Peter

  • How To Use The Vasper Machine So You Can Experience Optimal Health And Superior Function - I Love Marketing Episode #249

    · 00:47:07 · I Love Marketing with Joe Polish and Dean Jackson

    Show Notes: Joe and Peter show you step-by-step how to use the Vasper machine so you can experience optimal health and superior function Peter explains why he created the Vasper, how it works with other forms of exercise and why the Vasper is different from anything else out there How to compress the benefits of a 2-hour workout into 20 minutes with one of the most powerful and efficient exercise technologies available Peter talks about the type of person that would benefit from using a Vasper and how the Vasper can help maintain balanced hormones Vasper Success Stories: Peter shares some of the best Vasper success stories he has seen and heard

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  • Peter Shankman: Know Yourself To Optimize Your Effectiveness - Episode #291

    · 00:39:18 · The Less Doing Podcast with Ari Meisel: The Best Life Hacks And Productivity Tips For Less Doing, More Living

    There is a bit of debate about whether it was the ancient Egyptians or Greeks who first said, “Know thyself,” but whoever it was, Peter Shankman entirely agrees. Peter says that when you know yourself - including all your personal idiosyncrasies and weaknesses - you are better able to maximize and leverage your strengths and minimize and avoid your weaknesses. This conversation with Peter is all over the board but in a good way. It touches on so many good things we’re not even going to try to summarize it. Just listen. Self-medicating for ADD in a positive way. Peter Shankman’s approach. Peter Shankman is outspoken in his advocacy for those who suffer from ADD. His podcast alone is doing wonders to make much-needed information more well known. But he says he’s not convinced that medication is always the best approach. In this conversation, Peter tells how as a child with ADD he learned to manage his own approach to things to make his ADD serve him rather than the other way around. It’s a great section of the overall conversation that you’ll find intriguing. If you don’t know yourself you’ll constantly be frustrated with yourself. All of us have frustrations about the way we operate in the world, but none of us have to stay in that place. Step number one to addressing the frustration is taking the time and investing the energy to know ourselves. Peter Shankman says it’s no shame to admit where you’re weak or the ways you are downright unloving or unkind. Knowing those things is the first step to learning how to deal with them. Peter has some powerful approaches to avoidance of bad behaviors and the encouragement of good ones that make perfect sense when you hear him explain them. You can have that privilege by listening to this episode of Leverage. If you know yourself, you know what you’re good at and what you suck at. That’s priceless. One of the ways Peter has enabled himself to be so productive is by knowing himself backward and forward. He knows what he’s really good at and maximizes his opportunities to stay within those borders. For the things that still need to be done but that he is terrible at, he surrounds himself with people who can offset those weaknesses by taking on the tasks for him. Those are VAs, personal assistants, and many others. You can hear how Peter came to the conclusion he had to take that approach and how it works for him, on this episode. If you don’t like who you are, move. You are not a tree. As Ari wrapped up this episode he asked his favorite question, 3 tips to be more effective. Peter’s answers didn’t disappoint. He started with one Ari’s wife tells him all the time. “If you don’t like who you are, move. You are not a tree.” Behind the statement is the truth that we all have the power to grow, to become something more than we are at present. It’s that power that enables us to change even the most ingrained aspects of who we are as human beings. Listen in as Ari, Nick, and their guest Peter Shankman discuss how to know yourself to be more effective, on this episode. Outline of This Episode [0:03] Peter’s journey, even before he started HARO and how the service came about. [4:22] How Peter decided to sell the service and how it changed with the sale. [6:29] Nick’s question about Peter’s ADD and why he doesn’t think drugs are always the answer. [13:10] How Peter has learned to manage his time and productivity: know yourself. [20:12] What Peter does to handle new ideas effectively. [25:29] Why skydiving is one of the most peaceful and productive things for Peter. [29:52] The benefits Peter has found from cryotherapy. [33:42] Peter’s nighttime routine. [37:29] Peter’s top 3 pieces of advice to be more effective. Resources Mentioned www.Shankman.com www.Shankminds.com Podcast: Faster Than Normal Peter on Twitter Peter on Facebook HARO - Help a Reporter Out BOOK: Zombie Loyalist BOOK: Deep Work MOVIE: War Games   Find out more about what we’re doing at Leverage at www.getleverage.com and www.leveragepodcasts.com

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  • Jon Reed Interviews Peter Scott on NetWeaver BI

    · 00:27:41 · SAP and Enterprise Trends Podcasts from Jon Reed (@jonerp) of diginomica.com

    In this podcast, Jon talks with Peter Scott of Traxion Consulting and gets his take on why the NetWeaver BI marketplace has picked up so much momentum. Jon asks Peter to explain how NetWeaver BI got so hot and the skills SAP BI professionals need to succeed in the BI field. Peter also shares the keys to staffing SAP BI projects and how SAP end users should approach their BI installs and upgrades. In this twenty-seven minute podcast, Jon and Peter cover a range of NetWeaver BI topics, including: - The role of Traxion consulting in the BI market and their focus on BI knowledge transfer. - The changing terminology of BW and BI and the transition from BW 3.5 to BI 7.0. - Jon asks Peter why the NetWeaver BI market is so hot right now. Peter explains that in a recent survey, 40 percent of all CIOs cited BI projects as their number one priority. Part of the issue is the explosion of data for all SAP customers, and they want to stay on top of this data to improve decision making based on facts. Also, because of Sarbanes-Oxley, companies installed BW and now they are looking for more ways of leveraging the data. - Part of the growth of BI is about the transition between ERP as a transaction-based system and the new role of ERP has a decision-making platform to extend reporting and business intelligence to users and executives. How to pull the ERP data out and use it has become a top corporate priority. - Peter explains the keys to BI training and bringing an internal team up to speed, to leave them in a better position after external consultants have left. Peter talks about the importance of custom SAP training with heavy hands-on involvement, and why it can be so much more effective than a standard "out of the box" training. - Jon asks Peter how SAP teams can overcome user resistance to job changes brought on by BI and how to get them excited about the new technology. Peter talks about the importance of getting management on board to improve buy-in of the system, and to recognize that there will be user resistance if SAP users are not brought into the loop with the changes that are pending. - Jon's theory is that BI is not just for specialists anymore. BI is a skill that all consultants can and should incorporate into their SAP skill set. Peter agrees, and talks about the how all R/3 and ECC consultants can add value to their clients by understanding the NetWeaver stack, and BI specifically, and how the ECC environment connects to the OLAP environment, in SAP Financials and many other areas. And you can also get a great niche in BI by including a functional focus with those skills. - Peter gives his take on the kinds of skills you want to have on a well-rounded BI team. A solid understanding of data modeling and data warehousing is key. ABAP is still important, and ABAP for BI is valuable also for writing user exits and function modules for BI. Even in the age of Web Reporting and the Java stack, ABAP is still relevant. HTML and Javascript are also useful for advanced programming and inserting code into the Web Application Designer. Peter also recommends Visual Composer skills, and Web Dynpro skills, as well as Object-Oriented programming skills. - Peter comments about some of the tools that are emerging in the BI space, including Visual Composer and Web Dynpro, as well as other tools that are extending the out-of-the-box functionality, including customized reports and better presentation options that also increase user buy-in through a better interface. Peter says that with the latest WebDynpro and Visual Composer presentation options, you can almost trick users into not realizing they are using SAP because it's so intuitive. - Jon asks Peter about BI implementation scenarios and common mistakes to avoid. Peter talks about companies spending insufficient time on design, planning, and user buy-in during the initial project stages. Understanding the company's user requirements is important to be able to identify the limitations of the system and plan accordingly. - Peter talks about the real ROI takeaways from a successful NetWeaver BI project. Peter shares the example of a project where they were able to identify 7 million dollars in unbilled revenue as a result of the BI tools. Peter also finds that a good BI project helps an SAP customer develop much clearer benchmarks and metrics for everyone understanding the keys to business success in their industry. - In terms of a real-life example of a KPI, Peter describes previous clients who did not know who their most profitable customers were, and how the BI implementation helped them to identify who those customers were. Or, alternately, a company that figured out that some of their products were too expensive based on the analysis of the raw materials through BI reports. - Jon asks Peter to talk about upgrade lessons to NetWeaver BI 7.0. Peter talks about the importance, once again, of pre-project planning, and what bugs you might run into during the conversion. Internal knowledge, training, and change management all play a role.

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  • Ep226 - Mixed Mental Arts: Peter Schiff: The Cargo Cult of Libertarianism

    · The Bryan Callen Show

    One of the major challenges of our age is that there are a lot of words everyone uses as if we're all talking about the same thing but actually mean entirely different things. Case in point: "capitalism" gets thrown around a lot but it means something totally different to the Chicago School of Economists, Behavioral Economists, the Austrian School of Economics and to Adam Smith. Today, Hunter interviews Peter Schiff one of the most prominent voices in the libertarian movement, a word that has so many different meanings that it's hard to criticize as a whole. We can, however, look at what one man believes in this interview. What and how does Peter Schiff think? Well, I've got to say that I don't think that Peter Schiff's worldview makes much sense either internally, with what we know about human thinking, the historical record or what Adam Smith and America's Founding Fathers taught. In short, I don't think the cargo cult Peter Schiff is proposing will deliver prosperity for humanity. It will, however, deliver prosperity for him. In any evolutionary system, parasitism will emerge as a strategy and the same is true in human societies. You can create a following peddling a plausible-sounding worldview and then extract both money and political power from your followers. Usually, people think of this behavior only in terms of religion but, in fact, you can do it any arena. It applies to self-help. It applies to financial advice. It applies to political promises that gain you power but are so out of touch with reality that they have no chance of delivering your followers prosperity. So, let's look at what I took away from this. Firstly, there's where Peter and I agree. Wall Street has severe problems. It has lost touch with capitalism and confused self-interest with short-term greed that will line the pockets of bankers while destabilizing society as a whole. And I'm quite sure that Peter can help his followers make money by shorting the market. However, in that sense, he is little different from the people he criticizes. He profits while potentially destroying the system that allows him to profit. America's Founding Fathers believed in checks and balances. Nowhere is this laid out more clearly than in Federalist Paper 51 where James Madison writes "Ambition must be made to counteract ambition." The key lies in setting the ambitions of men against each other. You make people compete and check each other's behavior. In the same way, the free market is not about a free for all. As Adam Smith, Capitalism's Founding Father wrote, “People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.” And one of the things that merchants of drugs or ideas like Peter will do if left to their own devices is peddle things that enrich themselves while harming the people to whom they sell. Ambition must be made to counteract ambition. As I mention in this podcast, one of the reasons why the FDA was given increased powers was because of the case of Eben Byers. At the time, one of many patent/quack medicines was Radithor. It was water filled with radium. People drank radioactive water which was marketed as "Perpetual Sunshine." Eben Byers' doctor prescribed it to him (in part because he was getting kickbacks) and Eben Byers ended up becoming riddled with cancer and with holes forming in his skull. He became so radioactive that he had to be buried in a lead-lined coffin. As The Wall Street Journal titled an article about his death ""The Radium Water Worked Fine until His Jaw Came Off." Now, Peter Schiff had never heard of this story. As far as I can tell, he never bothered to try and understand why the FDA or any other government bureaucracy was founded. As I explained to him, I understand that too much government regulation is a problem. That's why I brought Luigi Zingales on to talk about A Capitalism for the People. It's also why I'm such a huge fan of Hernando DeSoto's Other Path. However, I don't know that no government regulation is the answer because that is simply removing the checks and balances. Further on in Federalist 51, James Madison pretty much nails it: "The interest of the man must be connected with the constitutional rights of the place. It may be a reflection on human nature, that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. But what is government itself, but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself. A dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on the government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions." It's hard to top that. Checks and balances and checks on that. So, if Peter Schiff believes the FDA has grown too large and wants to figure out how to check it, then I think that's a great conversation to have. Instead though, when I tried to engage Peter in a conversation about what was the proper role of government–or what was the baby and what was the bathwater–he said, "There is no baby!" He doesn't understand why the FDA was founded and he just wants to throw it all out. How to describe such a man? Well, he's certainly not very wise and if he's not very wise then maybe he's a fool. Structuring a society is a complicated and fascinating challenge. You have to recognize (as the Founding Fathers of both the American representative democracy and capitalism did) that whatever holes you leave someone is going to come in and try and exploit them. There is a hole in American public life that has been counteracted by the failures of the educational system and the media and people will come in and try and exploit the hopes and fears of the general public with plausible-sounding ideologies that potentially destroy the goose that lays the golden eggs: our society. While Peter repeatedly tries to blame America's government for the problems of the American people, in a democracy both power and responsibility ultimately rest with the people. The fault, dear friends, lies not in our Senators, but in ourselves. And there are many holes and problems with Peter's thinking. If he can't even spot the problems in his own thinking what makes him think that he can understand all the intricacies of modern medicine? Arrogance. Peter overestimates his own intelligence. I used to do that too but I've come to realize that I'm not that smart. Modern society is complex and that is fantastic. There are people who sit around all day trying to cure diseases that I haven't even heard of. And there are people whose job is to check the claims of all those people. That's the FDA. Ambition counteracting ambition. It's all very Founding Fathers-y. As someone who has spent the last twelve years doing a pretty deep dive of the neuroscience, psychology, culture, economics and political science, I can tell you that evaluating everyone's claims is a lot of work and I can tell you that there are a lot of people who put themselves forward as authorities on these things who clearly haven't read most of the things they claim to be authorities on. My ambition is to counteract their ambition. I want to lay out the material clearly enough so that you can decide for yourself what to believe. I don't have the time to also go through all the research on what drugs are safe, the science of climate change, vaccinations, nutritional information, what car to buy and on and on. I need to rely on others for that. Some of that will be done by the free market and some of that will be done by the government, but, frankly, I'd rather have it done by both. I'd rather have the ambition of one counteracting the ambition of the other. Removing one source of accountability when you don't even understand why it was put in in the first place is dumb. Can we just say it? Peter's ideas are dumb. They may make him money. They may make you money in the short-term. But if society collapses you're fucked. The end of the world as we know it isn't fun. It's hell on earth. Markets and societies are held together by trust and responsible citizens use their voice to try and create a society with increasing levels of trust. They don't profit by spreading mistrust. There are problems with government and with Wall Street and we should be respectfully challenging the thinking of everyone to try and make those institutions work better. Peter isn't doing that. But he can always change his mind. I hope he will. As of our interview though, I find his thinking to be little different than that of the Wall Street investors he rails against. It's clear on the failings in the thinking of others and very unclear on its own failings and it is an ideology that narrow-mindedly serves his interests at the larger expense of society. Is Peter malicious? I don't think so. He does, however, strike me as oblivious. That can always change. We're all oblivious to many things but there is a chasm of difference between people who mostly seem interested in promoting their own view like Peter and those (like Yascha Mounk in episode 228) who are interested in serving the people by constantly trying to find the flaws in their own thinking. You'll make your own decision. I can just pull back the curtain and help you see what's behind all the jargon and rhetoric. Peter Schiff doesn't think in terms of checks and balances. He thinks in terms of throwing out whatever's in the bath because he thinks there is no baby. In my reading of Adam Smith, Peter Smith is not a capitalist. He doesn't believe in the free market. He believes in anarchy. To which I say: "If m

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  • #025: Peter Diamandis on Why A.I. Will Save the World

    · 00:59:07 · Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

    Named one of Fortune’s “50 greatest leaders of all time,” Peter Diamandis is disrupting education and business through his 19 startups and his role as founder and Executive Chairman of the XPRIZE. Guided by the stories handed down from his father, he used medical school to launch his space exploration program and is now a multiple New York Times bestselling author. Dive in with Peter and Tom as they discuss the importance of cultivating passion, curiosity, and grit in this compelling episode of Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu. “Part of this is putting yourself out there and trying. The ratio of zero to one is infinite.” —Peter Diamandis SHOW NOTES Peter recalls leveraging familial pressure to become a doctor as a stepping stone toward his true desire.  [2:43] Peter talks about cultivating the drive to move in the direction of his passion. [6:01] Peter recalls how his father’s stories shaped his worldview. [10:44] Tom and Peter discuss why telling stories is the best way to encounter a growth mindset. [16:12] Peter reveals the three most important things to nurture in any child. [19:30] Peter spells out the most important elements of thinking like an entrepreneur. [23:57] Peter digs into his fascination with Star Trek and bridging the gap between science fiction and reality. [25:38] Tom and Peter dive deep into his passion surrounding stem cells and human longevity. [33:20] Peter discusses societal changes involving technological unemployment. [43:28] Peter talks about enhancing human intelligence and plugging into meta intelligence. [47:45] Peter explains why he believes we are living inside of a video game simulation. [52:54] Peter defines the impact that he wants to have on the world. [57:18]   MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE BOOKS Bold - http://amzn.to/2lydR4m [2:06] Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think - http://amzn.to/2cj3rSQ [2:07] The Poor Man’s James Bond - http://amzn.to/2qqL4wK [4:35] Fahrenheit 451 - http://amzn.to/2qzYdnd [46:49] Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow - http://amzn.to/2kDyIxH [49:48] Einstein's Intuition: Visualizing Nature in Eleven Dimensions - http://amzn.to/2qqMFTm [55:27]   ORGANIZATIONS Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS)- http://bit.ly/2s8gKaO [6:40] Space Generation Advisory Council - http://bit.ly/2rJZ7Bu [18:34] International Space University - http://bit.ly/2quHXTS [18:36] Blue Origin - http://bit.ly/1bYMzLo [33:44] Space X - http://bit.ly/2quzUGM [34:20] Kernel - http://bit.ly/2s8wYRq [48:34] Neuralink - http://bit.ly/2qqL3Ji [48:36]   COMPETITIONS/EVENTS Dean Kamen FIRST Robotics Competition - http://bit.ly/2oa0eJm [22:33] Tricorder Xprize - http://bit.ly/1oUcDXD [28:08] The Visioneers Summit - http://bit.ly/2dmNhTg [30:00]   PEOPLE Jeff Bezos - http://bit.ly/1IgYsWr [6:50] Gene Roddenberry - http://bit.ly/2qqNQlE [26:27] Elon Musk - http://bit.ly/1tNavZk [34:10] Ray Kurzweil - http://bit.ly/2quOq0X [48:09] Bryan Johnson - http://bit.ly/2qqelYM [48:34] David Foster Wallace: This Is Water- http://bit.ly/2r03vv2 [50:11] Thad Roberts - http://bit.ly/2r0h51B [55:00]   FOLLOW PETER TWITTER: http://bit.ly/2r9XYCO INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/2r7II7c FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/2qnpD3M WEBSITE: http://bit.ly/1KCNX5L   FOLLOW PETER’S ORGANIZATIONS Human Longevity, Inc. - http://bit.ly/2s1KMxR Singularity University - http://bit.ly/2qq7ej2 Planetary Resources - http://bit.ly/2qqk9Bd XPRIZE - http://bit.ly/2qnacbW  

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  • 42: How to Live the Christian Life to the Fullest with Peter Louis

    · 00:33:44 · Are You Real | Finding Your Purpose | Discover Your Talents | Christianity | Christian | Believer | Faith | Christ Follower

    In today’s episode, Jon talks with Peter Louis, a former soccer player, about his story and how he goes about living the gospel day by day. Peter’s life was radically changed after what he describes as a power encounter with God. He shares his story of overcoming an addiction to pornography and how he is helping others find freedom in God’s grace. Peter is the Founder of Braveheart Ministries, whose purpose is to help the church reach its fullest potential in proclaiming the gospel. Peter is full of tips on how to live the Christian life to the fullest.    What you will hear:   Peter’s 2006 power encounter with God How learning more about the power of the Holy Spirit helped Peter escape his addiction The importance of realizing that God is the only thing that can save you How God’s love can change how you live your day to day life Peter’s practical tips on changing your mindset if you are struggling with feeling like God doesn’t love you How changing your focus back on God can change your life Peter’s biggest strengths and weaknesses  Something big God has done in Peter’s life A daily habit that Peter has learned to help him stay focused on God What advice Peter would give his younger self Peter’s parting advice to you   Resources: Back to the Gospel Braveheart Ministries Revive Texas  

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  • 20VC: Benchmark's Peter Fenton on How To Differentiate Between Good & Great VCs, Why Ownership Is A Bigger Determinant Of Returns Than Valuation & What Makes A Truly Exceptional Board Member

    · The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

    Peter Fenton is a General Partner @ Benchmark, one of the world's leading VC funds with a portfolio including the likes of Twitter, Uber, Snapchat, eBay, WeWork, Yelp and many more revolutionary companies of the last decade. Peter himself sits or has sat on the board of Twitter, previous guest Cockroach, Optimizely, New Relic and ZenDesk just to name a few. Prior to Benchmark, Peter was a Managing Partner @ Accel. It is clearly not just me that has a man crush on Peter though as he has been named to Forbes Midas List for many consecutive years with the last list placing Peter as No 3 in the world. In Today’s Episode You Will Learn: 1.) How Peter made his way into the world of VC with Accel and came to be a General Partner @ Benchmark? 2.) How does Peter differentiate between the good and the great VCs? How can VCs use hyper-curiosity and hyper-competitiveness to improve their investing ability? Why does Peter not believe that operational experience is a necessity pre-VC? 3.) How does Peter view the importance of valuation in the investment decision making process? How much of a role does it play for him and what is his psychology around valuation, especially with regards to ownership levels? 4.) Why is Peter amused when he hears other investors say they must 'invest in big markets'? What were his big takeaways from watching the investment and hyper-growth journey of Snapchat? How did that influence his view on markets? 5.) Peter has previously said that he is a 'student of great board members'. What are the commonalities among the truly great board members? How do they engage and interact with the entrepreneur? How do they get the most out of their fellow board members? Items Mentioned In Today’s Show: Peter's Most Recent Investment: Zen.ly As always you can follow Harry, The Twenty Minute VC and Peter on Twitter here! Likewise, you can follow Harry on Snapchat here for mojito madness and all things 20VC. eShares is the No 1 Cap Table Management platform, allowing for equity management, 409A valuations, and liquidity, all in one place. eShares is made for companies of all sizes with over 5,000 trusted customers including the likes of Squarespace, Kickstarter, and DoorDash just to name a few. To try out the must have service of the industry, simply head over to esharesinc.com it is a must. Fond is the employee engagement suite with 3 core products, rewards: a recognition platform for rewarding achievements and milestones, perks: a premium corporate discounts program to show employees you care about them and then finally engagement IQ, a free employee engagement survey that allows you to measure the health of your organization. To check it out head over to fond.co

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  • 11: Peter Zheutlin, Author of Rescue Road: On the Road with Greg Mahle

    · 00:38:47 · Pawprint | animal rescue podcast for dog, cat, and other animal lovers

    We talk to author Peter Zheutlin about his discovery of the complex world of animal rescue through the adoption of his dog Albie. He describes the process of meeting, following, and ultimately writing a book about Greg Mahle and other animal rescue heroes, as well as the ups and downs of a writer's life.   Book Peter Zheutlin's New York Times and Amazon best-seller, Rescue Road: One Man, Thirty Thousand Dogs, and a Million Miles on the Last Hope Highway, records the journey of Greg Mahle, who drives a truck 26 times a year to save thousands of dogs. You also get to know many other heroes - the folks on the front lines of rescue - who visit shelters, search for strays, and sacrifice much of their lives to benefit dogs. People like Keri Bullock Toth, Kelle Davis, and Alicia McCarty, among many others. We featured Greg Mahle in Episode 9. Pawprint's Interview with Greg Mahle   Donate to Rescue Road Trips (Donate here!) Peter Zheutlin's wife, Judy Gelman, set up a YouCaring site for Greg Mahle to get a new truck, and Peter discusses it during the interview. The YouCaring site for Greg has been closed for an excellent reason - it reached its goal!! We shall see Rescue Road Trips deliver dogs to loving homes in a newer and safer vehicle in the very near future. If you want to donate to Rescue Road Trips to pay for diesel, help with truck repairs, and most importantly, help save thousands of dogs, donate here. Resources Peter Zheutlin's website Peter's initial article in Parade Magazine, where he writes about life on the road with Greg Mahle Rescue Road Trips' website Rescue Road Trips' Facebook Page Peter mentioned his fondness for the book Silent Spring by Rachel Carson Peter wrote this book about Annie Londonderry, a women who rode her bicycle around the world in the late 1800's Around The World On Two Wheels: Annie Londonderry's Extraordinary Ride Peter Zheutlin started working for the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War a few months before they were awarded the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize. Parade Magazine's Facebook post that Peter refers to during the interview. The response the post generated gave Peter the idea that Greg Mahle and animal rescue could be good subjects for a book. Music by Luke Gartner-Brereton http://soundcloud.com/luke-gartnerbrereton   Thanks to Peter Zheutlin!   All of Pawprint's music is composed by Luke Gartner-Brereton. Luke is a musician based in Australia, and he composes a wide variety of songs and musical loops http://vanillagroovestudios.com http://soundcloud.com/luke-gartnerbrereton   If you want to learn more about Nancy and Harold, go to our About Us page at thisispawprint.com/about or listen to our introductory podcast episode, "Fifty Puppies and a Podcast." http://thisispawprint.com/000 Pawprint (or Paw Print) is a weekly podcast dedicated to animal rescue, adoption, and the heroes who make it happen. Volunteer, walk, adopt, or foster a dog, cat, rabbit, or other wonderful pet through your local shelter, humane society, SPCA, pound, and animal control. Help increase animal protection, welfare, and rights. http://thisispawprint.com http://animalrescuepodcast.com

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  • DatC #048 - The Cunning Peter Paddon

    · 01:40:13 · Down at the Crossroads - Music. Magick. Paganism.

    Hello and thank you once again for joining me down at the crossroads for some music, magick, and Paganism. Where witches gather for the sabbath, offerings are made, pacts are signed for musical fame and we cross paths with today's most influential Pagans, occultists, and deep thinkers. Tonight, we meet with The Crooked Path walking Cunningman himself Peter Paddon to discuss Traditional Witchcraft. Peter and I had a great conversation about witchcraft and his thoughts on deity, the mysteries, his work, and what he had planned in the future. Peter was very big on utilizing technology in his teaching and in making himself available to the rest of the community. However, the heartbreaking reality of this interview is that Peter passed away quietly in his sleep three days after I spoke with him. His family made an announcement online about his passing and an obituary for him was written by Heather Greene for The Wild Hunt. My heart goes out to him and his family during this time. Though he was in the middle of a short break from his pod/vidcast during the time of his passing we at least have this final interview with him as well as the legacy of his writings and shows to learn from and honor him by. As you will hear in my discussion with him, he was extremely honest and friendly and had a lot of knowledge and experience to share. He touched the lives of many, including myself, with his show and teachings and he will sorely be missed. Farewell Peter.     The music featured in this episode. "Walpurgisnacht" by Faun "Salad of Doom" by S.J. Tucker "Fehu" by Wardruna "No Harm" by Tara Rice "The Winnowing" by Swallows "Call Me Satan" by Omnia "Fire in the Head" by Sharon Knight "Imramma (A Soul Journey)" by Damh the Bard Other links related to the episode. Peter Paddon Memorial Fund Peter Paddon, Author and Witch Pendraig Publishing Peter's books and items on Amazon.com The Crooked Path Podcast Peter's YouTube Channel The Witch Lord a sculpture by Chris Orapello The Witch Queen a sculpture by Chris Orapello  

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  • SaaStr 108: Growing To $500m In ARR & How To Hit 7 Figure Sales with Veeva Systems Founder, Peter Gassner

    · 00:22:43 · The Official Saastr Podcast: SaaS | Founders | Investors

    Peter Gassner is the Founder & CEO @ Veeva Systems, the industry cloud for life science systems. With just $4m in capital raised, Peter has taken Veeva to almost $500m in ARR and a prominent force in the rising tide of enterprise SaaS. As for Peter, prior to Veeva, Peter was a Senior Vice President of Technology at Salesforce where he experienced the successful IPO of the company and their rise into the most successful SaaS platform in the industry. Before Salesforce, Peter was with PeopleSoft for 9 years where he led a team of 450 professionals to support PeopleSoft’s technology platform. I do also want to say a big thank you to Jason Lemkin for the intro to Peter today without which the episode would not have been possible. In Today’s Episode You Will Learn: How did Peter make the move from Salesforce to founding one of the leaders in SaaS, Veeva? Why did Peter not want to be CEO in the beginning? What was the catalyst for his changing mindset? How has view of CEOship evolved over the Veeva journey? How does Peter assess the attractiveness of a market? What are the 2 questions Peter asks before going into a market? Is it wrong to move into smaller adjacent markets? How does Peter assess the suitability of potential board members? What does he mean when he says all founders should use the ‘grocery store rule’?   What is required to close 7 figure enterprise deals? How can sales teams look to build this relationship with large co’s in a natural and non-transactional way? If you would like to find out more about the show and the guests presented, you can follow us on Twitter here: Jason Lemkin Harry Stebbings SaaStr

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  • Peters sommarpod: World of Warcraft

    · Svamppod

    Orc-Peter har blåst i krigshornet och Troll-Niklas svarar anropet. I Peters Sommarpod pratas det World of Warcraft och varför allt var bättre förr. The post Peters sommarpod: World of Warcraft appeared first on Svampriket.

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  • Peters sommarpod: World of Warcraft

    · Svamppod

    Orc-Peter har blåst i krigshornet och Troll-Niklas svarar anropet. I Peters Sommarpod pratas det World of Warcraft och varför allt var bättre förr. The post Peters sommarpod: World of Warcraft appeared first on Svampriket.

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  • 010 SurpriseSunday · Peter Kummerfeldt · Survival Specialist For Wilderness Emergencies

    · 00:46:14 · Inspiring Adventurer · Daily Outdoor Sports Podcast · Surfing, Climbing, Kayaking, Skiing, Mountain Biking & more

    Peter Kummerfeldt is a wilderness and outdoor survival specialist and author. His safety courses and book surviving a wilderness emergency teach both the psychological and the physiological aspects of surviving. The seminars given by Peter also prepare people to survive after natural disasters. Peter’s Daily Habits Constant desire to fuel my knowledge: spends a lot of time reading and studying to ‘stay at the point at the end of the spear’ Peter’s Quote ‘Remove the mystery, you remove the fear.’ Peter’s Books Surviving a Wilderness Emergency by Peter Kummerfeldt Peter’s Outdoor Survival Video Outdoor Survival by Peter Kummerfeldt Peter’s Book Recommendation Survival Psychology by John Leach Connect with Peter www.OutdoorSafe.com See the original post at 010 SurpriseSunday · Peter Kummerfeldt · Survival Specialist For Wilderness Emergencies.

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  • Quick Comment: Commodore Peter Leavy on the search mission for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

    · 00:09:14 · The Lowy Institute

    Lowy Institute Military Fellow James Brown speaks to Commodore Peter Leavy who was in charge of the joint-task force organised to search for the missing Malaysian Airline Flight 370. Commodore Leavy discusses the difficulties that were faced by his team during the search including communication problems with other nations, weather issues, and operational limitations.TranscriptInterview between Commodore Peter Leavy RAN, Commander Joint Task Force 658 and James Brown, Military Fellow, Lowy Institute for International PolicyJAMES BROWN: I’m talking to Commodore Peter Leavy, who was the commander of the Joint Task Force involved in the search for Malaysian airlines flight 370. Commodore Leavy, how did this mission come together, how did the task force stand up?CDRE PETER LEAVY: The ADF put together a task force a couple of weeks after the aircraft itself went missing. It first went missing, as you know, on the 8th of March. Initially, as with any search and rescue activity, it was headed up by AMSA, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, from the Australian perspective working with the Malaysian authorities. There was a little delay, I guess, before the ADF got involved, as you’d understand. The initial search area was between Kuala Lumpur and Beijing, so it took some time, and some really good work from the technical analysts to work out that the aircraft was perhaps down in the Indian Ocean, and that’s when we got heavily involved.Personally, I had about 48 hours notice to move across to Perth with a small team, and we established ourselves at HMAS Stirling over there. But we were fitting in our command structure to a wider search and rescue effort that was already in place, and it’s probably worth noting too that the Australian Defence Force was a supporting agency to AMSA in the initial part of the search. We weren’t leading it ourselves, we were providing the assets, but a lot of the legwork on focusing the search areas was actually done by AMSA. That’s where their expertise is, and that’s their remit.(1.20) JAMES BROWN: So you’re the commander, you’re plugging into a wider civilian maritime search agency effort, what was the scale of the mission from your perspective?CDRE PETER LEAVY: It was quite large, we had up to about 18 aircraft from 7 different nations, and at various times up to about 15 to 16 ships – a mixture of civilian ships and naval ships from 5 different nations, plus a submarine of course. So the scale there was quite significant. Diverse nations, from China, obviously a very heavy interest with the number of passengers they had on board MH370; Malaysia, heavily involved as well; and obviously Australia, being in our search and rescue zone, we were quite heavily involved. But the coordination challenges there were, I guess, were tempered by it not being a combat operation, so that made it relatively, or took out one degree of complexity. But just the different language barriers were a bit of a challenge, but we worked through that fairly quickly. One good thing about navies in particular is, we had as a navy, and I had personally, exercised with every nation that was participating there. So we do tend to understand how each other work, how we operate, and the various strengths that each of those teams bought to the search area. So, the coordination in a sense was a bit of work behind the scenes, but relatively straightforward, and made all the much easier by everyone having that single focus on the mission, which for us was actually finding debris floating on the surface, initially. We had, as you know, Ocean Shield doing the, part way through, start of the underwater search, but that was really only one asset. The focus for us, particularly early on, but the focus throughout, for the majority of our assets, was really on that surface search for debris that was floating which would help the drift modelling back-cast to try and pin point the crash site.(3.07) JAMES BROWN: So give me a sense of, on a daily basis, how liaison between all these different force element works, how you’re communicating with them, when you’re bringing them all together to disseminate information – how does that work from your perspective?CDRE PETER LEAVY: Well we had the headquarters set up, my task force headquarters established in Perth. The actual communications link to the ships was being run by, effectively, our maritime component commander, which was our Director-General of Maritime Operations for the Royal Australian Navy, over in Bungendore (Headquarters Joint Operations Command located near Canberra), which was in a joint operations command. The advantage over there was of course, the tasking was coming from AMSA, and ATSB (the Australian Transport Safety Bureau), as I mentioned. And they, being in close proximity, all based around Canberra, had very close links. So, in a sense, the tasking was being almost subcontracted, if you like, from me to the maritime component over there, who had the direct comms links with the ships. And, importantly, the Chinese ships that were assisting in the search, you know, did a great job. Their coordination, or their communications paths, was back through our rescue coordination centre in Canberra, through to their sister organisation in China, RCC China, and out to the Chinese ships. So each of the nations had a slightly different comms path that was followed, but the coordination, effectively, the majority of the coordination was done by my team over in Perth, and then executed by our maritime component element that was over in Canberra.(4.36) JAMES BROWN: And you obviously had a fair bit of tactical interaction between the different search aircraft and ships over in Western Australia as well?CDRE PETER LEAVY: We did. The air task group, so all the aircraft that were involved in the search, were based in RAAF Pearce, and a couple were down in Perth airport. They would get the search areas, and they had a very robust organisation behind them, actually at Pearce, allocating search areas to aircraft on a day-by-day basis, a fairly resource-intensive task. But the advantage there is all the aircrew are co-located; they can all brief, and they were doing that daily; and they all had a very good appreciation of what each other was doing. So that was very well coordinated, and Group Captain Heap from the Royal Australian Air Force led that effort over there, did a fantastic job. On the maritime side, the coordination at sea, we did exchange liaison officers, particularly with the Chinese, so we had one of the XO’s off one of the Chinese ships join HMAS Success, which was our on-scene command ship at sea. So the tactical level interaction, and the ability to translate and the like, was very well handled both in the maritime and in their air spheres on the scene. Again, a great testament to militaries, navies and air forces, working together, a lot, in many cases, people that’ve actually known each other from other nations, which again facilitated that ease of transfer of information. So, all in all, I think it was a really good, a very good exercise in coordinating assets at very short notice. Obviously, our major exercises we do, there’s a lot of lead up and planning, we want to get the most out of them from a military context. But in situations like this, things happen at very short notice, and the ability to understand how each other operate, it was so beneficial when we came together. It was a very quick planning process. Everyone was on the same wavelength, everyone understood the mission, and that made that Commander’s intent, if you like, very easy to disseminate, and allowed the tactical commanders on the scene to get on and do the job. (6.36) JAMES BROWN: You mentioned before that you personally exercised with all the navies involved. So this is a situation where you’ve got warm channels of communications, you understand broadly how they work, and you can bring them together pretty quickly?CDRE PETER LEAVY: You could. The channels of communication, I guess I’d caution against creating the impression that that was very easy. Some of the communications paths we had to fight to establish, but luckily, some of them, they had been established before the task force already stood up. They were established within a day or two of the aircraft going missing, and we dovetailed into those. So whilst in some cases the direct communications paths weren’t there just to simply turn on, but we had the right knowledge and the right skills to quickly establish a communications path tailored for what we needed to achieve. And that only comes with working together, as we had done before.(7.23) JAMES BROWN: And just give me a sense of how difficult this part of the ocean is to operate in, I mean, you’re a long way off shore from Western Australia, what are the conditions like?CDRE PETER LEAVY: Look, it was very very rough at times, as you know the search started up, effectively on this flight path from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, moved to the Malacca straits, at one stage it was in the deep Southern Ocean. Very very rough. Heavy seas down there. Very windy. And of course, a lot of the searching that’s done by aircraft for instance, is looking for a visual search, looking out the windows, looking for debris in the ocean surface, floating debris. And of course the more white caps, the more waves you have, the more difficult there is to actually identify debris and wreckage. So very, very challenging conditions. And at extreme levels in the deep South Ocean, even the best, the longest ranged aircraft, would have maybe two hours on task. So, I think the statistics show that all up, about two thirds to three quarters of the flying hours that we expended were actually taken up in transit. Which leaves about a quarter to a third actually on station, doing the searching. So that gives an idea of just how remote this part of the world is, and how challenging it was.(8.31) JAMES BROWN: I think one of the extraordinary things to come out of this, as an observer, is that people have realised that not every part of the ocean is surveilled on a constant basis, not every satellite can see what’s happening, that sometimes it’s just about, how far can you get your aircraft, and how long can you keep them on station. Australia’s got an enormous maritime search and rescue zone, what lessons have you learnt from running this task force that you think will be of enduring relevance to Australian civilian maritime agencies, or to the Royal Australian Navy?CDRE PETER LEAVY: Oh, look, it’s probably the lessons that we always know. Communications is the big one. Establish that communications and the coordination mechanisms very early, I think we’re reasonably well practiced in doing that. This is probably the most challenging search and rescue situation that I’ve certainly been involved in. It’s probably the first time where we seem to have an aircraft that has disappeared with no May-Day calls, no electronic distress signals, no debris being found, I think that’s quite unprecedented. So this was extremely challenging, but I think the key lessons out of this, really, is that ongoing relationships that you have with sister navies, air forces, and the ability to, or the value in working together, in an exercise environment that just brings, or provides militaries with the wherewithal to come together at short notice, for a specific task, and form up in a very coordinated fashion very quickly. So probably no new lessons there, we’re really re-learning old lessons. And I’m pleased to say there was no real show-stoppers in this situation, there was obviously a lot of low-level details that had to get sorted through, and a lot of work to keep a lot of those mechanisms in place. But everyone was on board with trying to constantly strive for that end-state we were seeking. And that, coupled with the fact that we have worked together, with each other, even if not as individuals, certainly as navies, we do understand each other reasonably well, and that allows that coordination to happen relatively seamlessly.(10.30) JAMES BROWN: So you ran this mission for six weeks, the result, inconclusive to an extent. We’re now in, I guess, what you’d call an operational pause, where a lot of the data is being revalidated, re-examined, reviewed. Where do you see the search for MH370 heading to next?CDRE PETER LEAVY: Look, that’s really up to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, who have the lead now. The Australian Defence Force commitment has effectively completed just this last weekend, with the final return of Defence vessel Ocean Shield, back alongside, and de-mounting the Blue Fin 21, autonomous underwater vehicle that many people have heard of. And the towed ping locator equipment that was given to us by, or loaned to us by the US Navy through Phoenix International. That equipment is now returning to the United States, and Ocean Shield is no longer directly involved in the search.So the ATSB, as I understand it, are now looking at various commercial options for wider area surveillance of side-scan sonars to continue with their sub-surface search. Along the arc, the well-known now I think, Inmarsat arc, here we think is the most likely final resting place of the aircraft. But that’s a wide, wide area of water to search. Underwater searching obviously is much, much slower than the surface search for debris, which can be done largely by aircraft. So I think we’re in potentially for quite a long time here, and I think Air Chief Marshal Houston, the head of the joint agency coordination centre, has made this point time and time again. It’s, underwater searches like this, the phase that we transition to now, are generally very slow, very deliberate, but they do take time, and it’s going to be many, many months, potentially, before we see any developments. We obviously hope that we’ll get some sooner rather than later, but it’s really out of our hands now. But in terms of the Defence force participation, the form of participation that’s really scaled right back now. It’s become a civil-agency led search and recovery operation.JAMES BROWN: Commodore Leavy, thanks very much for your time.CDRE PETER LEAVY: Thanks James.

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  • PK 160: How to Turn Your Ideas Into an Animated Cartoon Series.

    · 00:46:32 · Pencil Kings | Inspiring Artist Interviews with Today's Best Artists

    Show Notes at: https://www.pencilkings.com/podcast-home/ “What I’d say to people with a great idea is to be prepared to take a few risks, be prepared to commit time, be prepared to learn new software, and be prepared to stick with your ideas.” ~ Peter Richardson. Want to know how to turn your ideas into an animated cartoon series? Do you have a cool creative idea trapped in your head and you're wondering how to turn your idea into something more? In this week’s interview, PK member, Peter Richardson, tells the story of how his new project, Spook Squad, went from a book, to a graphic novel and eventually into an animated show. There are many important lessons inside this story and we'll break them down for you piece by piece so you can take that big idea you have and turn it into something bigger. The steps are easy once you know how. And, most importantly, you don't need to be an amazing artist to get started...because the idea is where it all begins! Interview Chapters [00:37-16:07] Introduction and Overview Your host, Mitch Bowler, introduces today’s guest, illustrator Peter Richardson, who talks about his 40-year career in the industry and how the idea for Spook Squad, his new project with writer, Roger Hurn, came about. In this chapter, you’ll hear how their project developed from an initial idea for a children’s book and graphic novel into an animated cartoon series. Along the way, Peter taught himself how to use animation software such as Moho (Anime Studio Pro), and developed his skills as a storyboard artist by studying the work of other artists he admired. [17:09-22:20] How did Spook Squad Start to Gain Momentum? Creating a project is one thing, but what happens next? In this section, you’ll hear how Peter and Roger took their initial concept for Spook Squad to schools first, picking up an award from children’s literacy charity, The Book Trust, along the way. You’ll hear how feedback from the kids influenced their ideas, and how both men worked hard to eventually turn this project into a fully-fledged animation series through networking with other artists, agents and publishers. [22:21-30:08] How did the Idea for Spook Squad Take Shape? The idea for Spook Squad began on a wet weekday afternoon, when writer Roger got feedback from a young girl in school who’d seen his book. After taking what she’d said on board, he starting thinking of ideas...and the project started to come to life. In this chapter, you’ll learn why having a good idea is the most important thing for a successful book or animation...and why you don’t have to be the world’s greatest artist to accomplish this. You’ll also hear how Peter and Roger have learned to handle rejection over the years, and why self-belief and supportive online communities such as Pencil Kings can help you through any difficult times. [31:06-35:38] What Research did Peter and Roger do for Their Project? Spook Squad went through several changes before it eventually became an animated series. Peter and Roger found their initial idea for a book and graphic novel didn’t generate as much interest from publishers as they’d hoped, so a little more research was needed before they could decide which way to go next. In this section, you’ll hear how an online search for an artist led to Peter and Roger having a stall at Brand Licensing, a large trade show for creatives and the book industry, where they were able to start getting their project seen by the right people. [37:12-39:24] So how can you Turn Your Ideas into an Animated Cartoon Series? Through getting feedback from their target audience, learning from what other artists had done, and networking with the right people, Peter and Roger were finally able to get their Spook Squad project off the ground. But, how can you do the same? You’ll find out in this chapter. [40:40-44:25] Where can you Find out More About Spook Squad? Want to find out more about Spook Squad? In this chapter, Peter lets you know exactly where to see his work and offers stacks of really useful advice from his long-running career as an illustrator in the creative industry. So, if you’re ready to turn your ideas into an animated cartoon series or start working on that graphic novel you’ve been dreaming about, here’s where you can get started. [44:25-46:35] Conclusion Mitch wraps up today’s interview with Peter Richardson and offers his own advice on how you can start turning your creative ideas into reality.

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  • The Speech That Defined a Presidency

    · Uncommon Knowledge — audio edition

    Recorded on July 23, 2017Thirty years after Ronald Reagan’s famous denouncement of the Berlin Wall, Peter Robinson reflects on writing the Brandenburg Gate speech and why it was so important to include the now memorable words, “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!” Pat Sajak, host of Wheel of Fortune, turns the tables on Uncommon Knowledge’s host, Peter Robinson, sitting him down in the interview chair to discuss that famous speech and his journey to becoming Ronald Reagan’s speechwriter. Peter Robinson's journey to becoming Ronald Reagan's speechwriter began in Oxford as he was trying his hand at becoming a novelist. After a year of writing a book Peter wasn't thrilled with, William H. Buckley advised him to try to become a speechwriter in Washington, DC. Peter left Oxford and. after a series of interviews, was given the task of speechwriting for then vice president George H. W. Bush and eventually became a speechwriter for President Ronald Reagan. Five years after Peter Robinson became President Reagan's speechwriter it was Peter's turn to write one of the president's important speeches of the year to be delivered in Berlin during the height of the Cold War. To get the speech right, Peter spent a day and half in West Berlin researching the points of view of diplomats and politicians, all of whom all made it seem as though the Berlin Wall was something people hardly noticed any more. This view turned out to not be shared by the citizens of West Berlin, as Peter discovered later that evening when he sat down to dinner with citizens of West Berlin, where the dinner host said if Mr. Gorbachev is serious about perestroika he'd get rid of this wall. Peter’s dinner hosts went on to talk about how much they missed their families whom they hadn’t seen in decades because, though they lived just a mile away, the wall stood between them. That statement and the sentiments of the people of West Berlin struck Peter; after a series of drafts he came up with the now well-known line, "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!" That line, however, almost didn’t make it into the final draft of the speech as various advisers counseled against it and tried to persuade Peter and President Reagan to remove it. In the end, though, President Reagan insisted, and the line was kept in and remains to this day one of his most famous statements. (Playing time: 50:39)

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  • TSR 004: Peter Guthrie and Henry Goss from The Boundary in London

    · 01:05:50 · The SpectRoom

    In this session, we discuss the transformation Peter Guthrie and Henry Goss made from practicing architecture alone, to joining forces to form one of the most interesting and fastest growing ArchViz studios in London today. These two have created a total powerhouse, and they’re here to share the story of their success. Here’s just a bit of what you can expect on this session of The SpectRoom. Creating The Boundary Peter and Henry share the driving reasons and goals behind their decision to join forces and create The Boundary. From friends to business partners, as their individual capacities increased they decided to raise their game and share the burden of their work together. Although they just call it the next logical step, the results have been incredible.  Current Projects and What’s in (their) Store Despite detouring from traditional architecture, Henry and Peter are more involved in architecture and design than ever before. They’ve been working with their heroes on fundamental design details from an early stage, including Peter Zumthor on the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.We put Corona Renderer up against VRay, discuss animations and VR deliverables, and examine what it means at The Boundary to be a project manager, 3D artist, or project visualizer. We also chat about The Boundary Store, which they’ve set up to help people gain access to their scenes. The store is evolving to become a place where people will go to find the top brand, top-quality images. We put Corona Renderer up against V-Ray, discuss animations and VR deliverables, and examine what it means at The Boundary to be a project manager, 3D artist, or project visualizer.We also chat about The Boundary Store, which they’ve set up to help people gain access to their scenes. The store is evolving to become a place where people will go to find the top brand, top-quality images. We also chat about The Boundary Store, which they’ve set up to help people gain access to their scenes. The store is evolving to become a place where people will go to find the top brand, top-quality assets. Five Years into the Future When I asked Peter what we need to start thinking about now so that we are still relevant five years into the future, he admitted that although he may not be excited about VR and augmented reality, he is passionate about creating beautiful images, moving images, and films.Henry recognizes that the change will be constant in this industry — there will always be other companies coming up behind you, so you must constantly push forward with your energy. And that thrust toward success is the future of business at The Boundary. Henry recognizes that the change will be constant in this industry — there will always be other companies coming up behind you, so you must constantly push forward with your energy. And that thrust toward success is the future of business at The Boundary. Key Takeaways [1:00] Henry and Peter share the road that leads each of them to architectural visualization. [8:45] The benefits of ArchViz allow not only for graphics to become buildings but also for a lot of the best work to become individual works of art. [12:14] Architect vs. photographer — who deserves more praise? [15:58] The perfect 30-second elevator pitch to explain what visual architects are all about. [22:00] One major perk of the business is the level of stress that comes with “just” drawing images. [23:46] How Peter and Henry decided to create The Boundary. [26:58] The Boundary’s approach to projects. [34:50] Their dedication to R&D, new technologies, and new methods keeps pushing the industry forward. [41:30] Peter shares some of the major benefits of animation. [44:01] Experiences that have shaped the office environment at The Boundary, including training at State of the Art Academy. [46:56] Henry outlines the division of labor within The Boundary. [50:40] The sweet spot number of staff for their company, and how they are creating a tight-knit group that is having fun together. [54:00] If you want to work at The Boundary, Henry has a few tips to help you get the job. [1:00:16] The future of business at The Boundary. Main Quotes “A really powerful architectural image remains a really powerful architectural image in perpetuity.” — Henry Goss   “Architectural visualization is the key to the garden of architecture.” — Ronen Bekerman   “We are aiming for an image that looks as good as a photograph.” — Peter Guthrie   “A tight-knit group is required for a really creative environment.” — Henry Goss   “Keeping up to date with rendering technologies is a continual process, but what we love doing is making beautiful images.” — Peter Guthrie   “You can’t ever stand still in any rapidly-developing industry, including computer technology.” — Henry Goss   Sponsors AXYZ Design Quixel / Megascans   Software Mentions Sketchup After Effects Premiere Photoshop Corona Renderer V-Ray Unreal Engine TurboSquid PG Skies   Name Dropping The Boundary Peter Zumthor LACMA Magnus Strom Superhouse Magnus Strom Architects Richard Murphy Architects State of the Art Academy The Boundary Store  

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  • 648:Biluu Lets Mexicans Safely Drink Tap Water for $150 with CEO Peter Aronso

    · 00:15:21 · The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life

    Peter Aronson. He’s an award-winning journalist who’s has been featured on NPR and Marketplace. He’s also been a vice president in the corporate world. Now, his startup helps Mexico transform that notorious Mexican tap water into perfectly drinkable clean-tasting purified water. Famous Five: Favorite Book? – The Founder’s Dilemma What CEO do you follow? – N/A Favorite online tool? — HubSpot CRM Do you get 8 hours of sleep?— 7 If you could let your 20-year old self, know one thing, what would it be? – Peter wished he took business courses and knew about the GTD (Getting Things Done) methodology   Time Stamped Show Notes: 01:12 – Nathan introduces Peter to the show 01:33 – People aren’t supposed to drink the water in Mexico 01:41 – Mexico became the No. 1 consumer per capita in the world 02:08 – 70% of the consumed bottled water in Mexico is 5-gallon jug 02:21 – An average Mexican family is spending more for their water than on their broadband or landline 02:48 – Peter’s company is Biluu 03:07 – Peter had been curious about the startup and business world 03:13 – Peter was the corporate vice president for US-Indian Joint Venture 03:30 – While in the Himalayas, Peter would boil his drinking water every day 03:35 – Eventually, Peter taught the people how to use a water purifier 04:00 – Peter searched how to properly filter water and what should be taken out 04:25 – Peter’s wife is Mexican and he returned to Mexico 04:36 – Biluu is a for profit business, not a non-profit 04:44 – Biluu is currently doing direct sales and YouTube promotions 05:00 – The main challenge in Mexico is changing people’s habits 05:12 – “We’ve had to establish trust” 06:12 – Biluu filtration system cost is $170 06:50 – For $170, they can get virtually unlimited purified drinking water for a year 06:58 – A cartridge will last for a year 07:11 – 1500 people are drinking Biluu’s water 07:35 – Some of Biluu’s filtration systems are in restaurants 07:53 – Biluu has sold around 100 units 08:10 – The previous water filters in Mexico weren’t effective or scientifically proven 08:43 – 42% of Biluu’s growth came from referrals 08:55 – Biluu isn’t manufacturing by themselves 09:28 – Biluu has an exclusive license to the technology 09:39 – The deal is by volume commitment 09:57 – Biluu needs to maintain a 6-figure sales 10:14 – Biluu is totally self-funded 10:20 – Team size is 5 and all are based in Mexico City, Mexico 10:47 – Biluu is trying to look for brand ambassadors to reach out to people 11:06 – Biluu is also doing Facebook paid ads and Google AdWords 12:17 – The Famous Five   3 Key Points: It’s not easy to change people’s habits, but you HAVE to try—especially if it’s for the better. Learning from a community can be a life changing experience. Find a brand ambassador who has a good online reputation and large following.   Resources Mentioned: The Top Inbox – The site Nathan uses to schedule emails to be sent later, set reminders in inbox, track opens, and follow-up with email sequences Organifi – The juice was Nathan’s life saver during his trip in Southeast Asia Klipfolio – Track your business performance across all departments for FREE Acuity Scheduling – Nathan uses Acuity to schedule his podcast interviews and appointments Host Gator– The site Nathan uses to buy his domain names and hosting for the cheapest price possible Audible– Nathan uses Audible when he’s driving from Austin to San Antonio (1.5-hour drive) to listen to audio books Freshbooks – Nathan doesn’t waste time so he uses Freshbooks to send out invoices and collect his money. Get your free month NOW Show Notes provided by Mallard Creatives

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  • Psychedelics, Philosophy, Transhumanism and Peter Sjöstedt-H

    · 01:02:53 · Psychedelics Today

    Download Peter is a psychedelic philosopher focusing on panpsychism, psychedelics, Whitehead, Nietzsche and some other heavy weights. We discuss Peter's psychedelic philosophy and influences from psychedelic liberty cap mushrooms found in a field in England, his influence on the famous comic author Warren Ellis, his essay Neo-Nihilism, transhumanism and much more. We really look forward to having Peter on the show again in the future! Show Notes/links Peter's website Neo-Nihilism:  The Philosophy of Power (essay) Kindle Audiobook - Audible Ragnar Redbeard - Might is Right or Survival of the Fittest (1889) Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future - Friedrich Nietzsche The Road to Eleusis: Unveiling the Secret of the Mysteries - Gordon Wasson, Albert Hofmann The Psychedelic Influence on Philosophy - Higher Existence Patrick Lundborg Open University Warren Ellis Karnak Transmetropolitan Transhumanism Modafinil \ Provigil Whitehead Quotes ‘The terms morality, logic, religion, art, have each of them been claimed as exhausting the whole meaning of importance. Each of them denotes a subordinate species. But the genus stretches beyond any finite group of species.’ (MT) ‘Philosophy is an attempt to express the infinity of the universe in terms of the limitations of language.’ (Autobiog.) ‘The doctrines which best repay critical examination are those which for the longest period have remained unquestioned.’ (MT) ‘[I]n the development of intelligence there is a great principle which is often forgotten. In order to acquire learning, we must first shake ourselves free of it. We must grasp the topic in the rough, before we smooth it out and shape it.’ (MT) More on Peter's site here  Peter's Social Media Instagram Twitter Facebook Warren Ellis The Brink https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMyMbQAgiVc About Peter Peter Sjöstedt-H is an Anglo-Scandinavian philosopher who specialises in the thought of Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Whitehead within the fields of Philosophy of Mind and Metaphysics – especially with regard to panpsychism and altered states of sentience. Peter received a Bachelor’s degree in Philosophy and a Master’s degree in Continental Philosophy from the University of Warwick, where he was awarded a first-class distinction for his dissertation on Kant and Schelling in relation to ‘intellectual intuition’. He subsequently became a Philosophy Lecturer in London for six years but is now engaged in his PhD at Exeter University where he also teaches philosophy modules and writing skills. Peter is the author of Noumenautics and an inspiration behind the new inhuman philosopher Marvel Superhero, Karnak. In the words of futurist, philosopher and pop star Alexander Bard: ‘One of our favourite contemporary philosophers, Peter Sjöstedt-H…think a psychedelic Nietzsche’.

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  • 262: Prof. Peter O'Sullivan: Reconceptualizing Pain

    · 01:00:34 · Healthy Wealthy & Smart

    LIVE from Combined Sections Meeting, this episode of the Healthy Wealthy and Smart Podcast features Professor Peter O’Sullivan discussing elements of the biopsychosocial model for chronic pain management. Peter O’Sullivan is Professor of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy at Curtin University, Perth, Australia. In addition to his teaching and research at Curtin University, he works in clinical practice as a Specialist Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist (as awarded by the Australian College of Physiotherapists in 2005) in Perth, Australia. He is recognized internationally as a leading clinician, researcher and educator in the management of complex musculoskeletal pain disorders.   In this episode, we discuss: -Why you should validate your patient’s pain experience, understand their beliefs and fears, and disconfirm them through behavioral learning -The link between a practitioner’s language and self-efficacy -The informal and non-threatening art of Peter’s initial examination -Maintaining professional boundaries with chronic pain patients and avoiding burn out -And so much more!   One of the strongest influences to better treatment outcomes for chronic pain patients is trust in the therapeutic alliance. “You’ve got to build a strong therapeutic relationship,” Peter suggests if you want to see patient’s engage in their program and take more control over their pain.   Treating chronic pain patients can be challenging. With the right evaluation framework and understanding of neuroscience, Peter believes you can make instant impact for the patient. Peter stresses, “The nervous system is so damn plastic. If you can get to the heart of what someone is thinking and feeling. Validate it and take them on a journey—it can break that schema up.”   Peter is critical of therapeutic techniques in physical therapy when in fact a majority of patients would benefit from relaxation strategies and progressive loading. He suggests, “I think we undermine how smart the body is…someone who gets in trouble is someone who is too hyper vigilant and probably obsessed with their technique.”   For more information on Peter: Peter is the Professor of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy at Curtin University, West Australia and is a Specialist Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist (as awarded by the Australian College of Physiotherapists in 2005). His private clinic is Body Logic Physiotherapy in Perth www.bodylogicphysiotherapy.com.au. Peter has an international reputation for clinical research investigating the development, multi-dimensional assessment and targeted management of chronic spinal pain disorders. He has also developed a management approach for chronic low back pain – called ‘cognitive functional therapy’. He has published over 190 papers with his team in international peer review journals, has presented the findings of his research at more than 90 National and International conferences and has run clinical workshops in over 24 countries. Peter’s expertise is linking of clinical research to the clinical setting. (see www.pain-ed.com)   Resources discussed on this show: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell NOI Group Body in Mind Pain-Ed Adriaan Louw   Thanks for listening and subscribing to the podcast! Make sure to connect with me on twitter, instagram and facebook to stay updated on all of the latest! Show your support for the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes!   Have a great week and stay Healthy Wealthy and Smart!   Xo Karen   P.S. Do you want to be a stand out podcast guest? Make sure to grab the tools from the FREE eBook on the home page! Check out my blog post on the Top 10 Podcast Episodes of 2016!  

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