diets are deficient Sena’s view on supplementation and whole-food dietsMother nature’s mineral rations in foods, and how minerals are balancedExploring animal foods beyond meat Utilizing traditional cooking methods The real problem with the Standard American Diet How Sena focuses on food that is exciting and palatable for her clientsThe beauty of bone broth The deeper sense of stability and fulfillment that comes as side effect of becoming deeply nourished Psychological symptoms of mineral deficiencySena’s metaphor of a “mineral bank account” and how we borrow from the future to pay for the present Stress as the number 1 offender in mineral depletionWhy our systems in the modern day are so much more sensitive than they used to be in the past How Sena looks at basic metabolic factors of healthUsing our experience in the present to “know” if we are healthy Viewing sugar cravings a sign that the body needs energyFeeling empowered to eat what our bodies crave The relationship between “boss babe” culture and the prevalence of fertility-related health issues Societal judgements around inherently feminine traitsBuilding community around motherhood and creating new paradigms for business and parenting

    Find her on instagram @sena__maria, or sena-maria.com, and join her amazing group program!

    This episode was brought to you by Late Bloomer Ranch. Be sure to check our farm-raised yarn, flower essences, and BloomBoxes available to ship in the continental USA.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • If you’ve ever wondered about natural fibers, you are going to love this episode. And I’m not just saying that because today’s guest is my sister, Claire McAndrews Oliver. Claire is a Product Line Manager at Patagonia, and has spent her career working in apparel and understanding the process of imagining a garment and bringing it to life.

    Claire and I delve into the world of fiber and apparel, and attempt to shine a light on how the industry works, and why fiber matters. In today’s world, the process of creating a garment is complicated, and can cover several continents. If you want to add another layer of intentionality to your life, maybe start with your closet.

    Claire guides me through the following:

    What are natural fibers? The history and process of synthetic fibers How technical performance changes the fiber landscapeLate Bloomer Ranch yarnHow wool is keratin-based, just like human hairThe performance attributes of natural versus synthetic fibers Why body odor can be impacted by synthetic fibers The sheer number of distinct chemicals required to create polyester How to read your clothing material labelThe difference between manufactured cellulose and natural cellulose fibers Implications beyond chemicals in fiber processing and production PFAS in clothing productionIssues and constrains in regulating the apparel industry Why slow-fashion is more expensiveMaking consumer choices based on values and first-principles How the downfall of American manufacturing plays into the revival of ethical apparel Opening our eyes to the truth of the manufacturing industryHow the apparel industry can be a black box How Claire celebrates regional and ancestral knowledge in the production of natural fibers FibershedWhy Claire likes to shop small brands, for the artistry and commitment to the craftThe connection between agriculture and textilesHow Claire crafts her closet Why more people need to pick up the craft of tailoringEmbracing limitations as inspiration How Claire brings the fun, the art, and creative ways of being back into clothing

    Connect with Claire: On instagram @good_chit

    This episode is brought to you by Late Bloomer Ranch, a holistic ranch in the Teton Valley raising meat, eggs, wool, and cut-flowers of the utmost quality with integrity to match. Late Bloomer Ranch has Bloom Boxes for sale— the choicest cuts of meat packaged to ship throughout the lower 48 states. Check out Bloom Boxes, Flower Essences, Yarn & more at latebloomerranch.com

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Welcome to 2024! For us, this year has gotten off to a hot start with lots of exciting changes and updates at the ranch. According to today’s guest, Remington Donovan, that’s all par for the course for an 8 year— when your energy is focused in the right direction.

    Remington is a spiritual teacher, author, numerologist, astrologer, tarot reader, podcaster and so much more. He is insightful, outspoken, and full of wisdom from across the ages. On today’s episode, Remington guides us through some powerful teachings for the year ahead, and to bring more prosperity and purpose into your life.

    If you are interested in the esoteric, are looking for a boost in moral, or some fresh energy to restart your life’s mission— this is going to be a great episode.

    Corinne and Remington dive into:

    The significance of eating locally in the Magical Tradition The Western Mystery Tradition holds that eating locally helps align more and more with How doing the “inner work” and the “outer work” together creates harmony The significance of the 8 yearThe lesson of consolidating your energyScattered energy as a form of possession Developing a practice of rooting into your own energy Using tarot as a way to understand your soul’s teachings, without getting lost in the clouds Moving out of the old paradigm of surrender, into a paradigm of “doing it all” in the worldWhy when you align with your higher purpose, the rest starts showing up Remington’s practice of “Start Where You’re At” Remington’s path to becoming a spiritual teacher Dealing with cultural entitlement The role of mentorship and teachers in Remington’s evolution The role of Saturn in building discipline to get resultsWhy we are seeing more opportunity now, but still needing to do the work Living in devotion to your own life Remington’s book Prosperity Practices, and why consumerism has nothing to do with prosperity The philosophy of “it’s your incarnation, it’s up to you” The power of doing something charitable right in your community

    If you want to dive deeper into Remington’s work, take one of his workshops, or sign up for his patreon— you can find him here: themysticalarts

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • The foundation of every farm and garden begins with a seed. On this week’s episode, we dive into the world of seed production, why it matters, and how you can be more informed about purchasing seed and producing your own.

    Don Tipping is a farmer, permaculturalist, seedsman, and owner of Siskiyou Seeds, in the Siskiyou mountains of southwest Oregon. As stated on their website, “Siskiyou Seeds is dedicated to providing growers of all scales with organic, open-pollinated seeds of exceptional vigor, quality, and integrity. We are unique in the seed world in that we actually grow most of the seed that we sell here at our home farm.”

    Today, Don walks us through why it matters that Siskiyou Seeds actually *grows* their own seeds at their home farm, or by partnering with nearby farms, and how bio-regionally adapted seeds are the gateway to the heirlooms of tomorrow.

    Corinne and Don discuss—

    Origin story of Siskiyou SeedsThe work of adapting seed “with your hands on the dial” How the industry at large moved away from open-pollinated seed selection, to exclusively hybrids How to make open-pollinated seeds even better than hybrids using classical seed selection techniquesHow large scale commercial seed production is geared to a very specific market based on economies of scale Wild Garden SeedHow John Navazio shaped Don’s education of learning how to breed for disease resistance, nutrition etcGregor Mendel and the birth of geneticsThe overlapping of art and farming in seed production and flower farming Why bioregional adaptation matters for producing the seed crops of tomorrowHow to separate the wheat from the chaff in open-pollinated seed productionTurtle Tree SeedsAdding a face to a seed packet Creating a “Terroir” seed collectionRowen White of Sierra SeedsDon Tipping’s Seed Academy Nikolai Vavilov Kristyn Leach of Namu Farm and Second Generation SeedsThe journey of the cucurbita maxima to the United StatesUsing genomics to unpack the “real” story of seedsHow the home gardener can look at seed saving The importance of curiosity The need to backstop, or guarantee, bioregional seed companies

    Find Don and his products at siskiyouseeds.com, as well as on Instagram @siskiyouseeds

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Mark Kimball farms at Essex Farm in Essex, New York with his wife, Kristin, and their children and farm employees. Essex Farm is a “free choice, whole-diet, year-round CSA” in upstate New York, and, as you’ll learn on this episode, so much more.

    Mark is a thinker, and someone who is unafraid to take an unpopular opinion. He muses on difficult topics related to the “regenerative” movement, and asks questions that we are still pondering— even weeks after recording this podcast. Mark’s perspective correlates with so much of what we aspire to at Late Bloomer Ranch, and taps into the essence of what it means to farm and attempt to steward a brighter future.

    Dip into the root of it all, and reconnect with the essential elements of tending land with Mark Kimball.

    Corinne and Mark discuss:

    How he got started farming Why farming is everything mining isn’t Farming as an art form Why Mark is triggered by the word "regenerative"Mark's experience of removing industrial farming techniques to improve food quality The importance of trying to persevere in the face of failure Shah of Shahs by Ryszard KapuscinskiPig Earth by John BergerHow independent communities are anathema to a global politic Mark's experience trying to live up to his own land ethic The idea that to farm better, we need to be healthier How reaching out to others in a real and meaningful way may be the most important health habit of all Mark’s practice of saying "good morning”, and, greeting all the complexities that we are facing The power of the question: “Am I open to a childlike state of mind in my life?” Exploring a life of depth versus breadth His wife, Kristin Kimball’s amazing books And so much more.

    To find out more about Mark and his farm, visit essexfarmcsa.com
    You can also connect with him on instagram @farmerkimball

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Horses are powerful, dignified creatures. Strong in their softness, and remarkably willing companions for all the adventures (and misadventures) of their human riders. For people who love horses, there is no replacement for their presence and healing, and the richness of the dynamic relationship of horse and rider.

    On today’s episode of The Soft Focus, Corinne discusses the power of horses for healing with Emily Anderson of Embodying Wild. Emily describes herself and her work as an “ever-evolving wild-woman with a gift for reconnecting people with the source of their power. She is an intuitive healer, a spiritual guide and the founder of Embodying Wild, a healing space that supports individuals through online coaching, group retreats, and heart-centered partnership with horses.”

    In this discussion, Emily walks Corinne through the principles behind her work, and how she practices somatic techniques with clients, as well as in her own life. Emily graciously shares her own connection to the working ranch in Montana she calls home, how horses bring her back to her true nature in the present moment, and how her practices open her heart to a fuller experience of living.

    Emily and Corinne discuss:

    Horses as conduits for healing, and mirrors for the present moment The parallels between equine energy and feminine energy The trauma in the collective of the horse around autonomy, freedom, wildness, and connection to the bodyThe magic of simply *being* with horses, as opposed to operating from an agenda Implementing the intention of reciprocity The power of investigating “why?”Cultural yin/yang imbalances Building yin energy in women as a remedy for the epidemic of burnout Nurturing the somatic landscape with horses Children’s connection to wonderment and how that can be transformational Sabine Birmann’s philosophy of Being with Horses Emily’s approach of partnering with energy instead of attempting to tame it or contain itThe practice of dropping the agenda and attachment to outcomes so that a real conversation and experience can emerge Emily’s relationship with grief as a teacher, and how she honors it Emily’s visceral connection to death in her life on a working ranch Accepting the full spectrum of feeling as the gateway to somatic work The importance of ritual to connect us to the meaning of the passage of time. The beauty in solemnity Emily’s experience connecting back to her lineage as a healer How to connect with Emily’s offerings

    You can find Emily online on her website embodyingwild.com and @embodying_wild.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Are you someone who finds confidence and purpose in learning new things? Do you enjoy feeling personally empowered in your home and garden? Are you always looking to have more control over the supply chains impacting your daily life? If so, this episode is for you.

    Arielle Crawford spent the beginning of her professional life as a sustainable fashion designer in New York City. Committed to wearing exclusively natural fibers, she wanted to expand that discipline into other areas of her life. After COVID, she knew it was time to take her skillset and burgeoning confidence to a homestead in rural Texas, and learn how to live off the land.

    Today, Arielle walks Corinne through her journey learning about natural building methods and materials. They discuss diving into new projects before being “ready”, gaining confidence from learning new skills, the authenticity of living your life one day at a time, and how pregnancy is a superpower. Arielle is warm and generous with her information and experiences— we know this episode will inspire you to get out there and build something new!

    Corinne and Arielle discuss:

    How Arielle chose to leave fashion and New York City, to move to a career in natural building in rural Texas Arielle’s principle of “scaling out your values” The importance of learning new skillsHer transition from Brooklyn to central TexasHow skills from the fashion industry prepared her for the transition to off-grid livingThe special qualities of cob building The Hand Sculpted HouseMagical lime plastering The personal empowerment from natural building methods MOLD and what exacerbates it How traditional paint is similar to wearing polyester Arielle’s journey to living plastic-freeGetting to know a bag of flour Arielle’s mantra of “Convenience is not my King”Basic life skills as a balm for anxiety, depression, imposter syndromeThe stoic idea that your day is your lifeArielle’s experience of being pregnant as a superpower Living life in a pregnancy biorhythm Infusing leadership with femininity

    Find Arielle’s non-profit on instagram @therealnesspreserve, as well as her natural building company @texas_cob. Stay tuned for all their offerings in spring of 2024, teaching others about natural building and homesteading skills.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Leif Routman joins us today to discuss all things food. Leif is a musician, forager, and local food advocate. By day he dips his toes into part-time farming and a little cooking, and by night he makes his living on stage as a bandleader, performer, and composer.

    Corinne and Leif discuss the richness of a deep food culture, both in the production and the consumption. Also, Leif’s childhood in the upper-midwest, to his journey to the intermountain west, and the changing landscape in-between. He shares stories around his own journey to local food, foraging, and food advocacy— searching for flavor and quality, and ultimately finding so much more.

    This conversation was warm, engaging, and of-the-moment. We know you'll enjoy it.

    Covered today:

    Leif’s food background and upbringing The sacredness of family dinner Analogs between music and foodRitualizing food traditions to connect with family and loved onesThe gradual process of connecting to a local food system through friends and community Leif’s college experiences cooking and pursuing quality & flavor The freedom and broadening in a “narrowing” How Leif developed his land ethic The interplay between resilient health and interaction with wild landscapes Building up cultural traditions and rituals in the modern age to be better stewards of the landscape Celebrating seasons, change, impermanence The powerful, yet fragile, nature of the Teton Wilderness Leif’s shift-of-consciousness from his experiences foraging and engaging with the wild For the love of huckleberries, currants, and mushrooms “The Unprejudiced Palate” by Pellegrini“The Third Plate” by Barber

    If you want to connect with Leif, you can find him and his musical exploits on IG @leifroutman. Be sure to check out his exploits in local sourdough baking and cooking with local foods.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Danielle Beinstein is back on the podcast today, with her signature wisdom and insight. Corinne and Danielle converse about living life in the present, and from the heart, in an increasingly digital society.

    Danielle shares her lived experience of coming home to herself, and peeling back layers of conditioning and coping mechanisms to reveal her deepest core. It’s a real and enriching conversation for anyone looking to have deeper authenticity in their lives.

    Corinne and Danielle discuss:

    staying in questions rather than answers how Danielle anchors in the questions changes in perspective with rapid technological progressthe idea of the 4th waythe toddler way of being living in "constructs upon constructs"Danielle mourning for cities the digital experience versus the lived experience the pressure to evolve out of our humanness the concept of seeking salvation the energetics of fall & winterDanielle's practice of ritualizing the third placechanging relationship to travel vs rooting thick travel vs thin travel a la Chris Arnade Danielle's journey leaving los angeles where Danielle finds her core self Fatal Conveniences by Darin Olien learning to listen to the inner soul calling Danielle's containers and how to work with her


    Thank you so much for listening to The Soft Focus podcast. As a small business, everyone at TSF and Late Bloomer Ranch sincerely appreciates your support. Don’t hesitate to reach out and let us know what you think of the episode, who else you would like to hear from, and how this podcast finds you.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Charlie Southward, the founder of IGH Gardens, is a gardening genius. He grows lush and abundant produce on his half-acre farm in Long Beach, California, year-round, to donate to shelters in the region. In addition to his generosity with the food he grows, Charlie also teaches volunteers how to garden and grow food in their own backyards.

    On today’s episode, Charlie shares his inspiring life story, his spiritual experiences as a farmer and gardener, and how he started IGH Gardens.

    Corinne and Charlie cover:

    How Charlie learned his craftCharlie’s childhood with cooking and gardeningHow Charlie continued to grow food throughout his lifeCharlie’s sense of serenity in gardening, and how it anchors his lifeTiming, patience, and trusting oneselfHow Charlie came to giving away his produceWhat IGH gardens is up to todayCharlie’s work as a back-stage caterer, and how that shaped his character through adversity How to get involved with IGH Gardens today

    As mentioned, Charlie loves to connect with volunteers and share his skills. He also needs your help, and your skills! If you’d like to get involved with IGH Gardens, here is where you can find him:

    https://ighgardens.orginstagram: @ighgardensand via email, [email protected]

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • We’re back with another conversation between Corinne and Elliana Araujo to break down the nuts and bolts of the meat we produce at Late Bloomer Ranch. This episode is a compilation of questions we get frequently— wether it’s at the farmer’s market, our email inbox, or over social media. If you’ve ever wondered exactly how our meat is raised, this episode is for you.

    Today’s conversation is centered around rotational grazing, heritage breeds, supplemental grains and other feedstuffs, and the delicious and nourishing products that come from animals raised this way.

    Corinne and Elliana discuss:

    What it means to have “pasture-raised” pork at Late Bloomer RanchA brief description of the Late Bloomer Ranch grazing system The additional feed that LBR livestock consume, besides the organic pasturesWhich core heritage breeds make up the livestock at the ranchThe reasons for raising animals this way Health benefits of well-managed livestockThe best Late Bloomer Ranch cuts, and how Corinne and Elliana love to cook themThe significance of eating meat, and reverence for all life And more!

    You can find all of the Late Bloomer Ranch products, newsletter, podcast and blog at latebloomerranch.com Stay tuned for shipping launching August of 2023!

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.

  • Wolves, a controversial topic for many, and one we discuss from a practical angle in today’s episode of The Soft Focus.

    Kurt Holtzen, a Large Carnivore Conflict Mitigation Specialist, joins Corinne on the podcast today to talk about wolves in the west. Kurt’s approach is refreshingly commonsense, informed by years tracking wolves and raising sheep, and devoid of the political spin put on many conversations around large predators in the west, today.

    He explains how to minimize livestock conflicts with wolves, the benefits of having large predators on the landscape, and how wolves may even be tools for land management, instead of problems to be solved.

    Corinne and Kurt discuss—

    Why wolves? The state of wolves in the west todayElk populations in the west, and on working ranchesThe nature and behavior of Grey Wolves Conflicts between commercial sheep producers and wolf bandsKurt’s conflict mitigation strategiesAmerican White DogsLED Dog CollarsFox LightsSquawk BoxesWho can benefit from these tools, and why more people should use themKurt’s approach to viewing wolves as another piece of the wildlife management puzzle

    You can get in touch with Kurt on instagram @wilderness_trails_projects
    He shares great information about his low-tech conflict mitigation tools, tips, and examples out in the field. Definitely worth a follow if you are curious about interfacing with large carnivores.

    Kurt also mentions the Western Landowners Alliance, who you can find here https://westernlandowners.org WLA has good resources for landowner in the west looking to have a better relationship with wolves.

    And as always, we’d love to hear from you. Did you love this episode? Did it make you think? Let us know. Reach out via email [email protected] or on Instagram @latebloomerranch

    Please subscribe, rate and review the show.

    See you next time.