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  • Jason Fried

    · 01:17:34 · Love Your Work – Creativity | Productivity | Solopreneur | Startup | Entrepreneurship

    Jason Fried (@jasonfried) of Basecamp (formerly 37 Signals) shares his wisdom on cutting through the noise to find your own voice. There are some great nuggets in here about design, and how to be a contrarian thinker. This will be a great episode for entrepreneurs, whether they're experienced, or relatively new. Also, this is the FIRST EPISODE of Love Your Work! Please subscribe, and leave us a review to help us get featured in the iTunes "New and Noteworthy" section. Show notes: http://kadavy.net/podcast   Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/jason-fried-basecamp/   Transcript: [music] David Kadavy 00:11 This is Love Your Work. On this show we meet people who have carved out success by their own definition. I'm David Kadavy, best-selling author and entrepreneur. This is the first episode of the show, so if you're not familiar with me, I wrote a book called Design for Hackers, which is a bestseller. It debuted in the Top 20 on all of Amazon. Before that, I was the lead designer for a couple of startups in Silicon Valley, and I freelanced as well. I blog at kadavy.net. That's K-A-D as in David, A-V as in Victor, Y, and you can tell how many times I've repeated that in my life. You can follow me on Twitter at @kadavy, or you can join 60,000 others and take my free design course at designforhackers.com. One thing that's really important to me is helping people build a business and a lifestyle that suits them. It's something that I've managed to do, and I want more people to experience it, and that's kind of the  idea behind the show. With this show, I want to introduce you to people who have created businesses and lifestyles that are all their own. They've achieved success by their own definition and built a life according to their own values. They're not necessarily going to be millionaires, but they will be happy people. As the name of the show would imply, they love their work, and also, I love their work. Now, to help us get the show off to a great start, can I ask you a favor? David Kadavy 01:26 In this first few weeks of the show we have the opportunity to be featured in the iTunes store in their new and noteworthy section, and this show is a bit of an experiment. I'm launching with a few episodes and I'm going to see how it goes, but this first few weeks is absolutely critical. This is the one chance in the lifetime of this show to really bring in more listeners, and more listeners means I can put more of my energy into bringing you great guests with wisdom to share. But in order for that to happen we need reviews on iTunes. Lots of them. They also have to be positive reviews, but that's, of course, up to you and the actual quality  the show. So can you please review this show on the iTunes store? If you loved it and want to hear more, please give it five stars. [music] David Kadavy 02:14 I'm very grateful to bring you this first guest. He is one of my biggest heroes, and he's the perfect example of someone who has built a business and a life according to his own values. Jason Fried - yes, the Jason Fried - hardly needs an introduction. He is the CEO of Basecamp and a New York Times best selling author. Jason co-founded Basecamp way back in 1999. It was originally a web design shop, but they built a little project management app called Basecamp, and now that's the focus of the company. In the process of building Basecamp the company also created Ruby on Rails, which is an open-source web framework that powers thousands of sites. And the thing I admire most about Jason is his contrarion thinking. Whatever the prevailing wisdom is, Jason seems to speak up and explain why that wisdom is wrong. He intentionally has setup his company small. His employees can live and work wherever they want, and they get a three day week during the summer months. The company is almost totally bootstrap. I say "almost" because they did take a little bit of investment from the one and only Jeff Bezos of Amazon, primarily just to be able to give him a call once in a while. David Kadavy 03:23 Jason has co-authored three books, one of which is the New York Times best selling Rework, in which he and his co-founder, David Heinemeier Hansson, share their rules for running a simple business. This interview is about one hour long, and there is so much more that I wanted to ask Jason. It could've been several hours easily. We talk about Basecamp in the beginning, which you may already be intimately familiar with, but stick it out and we soon start digging into the source of Jason's famously contrarion thinking. I'm really fascinated by where it comes from, because I'm someone who tends to be a bit contrarion myself, but  these thoughts, they usually come after I have this deep internal conflict, and it seems like it just comes so naturally to Jason. So that's something that I try to unpack in the interview, and you're going to find some good tips for listening to that mischievous voice in your head. If you aren't already familiar with Jason, prepare yourself. He really spews brilliance. Everything that comes out of his mouth could be quoted, or could be a Tweet or could be the subject of a blog post. He's really easy to interview, which is great because he's one of the first people that I've interviewed. So I'm very excited to bring you this interview. Let's get started. [music] David Kadavy 04:44 Okay. So I'm here with Jason Fried in the Basecamp offices, and I look around here, and there's this beautiful wood paneling and it's just a quiet office. I can't help but notice there's nobody here. Jason Fried 04:58 No one's here. One person's here, but  he's at lunch. David Kadavy 05:00 Oh, okay. That person's at lunch. Jason Fried 05:02 That person's at lunch. David Kadavy 05:03 Well, we are talking here on the day before Thanksgiving, so I wonder if that has something to do with it. Jason Fried 05:09 A little bit, but also most of the people even who work in Chicago work remotely, so we're a remote company. People across 30 some-odd different cities around the world, and, including the people who are here, we have 14 people in Chicago. Usually any given day there's five of them here, and it might be a different five each day but that's how we work here. Yeah. David Kadavy 05:28 Wow, five people. Okay. And this is a huge office. Jason Fried 05:31 It's a big office, yeah. So we have 50 people in the company and we all get together twice a year. We have an office that's built to handle the whole company, but a very small portion of the company is in the office on any given day. Half the office, too, is dedicated to public space. We have a theater. We've got a big kitchen area, a reception area. It is still a large office, though. David Kadavy 05:54 Yeah. We're in Chicago so there's a little more space available.  So you guys have had this office for how long now? Jason Fried 06:04 Since August of 2010. David Kadavy 06:07 Okay. It's quiet, there's lots of space, there's lots of private spaces as well. To what extent do you feel like this office kind of is an expression of your own personality? Jason Fried 06:19 Well, I think it's an expression of the company's personality, which is probably derived at some point from mine since I was one of the founders. But mostly we're kind of an introverted group for the most part. Definitely there's some extroverted people here though as well, but we try to be respectful of one another's space, and privacy and time. So we kind of treat the office like a library, in that the rules here are kind of like library rules, which is that you walk into a library, everyone knows how to behave. You're respectful of one another. You're quiet. You don't interrupt people. People are studying, and thinking and working, and that's the same way the office here works. So for the most part, even if it's full of people, it's pretty quiet and pretty hush, and  then people can go into these private rooms like you and I are sitting in right now and have a full volume conversation without interrupting people on the outside. Just like a library, they have little side rooms where you can sort of talk loudly and not interrupt people who are reading outside. David Kadavy 07:14 Yeah, that was always something that bothered me whenever I worked at a company. I might have a bunch of different roles, but I might be ears deep in some code, and somebody would come up, and tap me on the shoulder, and interrupt me and just lose all of it. Jason Fried 07:28 You lose it all. You lose the focus, the zone, and so we want to protect that because that's a really hard thing to get into in the first place. So if you're in that, we want to make sure that you stay in that as long as possible, versus inviting interruptions all day long, which is what a lot of modern offices are all about these days. David Kadavy 07:45 Yeah, I can definitely relate to that. I've noticed that before. So you guys started out as a software sort of consultancy, right? Or a web design company. Jason Fried 07:57 Web design. Yeah, we started as a web design  company. David Kadavy 08:01 And that was called 37signals. Jason Fried 08:02 Yeah. In 1999 we launched the company in August, and we were doing website design for hire, but just redesign work for the most parts. So we weren't doing programming. We were just doing visual redesigns. So people already had the sites and we were like, "We can make that site a little bit better," and so they would hire us to do that. David Kadavy 08:19 Yeah. And now you are concentrated entirely pretty much on this one product, Basecamp. Jason Fried 08:25 Yeah, Basecamp. And Basecamp 3, the third version of that, just launched a couple weeks ago. David Kadavy 08:30 Oh, cool. Jason Fried 08:30 Every four years or so we completely reinvent the product from the ground up. Not a single line of code, not a single piece of design is shared. We make it all over again every four years, roughly. So we just did that for our third major time. Basecamp's been around for 12 years. It came out in February 2004. So about 12 years total now. So we're on the third major version. David Kadavy 08:50 That's funny. I guess I hadn't noticed that you reinvent the whole product every four years. Jason Fried 08:55 There's similar themes. So it's a lot like-- think about  cars. We'll take the Porsche 911. Porsche 911 was released in 1963. It's about 52 years old now, but there's been seven generations of the Porsche 911. So every seven years, roughly, they do a new chassis, they do new engines, they do new technology around it. But it's still a Porsche 911. It looks roughly the same. The engines in the back. The driving dynamics are similar. You can identify a 911 that was made today and a 911 that was made 50 years ago. You can tell there's continuity, but roughly every seven years it's an entirely new car. And the same thing is true for like a Honda Accord or a Civic. These lines have been around for decades, but every four, five, six, seven, eight - in cars it's more like five to eight years because it's very expensive to make a new car - they make a new car. It's still an Accord, which means it's a four-door primarily. They have a coupe version too, but it's like a family car. And the Civic's a little bit smaller. They have these themes and these spirits around the things, but they're all new. And so  that's what we do with Basecamp, is that Basecamp today, in 2015, can trace back to base camp classic, which is the first version of Basecamp in February 2004. The themes were similar but the product is reconsidered in a big way every four years, and in between that we just sort of improve the existing version. But then there's a point where you can't pack new ideas onto an old chassis, so we kind of redo the thing from scratch. David Kadavy 10:26 Yeah, that car analogy is interesting. I'm not totally up on the designs of cars, but I imagine that, say a Honda Accord, there's certain values that are portrayed - values about what a car is and what is important in a car being portrayed in that. And then there's all this changing technology, and then there's certain trends maybe that are influenced by other-- Jason Fried 10:47 Exactly. David Kadavy 10:48 --what the drivers are used to. Jason Fried 10:52 Yes. David Kadavy 10:53 That those sort of things change, and so that sort of calls for a total redo. Jason Fried 10:59 Totally. And you think about,  like-- I think just cars are really good metaphors for this because you think about the Corvette, which has been around, I think, since the 50s, and there's like a spirit to that car. It's a two-door sports car, it's kind of a long-nose. There's a spirit to it. And even though they don't all look the same over the years, there's a language and an idea behind the Corvette which stays in the DNA of the car, but the car is redesigned and reengineered completely from the ground up every seven years or something. That's just how that industry-- most industries work that same way. David Kadavy 11:33 Yeah. I mean, they're still positioned, in a way, against other types of cars. The Corvette, it's a different thing from a Camaro, right? It's a different type of person that will drive it and it's different sort of values that person has. Right? Jason Fried 11:48 Yes. So each car has it's spirit-- it's much like-- look, you are not the same person - I'm not even talking, like, personality - you don't share a single cell in common with yourself from  ten years ago. David Kadavy 12:00 Yeah. Jason Fried 12:01 So you're actually-- but you're still David. You're still the same guy. You've changed. Your tastes have changed and your points of view have changed, but you're still you, even though you've been completely reengineered from the ground up in many ways all the time. So there's iterative tweaks, and then at a certain point you're all new. You're actually all new compared to what you were ten years ago. David Kadavy 12:23 Yeah. So let's talk about that. Jason Fried 12:24 That's a little bit of a weird analogy, let's stick to the car one. But that's kind of what we're trying to do here, instead of the alternative, which is typically how software works, which is that it's constantly iterated on. Which is good, but that's when the code base gets really difficult to work on at a certain point, because it gets old and the technologies that you build on are kind of old. It becomes hard to work on, you begin to slow down, and you can't handle brand new ideas because you try and fit them into the current patterns and it's like, "But this won't quite fit anymore." So you kind of shoehorn it in, then you make compromises, and that's how things start to get bad over a certain point  of time. David Kadavy 13:01 Yeah. So let's talk about that DNA, then. Basecamp, for those who aren't familiar, is a project management web app, basically. Jason Fried 13:14 Yes. David Kadavy 13:14 I mean, there's probably-- Jason Fried 13:16 There's iOS and android apps, yeah. All that stuff [inaudible]. David Kadavy 13:19 When you started, it's like your main competitor was maybe Microsoft Project. Jason Fried 13:26 Main competitor has always been the same: email. David Kadavy 13:28 Email, okay. Jason Fried 13:28 Email and habits. David Kadavy 13:31 But when people would think of project management, would they think of email back when you guys were first starting? Jason Fried 13:39 If you ask people even today what their primary method of working on projects with people is, it's still email. So email is still the biggest. Our industry thinks there's certain products of the time that are the big product, but the biggest of them all is email. And that's not a product, it's like a thing. David Kadavy 13:58 It's a protocol. Jason Fried 13:58 Yeah, right. But  that is the thing you're always battling against, is email, phone, in-person habits. That's the thing you're battling mostly against. The biggest thing that you're trying to do is sort of-- there's this idea of non-consumption, which is this concept that there are people out there who work with others, and they need a better way to do that, but they don't know how to do it. They don't use any products to do it yet. I mean, they use products, but they use products that are not built for this purpose, but they just use other things. And they don't even realize that there's something out there that would help them. They're non-consumers. They want to consume. They want something better, but they don't even know something exists. So our industry sometimes thinks that whatever the hot product of the moment is, that everybody uses that. But actually, all things told, a very small slice of people use that, and most people don't use anything. So that's always the biggest  competition in our opinion, is the people who don't use anything. David Kadavy 15:03 I feel like there's a parallel we draw in there between email and what we were talking about with office interruptions. The email is this sort of portal where anybody can interrupt you, and you're providing a space through which everything is about this project that you're working on right now - all the communication that's happening and all that within Basecamp. What is that DNA of Basecamp? Jason Fried 15:32 Here's the thing. So the DNA of Basecamp, there's a couple things going on here. No matter what it is that you're working on, if you have a team there's a few things you need to do. I don't care if you are building a building, or you're working on a small school project, or you are putting together a publication or you're building a website, when you work with people you've got people problems. So you need a way to divvy up and organize the work that needs to get done amongst the group.  Our take on that is to-dos, but let's forget our implementation for the moment and just get back to the fundamentals. So you've got a group of people. You want to do some work together or whatever it is. You've got chunks of work, pieces of work that need to be outlined and divvied up in some way and assigned out. You need a way to hash things out quickly. So sometimes you just need to hash stuff out and go informally back and forth really fast. Sometimes you need to slow down and present something, and think about something, and pitch something, and write a thoughtful post or something and give people a chance to write back in time. So there's moments when you need to make announcements, there's moments you need to hash stuff out quickly. You need to keep track of when things are due and what the major milestones are - what's coming up next, when is thing launching or when are we doing this thing together? So there's some dates around it. There's artifacts. There's files, and there's documents, and there's sketches, and there's PDFs and there's stuff that-- typically you need to keep track of that stuff. Jason Fried 17:00 You want to organize that stuff. You need a place where everyone knows where it is, and where to go to get it and that sort of thing, right? And then finally, you need a way to check in on people. Like, "How's it going?" And, "How are we doing?" And, "Are we doing the right thing?" And, "How do you feel about how we're doing it?" And, "Are you stuck on anything?" Those kind of things. So to me, it doesn't matter the kind of work. When you work with people, those are things, right? Hashing stuff out, divvying up work, dates, artifacts, making announcements, being able to get a hold of people when you need to no matter what their speeds are, that sort of thing, right? So that, to me, is the DNA of what Basecamp's about. It's about understanding how groups actually work together to make progress on something. There's difference too, because there's moments when you're just social and you're just kind of, like, social. You're not trying to make progress there. But when you want to make progress on something, Basecamp comes in and helps you make progress on things with other people. David Kadavy 17:51 Yeah, and I like that you're-- Jason Fried 17:52 It's a collection. Let me-- it's really a collection. That's the the thing that's always set Basecamp apart, is that it's a collection of unique  tools that work together to help a group make progress on something together. There's many ways to approach things. There's a way to piece together a bunch of separate tools, and duct tape them together and try to point at each thing, or there's a way to buy something that kind of tries to do all those things really well in a simple way, and that's kind of our side. We want to give you one thing that you can use to do all these things together with a group, versus you having to go out and shop for a bunch of different solutions, and try to tie them all together and get people on board on five or six different products. David Kadavy 18:35 It sounds like you've been able to really think about the abstract needs that are there and separate that experience from the technology itself. It's not Ajax, to use a very 2002 term [chuckles]. Jason Fried 18:50 Very early, yeah. David Kadavy 18:51 It's not Ajax. It's not about all these individual technologies or something. It is managing these sort of abstract things that are floating in  the ether and making them into something that you can get a handle on. Jason Fried 19:04 And getting your head around it and getting organized around it is a really important part of working together with people. The thing is that everyone can have their own individual messes, but if you bring someone else into your mess they're going to be like, "Woah, I don't know where things are." So you need to have an organized place, a space, a shared place where you can do this kind of work. But yeah, it's not about technologies. It's not even necessarily about individual feature sets, because when I say, "Hash things out quickly," what I actually mean is-- in our implementation is more of like chat. Campfires are now in Basecamp 3. But in five years chat might not be they way to hash things out quickly. There may be another way to hash things out quickly. So, it's not about staying true to a tool set. It's about staying true to the problems you're trying to solve. This is what gives us the opportunity to resolve those in new ways [crosstalk] Use it to [crosstalk] technology at hand. Exactly. Just like the cars that change over time with technology. Jason Fried 20:00 Totally. Yeah. Bluetooth wasn't a thing in cars eight years ago. Now it is. Navigation wasn't a common thing, and now it's in almost every car. So technology moves, ideas move and things you can do change. And that's why I think forcing yourself to reinvent yourself and be willing to look at those technologies and those new options on a regular basis is very viable. David Kadavy 20:23 Now, when I think about you reinventing the product every four years, I can't help but think about how most people would react to doing something like that or the idea of doing something like that. They would be so scared that everybody would be so pissed when you change everything that they'd be afraid to make a change like that. How do you get over that? Jason Fried 20:49 Yeah, it's a great question, and the way to get around that is to, again, get back to people. People do not like to be forced into change.  People don't mind change. People hate forced change. So we never force anyone to switch versions of Basecamp. People who've been using Base-- we have customers who've been using Basecamp for 12 years. Same version. They signed up for Basecamp when it was just called Basecamp. Now it's called Basecamp Classic, which is the original version. We've never forced anyone on Basecamp Classic to move to Basecamp Two and no one on Basecamp Two has to move to Basecamp 3. We've made a commitment to our customers to always maintain every major version of Basecamp forever. So if you're happy with Classic, our definition of new may not matter to you. New doesn't matter to you. Consistency might matter to you-- Jason Fried 21:39 But the new customers, it would be to your detriment to have the original interface with the technology of 2002 or whenever it was-- David Kadavy 21:48 2004, yeah exactly. Jason Fried 21:49 --2004, and somebody shows up and that's what you've got, that would be a problem. David Kadavy 21:53 Totally. So new customers today who go to Basecamp.com will be signed up for Basecamp 3. That's the only thing they can sign up for. The newest, latest,  greatest version of Basecamp we've ever made before. Customers who've been with us from 2004, some of them might still be on Classic if they've chosen to. Some of them might be on Basecamp 2 if they've chosen to be. Up to them completely, entirely. That's how we solve that problem. We don't force change on anybody ever. Jason Fried 22:17 You don't run into situations where that backwards compatibility is just impossible to support? David Kadavy 22:21 We don't support backwards compatibility. Jason Fried 22:23 Maybe I'm using the wrong terminology there, but-- David Kadavy 22:26 If you start on 3 you can't move to Classic, because there's not a future parity. For example in Basecamp 3, you can assign - this is a small example - but you can assign to-dos to many people. In Classic you can only assign to-dos to one person. So if you're in Basecamp 3 and you assign a to-do to six people, and you try to go back to Classic somehow, you'd lose data because we wouldn't know where to-- you can't move backwards in time. Jason Fried 22:50 So you've been doing this for a long time. Basecamp has been around for 12 years in itself. The company has been around-- David Kadavy 22:57 16 years. Jason Fried 22:57 --for 16 years. This  reinventing every four years, is that something that helps you keep it fresh and keep it being something that you want to be doing everyday? David Kadavy 23:08 Yeah, it's for everybody. It's partially for us. It's fun to make something new and it's fun to improve that thing for a while, but at a certain point you want to make something new again. The way we did it in the past was we kept making new products. So we made Basecamp, then we made Backpack, then we made Campfire, then we made Highrise and then we made the job boards. We've made a variety of things over the years. What ends up happening, though, is that making something is actually the easy part. The hard part is that once it's out in the wild you've got to maintain it. You've got customers using it. They have demands, and you've got to provide customer service, and support and all these things. So we love the act of making new things, but we've decided that we want to focus on making one new thing over and over. That's how we keep it fresh for us, also keep it fresh for the market and keep it fresh for customers, but also not ever  upset existing customers by forcing them on to something new that they're not ready for or they don't want to be in. Something I learned early on - and it's sort of a ridiculous revelation because you just expect that you would know this, but it's one of the things you just don't think about. Software companies especially almost never think about this. People are always in the middle of something, right? David Kadavy 24:19 So if I release a brand new version, and they're in the middle of a project and they're trying to work on a client project with somebody, and we release a new version, we push some them on to the new one, they're in the middle of something else. They're not ready to move to this. They don't want their software to change in the middle of their project. So once we realized that, we realized, like, "Okay, that's a deep insight and very important. Our product is not their lives. Their lives is their livelihood. The work that they do for their client is what's important to them, and they don't want their software tool that's aiding them all of the sudden changing on them in the middle, because that's really disruptive and anxiety producing and stuff." So that's why we don't  force anyone to change. You've got to get to those human insights. The thing I've noticed most is that the things that drive people away are fear and anxiety. It's not about, "You don't have this feature. You don't have that feature." It's the fear and anxiety attached to forcing me to shift, or forcing me to change, or forcing me to switch or forcing me to do something I'm not ready for - that's where people really recoil. Jason Fried 25:24 Not having control. David Kadavy 25:23 Yeah. People don't want to be in a situation where someone's changing up underneath them that they rely on. That's a really uncomfortable feeling. It's like an earthquake. You live somewhere. You rely on the ground to be solid. You trust that the ground will be solid. Then one day the ground starts to shake, and that is terrifying because you can't go hide from that. Jason Fried 25:45 Have you experienced a couple earthquakes before? David Kadavy 25:48 I have, and it's terrifying. Jason Fried 25:48 Yeah, I have too. It's terrible. David Kadavy 25:49 Terrifying. Jason Fried 25:50 And they weren't even big ones. David Kadavy 25:52 No. Right. Jason Fried 25:52 It's the worst. David Kadavy 25:53 I'm a Midwesterner, so a small one is a big one for me. But the thing is, if it's really crappy weather-wise outside you can kind of go inside and hide,  but you cannot hide when the earth beneath you moves, and that's a terrible feeling, and that's what software's like to people. When there's this thing they've been relying on that's been consistently working a certain way and all of a sudden it changes on them, that's an earthquake. We don't want to create earthquakes for customers. David Kadavy 26:14 Yeah, especially this things that they're relying upon to help them-- Jason Fried 26:19 Do their job. David Kadavy 26:20 Do their job, do their work, to manage their projects. If I'm using a bad word there, I don't know. Jason Fried 26:25 Totally fine. Actually, what's interesting is we've gone away from the word "project," which maybe we can talk about in a little bit. But yeah, fundamentally, absolutely. People use Basecamp to run projects, and they use it for other things too. Imagine if you're doing work for a client. You're a designer. You do work for a client. You've trained the client on this thing. You've told them this is how it's going to work. This is a client relationship, which is often delicate. They're paying you a lot of money. You might be friends with them, but it's still a delicate relationship at some level. And all of a sudden, this thing you told them was going to work one way, all of a sudden works a different way on Tuesday then it did on Monday. That is a  bad situations, so we don't ever want to put our customers in those situations. David Kadavy 27:04 Right. You've definitely gotten really comfortable over all these years with your particular way of doing things, but I want to step back a little bit further and get an idea of where it all comes from. I'd say that you're probably known for being a contrarian thinker. Would you agree with that? Jason Fried 27:26 Yeah, probably. It's funny because I don't think my ideas are contrarian at all, of course, but against our-- let's call it against our industry, yes. David Kadavy 27:35 Yeah. I think that a lot of people have thoughts from time to time where there's a prevailing wisdom and they think, "Well, that doesn't seem right." But then they think a lot of people-- they bottle it up inside or they don't act upon it. They don't give themselves the permission and the confidence to go ahead and say, "I don't think it should be that way. It should be this other way," and to go ahead with it. I think that that's somethin,  even if you go back and look at the 37signals - which is the former name of the company - 37signals.com/manifesto, there's all these things about, "We're small on purpose," and all these things that are against the prevailing wisdom. "We purposely are not full service," things like that. Jason Fried 28:23 By the way, even that site itself-- actually, that site is the most contrarian thing we've ever done. We're a web design company. There wasn't a piece of work on that site. It was black and white. It was all text. 37 ideas is what that was. If you think about back then - that was in '99 - web design firms, even today-- David Kadavy 28:45 1999 for those who can't remember-- Jason Fried 28:47 Right, 1999, the previous century. David Kadavy 28:50 It was a different century [chuckles]. Jason Fried 28:53 But even today, it's all the same. Basically, agency sites are portfolio sites for the most part, which is like, "Here's our  shining work and here's the work we've been doing. Here's pictures of it," and I get that. We didn't have a single picture of any work that we'd done on that site, and the whole idea was that everyone's work pretty much looks the same. If it's good, it's roughly the same, right? But what sets companies apart and people apart, I think, are the ideas that they have, and most companies don't think they way we thought we thought. And so we want to put our ideas out there to make us appear different and to attract the kind of customers that we want to work with, who were people who'd appreciate this kind of thinking, versus just someone who'd appreciate a pretty picture of a website that we made. That doesn't help us self-select our clients. So that was the idea behind that. David Kadavy 29:38 I think this is something that's so important for people to master, to be able to have a thought that's different from the prevailing wisdom and to give themselves permission to go forth with it. Take us back to 1999 when you decided to make this all text. Was that something-- did you know that it was something different from the prevailing way to do it?  How did you arrive at that and give yourself permission to do that? Jason Fried 30:04 Great question. We knew it was different. We knew no one had never done anything like that before. It's funny, they were almost like tweets or short blog posts. They were just these really short thoughts. We weren't trying to be different. We just realized that we were, and then we're like-- Originally, one of my partners in the business was a guy named Carlos Segura, who's a graphic designer in Chicago. He has a line that says, "Communication that doesn't take a chance doesn't stand a chance." That's his motto, and that drove us early on, which is like, "Let's take a shot. What do we have to lose here? What we actually had to lose is not being ourselves, and that is a bigger loss than being yourself and not getting traction." If we were trying to act like everyone else  then we weren't really being ourselves, and that's the loss. "So let's take a shoot at putting ourselves out there, doing this differently, and let's see who we attract this way. Everyone's fishing with this lure. Let's put a different lure out and see what we attract, and maybe we attract some big fish that no one else knows how to attract, because everyone things the only way to attract this kind of fish is this way." Jason Fried 31:20 And it turned out that we landed a couple big projects, and we've been profitable as a company ever since then because of that. I mean, looking back, it's a bold move, but at the time we just didn't think it was bold. We're like, "We have nothing. We have nothing yet. We have no company yet, so we have nothing to lose. So let's take a shot." It's a lot easier now, in my opinion, to be hesitant and being afraid to take a risk when you have something to lose. Like, "We have something to lose. We've got a great business. We've got a lot of customers. We've got a reputation. We could lose that now," and then you get a little bit tight.  So we've tightened up as a company over the years. I think most companies do. But when you're fresh and brand new, that's the time to take a real shot. Why not, you know? David Kadavy 32:10 It's funny to think about that thought process that you had, because I think-- how old were you then? Jason Fried 32:17 25. David Kadavy 32:19 Maybe around 25 was when I started to wise up to, "Okay, these thoughts that I have in my head that are different from the way other people are doing things, I should do something to pursue those," but I think before that I allowed other people's ideas of what success was, or what it meant to what I should be doing, I think I allowed those ideas to-- I know I did. I know I allowed those ideas to dictate my own actions and put me in situations that didn't make me happy. So did you ever experience that sort of thing where you were maybe making decisions based  what somebody else had decided? Jason Fried 33:02 Oh, absolutely. Yeah. Before 37signals, I was just a freelancer doing website design on my own, and I always referred to "me" as "we." When I was doing proposals I'm like, "We will provide a--" because I always felt like I had to act bigger. I had to act like I was a company. I wasn't a company. I was me. I was just me, and I just thought I had to be something else. I remember at the time-- you've been around for a while, too. You might remember there was something called USWeb, which was like wrapping up all these small web design firms trying to make this big web agency made of-- I don't know if you maybe remember this. I barely remember it. David Kadavy 33:46 I don't remember that. What year would that have been? Jason Fried 33:48 That was like mid-90s, late 90s sort of thing. It was like-- David Kadavy 33:54 Mid-90s I was making web pages on my AOL space and not really-- Jason Fried 33:58 Yeah, but so was I. Anyway,  it's just a thing that didn't go anywhere, but I'm like, "Man, my firm might be acquired by a conglomerate." Like, this weird, stupid shit I was thinking about at the time. David Kadavy 34:14 I remember wanting to work for Razorfish and seeing, "Oh, wow. MTV is a client, and they're doing all these good things." Actually, my thing was Communication Arts magazine. Jason Fried 34:25 Sure, CA. Absolutely. David Kadavy 34:25 As a designer, I would pour through the pages, and I'd write down every firm that was there, and I would go to the city and I would call and try to get an interview. Jason Fried 34:34 I'd do the same thing. Same thing. David Kadavy 34:37 Really? That's interesting. Jason Fried 34:37 Yeah. I'd go through these designing [annuals?] and go, "Man, I wish I could do that kind of work." That's actually how I met Carlos for the first time. David Kadavy 34:41 That's exactly the way I was. Jason Fried 34:44 Yeah. I think most people are that way. I think it's good. I think it's a good start, and then you come into your own at a certain point. I think your mid-20s are actually a really healthy moment for that. Before that I was wide-eyed, and excited, and wanted to act bigger than I was and wanted  to be more professional. This is the thing. I want to be more professional. That's the thing you have when you're fresh out of school - you want to be a professional. "I need to write really long proposals and I need to talk in a certain way. I need to act a certain way. I need to appear bigger." And that's just insecurity, and it's natural. Like, you don't know. What do you know? You're 21, you're 20. You don't know anything yet, right? So you're trying to act. You're an actor, and at a certain point you become yourself. And I think that's when it's formative, is when you begin to realize-- and I realized this at some point. I realized it by accident. I was doing these long proposals because I thought that's what you had to do. Like, 20-page proposals. I remember writing 20-page proposals about-- David Kadavy 35:47 Oh, yeah. I've done a couple of those. Jason Fried 35:47 Right? David Kadavy 35:48 Yeah. Jason Fried 35:49 And you spend-- I don't know. Weeks and all-nighters, and you write these proposals-- David Kadavy 35:53 You don't get the job. Jason Fried 35:53 You don't get the job, right? And then I realized-- first of all, I hate writing 20-page proposals. I think they're a waste of time. Because here's what  happened to me. My parents were doing a kitchen renovation at home, and they were getting these proposals from contractors. I saw them look at them, and all they did was they turned to the last page. Like, "How much is it going to cost and how long is it going to take?" That's all you care about when you get a proposal, because to get a proposal from somebody, you've already vetted them at a certain level. Like, "I'm curious about what they would do for me. I know who they are, so what would they do?" You just want to know, how much is it going to cost and how long is it going to take? So I realized this. I'm like, "I'm doing these 20-page proposals. I'm busting my ass on them. I don't like doing them. It's what you're supposed to do, right? Or is it?" So I started doing shorter, and shorter and short proposals and started winning jobs. At the end of my freelance career I was doing single-page proposals, and I wasn't losing any business over them. I realized, "Holy shit, I don't need to do what everyone else is doing. I thought this is how you had to do it, but you don't have to do it that way." That's where I gave myself permission to go, "Well, what else don't I have to do that everybody else is doing?" David Kadavy 37:01 Okay. This is exactly what I'm looking for. This is the time when you slowly started making the proposals shorter and shorter, and you realized that this thing that other people had told you was so, or somehow you had come to the conclusion was true, was in fact not true. Jason Fried 37:18 It was in fact not true. I don't even know if people told me, or I just thought you-- I don't even know. David Kadavy 37:23 It was more than not true. It was false. Jason Fried 37:24 It was false at a variety of levels. It was false that I had to do that to get jobs. It was false that I had to stay up late and  bust my ass to get work. It was also false that it would make me happy. I was miserable making these long proposals, so I realized if I can eliminate the misery, and I don't have to stay up late, and I can be concise, and get to the point and present my work clearly in a page or two, man, that's a bunch of wins, plus it's a win for the customer on the other side. And I told them that. I'm like, "Look, I know how proposals are. You're just going to look at the--" I said this in my proposal. I'm like, "I know how proposals are. You thumb through a bunch of stuff, and at the end of the day you just look at the price and how long it's going to take, because you've already seen my work because that why you've asked me to submit a proposal. So I don't need to go through all my work again. Here's how much it's going to cost. Here's how long it's going to take." That was my pitch, basically. Like, "Look, let's cut through the bullshit, because that's going to represent how I'm going to work with you. I'm not going to bullshit you. I'm going to be direct and clear, and we're going to work concisely together." It was like an embodiment of  how we're going to work also. That resonated with people. Then I started to realize, "Man, I don't have to be like everybody else. This opens up opportunities." Now, I didn't see all the other opportunities. It was just like a moment where I could poke the way you're supposed to do it and get away with it, and then like, "Oh, maybe I can do this more." So I started doing more things like that. David Kadavy 38:57 There's sort of a sense of mischief to it. It kind of makes things more fun that way. Jason Fried 38:59 Absolutely. David Kadavy 39:00 I know I'm that way where if I get stuck in a rut, I just kind of say, "I'm going to just write this silly, mischievous blog post or email," and suddenly it feels fresh and people respond more. Jason Fried 39:12 Absolutely. This is something I'm actually thinking about here right now. Next year there's some stuff I want to do that doesn't seem like it would be a reasonable thing to do. Like, it would be difficult to justify in the same way  that I think a single page proposal would be difficult to justify until you realize it works, and then you don't have to justify anymore because it becomes true. And so there's a couple things - I'm being very vague here because I don't want to talk about it quite yet because I haven't formed any ideas thoroughly - but there's a couple things I want to do that seem counterintuitive to our own company or our own way of working that I want to ruffle a bit. David Kadavy 39:58 Yeah. So it sounds like you're trying to shake things up a little bit in the office. You don't want to get too complacent in doing things a certain way. Is that going to bring some freshness, or what's driving that? Jason Fried 40:10 Yeah. Well, that's part of the whole-- reinventing Basecamp is part of that. Like, being on this schedule where we have to reinvent Basecamp on a frequent basis. It's not that frequent, but like four years. David Kadavy 40:19 Four years is [inaudible]. Jason Fried 40:20 But yeah, in this industry-- actually, it seems like a long time in some ways, but-- David Kadavy 40:25 Yeah. Jason Fried 40:26 My opinions change over the years, and I have new ideas, and a thought comes to mind, and I've been doing some--  one of the things that's been interesting is I've been doing a lot of in-person demos of Basecamp 3. I've never really done a lot of in-person demos of Basecamp before, and it's been really interesting because I'm seeing some really cool insights that come from followup questions. We've always thought about demoing Basecamp with videos, or tutorials or whatever, right? But what I've realized is that that kind of demo doesn't lead to followup questions, and followup questions are really valuable, because that is where someone requests or looks for clarity. Like, "Wait. What do you mean by that?" Or like, "Wait, how do you do that?" Or, "Wait, how do you think about that?" David Kadavy 41:21 It's kind of like where they ask the question that they were initially too afraid to ask or something like-- Jason Fried 41:26 That's a good way to put it. David Kadavy 41:27 --but they thought was a dumb question before, but somehow-- Jason Fried 41:30 Totally. [crosstalk] That's a great way of putting it.  Yeah, a great way of putting it. Those moments, I'm realizing, are extremely valuable, very valuable. In fact, it's almost all the value. Yet, when you do a lot of self-service stuff you don't get to that value because you don't talk to the person, right? David Kadavy 41:49 See their facial expressions or-- Jason Fried 41:51 Yeah, or just the things that-- it's like a comedian. A comedian writes material, and if they want to do a one-hour show on HBO, they spend a year in the clubs perfecting that material They don't know how audience are-- they think all the stuff they're writing down is funny, but they've got to try that stuff out. You've got to try it out in front of an audience and see what reactions-- and sometimes the audience give a reaction on something that you didn't think was going to be that funny, or they react to the timing or something. You've got to try that stuff out. So what's been interesting is I gave a couple of demos of Basecamp 3. One of the interesting features of Basecamp 3 is-- it's such a basic thing. You can create folders, and you drag things into folders to  organize them your own way, and I got a standing ovation from this one group [chuckles]. I was really surprised by that. It was not something that I thought was going to be like this eureka moment for people, right? But I had to be there to see that, to feel it, to know that there's something there now. Then I can follow up on that and get-- wow. I'm like, "Whoa. Why was that such a big deal for you." "Oh, because--" and then you get the because. Jason Fried 43:06 Every word after because is gold, you know? You don't get that when you just kind of like put material out there that people can do on their own. So I want to do a lot more in-person stuff next year. This is stuff that does not scale. We have well over 100,000 paying customers. We have a very big business. Tons and tons of customers, millions of people use Basecamp. I can't possibly demo it for all of them, right? But  I don't have to. What if I can demo Basecamp to 200 companies a year? What if I could do that? How much better would the product be? How much better off would they be and how much better off would we be? I think it's undeniable that there'd be a deep value there, and I want to think about doing that kind of stuff. Anyway, that's very different from how we've ever done things before. So that's just one of the things I'm thinking about, but I just feel it's really important to shake up your own thoughts from time to time. David Kadavy 44:02 Yeah, and I love this idea of these insights of these things that you are taking for granted in a way for whatever reason - maybe it was an obvious solution to make the folders draggable like that - and then it just blows away these other people. I think that that's something that-- I find that myself just in trying, or I have found that in trying to find my own entrepreneurial voice or deciding what to do in my own career, is that every once in a while somebody  will make an observation. They say, "Oh, you're really good at explaining things," or something like that. And you're like, "Well, wait. I didn't know that." Was there anything like that for you personally that helped you find your own path in the early days of 37signals or something? Things that you didn't necessarily know that you were good at but you later discovered through observations like that. Jason Fried 44:58 Yeah. I'm not sure if it's a specific thing other than like a way of looking at things. So we would do work for clients all the time, oftentimes bigger clients. Like, back in the early days we'd do work for Hewlett-Packard or something. We did a website for them. And I'd be sitting in a meeting with them, and there'd be a lot of people on the table, and they'd be talking stuff through, and they'd be like-- they'd be talking stuff through, putting the ideas through their own process, which often involved a lot of people, followup meetings and a whole timetable to get something  to try something. I'd be like, "Why don't we just try it right now? Why don't we just make the change right now and just look at it together?" That, to me, was like, "Of course. If we want to see how it looks, let's just do it, and then let's look at it." For them, that was just like a revelation. Like, "What? But doesn't it have to be this, and that and approved?" I'm like, "It could be, but it doesn't have to be. Right now, let me pull out my laptop, and I'll make the change, and I'll hit reload and let's look at the page." That came from me being a freelancer. I was working on my own. I had no one else to talk to. No one else to rely on. I had to do it all myself. I did all the HTML and design. There was no process. Jason Fried 46:18 So for me, just growing up that way in the industry, helped me realize that you don't need a lot people to get things done. You don't need a lot of process to try stuff. But a lot of the clients I worked with early on, they couldn't believe-- they're like, "You're a genius." I'm like,  "I'm not a genius at all. That is like the worst label to give me. I'm actually being a simpleton." I'm just being like, "Let's just change it and hit reload." So it wasn't like a thing. It was just a way of cutting through. So what I saw there was that process creates layers, and layers and layers, upon which you then begin to rely. And you don't realize that there was a time, when you didn't have to have all those layers, but you've become used to them and you think then that's the only way. So I think what I was good at early on was coming in and cutting through that stuff, and being like, "We don't need to do all that. Let's just do it this way." And they'd be like, "What? What? You're not allowed to do it that way." David Kadavy 47:15 Again, it goes to this contrarian thinking thing. I'm trying to figure out like how much of it is your DNA and then how much of it was-- was there ever a time--? Huh. I guess what I'm trying to figure out is-- I think that, yeah, I can show a lot of  people, "Here we're talking with Jason Fried. He sees things differently from the way other people do," but somebody can't just flip a switch and start thinking in their own way or gain that confidence. Was there ever a time when you didn't have the confidence to do that, and how'd that happen? Jason Fried 47:53 Oh yeah. I mean, I've always had a world view, I think, which is things are simpler than they appear actually. Which is funny, because they're also way more complicated than they appear. What I mean by that is that things can be simpler. Like, whatever the thing you're trying to solve, there's a simpler version of that. I've just always had that in me, that I'm like, "There's no way this is the only way we can do this. We can do this simpler. We can be clearer about this--" David Kadavy 48:18 What do you think was the earliest example you can think of-- Jason Fried 48:22 Of that? David Kadavy 48:22 --where you did that? Jason Fried 48:29 I remember back before  the web was around-- the way I got started in any of this stuff was I made this program called AudioFile, which was a music organizing tool. It was like iTunes kind of way, way back, but there was no digital music. So it was just like a way to organize your CDs and your tapes. Because I had bunch, and I was loaning them out to friends and never getting them back. David Kadavy 48:51 Tapes, for people who don't know, was this thing that had two reels on it and there was this tape-like thing that had music on it. Jason Fried 48:57 It was actually tape. It was tape that moved [chuckles]. David Kadavy 49:00 It wasn't sticky. Jason Fried 49:01 Right. It was magnetic and weird. Anyway, so I would loan stuff out to friends and never get it back. I didn't know who borrowed it and I didn't know-- so I'm like, "I need to organize this stuff. I need to get my stuff together." So I started looking on AOL, actually, because the internet wasn't around. This was like the early 90s. But AOL was around. There was software boards and stuff where you could download shareware and stuff. I downloaded a bunch of these music apps, because there was lot of other people who had this problem, and I just found them incredibly complicated, and just really  weird, and strange, and ugly and all the things that-- it's still subjective, but my aesthetic was not being satisfied by their aesthetic. I'm like, "I don't know how to do this, but I need something, and I'm going to make one myself." So I just got FileMaker and learned how to do it, and made a much, much, much, much simpler version, because I just made something that I knew I needed. And it wasn't about imagining what everyone else needed, it was just like, "What do I need?" And I was able to cut right to that, and it became very successful product. I made $20,000 off this little shareware thing. David Kadavy 50:08 Just getting checks in the mail and--? Jason Fried 50:10 Yeah, and this was the revelation that I could do this for a living. So I put in the [product?]-- just like it was shareware, which is like, "You could use it for free, but if you like it, send me 20 bucks, and here's my home address." So people started sending me $20 bills, and I'm like, "Holy shit, I can do this." David Kadavy 50:29 Were there moments of doubt along the way? Jason Fried 50:31 Never, because I  didn't care. David Kadavy 50:33 You didn't care. It just happened. Jason Fried 50:33 It was for me. The product was for me. If no one used it, didn't care. And that's how I've always tried to make it, which is like-- we still make Basecamp for ourselves. We need Basecamps to run our own business. I care a lot more now because we have tons of customers and we've got a payroll - 50 people - and the whole thing. But fundamentally it's still we want to make something for ourselves, because we know there's a lot of people out there just like us who need what we need. That's how we look at it. But with AudioFile, the first thing ever, I was in high school or whenever it was, and there was never a moment of doubt because it didn't matter if anyone used it. It was a miracle that anyone did. But I needed it for my own thing, and so it wasn't even about confidence. It was like, "I need it anyway." That's how I kind of learned graphic design, and learned a little bit of software development, and learned usability, and learned about customer feedback and all that stuff I learned through those channels because I'd made my own little software thing. David Kadavy 51:32 So there are no existential crises over like, "Should I do this or that?" Jason Fried 51:40 I think the biggest one we had recently in the company was deciding to go all in on Basecamp, and then what to do with the other products and stuff. That was like an existential thing, but it was like a moment, and there was risk involved and all that stuff. Those moments still come up. I mean, deciding what to do with a product. Do we release it this way or release it that way, and how do we price it? We have those discussions and decisions all the time, but I try not to worry about it too much. I worry about it probably more than I should still, but it's like, "Let's make a call, and move forward and see how it does." David Kadavy 52:17 All right. I've got a few questions that are a little more canned questions as we wrap up. What's the biggest compromise that you've had to make in your career to have the success that you have? Jason Fried 52:30 Well,  the biggest compromise. That's a really great question. I've never been asked that question. I love when I've never been asked a question before. Those are great questions. So I made a compromise-- I'll talk about inside the business, and this is interesting because it turned out to be a great thing. So David, who's my business partner-- I'd had two partners originally in 37signals and then they both left, and so it was just me. And taking on another partner was a compromise in some ways, because it's, to me, like, "I'm running the show now, and now I'm going to bring someone else in and someone else's opinions are going to matter at that level." So it was like-- David Kadavy 53:19 And David, by the way, could be called a contrarian thinker as well, right? Jason Fried 53:24 Absolutely. David Kadavy 53:25 So lots of opportunities for you to disagree. Jason Fried 53:27 Yeah, and we do disagree. We still disagree deeply on certain things. We agree on most things, and then there are some things that are on the edges that we disagree on deeply, which is really healthy, and that's my point. Sometimes it feels like I have to give-- it would be easier if I could just do whatever I wanted, right? But the company wouldn't be better, and that's what I've come to realize, and I realized it pretty early. I'm just talking about the moment of thinking on taking on another partner, again, was this moment where I have to make compromises, and it turns out that compromises are actually really damn good things to make sometimes. But at the time I just remember thinking, "I've got it all now." And this actually includes ownership in the company. I owned a 100% of the company, and David came on as a partner and now he owns a piece. He owned more and more over time. Looking back on it, it's one of the best decisions I've ever made, but I just remember, going back, thinking about-- David Kadavy 54:28 It was a point of tension, right? Jason Fried 54:29 Yeah, absolutely. Internally. David Kadavy 54:30 It could have gone either  way. Jason Fried 54:32 It could have gone either way. Also, I talked to my dad about it, and my dad's always been someone who's like, "Never have a partner in business. Never take on a partner because a lot of them dissolve and it gets really messy and horrible," and I've been really fortunate to always be able to work with great people. But this is not a compromise I've considered recently. I'm thrilled with how things have turned out. But I just remember at the moment really feeling like I'm taking-- David Kadavy 54:57 And the two of you had worked together before that point. It wasn't just blindly going into this partnership. Jason Fried 55:02 No. Yeah, we'd worked together, and I actually encourage people to do that. I hired David-- David Kadavy 55:06 Like dating before getting married. Jason Fried 55:07 Yeah, absolutely. And I hired David as a-- David was still in school when I first met him, and I hired him. He only had ten hours a week to give me as on a contract basis to build Basecamp. Actually, before that we were working on some client work together as a contractor, because we didn't have any programmers on staff and he was the first programmer I had ever worked with. This client hired us to build an intranet for them and we're like, "We can do the design,"  and they're like, "Well, we want you to do the back end too," and I didn't know how to do that. I found David, and he did it with us. Anyway, we had experience working together on multiple levels, but it's still-- like, the moment you decide to bring someone into your business, as the remaining founder, it's a difficult moment. Even though [crosstalk]. David Kadavy 55:58 I [?] it myself. I own 100% of my business, and it would be kind of agony to make a decision like that. Jason Fried 56:07 Totally. And I think there's still times-- I'll speak for David. I'm guessing David feels the same way, that there's times David would just like to do things his own way and there's times I'd like to do things my own way. But the fact that we can't do that and we discuss these things with each other, we end up with something better. But there's also, of course, frustrating moments for everybody in every relationship. I mean, it's a relationship, right? And that's cool, but it is important, I think, when you--  I think a lot of entrepreneurs these days look for founders. They're like, "I need a co-founder. I need a co-founder. I need a co-founder." So they just go out and try and find one. You've got to date someone first, basically, for a while. I really think that's important. Because people are complicated, money is complicated, and people and money together is extremely complicated. There are few things in the world that are more complicated than that, and that's the kind of complication you're getting yourself into when you take on a partner in a business. David Kadavy 56:59 Yeah, it's almost like this commodity approach to something that's so personal, or a person. Co-founders. Like, "Oh, I'm just going to grab some milk at the store." Jason Fried 57:11 Yeah, it's not that way. David Kadavy 57:13 "I'm going to go grab a co-founder." Jason Fried 57:14 It's not that way. Especially if you're in a business 50/50 or something, like a lot of people do. They start out co-founder for 50/50. Actually, 50/50 is the worst number in business. There needs to be tiebreakers. But anyway, that's another topic. But anyway,  as far as compromises - to get back to that - I think at the moment it was a major compromise that I had to get over, but I'm so glad that I did. But it was a big moment. David Kadavy 57:41 Yeah. Well, that's a great one. I'm so flattered to have asked you a question that you hadn't been asked before [chuckles]. Jason Fried 57:45 I love that. David Kadavy 57:47 I'm sure you've been asked a lot of questions. What was the last book that you read that changed the way that you saw  something? Jason Fried 57:52 A great questions too. I typically do not like business books. I find them boring and too long, but I read something recently which I don't even consider to be a business book. A book called-- David Kadavy 58:03 It doesn't have to be a business book, by the way. It could be about-- Adrian, who I talked to, said he read a book about ants. Jason Fried 58:11 Totally. And I know that book, and he told me about it and it's on my list. But just being honest about it, the last thing I read that really changed my mind on something happened to be a business book. David Kadavy 58:23 Got you. Jason Fried 58:23 Although, actually there's-- can I give you two answers? David Kadavy 58:26 Yeah, absolutely. Jason Fried 58:27 Okay. So one of them was a business book called Turn the Ship Around, which is a wonderful book by this guy named David Marquet, who  was a captain on a nuclear sub, and he was brought in to turn the worst sub in the Navy around. Like, turn it from the worst sub in the Navy to the best, and the way they measured this was sailor satisfaction, people who wanted to sail on that ship again. There's a variety of things. I don't remember all of the details, but it was like-- let's say there was 100 of them. It was number 100. The worst. David Kadavy 58:56 Yeah, wow. Jason Fried 58:57 And they brought him in to make it great, and he did it by doing something extremely contrarian. In the military it's all about orders. You give orders. Business is often structured a lot like military. The orders come from the CEO and we all follow the orders, right? And he realized, "Look, there's 800 people on this ship. I'm one of those 800. If I'm the one getting orders, then there's only one brain on the ship. It's mine. What a terrible waste to have 800 brains  but only one of them has to work, and everyone else just does what I say. That is a waste." So he decided not to give any orders, which is something the military-- you don't do. It's the opposite of what you do. The only order-- David Kadavy 59:47 This sounds like a great book. Jason Fried 59:47 It's a wonderful book and it's a great story, and he tells it. It's not a business book at all, by the way. It's not at all. But it's sort of like-- David Kadavy 59:54 Lots of parallels. Jason Fried 59:54 Tons of parallels. But it's not a business book. He talks about how the only order he reserved for himself was the order to fire a weapon that could kill somebody. So if they had to fire a torpedo, that was still on him. Everything else-- what he did was, he said-- and it took him a while to make this work, which is what's really cool about the book is he is very honest about the failings of it initially. After he enacted the system, everything in his bones told him to step in and fix these problems, but he's like, "No, I got to let this settle out the way I want it to." Anyway, was that people were not-- so the way that it typically worked  is people would come to him, and they'd say, "Captain, what should I do?" Or whatever it is, and he'd be like, "Turn this ship 30 degrees starboard," or whatever. I don't know. They'd be like, "Aye, aye captain," and they'd go do it. He'd give the order. But what he wanted people to do instead was to come to him and say, "I intended to turn the ship 30 degrees," and then he could okay that. But the point is that his okay would just-- they're already saying what they're going to do. They have to, in their mind, already know what they're going to do. They can't come to him to ask him what to do. They have to come to him and tell him what they intend to do. David Kadavy 61:12 They have to go through that whole mental process of taking it through which is-- Jason Fried 61:15 "Because if he says yes, I've got to do this now." David Kadavy 61:17 Yeah. Jason Fried 61:16 "And I came to him with the idea." So he got people to come with intent-- David Kadavy 61:20 Accountability there. Jason Fried 61:21 Totally, and think it through and come with intent. David Kadavy 61:25 And ownership [crosstalk]-- Jason Fried 61:25 And that changed everything. Totally. And they started thinking. It took a while because it was weird at first, and this is part of  the thing, is whenever you enact something new at a company, it's very easy to fall back on, "This isn't going to work. This is too weird." But he talked about the process of getting over that and giving it space and distance to see if it would work, and it turned out that it worked and became the best ship in the navy. David Kadavy 61:47 That's a great recommendation. Jason Fried 61:49 It's a wonderful book. David Kadavy 61:50 I will read that book. Jason Fried 61:50 He's a wonderful writer and a very honest storyteller. So there's that book, and the other book is a book which has the cheesiest cover ever and also a very cheesy title. It's called the Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living, and it's like the cheesiest-- the book cover is someone doing a cartwheel in a field. David Kadavy 62:09 Stress-Free Living. Jason Fried 62:11 It's horrible. But it's this guy-- David Kadavy 62:13 Made by the Church of Scientology? Jason Fried 62:14 It looks like it would be, but it's actually the Mayo Clinic, which is like the world's best hospital. This guy who wrote it is a doctor there who sort of unlocked a couple of really interesting truths about the brain and how to reduce stress in your life,  and it's fascinating. It changed my life in terms of-- I haven't mastered the techniques, but they've influenced me greatly. The number one thing I'll tell you about it is that basically there's a sense-- what he's realized - and different religions and theologies have come to similar conclusions, but he's trying to make this very practical - is that there's two modes of the mind. There's the default mode and the focused mode. The focused mode is when you're working. He talks about when you're really into something, it's all you're thinking about, and you're cruising and you're nailing it, right? But when you're not focused and you're wandering, your mind tends to wander towards worry. It tends to wander towards-- you start having these thoughts in your head about the things you should be doing, the things you're not doing, and, "What's going to happen if I do this?" And, "Oh my God, global warming. We're all going to die." You just start-- because evolutionarily, you're programmed to do that, because if you just-- David Kadavy 63:31 It's amygdala taking over. Jason Fried 63:32 Yeah. It's like, "There's a tiger who's going to kill me, and I've got to be wary." But he's like, "In the modern world, most people don't have those things anymore." We're pretty safe. Not everywhere, but most places. So you've got to get your mind off the default mode, which is the wandering mode, and back into focus. So he helps you figure out ways. Some people do meditation. He's like, "Meditation's a wonderful thing if you have all this time to commit to it, and learn and really master it--" David Kadavy 63:59 Is that something you've tried? Jason Fried 64:00 I have, and I've never been able to do it very well. So this really spoke to me, because he's like, "I think meditation is a wonderful technique, but it's not a practical technique for most people." In fact, a lot of meditation's about just letting your thoughts come and go, and that's when you have a lot of the bad thoughts. It's very hard to really, really master that technique. So anyway, I'm not going to get into deeply, but the book's wonderful. It's really, really approachable, and there's just some really good fundamental things that have sort of changed my way of dealing with those moments when I race  towards bad thoughts, how to deal with those in a practical way. Anyway, those two books I highly recommend. David Kadavy 64:39 This is my first time asking this one. Do you make your bed? Jason Fried 64:44 No. I sometimes throw my bed. Like, I kind of just flop the sheets so it looks made up. But no, never been into that. David Kadavy 64:57 Just, one of these things I'd heard over and over again is, like, "You should make your bed," and I started doing it. Jason Fried 65:06 It's like a thing you just-- David Kadavy 65:08 It's one of these things I never did when I was a kid because it was like, "It's such a waste of time, mom. I'm not going to make my bed." Jason Fried 65:12 The reason why I don't do it is because I don't like made beds. When I go to a hotel the first thing I do is I tear the bed up. I don't like them-- David Kadavy 65:20 I kick sheets from under. I hate having my feet trapped. Jason Fried 65:22 Me too. I don't like things tucked in and tight that way. I like it to be semi-presentable on a certain level, but I don't  go through the details. I certainly don't tuck things in. David Kadavy 65:34 Yeah. You maybe flatten it out a little bit or something. Jason Fried 65:36 A little bit. Sometimes, but not all the time. David Kadavy 65:38 So it's not all just a bunch of-- Jason Fried 65:39 A flop. Yeah, floppy. David Kadavy 65:41 Yeah, just flop it. When have you left money on the table? Jason Fried 65:49 All the time. David Kadavy 65:50 And what did you get in return? I guess the question I'm really asking is, what sort of values have you guided-- because money is a certain value, and then there are other values. What are the values that have guided your decision making? Jason Fried 66:06 I've never ever been someone who's been interested in squeezing the last dime or penny out of anything. I don't find that to be interesting at all. I don't find extreme optimization to be interesting, like, "How can we move the numbers by .5%? Because there's money out there that we're not--" That doesn't do it for me, and also I feel like there's a moment where - this is very non-scientific - you're doing well enough.  It's about enough. And we continue to make efforts to grow the business revenues, and we always have every year. Our revenues are higher than the previous year. Our profits are greater than the previous year. I'm a fan of that level of growth, but I'm not a fan of trying to bust our ass to make 10% growth if naturally we can just do 8. If we can just do 8, I just don't need 10, you know what I'm saying? I just don't need that, so-- David Kadavy 66:57 That last 2% is what ruins your life [chuckles]. Jason Fried 67:02 Exactly, and so I've just realized that, "Hey--" I'm just making numbers here. "If we can do 5% growth, I'm actually pretty happy with that." We do more than that, but what if we did just do 5% every year forever? That's pretty damn good still. That's wonderful. Fine. What if we could do 20% with a simple change? I'd love that, but I'm not gonna bust my ass to try and go from 5 to 6. That just doesn't interest me. So those kind of things don't interest me. What interests me is having--  I do believe in creating cushion. So I do like to have room. I don't like to feel like we're so tight that payroll would be a problem. That is something I've never had to deal with, and I don't want to deal with that. So I always want to create very healthy margins and lots of room to try to experiment and not struggle through those things. I've always worked that way, but I've never looked at the numbers and felt like I need to move the numbers in a meaningful way by squeezing. So I'm not a numbers-driven CEO in terms of like, "There's got to be a way to pick up more," but I'd also think that there is plenty more to pick up, and I'm interested in picking it up as an exercise, but not because I feel like we must. That's kind of how that happens. David Kadavy 68:32 What do you feel  like you get in exchange? Jason Fried 68:33 By the way, I'm also big fan of just profit. So getting back to that, numbers for me have never been about top line growth or revenue. It's about profit, because profit to me is food, air and water for a company and it allows the company to continue indefinitely, and that's sort of what I want. Revenues do not do that, profits do. So I'm very big in the profit generation and not just trying to grow. Companies are like, "I want to get to $700,000,000 in revenues so we're worth $44,000,000,000." If they're only making $3,000,000 off all of the effort that goes into making [?], that doesn't interest me. Anyway, that was just an aside there, but I forget what else you were saying. David Kadavy 69:15 What do you feel like you get in exchange for leaving that money on the table? Jason Fried 69:19 A lot less stress. A lot less worry. Those things. And also just, I think, time back, and also a focus on more important things, like taking care of people.  We do a lot of really interesting things for employees here that, if I was financially driven, I couldn't justify these expenses. We do some very expensive things for employees. Above and beyond salary, above and beyond benefits, but just other things. I don't need to go into them specifically, but they don't make sense from a financial standpoint, but they make sense to me as someone who wants to create great experiences for employees who spend their days working for me and I get to work with them. So those are the things you get when you don't worry about those other things. David Kadavy 70:16 Do you have a final message for our listeners? Any parting words that you'd like to give them? Jason Fried 70:22 Well, tell me about the listeners. Who are the listeners? Tell me about the audience. David Kadavy 70:26 The audience. Well gosh, I don't know. You've really stumped me with that question, Jason [chuckles].  You know, I'm bringing in people like you, and the reason why you're going to be the first guest on this podcast is because you're somebody who has played by your rules and you have very clearly worked to achieve your own definition of success, which the evidence abound in this interview, I think. I'd like for people to see, through you, parallels in their own life. Not for them to do the same thing that you're doing, but for them to give themselves permission to listen to whatever contrarian voice might be in their head or whatever new way they might have of seeing something, and to give themselves permission to go forth with it. Jason Fried 71:22 If that's the sort of the goal of the show, I think the most important thing - and it took me a while to realize this in my own life - is just to be completely true to your self and recognize  that you've got to get to know who you are and then you've got to just live that life. I don't mean give up. That's not what I mean by, "Just live that life," but what I do mean is that if you believe in doing things your way and it doesn't compute with the rest of the world, do things your way, because you know yourself and that's how you want to live. If you want to take a certain chance and everyone else thinks you're crazy but you believe in it, then do it. You really have to get to know yourself and answer to yourself, versus letting other people define your own limits and your borders. It's a little self-helpy, which I don't like about it, but it's really true. You've got to get to know yourself. Something I hear from people when I speak, they're like, "Oh, I want to be like you guys." I'm like, "No, you don't. You want to be like you." You want to be like you, because  acting is hard. Acting makes you have to hold a bunch of things in your head about a different state of the world that is not natural to you. Once you stop acting, then everything becomes a lot easier. You may succeed and you may not, but at least you're being honest and true to yourself. That is the most important thing. David Kadavy 72:49 I can totally relate to that because I know, sitting across from you, you're somebody who I followed online for so long, and I was always watching what you were doing, and reading what you wrote and things. Eventually I had to find my own way of doing things. I know I'm not Jason Fried. I'm not going do things the same way that Jason Fried does things. Jason Fried 73:08 Yeah, and you shouldn't. You shouldn't. You should do things the way you do things. I think there's a lot of copying in our industry. I think there's a lot of people who try to be someone else. This is probably not even just in our-- I think this just in the world, right? I think the earlier you realize that acting and playing a part is really  hard but being yourself is really easy, then you should take the easier road. There's nothing wrong with that, and it's actually the more honest road, and I think that you'll ultimately be happier at the end of the day. So that's my advice to people. David Kadavy 73:43 That's great parting wisdom for everybody. Thanks so much for meeting with me. It's been a huge honor, and I think it's going to be a huge help to a lot of the listeners out there. Thanks so much. Jason Fried 73:54 Thank you. Let me say this, too. I think your show has a lot of legs, because you're a really good interviewer, and you have really good, deep questions and original questions. So I'm really excited to hear all your future interviews. David Kadavy 74:05 Hearing that from you is fantastic. Thanks so much, Jason. Jason Fried 74:08 You bet. Thanks. [music] David Kadavy 74:17 So there we have it. Before I go I've got to ask, do you like books? If you do, I'd love to send you my book recommendations. About 90% of them will be nonfiction on subjects spanning from biographies to neuroscience. Just go to kadavy.net/reading/, and make sure you put one more trailing slash on the end of that URL. Sign up, and you'll get my first set of recommendations right away. You'll be supporting this show if you buy any of those books through the links in the email. This has been Love Your Work, and I'm David Kadavy. The theme music for this show is See In You, performed by the Album Leaf, courtesy of Sub Pop Records. Love Your Work is a production of Kadavy Inc.    

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  • Setting Powerful Goals with Dr. Joe White

    · 00:52:46 · The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

    Dr. Joe White is a nationally know, Author, speaker and business consultant. Joe has a true entrepreneurial spirit and it has allowed him to join the ranks of those entrepreneurs who can boast that they have never worked a 9 to 5 job throughout their adult life. His professional experience has quite varied Dr. White has sharpened his skills in several capacities. From serving as CEO and COO of million dollar companies, to speaking on stages across the country. In 2001 he started a real estate investment company buying and selling houses through out North Carolina. In 2005 he took to the stages across the country selling his Real Estate Course “How to Make 5,000 to 10,000 a month wholesaling real estate”. The course taught the successful strategies he learned and developed on buying and selling properties with little to no money down while running his company. During the 2005 lecture tour, he was asked to be the keynote speaker at the 2005 graduation of the Breakthrough Bible College in Temple Hills, Maryland. Where he was bestowed with an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters during the graduation. Sault after for his advise and insight by business start ups, celebrates and large corporations. For over 20 years he has served the entrepreneur community. Launching events like The Triad Entrepreneur Pitch Tank the number one business event in the Triad area of NC, serving on boards such as Benaiah Holdings Group a OTC publicly traded venture capital firm and serving as the NC reparative for CEO Space International, the business conference ranked #1 in the world by Forbes and Inc. magazine as” the conference entrepreneurs can’t afford to miss. Dr. White is also the co-author of The Best selling book Concrete Jungle Success Strategies for the Real World, which also features best selling author and star of the movie The Secret Bob Proctor. Dr. Joe White is currently avalible for business consulting, real estate investing coaching and speaking engagements nationally and internationally. With topics ranging from Business Strategy, Goal Setting, Real estate Investing and Entrepreneurship. To Book Dr. Joe White or get more information email admin@drjoewhite.com or visit www.drjoewhite.com   Here's the Transcript of the Interview Hugh Ballou: Welcome, everybody. The Nonprofit Exchange is about goals today. I am attending a conference and have a little bit of noise in the background. While our guest today, Joe White, is speaking, I will be muting myself so there is no noise in the background. I have known Dr. Joe White for a number of years. He is an expert in real estate. He is also an expert in leadership and goal-setting, among other things. About a year or so ago, I asked him to participate in my Nonprofit Leadership Empowerment Symposium and teach the module on goal-setting. He was so good it was better than me doing it. I invited him to come on the Nonprofit Exchange and talk about goal-setting. Joe, we have shared one of your books, the anthology, but I believe you have a book that is more about goals. Feel free to talk about that book. Joe White, welcome to the Nonprofit Exchange. Joe: Thank you, Hugh. It is good to se you again. Hugh: We have our co-host Russell Dennis who is having some technical issues, but he will be on here to ask you some really hard questions later. He is streaming it live to Facebook. Dr. White, would you tell us about yourself, especially your background working with leaders and setting goals? Joe: Hugh, one of the things I always tell people that is unique about me is I am a person who has never had a job in my adult life. In not having a job or set occupation or set system, I pretty much had to figure out goals and systems and things like that at a very early age. What made me make that decision was when I had my first kid. I was thinking to myself without an college education, What can I do to mak sure my first daughter had the type of life I felt like she deserved? I knew entrepreneurship and business would be what I needed to do. I quickly started reading. I still to this day go through about four books a week. I study everything from business to entrepreneurship to real estate to religion to spirituality. I use all of that information and put it into different systems I use to help myself and my clients. I have been doing that since the age of 16, 17. I always had some way of making income that I would create myself just basically out of my head. I did real estate for a number of years. I took every course you could probably think of, every boot camp, workshop. Quickly made a million dollars in real estate. Switched from real estate to mental health for a while. Then I started doing speaking, consulting, and things like that, working with clients around the world, helping them be better in the areas of entrepreneurship and real estate investment. Hugh: That’s more than I had previously known about you. Joe: It’s something a little different. Hugh: Absolutely. That is why I invited you on today so we could learn some more about these different areas of expertise. Let’s talk about this topic of goals. Everybody writes goals. Very few people accomplish goals. I wanted to hone in on this particular piece because I have seen you teach this before. Why have you gravitated to this as one of the topics that you teach? Joe: I think that one of the things I feel like I am known for is making things simple for entrepreneurs and businesspeople because every business has its own language. If you were to go to Spain or Mexico and you didn’t speak Spanish, you couldn’t get a lot accomplished. What I try to do is make things simple. One of the first steps I think everybody needs to learn is how to set proper goals: the foundation of which everything in your business and your life is built upon. I feel like that was the best place to start. I read Think and Grow Rich when I was 14 years old. I have been setting goals ever since. I always learn something new. I am constantly studying. It is not like I learned about goals then and I stopped. I constantly study it. What I did was simplified the major techniques of goal-setting so that the average person could understand. Hugh: I have seen you present a short lesson on this. Are you prepared to give us Joe White’s overview of setting and achieving goals? Joe: I am. Hugh: Well, I am going to be all ears. I am going to listen for a little bit. Russell has been known to take notes and come back with a really hard question, so be prepared. Joe: I’m ready for you, Russ. So Hugh, what I will tell you is the system that I use for goal-setting, I call GPS. Just like you have a GPS in your car or on your phone, the purpose of the GPS is to guide you from one point to the destination you are looking to go to. I feel like GPS was the appropriate title for what I consider to be my goal-setting system. That stands for when I do that. When I say GPS, in this particular case, GPS stands for Goals, Purpose, Steps. Sometimes I interchange “system” with “steps” because sometimes we go through the steps, and sometimes we put a system in place in order to get what we actually need to get. What is a goal? It’s something you want to achieve in your life, in your business, in your personal life, or wherever it is. Most people die within five years after retiring. The reason why they die is because if we are not growing, we are dying. If you lose your purpose for life, what I am saying is you are probably going to die shortly after. Now, some people, if they retire, they will switch to something else, whether it’s taking care of their grandkids or going to another part-time job. But if we are not constantly working toward something, it’s like there is no reason to live. Goals are that important to our life. What we focus on is what we get. That is why it’s important to find things that we have to focus on for achievement. What really makes us happy—and it’s hard to define happiness—is seeing progress. Something about progress in human beings makes us happy or feel fulfilled. If you think about it, why I say that, I’ll give you an example. When we are growing up, most of the time in the house where we live, our mom would mark with a marker over your head how tall you were. You just couldn’t wait every month to see if you had grown. I used to be that small, and now I’m this tall. I was three feet, and now I’m four feet. We would get happy or excited to see that we had grown an inch or two inches and see how tall we got. That was progression. That was a way of measuring progression. We didn’t understand that was almost like goals because a lot of people will say, “I can’t wait to get as tall as Dad or my brother.” We were really setting goals. We were using the notches on the door or on the wall as a way of measuring that and showing progression. That is basically what I’m talking about when I’m talking about GPS. Let’s set a goal. Let’s measure the goal. Let’s put a system in place for getting that goal and knowing if we are on track or off track. The other thing that I love to tell people about is what’s called goal alignment. This is what I really talked a lot about, Hugh, at your event. Most people understand the basics of goals. What they don’t understand is there has to be a balance to goals. You just can’t have a goal to make a million dollars and not have other goals. I will give you some examples and tell you what I’m talking about. I set goals in every major area of my life. Just like a car has to be aligned, if you drive a car and the car is not aligned, when you start to go fast, the car will start to shake. If you go off the road, you could crash. Something bad could happen because you are going fast and you haven’t aligned the car. The same thing happens in our life when we don’t align our goals. You have to set goals in all the major areas of your life, not just in the financial area or the weight loss area. You have to set goals in your physical area. The reason why that is important, and I will give you examples on how goal alignment works in each of those areas, is if I don’t set a physical goal to exercise and take care of my health and go to the doctor and get checkups, if I am working on these financial goals and my business goals, and I get sick or have a heart attack or something else, all of those goals now crash. Then my #1 focus will have to be on my health, so I have to have health goals. In my spiritual life, I have to have spiritual goals because a lot of times that is where fulfillment comes in, that is where balance comes in. My family life: if I don’t take care of my kids, there are so many people who are wealthy who have problems with their kids where their kids are on drugs or whatever is happening. The kids are getting in trouble. When that comes up, now you have to take your focus off the business and money and build those kids. They are in trouble because you didn’t make taking care of your kids or teaching your kids part of your goals. Part of my goals are physical and spiritual and family and friends. I don’t know about you, but I know we have all had a situation with a friend where we say, “I really need to call this person,” and then something happens. The friend passes, God forbid, and you feel really bad because you feel like you didn’t call that friend or family member before they passed. We have to have goals in the friend area. We have to have goals in the spouse area. How many people do you know who have been successful in business, and then they get a divorce and lose it all or lose half or lose the focus? Now later on they are regretting it, “I am enjoying the money, but I wish I had a better relationship with my wife or my kids.” There has to be goals in every single area of your life. You have to look at where these different areas are, where these different roles and responsibilities lie. I am a father, I am a son, and I am a business owner. You have to set goals for each of those. If you don’t, what happens is you are going to have a crash in another area that will take away from you achieving those goals. That is what goal alignment is, and that is why that balance is super important. A lot of people don’t think about that when they think about goals. The next thing is the P. Do you have a question, Hugh? Hugh: This is good stuff. You got my attention when you said people die five years after they retire. That is why Russ and I never retire. We keep pushing the inevitable later and later. This is so good. People set goals without the realization of what is the benefit. How is it going to benefit me in my life? You talked about that a little bit. Go ahead. This is extremely valuable stuff. Before you end, I want to focus on personal goals and corporate goals. We are leading a charity, church, or synagogue, so those are organizational goals. Very often, we don’t write personal goals. Then compare the two. Let me not interrupt you any more. This is really good stuff. They can comment. Russ, is your audio working yet? I don’t know if his audio is working yet. Are you there? Russell Dennis: I’m going to try. Can you hear me again? Hugh: Yes. Glad you’re here. Just know, Joe, that he is capturing sound bites in his brilliant way. He will have a chance to come back with questions. Russ, if it’s okay, we’ll let him finish his presentation part, and then I’d like to throw it to you for a few questions, if that works for you. Russell: That will work. Hugh: All right, Joe, go on. Joe: Those are called areas of management. Everybody has two main areas of management, which are the personal areas of management and your business areas of management. Each of those areas has to be aligned. You want to balance out your business area. What are the key elements in business that make you successful and set goals in those areas? What are the key elements you need for your personal life? Set goals in those areas. I used to think, I only need a business goal or a sales goal or a money goal. But I quickly learned I had to balance all those areas in business and personal. Going to the P in GPS, the P stands for purpose. It is your why. I can tell you about setting all these goals, but it doesn’t make a difference if you don’t have a why. The why is the gas in the tank of the car. It’s what makes things go. If I tell you, “Don’t touch the stove,” we would tell little kids not to touch the stove, the first thing they say is, “Why?” “Because it’s hot.” Maybe they don’t understand at first, but the moment they touch the stove, they quickly understand that it’s hot. That is the motivation, the why. Why don’t we run red lights? Why does everybody stop at a red light? Because you will get a ticket. That motivates us not to do it. We have to understand with anything we’re doing what’s our why. Why are we doing this? What feeling, reward, are we going to get from actually achieving that goal? That is going to be the motivation for us to act. If we don’t understand that why, we often don’t achieve the goal. One of the most average, normal goals that everyone wants to set is how to lose weight. The problem becomes a lot of times the why isn’t strong enough. The why isn’t more powerful than the ice cream sundae. Sometimes we have to do a deep dive within ourselves and figure out why we want it. Sometimes it’s not important enough to us. We’re okay with where we are. Sometimes people don’t go after that goal. We definitely want to build a strong why. The S is Steps or System. If you remember before there was GPS, everyone would pretty much have a map. We would get these maps from the gas station. How we would gauge if we took a trip to Winston-Salem, where I live, to Orlando, Florida, where Hugh is now, is we would look at the map and see the different cities along the way. I would see in an hour and a half I would be in Charlotte. Then I’ll be in Georgia. Then I’ll be in Jacksonville. Then I’ll be in Orlando. That was a way of us gauging we were going in the right direction. Sometimes when my GPS screws up and it sets me on the wrong road, it will reroute me back the right way. That happens to us sometimes, too, when we are doing goals. We start going the wrong direction, and we have to reroute ourselves to go back in the right direction. I’m saying all that to say if we have a goal to lose 30 pounds, we want to plan stops along the way. We want to say, “Okay, in one month I am going to lose ten pounds. Month two I am going to lose pounds. Month three I am going to lose ten pounds.” When we gauge or check, we know we are headed in the right direction. If we’re not, we know we need to do something different. We need to exercise more or diet more or whatever it is we need to do. But that is just a way of gauging if we are going in the right direction. The other thing is systems. A lot of times you don’t have to think of everything yourself. There are systems already in place created by other people that allow you to just plug and play. I am a big fan of systems. I listen to Dave Ramsay and use his budgeting system. There are different dieting systems. If you think about a company like McDonald’s, every Big Mac at every McDonald’s tastes the same way. That is because they have a system in place to make it the same no matter where you go. There are systems in every area of life that you can plug and play that will help you get the result you are looking for. Again, that goes back to that why. If you don’t have a strong enough why, you don’t move forward in the systems and actually do the things you are supposed to do. Questions, Russ? Russell: Good day. Thanks for joining us. Can you guys hear me okay? Hugh: We can. Russell: Excellent. I love the GPS. It’s really a good direction. We rely on these for our cars. We rely on them to keep us going the way that we’re going. It’s important to put the right information in the GPS, so the why is really critical. How long have you been using the GPS system, and what sort of success have you had with the people you work with in explaining this system? It certainly sounds like something that people, once they hear about it, get. Joe: I have been using it for five years. I use it a lot of times on projects. I have a lot of clients I work with. Some are celebrity clients. I am working on projects, whether they are movies, television shows, major real estate projects, or projects for hedge funds. Pretty much, even though they are all big strategic projects, some are small or some are up to ten million, the premise is till the same. There is a goal they want at the end: if it is a movie, to get the movie made; if it’s a TV show, to get the season filmed; if it is a real estate project, to raise the money in order to buy the land. It’s the same process, GPS. I have used that process with major clients to regular people. Russell: Do you find that people who work with this system enjoy using it? Whether the results they have gotten using the GPS system as opposed to what they have tried before. Joe: What I find is that people like things they can relate to something else. What helps us understand something is when we can say, “Okay, this is sort of like this.” When you can say, “Okay, I get it because I can think of a map and destinations and directions. It’s pretty simple.” The current project I am working on is for a large television show with a celebrity who has been on TV for years. We use the system for funding and getting the project done. We had great results and raised half a million dollars. I am using the system now with a former NBA player. He is raising five million dollars, and we have had great progress. We are still in the middle of it. I have used it for myself for years. I used it also on my kids. I don’t tell my kids what to do anymore because they are all in college, but I coached them. This is one of the things I coached them on. What are your goals? What type of grade do you want to get in this class? How many hours do you ned to put in? How much do you need to study? What do you need to study in? Things of that nature. I am working on my daughter now who is taking the bar. We are using GPS to get her prepared for the bar. Her goal is to pass the bar and start to practice law. So far, we are having great success with her as well. Russell: The thing with this system that makes it so beautiful is that it’s simple. But it can be deceptively simple because of the concept. Have you found people that stumble with it or just stumble grasping the simplicity of it and applying it to their goals? Joe: I think that goes back to that why piece. Most things to do with success are easy anyway. We all pretty much know what we need to do. If we need to lose weight, we know that we need to move more and eat less. What stops us from doing that is not having a strong enough why. You want something that you shouldn’t have more than you want the results that you want. I don’t think it’s so hard; I think the discipline comes into anything you want to achieve. Anything you really want, there is an element of discipline. I always think about people who pray but never take any action. There is a funny story I heard about a woman who wanted to win the lottery. She would get up every single morning for a year and say, “God, please let me win the lottery today. I hope I win that million dollars.” She kept doing it for a year. By the end of the time, He said, “Listen, lady, I need some help. At least buy a ticket.” Often that’s what I find a lot of people do. They don’t buy a ticket. Russell: When people come to you, they probably have gotten to know who you are. When people come to you, where do they typically find themselves? Is a typical person that comes to you someone who is already a high performance person, or do you get people who are stuck personally and professionally looking for solutions? Joe: I think a lot of people find me when they have vision confusion. They have a vision of something they want, but it’s almost like they don’t know how to get it. I do believe a good coach doesn’t really give you the answers, but a coach pulls the answers out of you that are already there but you just don’t believe that those are the answers. With anybody I work with, from celebrities to my kids, I find they all have the same similar issues. They know the answers; you just have to pull them out of them. Russell: Okay. I think people have an inherent genius and they get blocked. You talked about the word “belief.” I think that’s critical because I have had blockages. It’s really a matter of what I believe would actually happen. So when you meet a person and they are in that place and it is clear to you that the belief is the problem, how do you approach getting them on track? Seeing the possibilities when they are stuck? Joe: I think that there is something I use called the power of questions. Anytime there is something wrong, pray first. Then if you sit down with a piece of yellow paper and write the numbers 1-50, I say to write 50 ways to make this happen. Let’s look at the top three ways you come up with and read those top three ways every day. There is something, too, about the subconscious mind. That is when we go back to reading Think and Grow Rich. Normally I fall asleep with it playing on my audiobook, and I will wake up and play it again. Building that subconscious mind, that self-confidence, doing affirmations, redoing it every single day to build your confidence and faith in yourself, and then going back to those solutions that you know you should use and implement them. I was seeing something on Facebook the other day: Motivation gets you in the game; execution keeps you there. Russell: It is about executing. It is about taking action. For me, I have had to act my way out of these blockages more than anything else. Once you get somebody to believe, do you start on the small scale, or do you just say we are going to go into this at full speed? Do you start at a small scale and build small victories? Or does that approach vary from person to person? Joe: I think it varies from person to person because different people need different things. I have had celebrities that you would think would be much further ahead than the average person, and they really aren’t. Everybody has different strengths and weaknesses. Most people do a SWAT. What are your strengths and weaknesses? We talk about that. We need to look at if we need to strengthen the strengths or the weaknesses first. That is normally where the first place I start is. Are you the right person to be doing certain things? There are some things you maybe shouldn’t do. Maybe if you are bad at accounting or bad at money, instead of getting stronger at budgeting, maybe you need to bring in someone who is already strong at that, a CFO or something like that, to handle that particular issue. Everybody we deal with a little bit differently. Russell: Okay. I think it’s probably better to work from your strengths. Sometimes we can burn a lot of energy working on weaknesses. Do you find that that is a big part of the roadblock? Too much focus on the weakness. Joe: Most definitely. Recently, I was doing a lot of studying on how to do Wordpress to do my own website development. I felt myself spending so much time on that. I said, “You know what? The time I am spending on trying to learn this, I could have hired somebody and been doing something that actually matters that makes me money.” It’s not that it’s not important, and I like to be able to update it; I’ve got that part. Some of the design, it’s not a good use of my time to learn how to do all of that. I think we all have to look at what things we should remove from our day or remove that we don’t do. There’s something I call the time-money equation. Is this the time I’m spending off the money I will make doing the major things that I do? If it’s not, I don’t need to do it. That may be cleaning the house, cutting the grass, washing the car, whatever it is. The majority of our time needs to be spent on what h most important things for me to do to make progress. Russell: That’s a good way to measure. Does the time spent actually pay for itself? Does it pay for itself? Everybody has got a little bit of a different value. Do you tend to move people toward monitoring value? Is it personal core values? How do you help people prioritize that cost and that value, that time spent? Joe: I think there are different currencies. Sometimes we only speak of money as currency. Time is a currency. Health is a currency. So I think we have to look at what the most important currency is. Do you want to free up your time so you can work on the other areas that we talked about with your goals, keeping that system in balance? Now I am going to stop doing the things that I’m not good at. I’m going to outsource them. I am going to focus on freeing up the currency that is time so I can spend it with my family, friends, wife, or whomever, so I can achieve the goals in those other areas we talked about that are important. There are all kinds of currencies. I don’t want to think money is the only currency. Some people’s goals are not to make lots of money; they want to make enough money to be comfortable but to have enough time to spend with their family and enjoy life. There is a balance we all have to find. Russell: I believe that people just don’t have money for the sake of having money. What are the things that money are going to allow me to do? That might mean spending more time with family. That might mean vacationing. That might mean providing help or actually spending time working on a cause that is important to them. It’s a little bit different for everyone, I believe. As a group, I know you work with people from many different walks of life. Do you find that people who are what I call difference-makers—my friend Wendy Lipton-Dibner says they are people with the heart space. They are either faith-based or working with a charity. Do you mind that these folks are more conflicted than folks that work in the corporate area, or are the problems universal, regardless of the type of profession a person takes on? Joe: I think they’re universal. There may be the different currencies they are looking for. But I think it’s universal what they’re actually looking for. Some people in the heart space are looking to make a difference in as many lives as possible. Other people are looking to make money, and maybe they use that money to make a difference. It depends on the individual. Russell: How common is it when a person is sort of stuck professionally for it to be a personal heart space type of manner? Do you find that most of the blockages, regardless of what they are, can be traced to personal confusion or blockage? Joe: I think sometimes we want to repeat the same act but the show has moved on. What I mean by that is things change. When you look at commercials that have the ‘60s, ‘70s, ‘80s, and ‘90s, you will start to see a big change in fashion, but also the energy, how everybody looks. I think every ten years, the world changes. If you don’t change in that ten-year space with the world, you will often get left behind. Then you’re stuck because you’re still trying to use what worked in that ten years in this ten years. I look at some of the changes that are coming up, and I see a lot of people who are stuck. We have a system where they are doing self-driving trucks. In the next six years, they are probably going to get rid of 60-70% of truck drivers. We get self-driving cars. We have screens on restaurants that are going to be taking orders. If you are still trying to drive a truck, and 70% of the work is gone, then of course you are going to be stuck. I think what happens to people that we are not adapting. One of the blogs I am working on writing right now is what would happen if you got fired today? It’s one of the reasons I am really big on entrepreneurship and why I love working with entrepreneurs. There is not the job security that we used to have. So many jobs are going overseas, technology. I think that we have to adapt with the times. We have to always be growing. Going back to when we were talking about how when people don’t grow, they die. I think that there are a lot of people I come across who haven’t read a book since high school. They spend all their time either working or watching TV. Hugh: Russ, those are really good questions. I was going to encourage you to make them harder and harder. What Russ and I know to be true, and I have discovered this about Joe a while back, is that we in SynerVision—Russ is one of the WayFinders in SynerVision—reframe a consultant to be a WayFinder, but we also reframe strategies that aren’t working. I would want to know from Joe a couple of things. Russ, maybe you had a couple more and I interrupted you. I’m sorry if you do. But may I ask two right here? Russell: Go for it. Hugh: It’s piggybacking on what you are setting up so well. What are some of the things people do that are wrong that hurt them? What are some of the worst practices? You are giving us some best practices. What are some of the things that people should avoid doing? Russ, I will give it to you, and then you can take us out. We are in the last 15 minutes of the interview, so I will let you do a wrap, if you will. Joe: I would say number one is not being consistent. Sometimes you have the start/stop issue. They start something, they do it for a week or two, and they stop. If you start losing weight and working out, then you stop, of course your body will go back to where it was before, and then you are starting over. When they start over, they get discouraged or they can’t find that same why that actually motivated them the first time. The other thing is to listen to people who don’t have their best interest at heart. A lot of times, what happens is when you start to make progress in your life, that makes people around you who aren’t making progress uncomfortable. If you can do it, then they have to look at themselves and say, “Why aren’t I doing that?” It’s much easier to stomp on your dreams or tell you you shouldn’t be wasting your time losing weight than it is to actually do something themselves. I think that when we are starting to make change, we have to start to be friendly but not familiar. What I mean by that, even with family, sometimes we have to distance ourselves, or just show up at the Thanksgiving dinner but maybe in between that we don’t talk as much because we are working on our goals. We don’t need anything to taint that process or contaminate it. We need to stay focused on it and we need to stay consistent. Russell: Some people won’t lift you up. It’s hard to leave people behind. I think that’s kind of a common problem. If I change, I am going to start losing people. That becomes a personal challenge that creates an inner conflict. One of our running jokes that I have with Hugh is that when I am standing in a room and I look up and realize that I’m the smartest guy in there, I run like hell and find myself another room because there is that disconnect. I know the work you do has a way to build accountability as part of that system. Do you find that a lot of people make commitments to others they don’t make to themselves? In those instances, how do you help them work around that? Joe: I deal with that all the time. As a matter of fact, a coach is almost like a paid accountability partner. What I find a lot of people, and I’m guilty of this, too, is we will keep promises to others, but we won’t keep them to ourselves. When you don’t keep promises to yourself, that is actually what starts to kill your self-esteem and your confidence. Now you don’t have confidence in your own word. If you kept breaking promises to your kids, eventually they won’t believe what you say. If you do that to yourself on a constant basis, say I’m going to lose weight or I am going to make $10,000 and it doesn’t happen over a period of time, you actually lose confidence in yourself. Whether you feel it or not, it’s actually happening. What I believe you should do is either make a public declaration, like going on Facebook and saying I am going to do this by this time, because normally people will say something about it. Or you have an accountability partner who checks in with you once a week, and you tell them what you did toward your goal that week; maybe you do the same thing for them. Or you pay somebody to be accountable to. When I had a trainer, I felt like he was trying to kill me. I don’t know if he had life insurance on me or what was going on. He would ask me every single week, “Let me see your food journal. What did you eat?” That accountability does help. Russell: I have an accountability coach. Wonderful guy. Hugh knows him. He has become a very good friend: Ryan Roy. The name of his business is Justify or Just Do It. His reasons are results. I think there is a level of comfort that comes from finding a reason why something didn’t happen. Sometimes what we do doesn’t work, but do you find that you come across a lot of people that would rather be in that comfort zone than actually really looking at results? Is excuse-making something that happens frequently? Joe: I think we all do that at times. We make an excuse as a way of keeping ourselves comfortable, but it’s not getting us closer to our goals. I think that one of the reasons we have to measure constantly is when we measure something, there is no way we can deny that we are not getting results. The other thing is sometimes you have to come up with multiple ways of measuring. I go back to losing weight because it’s something we can all relate to. I know I want to do it. But I realize that sometimes I would work out super hard, eat right for a whole week, and I wouldn’t lose one single pound. What could happen is I would get discouraged, say this isn’t working, and go eat the ice cream sundae. Then I start realizing, You know what? Maybe what I have to do is measure inches, too. I have to take a tape measure and measure the inches in the areas I want to lose because maybe I’m not losing pounds but inches of fat. Or maybe I’m gaining muscle. One of the things to prevent being discouraged or getting in the zone like feeling something isn’t working is we have to find multiple ways to measure if we are making progress. There are multiple ways to see the growth. Russell: One of the things that Ryan has said to me is it took me a while to wrap my mind around the idea of celebrating small things. It doesn’t matter how small. It’s celebrate. That’s what I like about your GPS system because you are talking about pulling things apart. That’s what we try to advocate. Pull things apart. Take the larger goal. Pull it apart. Get smaller, more manageable. These little things add up to success. You get momentum. What are some of the ways that you help people build that momentum so that they are actually moving forward and are looking at things that can be measured? Joe: I think that any time you start a goal, you need a springboard. You need a way to have at least a small succession in a short period of time so the motivation stays high for you to continue. I go back to losing weight. It may be that you have a week where there is a cleanse or a fast. It’s a little simpler to do, and it gets off three to four pounds. All of a sudden, you kickstart everything. When I am teaching real estate, I give my students a kickstart course, which is a simple course with four to five simple instructions that allows you to go out and see progress instantly so you are motivated to continue. Russell: That’s it. Sometimes it’s hard. We have to look back. That’s the beauty and importance of making instant win. When somebody hasn’t been doing things, they start working with you and they’re not stuck, but you go a week and they are just on fire. You talk to them a few days or a week later, and they don’t just have a list, they start off with a list of three things. The next time you talk to them they have War and Peace in front of them. How do you help them manage that process? Does it go from one thing to the extreme to the other? They’re enthusiastic; you don’t want to dampen that. But how do you reel that in as it were to keep somebody from overextending themselves? Joe: That’s the catch. When we were first talking about GPS, we talked about setting goals in multiple areas of your life. They have to crash sometimes. Something happens in the personal life because you didn’t set a goal in that area. All of a sudden, you can’t focus on the business life. Or something is happening physically because you didn’t set goals in that area. That is why those crashes come up. If you align, that doesn’t happen as often. What I mean by that is if you think about a lot of pro athletes who didn’t study finance, all of a sudden they get a contract with millions of dollars. Life starts to go fast, and now you see all those other issues. They didn’t focus on their spirituality, so issues come up. They didn’t focus on learning their financial piece about money, so now they start having money problems. When they leave the NBA or NFL, they’re broke. They didn’t align everything, so when life starts to go fast, a crash happens. We have to balance out all those areas in our life and set goals in those individual areas from financial to physical to spiritual to family to spouse to home to auto. When I have my system in place, I have home, auto, style, fashion, everything because there has to be a balance in there that all of these things are important to my life. If I neglect them, there will be a consequence at some point in time. That’s the crash: the consequences from not actually balancing everything out. It’s simple, but it’s complicated. It’s simple because all you have to do is sit down with a piece of paper and say, “What do I want in my physical life? What do I want my health to be like? What do I want my relationship with my creator to be like? What do I want my relationship to be like with my kids? Am I once a week going to take my kids on a date?” Sometimes couples do date night; what about your kids? Have a date night with your kids where you are going to take two hours once a week to spend with each kid because you are going to have two to three kids and not know them as individuals. You have to have that individual time as well. Or what about your spouse? After being in a relationship for so many years, you start to be more like roommates than lovers. There is no romance. That’s because you didn’t set a goal for that to happen. You didn’t focus on that, so it didn’t come to fruition. I saw Hugh on his birthday, and he was out on a date with his wife at a concert. Go, Hugh! That’s GPS in the works. It worked. Keeping the juices going. Russell: I’m just wondering if he said to her, “Honey, you should probably drive because I’ve had a little bit. Because of my age and mental condition, I’ve forgotten my way to the theater.” She probably said, “Turn on the GPS.” Joe: That’s probably exactly what happened. Hugh: My wife taught me harassment is a form of affection. I’m getting some of that now. Russell: I only torture people I love. Speaking of people that we love… What happened to me is I said I was going to do some things. Your family may hear some of these grand ideas and schemes and go, “Ah yeah, there he goes again.” There could be a little skepticism from those who are close to us. It’s easy for a bachelor like me, but if you get somebody that is married and they have a family, sometimes that natural resistance that we have within ourselves, it comes from people around us. What are some ways you help people address that? That is very real. There is a lot of pressure with children, spouse, and other obligations. Joe: I believe every new ideal is born drowning. When you first come up with something in the first few minutes, the moment that you come up with it, it’s best not to share it. It’s better to fully develop it. Someone could say something negative, and it automatically starts to kill that dream because you haven’t fully completed a vision. If you are going to share that idea, don’t share it with anybody who is going to say something negative right away. Go to your support system. Go to your mastermind. Go to the people who are going to tell you how to make it happen, not the people who are going to tell you what could happen if you start to move in that way. I always believe if I come up with a great idea, I don’t even want to share it. If I come up with a new book idea, there are certain people I am not going to share it with, except for a Hugh or a Russ who are going to say, “Joe, you should do this with that,” and they start pouring into that idea, breathing life into it, giving me positive feedback. Russell: That’s important. Use the support systems that are available and keep it moving. Hugh? Hugh: I have a contrasting perspective on that. Sorry there are people being loud around me. My A of SMART goals is accountable. I find there is power in sharing it. I find motivation in like you said, Joe, when you write a goal and people go, “Let me connect you with some people. I can help you with that.” That is one powerful way of motivating ourselves with our goals, by sharing it. Another one is what Russ brought up, sharing it and people go, “You’re going to do what?” I call that motivation. Watch me! There is a twist on that piece. I think you can win. We are coming up to our last five minutes here. Russ, do you have any more questions? Or do you want to let Joe do a final tip or piece of advice for people? Russell: There is a lot. I could spend all day asking questions. But I would really love for Joe to put a nice bow on it and talk to people because they face all of these doubts. As I said before, their system is deceptively simple in the concept of its intent. Taking that initial step, taking that initial step no matter how overwhelmed you are. I would love to have you talk to people about how they can do that, how they can fight that fear and move through that. Joe: Going through the system like you said is really simple. Figure out what you want in your goal. Hugh spoke briefly about SMART goals. You could easily, and I’ll be happy to put a link up to a SMART goal sheet people can use. SMART goals is that the goal should be specific, measurable- What is the A, Hugh? I forgot. Hugh: Accountable. Joe: He said it before. Accountable. The goal should be realistic and time-sensitive. I will put up some SMART goal sheets on my website that you can use when setting your goals. I like to keep things simple, and that is why I came up with GPS. Know your goal, know why you want that goal, and know the steps to getting there. Simple steps. If it’s five steps or ten steps, whatever the steps are. One of my goals is to help 100 people make $10,000 in real estate investing. To anyone who is on the actual podcast, if they will go to drjoewhite.com/freegift, I am going to put up the SMART goal sheets. I will give them a book on actual goal setting, and I will give them my free real estate kickstart course. That is quite a bit of stuff. Drjoewhite.com/freegift. They can have all of that stuff if they go there. Russell: I put that link up in the chat. That’s great stuff. That’s wonderful. Hugh: We’ll make sure that link is in the notes for the podcast and on the page for the Nonprofit Exchange at thenonprofitexchange.org. We will put those links on that page. Russell: Yeah, I’ve got it in the chat here. This is wonderful stuff, Joe. I love your system. I am going to go have a look at that. Love to talk to you a little bit further. Joe: Most definitely, Russ. I am here to help anybody I can. I enjoy helping. I think service is super important. I want to serve and be a servant and help in any way I possibly can. We all have some things we want to achieve. We all want to be better. I would just say to everybody that now is the time. If not now, when? That is what I always ask people. Russell: Now is the time. Hugh? Hugh: Time is now. The time is now. Russ, those were really good questions. Joe, I teach goals, but like I said earlier in the broadcast, Joe did this module in my workshop in Raleigh. He did a better job than I do teaching my modules. I wanted to have him here to do that. When Russ does a module, he does a better job than me. One way I look really good is surround yourself better than you are, which is what Russ talked about earlier. Joe, thank you so much for being a guest today. Russ, thank you for being my co-host in this and crafting such great questions. Joe, we will put your information on the podcast and on the site. Thank you for the offer and the free gift for people. Joe: Thank you, Hugh. Have a great trip and a great time in Florida. Hugh: I’m loving it. Thank you.

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  • Solopreneur Hour

    · 01:15:57 · Entrepreneur Success Stories By Join Up Dots - Inspiration, Confidence, & Small Business Coaching To Start Your Online Career

    Todays guests is Mr Michael O'Neal, the podcasting master behind the hit Itunes show "The Solopreneur Hour Podcast". The top ranked business show, or The Solohour as it is known to its friends, teaching online marketing and entrepreneurship skills.  Michael is a man who quite simply without him, then I wouldn't be on the mic today. So you know where to send all your complaints too. He is a born entrepreneur with a fascinating story, of successes, setbacks, leaps of faith, and finding his unique path with the guidance of John Lee Dumas and Pat Flynn. Growing up in Philadelphia, the thought of being the host of his own podcast show was the last thing on his mind. He was a normal type of kid, obsessed with sport, finding trouble at school, and generally being a kid. But unfortunately that freedom of thought and energy changed when he was moved from his beloved Philly, and taken down to Florida, and it seems to me this was the start of him looking for his path in life. He didn’t fit in down in the Sunshine State, so as soon as he could, he got himself back up North, and discovered one of the first dots in his life that links him to where he is today…the internet. He was fascinated by the worldwide web, so developed skills to be a web designer. And that was his life for fifteen years, until unfortunately his parents both passed away in a very short time, and he found himself sitting with just $14 dollars in his pocket. He was over 30, with a decision forced upon him. Would he accept the punches that life had dealt him, or would he start fighting back? And that descision was made and he took the steps that made him “Know too much” and not want to work for anyone else again? He was going to become a solopreneur and own his own future. But how did he know he had the skills to be a success in the online arena? How did he know where his true passions lie? And does he regret inspiring guys like me to jump into the pool too? Well lets find out as we bring onto the 100th show to start joining up dots, the man on the mike, the host of the “Solopreneur Hour podcast”, the one and only Mr Michael O’Neal!   For more on the Solohour Podcast go to: The Solopreneur Hour Podcast with Michael O'Neal - Job Security...for the Unemployable By Michael O'Neal Chats with Proudly Unemployable Solopreneurs Like Himself Description They say successful people put their pants on the same way we all do. This show is about watching them put their pants on. Nominated As "Best New Show of 2013" by Stitcher Radio, Our range of guests takes us from comedy, to acting, to the NFL, to UFC and MMA, to Top Music Stars, to Millionaires, to Business Experts, to Real Estate moguls, and everything in between. Guests like Nicole Arbour, Adam Carolla, Hines Ward, Sam Jones, Tucker Max, Jonathan Fields, Derek Halpern, Pat Flynn, Amy Porterfield, John Lee Dumas, Chris Ducker, Chris Brogan, Guy Kawasaki, Mike Johnston, Rich Franklin, and many more, these casual conversations contain tons of action-inducing content wrapped up in an entertaining candy shell. Transcript Yes hello. How are we all? Can you believe it. Episode 100. We have been building up to this for well, it seems like a hundred episodes and we are finally here. We have got a man who who quite simply rose to the top and was going to be the only person who would fit the mantle of being my 100th guest. And I’ve had people banging down the doors. I had Paul McCartney phone up the other day and say I want to be on the show, I’ve heard it’s a big thing and I said to him, “Paul, unless you can get the other four Beatles to join you, it’s not going to happen” We’ve had  David Bowie crying. It’s been pathetic really. So today’s man has been nailed on to do this today, and I’m absolutely delighted that he’s on the show because quite simply without him I wouldn’t be on the microphone. So you know where to send all your complaints to! He’s a man with a fascinating story of successes, setbacks leaps and finding his unique voice. Growing up in Philadelphia he was a normal type of kid obsessed with football at school, and generally being a kid. But unfortunately that freedom of thought and energy changed when he was moved from his beloved Philly and taken down to Florida and it seemed to me this to stop him looking for his path in life. He didn’t fit in down in the sunshine state so soon as he could he got himself back up north and discovered one of the first dots in his life that links him to where he is today the Internet. He was fascinated by a World Wide Web so develop skills to be a web designer and as he’s known for 15 years until unfortunately his parents both passed away in a very short time and he found himself sitting with just fourteen dollars in his pocket. It was over thirty with a decision forced upon him. Would you accept the punches that life had dealt him or would he stop fighting back and that decision was made and he took steps that made him know too much and not want to work for anyone else again. He was going to become a solopreneur and own his own future. But how did he know he had the skills to be a success in the online arena and how did he know where his true passions lie? And does he regret inspiring guys want me to jump into the pool too. Well let’s find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up thoughts the man on the microphone. The host of the Solohour podcast, the only Mr. Michael O’Neal. Well how are you Michael?   Michael O’Neal Oh here is what I can’t even what is happening. I am so flabbergasted by that intro. OK. Two things. Number one that was the best intro I’ve ever had. And formerly Chris Cerrone had that that title of the best in show to a show I’ve ever had. But it was one of the best I’ve ever heard for anybody which is why you are so the right person for this job. Well we’re all thankful you have a microphone in front of you David. Trust me on that. Second thing is I would pay to hear Zombie John Lennon if you could figure out a way to get all four Beatles on the show. That would be cool. David Ralph Well I can do Steve Jobs every day. So I might be able to do them as well. Michael O’Neal Ah so dude that was incredible. I am . I am flummoxed. David Ralph I’m so excited to be on David Ralph’s show. David Ralph – Yeah. Go go and do that because I know you have been doing an action of me on a few shows and we’ll show you a few times night. Yeah you got a little bumper for me on my show. I have these little things that when people ask you me I have a guest on the show that I have them do a little like Hi this is David Ralph and then I get interested in this opener with Mike O’Neill and your voice is so. What’s the first thing I ever said to you. I said you have the ultimate voice for radio. Didn’t I say that you did. Absolutely. David Ralph I haven’t got the face for television but I’ve got a voice for Radio Michael O’Neal Well as long as you’ve got the radio part worked out and you have taken this thing and you’ve run with it my friend. So I’m honored. I’m honored to be at the 100 episode Mark. Thank you. Thank you. David Ralph Absolutely. It is an honor to have you here because it is amazing when you start this thing,because you started your show what was it August 2013. Michael O’Neal Eleven month ago. David Ralph Yeah,11 months ago and now you are rocking and rolling with the best of them you surround yourself with, with the Internet movers and shakers the ziggers and zagers and you know you’re going to be humbled by this. So maybe you won’t. You are an online celebrity of note. When I was saying to people is my show a lot of people sort of touch on the shows of said to me I know who you’re going to have. And I said no you don’t. And I go Yes I know who you’re going to have and ego going and going to no one. And I when Martin O’Neill and I went oh term term how did I know. Really I know. Yes yeah I did it because I had pain you know I don’t want to suck up to you Michael but the early days I didn’t know what the hell I was doing. So I just kept on saying your name over and over again or some kind of benchmark of what I was trying to achieve because you like that you’d come out the gates really and say look like a rocket ship. It’s unbelievable. But you’ve only been around so long because it seems like you’ve been here ever in a day. Does it seems like that to you? Michael O’Neal It is weird. It does feel like it was yesterday that I launched the show. It feels really really recent to me that it happened. So but then at the same time I look at the memories that I’ve had over the last 11 months and all the cool benchmarks and you know different things that have happened and, but it’s packed full of stuff right. So I think if there’s any celebrity it’s sort of a z list celebrity and only at certain conferences. But yeah it’s been it’s been an incredible journey. I couldn’t be happier with how it’s gone. And I can’t wait to see what happens in the next 365. You know I’m really excited about that. David Ralph Is there a plan to the next 365 because you seem to me somebody who is very much stimulated by the now and then. Are you somebody who knows what you’re aiming to achieve? Michael O’Neal No I’m a notorious non planner. Much to the chagrin of my girlfriend who is a total planner and if I didn’t have the you know a calendar app on my phone I would be I would be completely floating out there now because I I wake up and I look at I go OK what do I have to do today. And then I see what’s going on for the day. And sometimes that doesn’t work out for me like in a social situation because people actually make plans to go out and do things. But and I’m not one of them. And all of a sudden it’s Friday I’m like I probably should have planned to do something. Yes I watch movies tonight. But yeah I I’m in an interesting spot right now because I have had this kind of five year run of as you mentioned in the intro bringing myself in this very circuitous path from $14 and not having a clear direction to now. When someone says What do you do. I say I’m a podcast host. And that’s a thing like I. That’s what I do. So I sort of a couple of weeks ago had an occasion to kind of put the cap on that five year journey and now I’m going to be looking ahead but I haven’t quite formulated what that ahead looks like yet. David Ralph And how did you do that? How did you put a cap on that. How did you say that is five years, finished boxed up? Michael O’Neal Well it was as i say I’m I’m a notorious non-celibrator. I’m a guy that usually gets to an achievement and then continues to go without acknowledging it. And I have what is probably a weird story that you’re asking for but hey here comes. So I’ve been a Porsche fan for my whole life. And you may already know where you’re heading with this but I was a Porsche fan my whole life and I don’t know why particularly. I was I had a Volkswagen in high school and I think that maybe planted to see a little bit and I was a car guy and so you know those Porsche ads from the 80s with like the big fender flares and the big wing. I think I was attracted to that and I eventually in 2003 I bought my first vintage Porsche so I bought a 1972 11 and it was a piece of crap. I bought it in New York. I didn’t know better. I drove across country midway across the USA and midway across the country the engine blew up. So that’s how badly. Where were you when this happened. I was in the dead heart middle of Nebraska when it happened in Nebraska I suppose. You it’s nothing. It is hundreds and millions of acres of wide open like cornfields and nothing else. I mean we are I was I have a picture of my car sitting looking like it’s a panther wading in the grass. Waiting to you know to prowl and it’s just sitting there with with like a hundred miles in each direction of grass. There was no middle of nowhere when it happened and I ended up finding a Volkswagen place 60 miles away that towed me in. And the guy dropped the oil pan in the car and just giant chunks of metal came out and I’m like I’m pretty sure that’s not how it’s supposed to be. So I ended up getting a tow truck driving it from Denver where I was living at the time and picking it up. Neither here nor there. So I eventually traded that piece of crap on and got a nicer one. Not when I bought it but in 2005 and I restored this car it took me four years and 2000 hours to restore this car back to better than factory condition when I still have it now. And as part of the dynamic this one in 1969 9/11 and the 69 through 73 nine elevens are very very sought after. They are the iconic 9/11. So when you would see Steve McQueen and a picture of him in the 60s you know you know in LA MA or something driving a 9/11 he was driving one of these sort of 69 to 73 virgins. And one of the sponsors of Porsche in the 60s was a company called Hoyer which was tag Hoyer before Tagg was involved in the mid-80s. So just Hoyer and it’s a guy named Jack Hoyer and he made these beautiful tiny pieces chronographs based on race timers. So you’d have a co-driver with you as a race car and there was a race in Mexico called the career of PanAmericana and the first Porsche Carrera was named after this particular race. So Hoyer as a sponsor of Porsche created a watch based on the chronographs that they used for the race cars and they called it the Hoyer Kura. So this was a very utilitarian type watch you could use it as a race time or you could just click one of the buttons and it had this chronograph on it. It was beautiful automatic beautiful timepiece. And as I’ve been going through this journey for five years this has been on my vision board because these are about three grand and above to get one of these watches. But that was so superfluous for me because I had no i like zero money. And for me to spend three grand on something as excessive as a watch wasn’t even on my radar. So about a month and a half ago now I was in this position where I was like this could be the time. And I scoured the world. I ended up buying a 1972 Hoyer Carrera from a guy in France and it came to my house and it was more beautiful in person than I. I’d never seen one in person is more beautiful than I even thought it could be. And I remember at the mid midday I’d gone to this little swimming pool by my house I belong to this little pool club which is where I work out and I was swimming in the middle of the day two o’clock in the afternoon like Tony Soprano in the middle of a work day and thinking I just did this like this just happened. This 5 year journey comes stops right now like this is where my new journey begins. I’ve gone through this trial by fire. I’ve come out hopefully like a phoenix. I’m in a position where I can buy this watch now which is insane to think about and I’m peaceful and grateful for the life that I’ve built. And so that for me was the cap of a five year struggle. I mean a real struggle to get to where I am today. David Ralph Mr. O’Neill is a perfect story. It started and it made me think if I’m ever in a pub quiz and a question about Portia comes up you’re my man that does it to Luli you are obsessed by that and you. The amount that you were quoting then. Michael O’Neal Ah. I mean I think. I think it’s kind of a lifetime obsession for people that become afflicted by it. In fact there’s a great ad I will send it to you on YouTube and there’s an ad for the new Porsche about the time the new Porsche Carrera ad and it was there it’s a little boy. And he’s a little kid in his classroom and he’s daydreaming and on 9/11 drives by him and you just see him like looking out the window and his pencil drops and you know then he he gets in trouble. And then he runs to the you know was on his BMX bike to the Porsche dealer after school and and he you know he ends up sitting in this car and the steering wheel is bigger than he is and you see Mike raised his head he’s 12 or something and that he goes to the dealer or the guy goes you have a card and the guy goes yeah here you go and he goes I’ll see in 20 years. And then there’s this great voice over that says something like there’s a there’s a there’s a particular moment that happens with you know a Porsche fan. There’s that time you want one. Then there’s the time you get one and for the truly affected afflicted there’s the 20 years in between. And it just like it gives you the chills and my buddies sent it. I sense my body goes man. Pass the Kleenex. So I guess there is a real passion there for this. It’s a very visceral feeling that is so different because of the way they build their cars and because the engines in the rear and it’s a totally different experience than you have with with any other vehicle that yeah there becomes a real passion a real obsession with him. Did you read that because this shows about joining up dots, but do you remember as a young kid having the same kind of obsessive compulsive in both words and things when when you was a little kid running around the streets of Philly pretending you Rocky did most will keep you alive without paying him for the Michael O’Neal No no no. I was a BMX kid. Now I was I was in a suburb. I was the only gentile I was in a super Jewish town north of Philadelphia. And I was a BMX or I rode my BMX bike. I mean I was from 1984 until I mean I was racing bikes from 84 until 2000. David Ralph So Rocky wasn’t on your radar at all? Michael O’Neal No not at all. Tony Hawk and Dave you know Dave Voelker and Matt Hoffman and you know BMX guys Bob horo. They were all on my radar. I’ll tell you here’s here’s a little here’s a join up dot that is current. I rode an entire daywith real wow I just blanked on his name. That’s embarrassing really. I’m killing myself right now this is bad radio. David Ralph What  does he look like? Michael O’Neal He’s a big famous director now and he will watch films John Malkovich. Being John Malkovich won a friggin Oscar. We’re ready. Come on. With it and it might seem seamless Spike Jones for crying out loud. David Ralph Spike Jones Michael O’Neal Yeah Spike Jones the director was a dude I rode with at a place called Rockville BMX and we were just BMX or dudes riding around. And then he he became a photographer for one of the BMX magazines and then started doing filming because he did Beastie Boys first video I forget which one and then started doing independent films then did Being John Malkovich and now he is like an international you know massive director like one of the best most well-reputed directors in the world. And it was kind of cool. I mean so he did adaptation he did Being John Malkovich Where the Wild Things Are You know just just done amazing stuff. So the Academy Awards. And so a pretty pretty bad ass. He did her you know the movie Her most recent Yeah that’s Spike Jones. David Ralph So is there any similarity between the young kid in Philly and now, because from what I see across the pond and I listen into the conversations that you have with your internet guys and it does seem from this side of the pond that you’ve got a gang of friends and followers and whatever that basically control the Internet. I had Rick Mulready on the show. And I said “Do you ever feel like slipping something into Pat Flynns drink, so that the next morning you turn on your screen and see if there’s a black hole on the Internet because he’s not functioning at this time because it kind of seems not” But he wouldn’t be pushed in to slipping a Mickey into his drink in any shape or form. But you seem a little bit edgy to most of them. Michael O’Neal Yeah. David Ralph Is that because you’re from Philly. Is it because he’s a very sort of industrial Con. Its a real city you know. Its like a working class city when you’re there. Michael O’Neal Yeah I think the the edginess is something that I’m kind of a known for. I don’t know if you curse on your show but I’m kind of a no B.S. kind of guy and I’ve never been one to straddle the fence very very much. And I think what happened with Irwin what happens with a lot of these sort of Internet type celebrities is that they’re so concerned about getting the broadest audience that they sometimes come off as being a little bit milktoast or a little bit vanilla. And I come from a totally different perspective where when you think about media you think about New York Philadelphia Boston. These are like the media centers of the world. It’s where you know you go to Boston College that’s one of the broadcasting school that’s where Howard Stern went. That’s where many very famous broadcasters come from those places I went to Temple University which has an incredible media department. And when you look at the people that are iconic in history they’re not people that are vanilla. There are people that have strong opinions one way or the other and people either love them or they hate them but they’re definitely them. So they definitely have a presence. They definitely have a voice that’s unique to them. And I think I always think it took me a little while to settle into that on my show but it is ultimately as you as I developed the show and I developed my own voice I realized hey I’m not in the interest of pleasing everybody. Like that’s not my job. My job is to talk from my perspective on certain issues and try to extract really good business advice from people without them or my audience really seeing what I’m doing. And one of my favorite quotes to that is and you probably heard me say before but which just never let him see your work. You know that’s from Bill Cosby also from my alma mater Temple University in Philly and that basically means that go through your process ask your questions you know have questions written down but you don’t have to be so blatant about it. You can you can ease through you know great standup comedians do this like Louis C.K. talks you know he’ll be sputtering and angry and going through all this process on stage and you think that that’s just how he is. You laugh at his angry energy but he knows all the beats within that he knows exactly what he’s doing within that realm and that is that is him not letting you see him work on him. David Ralph When your on the mike then how much is you now being absolutely authentic and how much is it creating a mood creating an atmosphere on the show. Michael O’Neal Well it can’t. Can’t you have both? David Ralph Oh I don’t know CAN you? Michael O’Neal What are you asking? Are you asking how much is sort of pre-written and how much is off the cuff? David Ralph Well on this show for example some of the things I say I only say to get a reaction from the guest. You know do I really mean it kind of. Do I think that they will go against it. Yes. So I will say it. How much do you actually say that you believe 100 percent. Michael O’Neal Well first of all you do that because you understand this and you’re a pro. I mean this is a very natural place for you to end up. So I think that that I do very similar things to you, as you do just because yeah sometimes you want to extract some stuff from a guest that is being difficult. But yeah I mean I’m pretty authentic dude. I there’s not a lot there’s people that have met me in real life and go Oh you’re exactly like you are on the show. Yeah Im exactly like I’m in the show. I turn it on and I talk so I don’t have this, I’m not affected in any way. I just go. David Ralph So you’re not like you haven’t got a human graphic equalizer when you press record you just kind of increase certain parts of your personality. Michael O’Neal Not really. No. This is pretty much how I am. Yeah I’ll speak like I speak. I’m probably slightly dirtier in real life. David Ralph Well you don’t know where the words will land do you! Michael O’Neal I probably curse a little more which is fine. I’ve done a few podcasts now where I was allowed to do that and it did make it really nice. David Ralph Are you in the same situation as me because I used to listen to your show all the time and it was a staple diet during my transition at that time and now I’m doing this. One of the failures of me is that I don’t get time to listen to other people’s shows. I listen to your one  the other day because I just suddenly realized I had a gap but you almost become an island of your own success where before I used to listen to shows and I used to think oh I’ll take a bit of it and I’ll take a bit of it and become like a magpie. And now I don’t know what vibe is out there and I don’t know whether I’m being edgy or whatever. It just seems to be you. Speaking to the mic and I throw it out to the world and hopefully it goes well. It seems to be a fault of mine, and so do you have the same thing? Michael O’Neal No I’m exactly the same way. I’d say partially by choice and partially by by time. So when I when I do have time to consume podcasts I don’t tend to go business. I tend to go comedy. And lately I tend to go NFL football. I listen to podcasts related to that because I want to be able to clock out a little bit when I do want real inspiration. I’ve been listening to here’s the thing with Alec Baldwin it’s WNYC. I’ve not heard a better intro or production or interview style than that show. It’s his in his intros are nothing short of brilliant. I mean they’re amazing how he brings a guest on an and then how he interviews and his questions are very in-depth and he’s such a pro that it makes it really easy for me to like look at that bar and go OK that’s where the soul open for hours going. That’s what I do. I actually honestly David I find now the more that I get into this show the more I almost can’t stand other people’s shows like there so few that can capture my attention and that I feel like are being done well even with really good friends of mine that do shows I just go and that is almost unlistenable. You know it’s so. So I just don’t I definitely look far above the kind of Internet Marketing slash business world for inspiration on how I want to run mine. David Ralph because the only two that I listen to now is yours. And I went on started. I wanted to listen to every single one. And but the nerdiest and there the only two reasons. Yeah great and Nerdist is good for a number of reasons. David Ralph Yeah I just like the way it kind of flows and you don’t even know it started and it just kind of teases right. Michael O’Neal That’s right. Yeah they just start it. We kind of did that today didn’t we. David Ralph Yeah absolutely and that was the good stuff. Michael O’Neal And we talked for a while before we started recording. You know me I mean it just felt like yeah hit it. Go for it. We’ll start like Nerdist. But yeah no I think that there’s a sense there’s such a glutton of new shows out there and I don’t. but if I’m being opinionated I don’t. There’s a lot of places where people are learning quote on quote how to podcast. And I think they’re feeding them crap information.So often a big problem. David Ralph And I know he’s a mate of yours and I wish him all the success in the world, but the problem is so many people are trying to duplicate John Lee Dumas and that’s not right. He came first and he created the structure of his show, and whether you like that format or whatever that is he’s and he’s made in his own by being him. And I hear these shows and after about three minutes I think oh my god it’s the same thing again. Now I will listen to your shows and I will go all the way through. But people miss a trick don’t lay up coming back to my all the time is finding your authentic self playing to your streams. And and if you do that you create a bigger loyalty. You know if you are totally yourself people either hate you or like you but the ones that like you will love you. And that’s where these people are missing out because they’re not even being authentic to themselves they’re just kind of a middle ground. Michael O’Neal Yeah. And John would tell you and I’ve said this a million times in front of him and said do you the success of your show or his show has nothing to do with his format. And it has nothing do with him as a podcast for that all. It has everything to do with the fact that he has a financial background writes great marketing copy and has a schedule and a rigidity too. He has a military rigidity because he was in the military to his to his business. And unless you come with that exact kind of background you will not have success in that way. People think that because of the way he does his show because it’s structured and because he has these set questions and does it seven days a week that that’s why he’s successful and is completely irrelevant to that. So the problem is is like you said so many people listen to that or they go to podcasters paradise and they learn a certain way to do things. And I’m almost diametrically opposed to every single thing that they’re learning. So it’s like it’s like man I it’s it’s frustrating for me in that way. And I shouldn’t say that like I want to rephrase that I’m not time actually oppose everything they’re learning what I’m what I’m worried about is that the things that I think make podcasting successful aren’t emphasized in a lot of training courses. And like you just said finding your own voice is a number one you have to be successful. You have to find your own voice and you have to have a great brand and it’s not something that people speak about a lot. Like I took a lot of cliff Ravenscroft stuff. I’ve taken all the stuff. I’ve seen a number of course is out there a lot of them don’t pay a lot of attention to that piece and I worry that with this next phase of podcasting and what’s you know since everyone’s starting a show they’re going to find it a lot harder to sustain it unless they’ve found their own voice on their voice. And and it’s within this brand that they’ve really created. So we’ll see. But that’s the jury’s out on that. David Ralph Did you really have to love doing this because I’m going to play a speech in my Jim Carrey and I’m actually I’m going to play now and we’re going to talk afterwards. This is Jim Carrey. Jim Carrey Sound Clip My father could have been a great comedian but he didn’t believe that that was possible for him. And so he made a conservative choice. Instead he got a safe job as an accountant. And when I was 12 years old. He was let go from that safe job. And our family had to do whatever we could to survive. I learned many great lessons from my father. Not the least of which was that you can fail at what you don’t want. So you might as well take a chance on doing what you love. David Ralph Is that the true message that we should be getting across? Michael O’Neal Yes it is unfortunately the connecting of the dots joining of those two dots which is I found this thing that I love and now I have to figure out how to get paid for it is difficult. That’s a difficult journey. And that’s my that was my five year journey. Right. First not even knowing what it was that I loved. I had no idea I was going to podcast five years ago but I had an initial foray into public speaking. I started teaching social media on stage and I ended up traveling and going to 17 cities teaching people how to use social media to grow their business and I found it very like oh this is something I could be good at. And then that morphed into doing back end production on a podcast for a year and a half and just starting to understand the podcasting industry that finally morphed into me starting my own show and here we are. But it was a five year journey to find that you know like I had indicators of it and if someone in 2009 it said hey do you want to get. You want to make six figures and be a public speaker. I be like totally that be great. But at the time I had nothing to speak about. And now I do. So it’s kind of a I I do feel like you have to find something that will and you’ve probably seen this in your life with your show something that will make you walk into that studio and record an episode even if you’re exhausted or not in the mood or whatever because you truly love it and you’re excited about it. Oh yesterday. That’s how I am. Yeah I’ve had times when I’ve recorded 12 shows back to back and now I’ve. Why just because I knew I was going to do it seven days a week show and that was the hardest time I had. I had no internet for two weeks he just crashed on me and I suddenly panic but I didn’t have enough to cover. And I was going away as well. So yes seven days a week he goes out and I needed the boke. And so I did it and I started off at six o’clock in the morning and I just went through through move through and I edited and I did everything in the gap between when I recorded the next one and he just went seamlessly. And when I pressed record yes I was on I was on. Once I was off it was just like I was you know on drugs or something I was just slump too much. But it wasn’t until the very last ones that I realized actually about that passion that you’re talking about the ability to actually do it when you’re tired. I’ve gone past by and I was actually feeling ill. And I remember doing this show and the sweat was pouring off me and I listened back to and it doesn’t sound like it but I realized brain actually no you’ve got to look up to yourself as much as you do actually doing something. Yeah I’m very committed to that. DAVID It’s I have I have three sort of pillars if you will that I do I think make a good soul a partner or a successful soul a partner. And there’s there’s time freedom there’s financial freedom and there’s location freedom. And so the first one is really easy time freedom simple you walk into your boss’s office tell him to go screw himself and then you have time freedom. There you go. Location freedom. You can pretty much just get in a car and go somewhere that we have that kind of freedom in the U.K. and in the United States. Yeah there’s some complications in between. But technically you can just go do that. It’s the financial freedom part. That’s the tricky part of the three. That is a little harder. But I find that I’m so unwilling to compromise my time freedom. I’ve turned down so many more so much more money because it would compromise my time freedom like I could have a lot more coaching clients and a lot more people in my my group coaching. It’s called Solo lab. But with that I would have to commit another couple of days to taking care of them and I’d I’m willing to do that at all. Like i will i love my life the way it is right now and I can be comfortable financially I can go do fun things. And I don’t have to compromise that. And you know hopefully I can continue to grow and continue to you know make more money maybe have more speaking gigs things like that but I don’t intend on working any harder. I just want to you know work smarter maybe try to over deliver a little more to my audience and that’s what I’m looking for. Well was sensible and that’s exactly what I want to do as well because I hate these people and it’s almost like a badge of honor. But I’ve quit in nine to five job. And then you go yes I’m an online marketing do I do this I’m a diva and I cook my time and I’m doing 80 hours a week and I think right. Right. What the hell do you do that. Why don’t you just do two days hard work and have the rest of the time of it. It seems stupid that I say that. That’s right. And it’s. It does. It is counter intuitive. The thing is when my parents passed away you mentioned this in the intro when they did that. My perspective on time completely shifted and I just I. Life’s too short. So I am very much a person that says both. When someone says would you like this or this. I say both. When I get an opportunity to do something I say yes. Win you know and I just do it like it’s a thing that I have committed to and not mentally like I don’t just go yeah this is what I’m going to do from now on. I just do it now I just say yeah let’s do that. That sounds fun. Let’s just go for that. I’m going to go on a hike. Yeah. Great book a ticket. You know and we just do it. And I found that that has served me really well because when I do that and I put that as a priority in my life then the the stuff that I’m not so thrilled about I still end up having to do it. It still fills in the blanks but my priority is to really extract the most that I can out of my life and I’ll tell you not a person that does that well I think as John John Lee Dumas he works probably a little more like the person you were just mentioning. He works a lot but he’s also great at saying yes when when something comes across his desk he goes yeah lets do that. And it’s like on the schedule. And I think that’s that’s part of I think what that’s part of success. To me that’s part of what success feels like is being able to do that. I remember hearing an interview with Billy Joel and the interviewer said to him Billy you’ve sold X squillion albums and singles and you’ve done these tours and you play Madison Square Garden five straight nights. What has success given you. And he just said time and that was it. He can wake up each morning and if he doesn’t want to do something he doesn’t. And that single word resonated with me hugely especially when I was in my 9 to 5 job and I realized then that things were not right. And why should I be doing a nine to five job when there are options I suppose. I began to know too much. And then once you know too much brain you realize you can’t ever go back. Michael O’Neal Yeah. It’s really really is a one way street. It also but that carries over as well into my personal life as well. And I think when the there’s ever such a different confidence now just in my life in general and I think Billy Joel would sort sort of anybody that reached a level of success has this this this underlying confidence about them that is very attractive not only to you know the opposite sex but it’s what attracts other successful people to you. There’s just there’s a subtlety in actions and just how really how you go through life when you’re confident that is very attractive to you know both both people both sexes and that is something that people pick up on pretty easily. You become a success back humor don’t you. You know the old Jim rhône thing about you know the average of you know five people to surrender a lot of people I talked to. Yeah. I mean a crappy job and all these miserable people all the time. How can I surround myself. And one of the things I say to them is you know focus on success because the more success you get and the more competence as you say they end up a successful people get sucked into your world and suddenly you created what he was saying. It’s not easy to do. But it certainly is a mindset that starts moving in that direction. That’s right. And you it’s funny you just asked that question of me is how do you now you’re on it you’re on an island so you’re you’re in the UK you’re not. I’m in San Diego so I get to have a bunch of people around me at all times. I will say though we don’t get together. I mean you know we get together as friends but I’m not in a mastermind with any of these people around me. We don’t sit there and me out. So you know to answer your question I’m mean answer answered on my show tomorrow. But you’ve got to join a group you’ve got to join a group mastermind of some sort. And there’s really no other way. If you if you’re not surrounded by those five people that that you feel are motivating you in a way that that is bettering your life and hopefully their lives. You’ve got to separate from those people and find the people that are doing that and pretty much everyone I know that’s in this you know business Internet Marketing podcasting world has some sort of coaching program. And my best advice is to get people that you really enjoy like how they speak and like how they deliver and join their group and that’s it. And you know once you’re a part of that community you’ll be a lot more apt to be motivated you know learn the things you want to learn. It’s part of the reason why I don’t need to listen to podcasts anymore because I have so many people in my group that are doing cool things. I get to learn about all the cool new stuff without having to go listen. They sort of comes to me. So so do you now feel that you’re ahead of the curve. Because when when you started the show I remember you saying it’s the Wild West and now it seems like every man Dogan whatever has made me a podcast. So do you think now about you it’s not the Wild West but you actually ahead of the curve. It’s good. Get a question. Yes and no I think it’s still the wild west. I think that people in this environment aren’t necessarily looking in the right direction to advance their business where they should be. Let me clarify that. I think inspiration for how someone’s podcast get better gets better doesn’t happen within the new podcasting community. It happens with old media. Then you go look at how you all learn how to interview you go study Howard Stern if you want to learn how to produce an an excellent show. You go you know you look at and some an NPR show or something like that like a where a BBC show something that you know pay close attention to how people are introducing guests and what they’re how they do their ads and how they integrate you know clips from this person’s body of work into their intro or into the show itself. So I think there is really a professional side to this that will ultimately come out. For me personally what I’ve realized over the last couple of months and this is something that I think you can you can sort of strap on as a badge of honor as well is that I’m a better interviewer than most. Just in general I’m more intuitive and I have more range of knowledge so I can connect those dots. You know I can join those dots. And that’s what makes for a compelling and entertaining interview no matter who you are it’s the people that have the pre-scripted questions that I think are really going to struggle because that’s that’s very exhausting to an audience. So on one side I think I’m still really ahead of the curve in that. I come from this and as do you come from this background this history of paying attention to interviewers and then sort of bringing this natural ability to the microphone that 99 percent of people don’t have. And that’s the building not only to interview someone in a business sense and extract what they do for a living but actually make an entertaining hour of programming for someone. And in my opinion they can get the business data from 80000 podcasts that are on iTunes but it’s really hard to get entertainment out of it. And that’s what I’m trying to bring to the table and I think that’s what you do a really great job bringing to the table as well because because what I’ve realized you know was a complete nobody is basically the very first interview I did was no you weren’t Yes. Stop it. Tom Mocha’s was episode your line on the line. Me right now David. And he was a huge inspiration to me so I wanted him as guest number one. And he was talking to a gentleman called John Lee Dumas and so awful who’s is CHEP never heard of him. And I went over to his show and the very first show I listened to was episode 3 2 2 which was yourself and kidding. That was I didn’t know that. Yeah that was the very first episode. And the fascinating thing about it was which got me on the show and this is my sort of join up thought was the fact that everything you see in life is normally about benchmarking against success. You see people already Veja and you go I’d like to do that but it worked for him he’s had this skill he’s got that you know he’s a natural that’s for sure. On that show on 0 5 3 2 2 you hadn’t even lunged and he was saying to you you know when are you going to go and you and I’m going to go on Wednesday or whatever it was. And I tuned in and I listened or whatever you do you click on it you don’t tune into you. But I heard you speak for the very first time and I found it fascinating because I was seeing but not some bouts of somebody finding their way. And you was saying Yeah and I had 17 downloads and it wasn’t that you were looking at success you were looking at somebody finding their flow finding them. Moving on. And that’s right. But that’s what really flavored my show was the fact that you were doing something that seemed natural and you were holding your hands up and you going really. I don’t know if this is going to work but hey if it doesn’t change we’ll move on later on. And remember you did this show and it was it was some chap I don’t remember who was with them on the on the beach somewhere and calls were whizzing past and your battery ran out half way through. Yes and yes you still put out and I thought that’s interesting because what he’s saying back is not that this show has got to be polished and perfect what he’s saying is is a journey and I’m going to improve from that and that be the last time that my battery runs out halfway through. That’s right and it was definitely the last time that happened. Yeah. Yeah it’s a good way to good insight. I see. If I were doing it again yeah I would probably do the same thing again. I was I’ve been always sort of a fan of the let’s just put it out at that at that time. I was leaning more on my hopeful interview skills than I was like ultimate show quality and since I’d already put out a couple of episodes it wasn’t that bad but I really loved the guys story. So I was like yeah there was Harry. Harry Smith was the guy’s name and. And. And I thought yeah let me let me throw that on. And why not. What happened. You know and somewhere. This is what’s so cool about this right. You heard one single episode I did from Johnny Dumas which was like a random occurrence. And look how much it’s affected both of us. Yeah. Just that one thing. So if one little episode you put out catches the right person it can literally be life changing. I will say something. I want your listeners to go to solo our solo our dotcom and I want you to go back to like three. I don’t know let’s say pre 70s so anything from episode like I don’t know one until episode 70 and I want you to click on those posts and read how great David’s comments are for the episodes. They are so insightful and brilliant. And you do such a great job summarizing. I think I even wrote you once and said Do you want to write my show summaries. Remember that you did and it was just that the crux of me doing this and I knew I was just going to stall so cool. So I am and you still you just did it the other day when you were that episode you listened to. You do such a great job summarizing. You’re going to be such a smash successful podcast. David Yeah I have no doubt whatsoever you are going to I hope you will let us be on your show someday when you do these live broadcasts in front of you know a hundred thousand people at the Wembley Stadium. Did you know when you start this and I’m really going to open up here so I don’t really have a Chevez. But when you start based you want it to be so good and you want it to be brought in and you kind of. There were job. You look back on them and you go OK yeah that wasn’t quite where I wanted to be but it was all right. And then you hit sort milestones and you listened back to some of these shows I don’t know if you listen to yours and I thought oh that was a bit closer to what I had in my head my original vision. And I got to show it E.T. and that’s when I suddenly realize Michael that was the host of a show and it was my responsibility to be the host to even I think he was too grateful for people giving up their time to be on my show. I it was a complete mind set. Now I want this to be the biggest show out there. I absolutely do. And it’s all I can focus in on and it’s in many ways it’s killing me or my life is totally out of whack. But all I want is about is the number one thing upset that on any show because it sounds a bit arrogant really I’m upset. Once we’ve stopped recording them when somebody asked me about it that is where I want to be and I want to be join up not as a brand. Exactly as you say. Right. Because it’s one of those things that you kind of go join up towards. What does it mean. And I’m very aware of if you provide quality and content as quality brand in many ways take care of itself. It’s like we always talk in the early episode the name that was always mentioned was Pat Flynn. And you know he’s got that classic smart passive income and you forget that’s a premium brand but actually he’s only three words put together and he’s because he’s provided that great content and quality and value. But it becomes the kind of the trust word where what he’s trying to achieve. That’s right in he that he can live that now. But I actually want I want to focus on something you said just before that you will be bigger than him and so will I. And I know I don’t mean that like he doesn’t have the same aspirations as you do. Right. And I’m saying in terms of podcasts in terms of like Pat wants to speak I’m not speaking for him here but just knowing what I know about him. He he is sort of the crash test dummy of internet marketers. So he does all these really cool things on the web. I want my show to become about like I want to. I want to be interviewing complete legitimate A-listers you know and finding out about their kind of business and so normal journey. That’s where I will see the show going. And because of that if when and if I get to that point. The show the podcast itself will be bigger than all of the internet marketing type podcasts. Does that make sense. Yeah it’ll be way bigger than that. It’ll be more like Nerdist. You know Chris Hardwick gets killer guests on his show and that’s why his podcast is you know number one number two number three on iTunes overall. And so it’s it’s one of those things that that I it’s what I aspire to do as well is to get working within this world like real A-list category of people because I think that they’ll appreciate talking about their journey. And so that’s where I want to head with that. Also I was very strategic and I changed direction. I realized that when I started I was just throwing out the net to anyone and anyone would jump on the show. I would have them round about sort of thing once again I thought to myself no I can’t do this because when I was looking at other people’s shows I was thinking Oh I’ve been on my show I’ve been on my show and it was just the sort of hybrid of people doing the rounds. So I went off in a different direction. So if you listen to episode 88 I had Cathy O’Dowd who was the first woman to hit the summit of Everest from both sides. I’ve got the first civilian astronaut coming on the show. I’ve got a chap over a few years ago was worldwide news because he sold his life on e-bay and he’s just sold his life to Disney and all that kind of stuff. So I realized I had to change direction to become more unique to be more interested by the stories more. Yes. Extract out of them what I wanted to show to the world and that was my original vision but I couldn’t say Eva until later on in the journey. Yeah and that’s really what you’ve done. That’s the whole point. That’s why you will be successful because you’ve you’ve done this in a sort of a different way in your life when you look back to sort of the Philadelphia kid and you riding around on your BMX and all that kind of stuff. Well you just sort of wanting to be the classic sports kid was. If you look back and now we all going to send you back in time soon on the Sermon on the mike. No I was a show off though. I think I think I was you know a performer of some sort and the PA is I keep is that makes my colonial who he is to play better racquetball with an audience. Yes. Every single time. Yeah I think so. I think there’s that’s there that’s in there. It’s in the DNA for sure. I don’t use that a lot but it’s in the DNA. I work better in a performance environment which is presumably why I kind of screw myself on the show intentionally. I don’t I I prepare in a way where I I’ve researched my guest as you have. You know you know and you certainly listen to the show but at times you know a little bit about me and you’re able to then naturally structure questions that that dovetail into my history and that’s what a good interviewer does. I don’t write a lot of questions out sometimes intentionally and that’s because I there’s something about the performance side. I realize now that I’m I’m doing this the shows this this month I’ve got over 300000 downloads for the first time and this is a and I realize so there’s people listening and I have to perform. You know what I like it. It makes me it UPS my game. I’m live on the show. And I think I do that to myself on purpose because because I work better in that environment a lot maybe underpressure a little. Well we’re very similar. It’s fascinating. I feel like I’m finding out the real Marcantonio here. Where is the person behind the that the presenter. Because I am somebody who has spent my life doing training courses and presentations and that’s my job. I’ve never done this kind of thing. It was totally BA and I’m somebody very much likes to be on their own likes no one near them. And then when I suddenly go ping. That’s it. It’s performance time. And I don’t know if it’s showing off or trying to create a different persona for myself because that’s kind of not naturally me. But I do have the ability to raise my game and present a different side to myself if you know me deep down you would say to me different people that the people who know me from seeing where I allow them to see me they would say yeah you it’s like I’m on the mike as you are when you normally doing those things because I’m letting them see what they want to see. Yeah. Yeah I mean I think there’s there’s an element of that and again I want people to understand this is why we and we talked earlier about sort of what John brought to the table. And I’m you know people look at my show and say it’s it’s been it’s it’s been pretty successful in the first 11 months just overall debt is not that’s not a fluke because I didn’t just start in August of 2013 with kind of media. You know I’ve been a professional drummer my whole life. I’ve performed I’ve been on I’ve been a racer I’ve been you know a competitive racquetball player for for many many tournaments for many many years now and before that it was tennis. So I’ve always been performing in some way or the other. I I coached for five years on teaching people social media in front of huge audiences. I’ve played Red Rocks in front of 10000 people like me being on a microphone and being natural at it is not something that happened overnight. It’s a it’s this is something that you walked in with. You’ve been training for years before you turned a mike on yourself. So it’s kind of like Yeah right yeah. You were new to podcasting but not nuda trying to translate a concept from one person to an audience like that’s something you’ve been doing for a long time. So so that’s I think that it’s a bit of a misnomer within our industry that yeah anybody can you know podcast or anybody can start blah blah blah. That’s kind of cool I get it. Yes technically you can turn on an app you can go to boss jock on your iPhone and upload it to clips and you’ve got a podcast but can you do it. Well can you do it so that when someone switches from morning radio or Howard Stern or the BBC to your podcast that they don’t notice a huge drop off in quality or you know sound quality interview quality production quality that’s that’s what I try to bring the table and I think you do the same thing. So is that what you’re saying really and I’m going to play the words of Steve Jobs because he says it very well as well but no experience is wasted. It doesn’t matter what you’ve done in your life you will pull elements and you extract what you need to create your new path. Out 100 percent. Absolutely yes. Everything you’ve done up until this point is does training for you for this next phase. When I have people on their show and we have these episodes called Find your swing I want to find out everything that person has done because it find your swing is like well what do I do. Like what am I naturally gifted at how can I make money off of something that I really enjoy that I’m passionate about that’s what finding your swing is. And it’s I want to find out like what you did when you were a kid. Were you an athlete did you or you or you a professional knitter you like to knit hats. You know like what is it what do you do. And when people can start accessing those things that they’ve done their whole lives they’re really gifted and I like to find ways that we can use those talents in whatever their next business endeavor is. We call about connecting our past to build our future and here. And one of the names as come out is if you really want to know your passion really want to know what you’re naturally good at. Don’t think about what you were doing in adult life because very much you would have been taking a responsibility for a wage or whatever. Look at what you was doing as a kid when you weren’t being paid for it. And if you was a drama when you was a kid and you loved doing it then try and look at something that would do that. And he says that exactly the same way as you do it and you’ll find your swing episodes. That’s right. And I and I love those. Again that’s another instance where we totally put ourselves on the spot. I have a co-host. Her name is Dawn Mars. For those episodes and we never read the questions first. Like I only you know sometimes I glance at them to see just a copy and paste them into my Evernote when we’re doing the show. But we were reading them and answering them live and which again has another element of pressure that we’ve got to come up with an answer and these people are literally like I’ve had people that have taken what we’ve said on the show. They’ve made a business from it like the next day they’ve gone and done it. So it’s it can be a little daunting. And I was going to ask you earlier you know your show’s growing now and this this will be big your show will have a huge audience at some point and I’ve asked this with other people that are in the space. Have you yet felt this sense of responsibility that comes with that the fact that you’re speaking into a microphone and someone’s actually listening to what you’re saying. Yeah. With power comes great responsibility. And it’s funny the very first show I released I got two e-mails and they were from people I’d never met and they were saying thank you so much for putting the show out there and I thought oh my God. And from that moment of being very aware of what I’m saying or being very aware of I don’t know where my words are landing. And of also having a conversation with my wife this afternoon saying if this really takes on. Just as I want it to really take on I’m a little bit scared but I haven’t got the value to provide the audience but I won’t and I don’t know why that is because you know success is everything you want. But I suddenly felt a pressure because I can see the downloads increasing increasing increasing. I can see the work coming towards me and I’m doing this seven days old on my own. There’s not one person that helps me and I’m also balancing other responsibilities as well. So this isn’t my only so restrained I suddenly freaked this afternoon for the exact reason that you said oh my god this is power this is responsibility. I’ve got to be careful with it. Yeah. Have you also found it. I agree. I felt that in some I haven’t had yet. Hey buddy come back to me I’m like you ruin my life but I’ll show it. That’s going to have to happen right. Someone will listen to something you’ve said or I’ve said and they’re going to do it and it’s not going to work for them and we won’t have the details but they’re going to say I listened to you when you were in my life. That’s going to happen. There’s no way it that doesn’t happen. When you’re when you grow this thing to where it can go there’s no way that doesn’t happen. Well think shows a slightly different note because you teach nuts and bolts. I think with my show I talk about hope and I told you why leap of both. Yeah I really think I teach nuts and bolts because that’s that’s I feel like there’s a lot of shows that do that specifically. And I I feel like I teach more of the journey and then the nuts and bolts sort of fall from there. Well I think that’s the same thing. I think what you do you you talk about the journey you get the cogs working in your own brain and brain when you throw out the nuts and bolts which you probably don’t think have got value as such. You’re already using those cokes and you’re thinking yeah I can use that yeah I can tell you that that’s exactly what happened with me. You know I couldn’t see how to do this because I’ve never done this. But just by you having conversations with people you take the element and you take the element and you take that element and what do you do. He’s been up to you as an individual to put it together. Yeah I actually find myself pretty. I can be very socially awkward at the beginning and I sometimes I’ve actually accessed my I’ve switched into interview mode when I’m meeting someone in real life. I just watch on Mike I like my mentally switch on a podcast microphone in front of me and I found it so much easier to have conversations with people that way. So that’s kind of interesting to me is bizarre. I’m getting ready to play Steve Jobs now because I’m fascinated to see your spin on this. And this is the fulcrum of the whole show so this is a job. Don’t be free to do that of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward. When I was in college but it was very very clear looking backwards. Ten years later again you can’t connect the dots looking forward. You can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something your gut destiny life karma whatever because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart even when it leads you off the well-worn path. And that will make all the difference. When I’m going to ask a different question because I think you’ve answered it already but you will say yes you believe in it. But why do you think so many people don’t believe in that. I think that’s a lot. Most people get hung up on the how of something for example I think that we we pick a point be right we pick a point B that’s there’s the dot so I’ve got this I want to I want to do I want to have this show. And to get this show together I need this this this this this this this and we get stuck in the details of the this this this this this instead of. All right I’m going to sort of flow through this. All I want to do is get to that thing. I’m not sure how I’m going to get there yet but I’m going to I don’t really know. And by the time you get there and you look back and go wow that is not the path that all that I was going to take. My favorite metaphor. Or maybe it’s an analogy I forget but for this is if you and I were sitting at a cafe and I there was you know a three story building across the street and I said David there’s a hundred thousand pounds sitting in a bag on the roof of that building across the street. You have 15 minutes to get it. How fast would you be out the door to go get that money. I’d be on the right run the window right but you wouldn’t know how you were going to get it. You had no idea how to get to the roof of that building. You just knew you were getting to the roof. You don’t know if you’re going to you know helicopter down you know if you’re going to call the fire department to take you up there or you know scale like Spiderman but you’re getting to the roof of that building somehow. And I think what successful entrepreneurs do is they just keep their eye on that that you know that bag the bag that’s on the roof. They’re not quite as concerned about the how part. And we very much get concerned about the how part. And the second piece of that is when someone gives you an opportunity I just said this a little earlier when someone gives you an opportunity. Our instinctive reaction is to say no because of this this and this versus just instinctive to say yes and I’m going to figure out how to work out this this and this and that is a huge mental shift even though it’s very subtle. It’s just yes and no. But if you’ll find that people in your world that are really successful or really look like they’re just having a great time. They’re the ones that say yes first and then figure out how it’s going to work after and most of the people that are stuck and they don’t get from that one dot to the next dot. Those are the ones that say no because you know I I can’t live in San Diego because I have kids in school or because I can’t afford the move or because whatever we can come up with 15 different ways. But in reality all that stuff can be worked out. So I think that’s how I would respond to that and I hope that helps someone. So what scares you this is probably my final question before I send you on the mike and you can have a one on one with your younger self. As you all know and you’ve got these rocking and rolling show everything’s going well you’ve just bought these the watch you’ve finished off the last five years and everything’s good and you’ve got a lovely new girlfriend. What scares you. Well when you look at what you need to achieve. What scares me. I have to say I look at the bank being intimidated or being excited. I sort of treat the same way. So I don’t get super excited about everything and I don’t get scared about everything. I gosh I mean I don’t I I can honestly say I don’t have that for the same reason when someone said you know when I was so literally I was scraping up change so I could take in an airport shuttle for a ticket that was paid for by somebody else to go speak in front of 3000 people and that in which I was going to make $5000 or whatever that weekend. A few years ago I I literally had to scrape $8 up so I could take the shuttle like in change so I could take the shuttle to get to the airport that I had. I had $18 in my bank account at the time. And so it wasn’t enough to get the cash out of the machine. So I wasn’t worried about it. I’ve never been worried about stuff like that and I didn’t even know what success was going to look like for me. But I had a feeling that I was destined for it. And that’s the only way I can say is that it was it was very innate and I didn’t know where it was going to come from but I was very patient about it. Now I was also very patient about about you know I knew I was going to meet a great woman at some point and I was able to reach you know like you said read about a year ago but but recently. So I think that I have that that vibe that that it’s the same reason I don’t plan a lot. I just don’t. I’m living very much in the moment as I go day by day. And for better or for worse I don’t plan as much as I probably could or should. But right now I’m not really you know scared about anything. I mean I could say you know the show doesn’t grow at all. But even if it doesn’t I’m live in a great life right now. So I guess I’m not even that scared of that. OK last question before we send you back this time. Is it easier to move forward when you’ve hit rock bottom and you really did hit rock bottom. Yes it is. It’s easier for me to keep perspective on it. I just last weekend went to I went to Napa Valley with my girlfriend’s family and it was a very first class trip like from private private jet from San Diego to Napa Valley which I’ve never done before my life and everything was super exclusive super like Michelin star first class and I was like man I don’t want to be here like this. No I don’t mean like I didn’t want to be at the weekend. I just I don’t want to live in that universe of that sort of high end world. And that’s it. I I remember looking longingly at a train that goes through Napa Valley and it stops at all these different wineries and I’m kind of like Man I wish I would’ve just taken the train and gotten kind of drunk at the third winery and kept going and that would’ve been a really fun day. Instead it was like this you know 12 people serving our table kind of thing and it just wasn’t me. But my my Philly boy sort of like Kragen pragmatist personality carried me through that whole weekend thinking yeah I would be fine with stopping at a fast food place now and going to another winery. We don’t have to go to a hundred dollar plate dinner you know. And so I think if anything it’s given me perspective and there’s one more piece of perspective that in my very very lowest time and it was very low. And I thank you for not like making me go through that again like 40000 other shows have but I had a I remember the current hurricane Katrina had hit the southern United States and it just decimated New Orleans. And this was literally at my lowest time. And I remember looking on the news and seeing like a little 9 year old little black kid who everybody in his family died. Right. And he lost everything like lost every piece of memory he ever had including all of his family members. And he’s this kid who doesn’t have much of an education. He’s a minority. He doesn’t have a lot of opportunity that are coming coming to him and I remember thinking all right no matter what happens I’m a white male with a skill set in United States and that’s not and that’s not to be racially insensitive I’m looking. That was a practical. OK. So no matter what my situation is I can’t complain like I’m starting with these four advantages that a lot of people all over the world don’t have. I will be given opportunities that a lot of people don’t have and that really kept me grounded like that there was this you know that some people had to struggle to get to what I had innately by birth that I had nothing to do with. So that really kept me grounded and it still keeps me grounded to this day is that I always realize that there’s people out there that do not have the same opportunities that I knew the answer. Mike are we going to put you on the Sermon on the mike now. This is when we send you back in time lost a young Marty McFly to have a one on one with yourself and if you could go back in time. What age would you choose and what advice would you say. So I’m going to play the music and when he gets out you’re up. This is the Sermon on the mike. Here. We go with the speed of this. This man. Who. I think that first of all very handsome very very talented man couldn’t congratulate now. If you could work on harnessing that Philly attitude a little bit just over the next few years if you could take the edge off of that. Not everybody is out to get you and focus on building some relationships that you will sustain forever without having that kind of you know screw you Gene. Not Eugene. I don’t know anybody named Eugene. I’m not trying to signal that that will serve you in the future. Yeah. So to some or to to to bring that and I know that was very short but to bring that in I feel like over the last few years I’ve been able to take this. There was a bit of filea attitude like where if someone slighted me in any way that was it they were erased like done. And there was no real going back. It was partially like it was a Scorpio in me that that that’s sort of like had that stinger. And I you know it’s it’s the it’s the patience I have now which is maybe a little bit of it’s I wouldn’t say less judgment because I think judgment makes for good comedy. But but it’s just maybe being a little more empathetic to people’s situations and realizing that that people aren’t always in control of their actions and sometimes they’re going through a learning process as well. And to just instantly give them the guillotine and out of one’s life is not the most productive way to go through things. I don’t do that anymore but I did it for a number of years and I think it was just a reaction to losing my parents and it being so so much. OK Wolf I’m going to lose this anyway I might as well just cut it right off. And I think that didn’t that didn’t serve me for a long time. So I’d fix that. Michael how can our listeners connect with you sir. Well you know this. Oh I know you say you say in an American Xon is better I would say the same thing if you were speaking in a British accent. By the way you going to come on my show some time. I would love to come on your show it oh no great. And Howard Jones I want him to go. Has he been on your show yet. No he isn’t knocking me back. He said he would and not me but I’ve called a few of them that sign up for it. And then you just come down and that’s a drag. Anyway the show is called the Solar Perner hour. The Web site because no one can spell pre-New or is solo our dotcom. And if you’d like some coaching give a coaching program yet. I’ve only been focused on building you audience. That’s good. Well so if anybody needs coaching including you my friend I can’t believe you’re not in solo lab. I want solo lab dotcom and we’d love to have you in our really cool community. Mancow thank you so much for spending time with us tonight joining up those dots on the 100th episode and it’s quite the world’s longest episode of ever done as well. Please come listen. Is. Yeah we were about seven minutes past what we normally do. So come back again when you have more dots to join up because I do believe that by joining up the dots and connecting up pasts is the best way to build a future. Mr. Michael O’Neill thank you so much. And thank you.

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  • Michael ONeal The Host Of The Solopreneur Hour Podcast Joins The Dots On The 100th Show

    · 01:14:39 · Entrepreneur Success Stories By Join Up Dots - Inspiration, Confidence, & Small Business Coaching To Start Your Online Career

    Todays guests is Mr Michael ONeal, the podcasting master behind the hit Itunes show "The Solopreneur Podcast". The top ranked business show, or The Solohour as it is known to its friends, teaching online marketing and entrepreneurship skills.  Michael is a man who quite simply without him, then I wouldn't be on the mic today. So you know where to send all your complaints too. He is a born entrepreneur with a fascinating story, of successes, setbacks, leaps of faith, and finding his unique path with the guidance of John Lee Dumas and Pat Flynn. Growing up in Philadelphia, the thought of being the host of his own podcast show was the last thing on his mind. He was a normal type of kid, obsessed with sport, finding trouble at school, and generally being a kid. But unfortunately that freedom of thought and energy changed when he was moved from his beloved Philly, and taken down to Florida, and it seems to me this was the start of him looking for his path in life. He didn’t fit in down in the Sunshine State, so as soon as he could, he got himself back up North, and discovered one of the first dots in his life that links him to where he is today…the internet. He was fascinated by the worldwide web, so developed skills to be a web designer. And that was his life for fifteen years, until unfortunately his parents both passed away in a very short time, and he found himself sitting with just $14 dollars in his pocket. He was over 30, with a decision forced upon him. Would he accept the punches that life had dealt him, or would he start fighting back? And that descision was made and he took the steps that made him “Know too much” and not want to work for anyone else again? He was going to become a solopreneur and own his own future. But how did he know he had the skills to be a success in the online arena? How did he know where his true passions lie? And does he regret inspiring guys like me to jump into the pool too? Well lets find out as we bring onto the 100th show to start joining up dots, the man on the mike, the host of the “Solopreneur Hour podcast”, the one and only Mr Michael O’Neal!   For more on the Solohour Podcast go to: The Solopreneur Hour Podcast with Michael O'Neal - Job Security...for the Unemployable By Michael O'Neal Chats with Proudly Unemployable Solopreneurs Like Himself Description They say successful people put their pants on the same way we all do. This show is about watching them put their pants on. Nominated As "Best New Show of 2013" by Stitcher Radio, Our range of guests takes us from comedy, to acting, to the NFL, to UFC and MMA, to Top Music Stars, to Millionaires, to Business Experts, to Real Estate moguls, and everything in between. Guests like Nicole Arbour, Adam Carolla, Hines Ward, Sam Jones, Tucker Max, Jonathan Fields, Derek Halpern, Pat Flynn, Amy Porterfield, John Lee Dumas, Chris Ducker, Chris Brogan, Guy Kawasaki, Mike Johnston, Rich Franklin, and many more, these casual conversations contain tons of action-inducing content wrapped up in an entertaining candy shell.   Yes hello. How are we all? Can you believe it. Episode 100. We have been building up to this for well, it seems like a hundred episodes and we are finally here. We have got a man who who quite simply rose to the top and was going to be the only person who would fit the mantle of being my 100th guest. And I’ve had people banging down the doors. I had Paul McCartney phone up the other day and say I want to be on the show, I’ve heard it’s a big thing and I said to him, “Paul, unless you can get the other four Beatles to join you, it’s not going to happen” We’ve had  David Bowie crying. It’s been pathetic really. So today’s man has been nailed on to do this today, and I’m absolutely delighted that he’s on the show because quite simply without him I wouldn’t be on the microphone. So you know where to send all your complaints to! He’s a man with a fascinating story of successes, setbacks leaps and finding his unique voice. Growing up in Philadelphia he was a normal type of kid obsessed with football at school, and generally being a kid. But unfortunately that freedom of thought and energy changed when he was moved from his beloved Philly and taken down to Florida and it seemed to me this to stop him looking for his path in life. He didn’t fit in down in the sunshine state so soon as he could he got himself back up north and discovered one of the first dots in his life that links him to where he is today the Internet. He was fascinated by a World Wide Web so develop skills to be a web designer and as he’s known for 15 years until unfortunately his parents both passed away in a very short time and he found himself sitting with just fourteen dollars in his pocket. It was over thirty with a decision forced upon him. Would you accept the punches that life had dealt him or would he stop fighting back and that decision was made and he took steps that made him know too much and not want to work for anyone else again. He was going to become a solopreneur and own his own future. But how did he know he had the skills to be a success in the online arena and how did he know where his true passions lie? And does he regret inspiring guys want me to jump into the pool too. Well let’s find out as we bring onto the show to start joining up thoughts the man on the microphone. The host of the Solohour podcast, the only Mr. Michael O’Neal. Well how are you Michael?   Michael O’Neal Oh here is what I can’t even what is happening. I am so flabbergasted by that intro. OK. Two things. Number one that was the best intro I’ve ever had. And formerly Chris Cerrone had that that title of the best in show to a show I’ve ever had. But it was one of the best I’ve ever heard for anybody which is why you are so the right person for this job. Well we’re all thankful you have a microphone in front of you David. Trust me on that. Second thing is I would pay to hear Zombie John Lennon if you could figure out a way to get all four Beatles on the show. That would be cool. David Ralph Well I can do Steve Jobs every day. So I might be able to do them as well. Michael O’Neal Ah so dude that was incredible. I am . I am flummoxed. David Ralph I’m so excited to be on David Ralph’s show. David Ralph – Yeah. Go go and do that because I know you have been doing an action of me on a few shows and we’ll show you a few times night. Yeah you got a little bumper for me on my show. I have these little things that when people ask you me I have a guest on the show that I have them do a little like Hi this is David Ralph and then I get interested in this opener with Mike O’Neill and your voice is so. What’s the first thing I ever said to you. I said you have the ultimate voice for radio. Didn’t I say that you did. Absolutely. David Ralph I haven’t got the face for television but I’ve got a voice for Radio Michael O’Neal Well as long as you’ve got the radio part worked out and you have taken this thing and you’ve run with it my friend. So I’m honored. I’m honored to be at the 100 episode Mark. Thank you. Thank you. David Ralph Absolutely. It is an honor to have you here because it is amazing when you start this thing,because you started your show what was it August 2013. Michael O’Neal Eleven month ago. David Ralph Yeah,11 months ago and now you are rocking and rolling with the best of them you surround yourself with, with the Internet movers and shakers the ziggers and zagers and you know you’re going to be humbled by this. So maybe you won’t. You are an online celebrity of note. When I was saying to people is my show a lot of people sort of touch on the shows of said to me I know who you’re going to have. And I said no you don’t. And I go Yes I know who you’re going to have and ego going and going to no one. And I when Martin O’Neill and I went oh term term how did I know. Really I know. Yes yeah I did it because I had pain you know I don’t want to suck up to you Michael but the early days I didn’t know what the hell I was doing. So I just kept on saying your name over and over again or some kind of benchmark of what I was trying to achieve because you like that you’d come out the gates really and say look like a rocket ship. It’s unbelievable. But you’ve only been around so long because it seems like you’ve been here ever in a day. Does it seems like that to you? Michael O’Neal It is weird. It does feel like it was yesterday that I launched the show. It feels really really recent to me that it happened. So but then at the same time I look at the memories that I’ve had over the last 11 months and all the cool benchmarks and you know different things that have happened and, but it’s packed full of stuff right. So I think if there’s any celebrity it’s sort of a z list celebrity and only at certain conferences. But yeah it’s been it’s been an incredible journey. I couldn’t be happier with how it’s gone. And I can’t wait to see what happens in the next 365. You know I’m really excited about that. David Ralph Is there a plan to the next 365 because you seem to me somebody who is very much stimulated by the now and then. Are you somebody who knows what you’re aiming to achieve? Michael O’Neal No I’m a notorious non planner. Much to the chagrin of my girlfriend who is a total planner and if I didn’t have the you know a calendar app on my phone I would be I would be completely floating out there now because I I wake up and I look at I go OK what do I have to do today. And then I see what’s going on for the day. And sometimes that doesn’t work out for me like in a social situation because people actually make plans to go out and do things. But and I’m not one of them. And all of a sudden it’s Friday I’m like I probably should have planned to do something. Yes I watch movies tonight. But yeah I I’m in an interesting spot right now because I have had this kind of five year run of as you mentioned in the intro bringing myself in this very circuitous path from $14 and not having a clear direction to now. When someone says What do you do. I say I’m a podcast host. And that’s a thing like I. That’s what I do. So I sort of a couple of weeks ago had an occasion to kind of put the cap on that five year journey and now I’m going to be looking ahead but I haven’t quite formulated what that ahead looks like yet. David Ralph And how did you do that? How did you put a cap on that. How did you say that is five years, finished boxed up? Michael O’Neal Well it was as i say I’m I’m a notorious non-celibrator. I’m a guy that usually gets to an achievement and then continues to go without acknowledging it. And I have what is probably a weird story that you’re asking for but hey here comes. So I’ve been a Porsche fan for my whole life. And you may already know where you’re heading with this but I was a Porsche fan my whole life and I don’t know why particularly. I was I had a Volkswagen in high school and I think that maybe planted to see a little bit and I was a car guy and so you know those Porsche ads from the 80s with like the big fender flares and the big wing. I think I was attracted to that and I eventually in 2003 I bought my first vintage Porsche so I bought a 1972 11 and it was a piece of crap. I bought it in New York. I didn’t know better. I drove across country midway across the USA and midway across the country the engine blew up. So that’s how badly. Where were you when this happened. I was in the dead heart middle of Nebraska when it happened in Nebraska I suppose. You it’s nothing. It is hundreds and millions of acres of wide open like cornfields and nothing else. I mean we are I was I have a picture of my car sitting looking like it’s a panther wading in the grass. Waiting to you know to prowl and it’s just sitting there with with like a hundred miles in each direction of grass. There was no middle of nowhere when it happened and I ended up finding a Volkswagen place 60 miles away that towed me in. And the guy dropped the oil pan in the car and just giant chunks of metal came out and I’m like I’m pretty sure that’s not how it’s supposed to be. So I ended up getting a tow truck driving it from Denver where I was living at the time and picking it up. Neither here nor there. So I eventually traded that piece of crap on and got a nicer one. Not when I bought it but in 2005 and I restored this car it took me four years and 2000 hours to restore this car back to better than factory condition when I still have it now. And as part of the dynamic this one in 1969 9/11 and the 69 through 73 nine elevens are very very sought after. They are the iconic 9/11. So when you would see Steve McQueen and a picture of him in the 60s you know you know in LA MA or something driving a 9/11 he was driving one of these sort of 69 to 73 virgins. And one of the sponsors of Porsche in the 60s was a company called Hoyer which was tag Hoyer before Tagg was involved in the mid-80s. So just Hoyer and it’s a guy named Jack Hoyer and he made these beautiful tiny pieces chronographs based on race timers. So you’d have a co-driver with you as a race car and there was a race in Mexico called the career of PanAmericana and the first Porsche Carrera was named after this particular race. So Hoyer as a sponsor of Porsche created a watch based on the chronographs that they used for the race cars and they called it the Hoyer Kura. So this was a very utilitarian type watch you could use it as a race time or you could just click one of the buttons and it had this chronograph on it. It was beautiful automatic beautiful timepiece. And as I’ve been going through this journey for five years this has been on my vision board because these are about three grand and above to get one of these watches. But that was so superfluous for me because I had no i like zero money. And for me to spend three grand on something as excessive as a watch wasn’t even on my radar. So about a month and a half ago now I was in this position where I was like this could be the time. And I scoured the world. I ended up buying a 1972 Hoyer Carrera from a guy in France and it came to my house and it was more beautiful in person than I. I’d never seen one in person is more beautiful than I even thought it could be. And I remember at the mid midday I’d gone to this little swimming pool by my house I belong to this little pool club which is where I work out and I was swimming in the middle of the day two o’clock in the afternoon like Tony Soprano in the middle of a work day and thinking I just did this like this just happened. This 5 year journey comes stops right now like this is where my new journey begins. I’ve gone through this trial by fire. I’ve come out hopefully like a phoenix. I’m in a position where I can buy this watch now which is insane to think about and I’m peaceful and grateful for the life that I’ve built. And so that for me was the cap of a five year struggle. I mean a real struggle to get to where I am today. David Ralph Mr. O’Neill is a perfect story. It started and it made me think if I’m ever in a pub quiz and a question about Portia comes up you’re my man that does it to Luli you are obsessed by that and you. The amount that you were quoting then. Michael O’Neal Ah. I mean I think. I think it’s kind of a lifetime obsession for people that become afflicted by it. In fact there’s a great ad I will send it to you on YouTube and there’s an ad for the new Porsche about the time the new Porsche Carrera ad and it was there it’s a little boy. And he’s a little kid in his classroom and he’s daydreaming and on 9/11 drives by him and you just see him like looking out the window and his pencil drops and you know then he he gets in trouble. And then he runs to the you know was on his BMX bike to the Porsche dealer after school and and he you know he ends up sitting in this car and the steering wheel is bigger than he is and you see Mike raised his head he’s 12 or something and that he goes to the dealer or the guy goes you have a card and the guy goes yeah here you go and he goes I’ll see in 20 years. And then there’s this great voice over that says something like there’s a there’s a there’s a particular moment that happens with you know a Porsche fan. There’s that time you want one. Then there’s the time you get one and for the truly affected afflicted there’s the 20 years in between. And it just like it gives you the chills and my buddies sent it. I sense my body goes man. Pass the Kleenex. So I guess there is a real passion there for this. It’s a very visceral feeling that is so different because of the way they build their cars and because the engines in the rear and it’s a totally different experience than you have with with any other vehicle that yeah there becomes a real passion a real obsession with him. Did you read that because this shows about joining up dots, but do you remember as a young kid having the same kind of obsessive compulsive in both words and things when when you was a little kid running around the streets of Philly pretending you Rocky did most will keep you alive without paying him for the Michael O’Neal No no no. I was a BMX kid. Now I was I was in a suburb. I was the only gentile I was in a super Jewish town north of Philadelphia. And I was a BMX or I rode my BMX bike. I mean I was from 1984 until I mean I was racing bikes from 84 until 2000. David Ralph So Rocky wasn’t on your radar at all? Michael O’Neal No not at all. Tony Hawk and Dave you know Dave Voelker and Matt Hoffman and you know BMX guys Bob horo. They were all on my radar. I’ll tell you here’s here’s a little here’s a join up dot that is current. I rode an entire daywith real wow I just blanked on his name. That’s embarrassing really. I’m killing myself right now this is bad radio. David Ralph What  does he look like? Michael O’Neal He’s a big famous director now and he will watch films John Malkovich. Being John Malkovich won a friggin Oscar. We’re ready. Come on. With it and it might seem seamless Spike Jones for crying out loud. David Ralph Spike Jones Michael O’Neal Yeah Spike Jones the director was a dude I rode with at a place called Rockville BMX and we were just BMX or dudes riding around. And then he he became a photographer for one of the BMX magazines and then started doing filming because he did Beastie Boys first video I forget which one and then started doing independent films then did Being John Malkovich and now he is like an international you know massive director like one of the best most well-reputed directors in the world. And it was kind of cool. I mean so he did adaptation he did Being John Malkovich Where the Wild Things Are You know just just done amazing stuff. So the Academy Awards. And so a pretty pretty bad ass. He did her you know the movie Her most recent Yeah that’s Spike Jones. David Ralph So is there any similarity between the young kid in Philly and now, because from what I see across the pond and I listen into the conversations that you have with your internet guys and it does seem from this side of the pond that you’ve got a gang of friends and followers and whatever that basically control the Internet. I had Rick Mulready on the show. And I said “Do you ever feel like slipping something into Pat Flynns drink, so that the next morning you turn on your screen and see if there’s a black hole on the Internet because he’s not functioning at this time because it kind of seems not” But he wouldn’t be pushed in to slipping a Mickey into his drink in any shape or form. But you seem a little bit edgy to most of them. Michael O’Neal Yeah. David Ralph Is that because you’re from Philly. Is it because he’s a very sort of industrial Con. Its a real city you know. Its like a working class city when you’re there. Michael O’Neal Yeah I think the the edginess is something that I’m kind of a known for. I don’t know if you curse on your show but I’m kind of a no B.S. kind of guy and I’ve never been one to straddle the fence very very much. And I think what happened with Irwin what happens with a lot of these sort of Internet type celebrities is that they’re so concerned about getting the broadest audience that they sometimes come off as being a little bit milktoast or a little bit vanilla. And I come from a totally different perspective where when you think about media you think about New York Philadelphia Boston. These are like the media centers of the world. It’s where you know you go to Boston College that’s one of the broadcasting school that’s where Howard Stern went. That’s where many very famous broadcasters come from those places I went to Temple University which has an incredible media department. And when you look at the people that are iconic in history they’re not people that are vanilla. There are people that have strong opinions one way or the other and people either love them or they hate them but they’re definitely them. So they definitely have a presence. They definitely have a voice that’s unique to them. And I think I always think it took me a little while to settle into that on my show but it is ultimately as you as I developed the show and I developed my own voice I realized hey I’m not in the interest of pleasing everybody. Like that’s not my job. My job is to talk from my perspective on certain issues and try to extract really good business advice from people without them or my audience really seeing what I’m doing. And one of my favorite quotes to that is and you probably heard me say before but which just never let him see your work. You know that’s from Bill Cosby also from my alma mater Temple University in Philly and that basically means that go through your process ask your questions you know have questions written down but you don’t have to be so blatant about it. You can you can ease through you know great standup comedians do this like Louis C.K. talks you know he’ll be sputtering and angry and going through all this process on stage and you think that that’s just how he is. You laugh at his angry energy but he knows all the beats within that he knows exactly what he’s doing within that realm and that is that is him not letting you see him work on him. David Ralph When your on the mike then how much is you now being absolutely authentic and how much is it creating a mood creating an atmosphere on the show. Michael O’Neal Well it can’t. Can’t you have both? David Ralph Oh I don’t know CAN you? Michael O’Neal What are you asking? Are you asking how much is sort of pre-written and how much is off the cuff? David Ralph Well on this show for example some of the things I say I only say to get a reaction from the guest. You know do I really mean it kind of. Do I think that they will go against it. Yes. So I will say it. How much do you actually say that you believe 100 percent. Michael O’Neal Well first of all you do that because you understand this and you’re a pro. I mean this is a very natural place for you to end up. So I think that that I do very similar things to you, as you do just because yeah sometimes you want to extract some stuff from a guest that is being difficult. But yeah I mean I’m pretty authentic dude. I there’s not a lot there’s people that have met me in real life and go Oh you’re exactly like you are on the show. Yeah Im exactly like I’m in the show. I turn it on and I talk so I don’t have this, I’m not affected in any way. I just go. David Ralph So you’re not like you haven’t got a human graphic equalizer when you press record you just kind of increase certain parts of your personality. Michael O’Neal Not really. No. This is pretty much how I am. Yeah I’ll speak like I speak. I’m probably slightly dirtier in real life. David Ralph Well you don’t know where the words will land do you! Michael O’Neal I probably curse a little more which is fine. I’ve done a few podcasts now where I was allowed to do that and it did make it really nice. David Ralph Are you in the same situation as me because I used to listen to your show all the time and it was a staple diet during my transition at that time and now I’m doing this. One of the failures of me is that I don’t get time to listen to other people’s shows. I listen to your one  the other day because I just suddenly realized I had a gap but you almost become an island of your own success where before I used to listen to shows and I used to think oh I’ll take a bit of it and I’ll take a bit of it and become like a magpie. And now I don’t know what vibe is out there and I don’t know whether I’m being edgy or whatever. It just seems to be you. Speaking to the mic and I throw it out to the world and hopefully it goes well. It seems to be a fault of mine, and so do you have the same thing? Michael O’Neal No I’m exactly the same way. I’d say partially by choice and partially by by time. So when I when I do have time to consume podcasts I don’t tend to go business. I tend to go comedy. And lately I tend to go NFL football. I listen to podcasts related to that because I want to be able to clock out a little bit when I do want real inspiration. I’ve been listening to here’s the thing with Alec Baldwin it’s WNYC. I’ve not heard a better intro or production or interview style than that show. It’s his in his intros are nothing short of brilliant. I mean they’re amazing how he brings a guest on an and then how he interviews and his questions are very in-depth and he’s such a pro that it makes it really easy for me to like look at that bar and go OK that’s where the soul open for hours going. That’s what I do. I actually honestly David I find now the more that I get into this show the more I almost can’t stand other people’s shows like there so few that can capture my attention and that I feel like are being done well even with really good friends of mine that do shows I just go and that is almost unlistenable. You know it’s so. So I just don’t I definitely look far above the kind of Internet Marketing slash business world for inspiration on how I want to run mine. David Ralph because the only two that I listen to now is yours. And I went on started. I wanted to listen to every single one. And but the nerdiest and there the only two reasons. Yeah great and Nerdist is good for a number of reasons. David Ralph Yeah I just like the way it kind of flows and you don’t even know it started and it just kind of teases right. Michael O’Neal That’s right. Yeah they just start it. We kind of did that today didn’t we. David Ralph Yeah absolutely and that was the good stuff. Michael O’Neal And we talked for a while before we started recording. You know me I mean it just felt like yeah hit it. Go for it. We’ll start like Nerdist. But yeah no I think that there’s a sense there’s such a glutton of new shows out there and I don’t. but if I’m being opinionated I don’t. There’s a lot of places where people are learning quote on quote how to podcast. And I think they’re feeding them crap information.So often a big problem. David Ralph And I know he’s a mate of yours and I wish him all the success in the world, but the problem is so many people are trying to duplicate John Lee Dumas and that’s not right. He came first and he created the structure of his show, and whether you like that format or whatever that is he’s and he’s made in his own by being him. And I hear these shows and after about three minutes I think oh my god it’s the same thing again. Now I will listen to your shows and I will go all the way through. But people miss a trick don’t lay up coming back to my all the time is finding your authentic self playing to your streams. And and if you do that you create a bigger loyalty. You know if you are totally yourself people either hate you or like you but the ones that like you will love you. And that’s where these people are missing out because they’re not even being authentic to themselves they’re just kind of a middle ground. Michael O’Neal Yeah. And John would tell you and I’ve said this a million times in front of him and said do you the success of your show or his show has nothing to do with his format. And it has nothing do with him as a podcast for that all. It has everything to do with the fact that he has a financial background writes great marketing copy and has a schedule and a rigidity too. He has a military rigidity because he was in the military to his to his business. And unless you come with that exact kind of background you will not have success in that way. People think that because of the way he does his show because it’s structured and because he has these set questions and does it seven days a week that that’s why he’s successful and is completely irrelevant to that. So the problem is is like you said so many people listen to that or they go to podcasters paradise and they learn a certain way to do things. And I’m almost diametrically opposed to every single thing that they’re learning. So it’s like it’s like man I it’s it’s frustrating for me in that way. And I shouldn’t say that like I want to rephrase that I’m not time actually oppose everything they’re learning what I’m what I’m worried about is that the things that I think make podcasting successful aren’t emphasized in a lot of training courses. And like you just said finding your own voice is a number one you have to be successful. You have to find your own voice and you have to have a great brand and it’s not something that people speak about a lot. Like I took a lot of cliff Ravenscroft stuff. I’ve taken all the stuff. I’ve seen a number of course is out there a lot of them don’t pay a lot of attention to that piece and I worry that with this next phase of podcasting and what’s you know since everyone’s starting a show they’re going to find it a lot harder to sustain it unless they’ve found their own voice on their voice. And and it’s within this brand that they’ve really created. So we’ll see. But that’s the jury’s out on that. David Ralph Did you really have to love doing this because I’m going to play a speech in my Jim Carrey and I’m actually I’m going to play now and we’re going to talk afterwards. This is Jim Carrey. Jim Carrey Sound Clip My father could have been a great comedian but he didn’t believe that that was possible for him. And so he made a conservative choice. Instead he got a safe job as an accountant. And when I was 12 years old. He was let go from that safe job. And our family had to do whatever we could to survive. I learned many great lessons from my father. Not the least of which was that you can fail at what you don’t want. So you might as well take a chance on doing what you love. David Ralph Is that the true message that we should be getting across? Michael O’Neal Yes it is unfortunately the connecting of the dots joining of those two dots which is I found this thing that I love and now I have to figure out how to get paid for it is difficult. That’s a difficult journey. And that’s my that was my five year journey. Right. First not even knowing what it was that I loved. I had no idea I was going to podcast five years ago but I had an initial foray into public speaking. I started teaching social media on stage and I ended up traveling and going to 17 cities teaching people how to use social media to grow their business and I found it very like oh this is something I could be good at. And then that morphed into doing back end production on a podcast for a year and a half and just starting to understand the podcasting industry that finally morphed into me starting my own show and here we are. But it was a five year journey to find that you know like I had indicators of it and if someone in 2009 it said hey do you want to get. You want to make six figures and be a public speaker. I be like totally that be great. But at the time I had nothing to speak about. And now I do. So it’s kind of a I I do feel like you have to find something that will and you’ve probably seen this in your life with your show something that will make you walk into that studio and record an episode even if you’re exhausted or not in the mood or whatever because you truly love it and you’re excited about it. Oh yesterday. That’s how I am. Yeah I’ve had times when I’ve recorded 12 shows back to back and now I’ve. Why just because I knew I was going to do it seven days a week show and that was the hardest time I had. I had no internet for two weeks he just crashed on me and I suddenly panic but I didn’t have enough to cover. And I was going away as well. So yes seven days a week he goes out and I needed the boke. And so I did it and I started off at six o’clock in the morning and I just went through through move through and I edited and I did everything in the gap between when I recorded the next one and he just went seamlessly. And when I pressed record yes I was on I was on. Once I was off it was just like I was you know on drugs or something I was just slump too much. But it wasn’t until the very last ones that I realized actually about that passion that you’re talking about the ability to actually do it when you’re tired. I’ve gone past by and I was actually feeling ill. And I remember doing this show and the sweat was pouring off me and I listened back to and it doesn’t sound like it but I realized brain actually no you’ve got to look up to yourself as much as you do actually doing something. Yeah I’m very committed to that. DAVID It’s I have I have three sort of pillars if you will that I do I think make a good soul a partner or a successful soul a partner. And there’s there’s time freedom there’s financial freedom and there’s location freedom. And so the first one is really easy time freedom simple you walk into your boss’s office tell him to go screw himself and then you have time freedom. There you go. Location freedom. You can pretty much just get in a car and go somewhere that we have that kind of freedom in the U.K. and in the United States. Yeah there’s some complications in between. But technically you can just go do that. It’s the financial freedom part. That’s the tricky part of the three. That is a little harder. But I find that I’m so unwilling to compromise my time freedom. I’ve turned down so many more so much more money because it would compromise my time freedom like I could have a lot more coaching clients and a lot more people in my my group coaching. It’s called Solo lab. But with that I would have to commit another couple of days to taking care of them and I’d I’m willing to do that at all. Like i will i love my life the way it is right now and I can be comfortable financially I can go do fun things. And I don’t have to compromise that. And you know hopefully I can continue to grow and continue to you know make more money maybe have more speaking gigs things like that but I don’t intend on working any harder. I just want to you know work smarter maybe try to over deliver a little more to my audience and that’s what I’m looking for. Well was sensible and that’s exactly what I want to do as well because I hate these people and it’s almost like a badge of honor. But I’ve quit in nine to five job. And then you go yes I’m an online marketing do I do this I’m a diva and I cook my time and I’m doing 80 hours a week and I think right. Right. What the hell do you do that. Why don’t you just do two days hard work and have the rest of the time of it. It seems stupid that I say that. That’s right. And it’s. It does. It is counter intuitive. The thing is when my parents passed away you mentioned this in the intro when they did that. My perspective on time completely shifted and I just I. Life’s too short. So I am very much a person that says both. When someone says would you like this or this. I say both. When I get an opportunity to do something I say yes. Win you know and I just do it like it’s a thing that I have committed to and not mentally like I don’t just go yeah this is what I’m going to do from now on. I just do it now I just say yeah let’s do that. That sounds fun. Let’s just go for that. I’m going to go on a hike. Yeah. Great book a ticket. You know and we just do it. And I found that that has served me really well because when I do that and I put that as a priority in my life then the the stuff that I’m not so thrilled about I still end up having to do it. It still fills in the blanks but my priority is to really extract the most that I can out of my life and I’ll tell you not a person that does that well I think as John John Lee Dumas he works probably a little more like the person you were just mentioning. He works a lot but he’s also great at saying yes when when something comes across his desk he goes yeah lets do that. And it’s like on the schedule. And I think that’s that’s part of I think what that’s part of success. To me that’s part of what success feels like is being able to do that. I remember hearing an interview with Billy Joel and the interviewer said to him Billy you’ve sold X squillion albums and singles and you’ve done these tours and you play Madison Square Garden five straight nights. What has success given you. And he just said time and that was it. He can wake up each morning and if he doesn’t want to do something he doesn’t. And that single word resonated with me hugely especially when I was in my 9 to 5 job and I realized then that things were not right. And why should I be doing a nine to five job when there are options I suppose. I began to know too much. And then once you know too much brain you realize you can’t ever go back. Michael O’Neal Yeah. It’s really really is a one way street. It also but that carries over as well into my personal life as well. And I think when the there’s ever such a different confidence now just in my life in general and I think Billy Joel would sort sort of anybody that reached a level of success has this this this underlying confidence about them that is very attractive not only to you know the opposite sex but it’s what attracts other successful people to you. There’s just there’s a subtlety in actions and just how really how you go through life when you’re confident that is very attractive to you know both both people both sexes and that is something that people pick up on pretty easily. You become a success back humor don’t you. You know the old Jim rhône thing about you know the average of you know five people to surrender a lot of people I talked to. Yeah. I mean a crappy job and all these miserable people all the time. How can I surround myself. And one of the things I say to them is you know focus on success because the more success you get and the more competence as you say they end up a successful people get sucked into your world and suddenly you created what he was saying. It’s not easy to do. But it certainly is a mindset that starts moving in that direction. That’s right. And you it’s funny you just asked that question of me is how do you now you’re on it you’re on an island so you’re you’re in the UK you’re not. I’m in San Diego so I get to have a bunch of people around me at all times. I will say though we don’t get together. I mean you know we get together as friends but I’m not in a mastermind with any of these people around me. We don’t sit there and me out. So you know to answer your question I’m mean answer answered on my show tomorrow. But you’ve got to join a group you’ve got to join a group mastermind of some sort. And there’s really no other way. If you if you’re not surrounded by those five people that that you feel are motivating you in a way that that is bettering your life and hopefully their lives. You’ve got to separate from those people and find the people that are doing that and pretty much everyone I know that’s in this you know business Internet Marketing podcasting world has some sort of coaching program. And my best advice is to get people that you really enjoy like how they speak and like how they deliver and join their group and that’s it. And you know once you’re a part of that community you’ll be a lot more apt to be motivated you know learn the things you want to learn. It’s part of the reason why I don’t need to listen to podcasts anymore because I have so many people in my group that are doing cool things. I get to learn about all the cool new stuff without having to go listen. They sort of comes to me. So so do you now feel that you’re ahead of the curve. Because when when you started the show I remember you saying it’s the Wild West and now it seems like every man Dogan whatever has made me a podcast. So do you think now about you it’s not the Wild West but you actually ahead of the curve. It’s good. Get a question. Yes and no I think it’s still the wild west. I think that people in this environment aren’t necessarily looking in the right direction to advance their business where they should be. Let me clarify that. I think inspiration for how someone’s podcast get better gets better doesn’t happen within the new podcasting community. It happens with old media. Then you go look at how you all learn how to interview you go study Howard Stern if you want to learn how to produce an an excellent show. You go you know you look at and some an NPR show or something like that like a where a BBC show something that you know pay close attention to how people are introducing guests and what they’re how they do their ads and how they integrate you know clips from this person’s body of work into their intro or into the show itself. So I think there is really a professional side to this that will ultimately come out. For me personally what I’ve realized over the last couple of months and this is something that I think you can you can sort of strap on as a badge of honor as well is that I’m a better interviewer than most. Just in general I’m more intuitive and I have more range of knowledge so I can connect those dots. You know I can join those dots. And that’s what makes for a compelling and entertaining interview no matter who you are it’s the people that have the pre-scripted questions that I think are really going to struggle because that’s that’s very exhausting to an audience. So on one side I think I’m still really ahead of the curve in that. I come from this and as do you come from this background this history of paying attention to interviewers and then sort of bringing this natural ability to the microphone that 99 percent of people don’t have. And that’s the building not only to interview someone in a business sense and extract what they do for a living but actually make an entertaining hour of programming for someone. And in my opinion they can get the business data from 80000 podcasts that are on iTunes but it’s really hard to get entertainment out of it. And that’s what I’m trying to bring to the table and I think that’s what you do a really great job bringing to the table as well because because what I’ve realized you know was a complete nobody is basically the very first interview I did was no you weren’t Yes. Stop it. Tom Mocha’s was episode your line on the line. Me right now David. And he was a huge inspiration to me so I wanted him as guest number one. And he was talking to a gentleman called John Lee Dumas and so awful who’s is CHEP never heard of him. And I went over to his show and the very first show I listened to was episode 3 2 2 which was yourself and kidding. That was I didn’t know that. Yeah that was the very first episode. And the fascinating thing about it was which got me on the show and this is my sort of join up thought was the fact that everything you see in life is normally about benchmarking against success. You see people already Veja and you go I’d like to do that but it worked for him he’s had this skill he’s got that you know he’s a natural that’s for sure. On that show on 0 5 3 2 2 you hadn’t even lunged and he was saying to you you know when are you going to go and you and I’m going to go on Wednesday or whatever it was. And I tuned in and I listened or whatever you do you click on it you don’t tune into you. But I heard you speak for the very first time and I found it fascinating because I was seeing but not some bouts of somebody finding their way. And you was saying Yeah and I had 17 downloads and it wasn’t that you were looking at success you were looking at somebody finding their flow finding them. Moving on. And that’s right. But that’s what really flavored my show was the fact that you were doing something that seemed natural and you were holding your hands up and you going really. I don’t know if this is going to work but hey if it doesn’t change we’ll move on later on. And remember you did this show and it was it was some chap I don’t remember who was with them on the on the beach somewhere and calls were whizzing past and your battery ran out half way through. Yes and yes you still put out and I thought that’s interesting because what he’s saying back is not that this show has got to be polished and perfect what he’s saying is is a journey and I’m going to improve from that and that be the last time that my battery runs out halfway through. That’s right and it was definitely the last time that happened. Yeah. Yeah it’s a good way to good insight. I see. If I were doing it again yeah I would probably do the same thing again. I was I’ve been always sort of a fan of the let’s just put it out at that at that time. I was leaning more on my hopeful interview skills than I was like ultimate show quality and since I’d already put out a couple of episodes it wasn’t that bad but I really loved the guys story. So I was like yeah there was Harry. Harry Smith was the guy’s name and. And. And I thought yeah let me let me throw that on. And why not. What happened. You know and somewhere. This is what’s so cool about this right. You heard one single episode I did from Johnny Dumas which was like a random occurrence. And look how much it’s affected both of us. Yeah. Just that one thing. So if one little episode you put out catches the right person it can literally be life changing. I will say something. I want your listeners to go to solo our solo our dotcom and I want you to go back to like three. I don’t know let’s say pre 70s so anything from episode like I don’t know one until episode 70 and I want you to click on those posts and read how great David’s comments are for the episodes. They are so insightful and brilliant. And you do such a great job summarizing. I think I even wrote you once and said Do you want to write my show summaries. Remember that you did and it was just that the crux of me doing this and I knew I was just going to stall so cool. So I am and you still you just did it the other day when you were that episode you listened to. You do such a great job summarizing. You’re going to be such a smash successful podcast. David Yeah I have no doubt whatsoever you are going to I hope you will let us be on your show someday when you do these live broadcasts in front of you know a hundred thousand people at the Wembley Stadium. Did you know when you start this and I’m really going to open up here so I don’t really have a Chevez. But when you start based you want it to be so good and you want it to be brought in and you kind of. There were job. You look back on them and you go OK yeah that wasn’t quite where I wanted to be but it was all right. And then you hit sort milestones and you listened back to some of these shows I don’t know if you listen to yours and I thought oh that was a bit closer to what I had in my head my original vision. And I got to show it E.T. and that’s when I suddenly realize Michael that was the host of a show and it was my responsibility to be the host to even I think he was too grateful for people giving up their time to be on my show. I it was a complete mind set. Now I want this to be the biggest show out there. I absolutely do. And it’s all I can focus in on and it’s in many ways it’s killing me or my life is totally out of whack. But all I want is about is the number one thing upset that on any show because it sounds a bit arrogant really I’m upset. Once we’ve stopped recording them when somebody asked me about it that is where I want to be and I want to be join up not as a brand. Exactly as you say. Right. Because it’s one of those things that you kind of go join up towards. What does it mean. And I’m very aware of if you provide quality and content as quality brand in many ways take care of itself. It’s like we always talk in the early episode the name that was always mentioned was Pat Flynn. And you know he’s got that classic smart passive income and you forget that’s a premium brand but actually he’s only three words put together and he’s because he’s provided that great content and quality and value. But it becomes the kind of the trust word where what he’s trying to achieve. That’s right in he that he can live that now. But I actually want I want to focus on something you said just before that you will be bigger than him and so will I. And I know I don’t mean that like he doesn’t have the same aspirations as you do. Right. And I’m saying in terms of podcasts in terms of like Pat wants to speak I’m not speaking for him here but just knowing what I know about him. He he is sort of the crash test dummy of internet marketers. So he does all these really cool things on the web. I want my show to become about like I want to. I want to be interviewing complete legitimate A-listers you know and finding out about their kind of business and so normal journey. That’s where I will see the show going. And because of that if when and if I get to that point. The show the podcast itself will be bigger than all of the internet marketing type podcasts. Does that make sense. Yeah it’ll be way bigger than that. It’ll be more like Nerdist. You know Chris Hardwick gets killer guests on his show and that’s why his podcast is you know number one number two number three on iTunes overall. And so it’s it’s one of those things that that I it’s what I aspire to do as well is to get working within this world like real A-list category of people because I think that they’ll appreciate talking about their journey. And so that’s where I want to head with that. Also I was very strategic and I changed direction. I realized that when I started I was just throwing out the net to anyone and anyone would jump on the show. I would have them round about sort of thing once again I thought to myself no I can’t do this because when I was looking at other people’s shows I was thinking Oh I’ve been on my show I’ve been on my show and it was just the sort of hybrid of people doing the rounds. So I went off in a different direction. So if you listen to episode 88 I had Cathy O’Dowd who was the first woman to hit the summit of Everest from both sides. I’ve got the first civilian astronaut coming on the show. I’ve got a chap over a few years ago was worldwide news because he sold his life on e-bay and he’s just sold his life to Disney and all that kind of stuff. So I realized I had to change direction to become more unique to be more interested by the stories more. Yes. Extract out of them what I wanted to show to the world and that was my original vision but I couldn’t say Eva until later on in the journey. Yeah and that’s really what you’ve done. That’s the whole point. That’s why you will be successful because you’ve you’ve done this in a sort of a different way in your life when you look back to sort of the Philadelphia kid and you riding around on your BMX and all that kind of stuff. Well you just sort of wanting to be the classic sports kid was. If you look back and now we all going to send you back in time soon on the Sermon on the mike. No I was a show off though. I think I think I was you know a performer of some sort and the PA is I keep is that makes my colonial who he is to play better racquetball with an audience. Yes. Every single time. Yeah I think so. I think there’s that’s there that’s in there. It’s in the DNA for sure. I don’t use that a lot but it’s in the DNA. I work better in a performance environment which is presumably why I kind of screw myself on the show intentionally. I don’t I I prepare in a way where I I’ve researched my guest as you have. You know you know and you certainly listen to the show but at times you know a little bit about me and you’re able to then naturally structure questions that that dovetail into my history and that’s what a good interviewer does. I don’t write a lot of questions out sometimes intentionally and that’s because I there’s something about the performance side. I realize now that I’m I’m doing this the shows this this month I’ve got over 300000 downloads for the first time and this is a and I realize so there’s people listening and I have to perform. You know what I like it. It makes me it UPS my game. I’m live on the show. And I think I do that to myself on purpose because because I work better in that environment a lot maybe underpressure a little. Well we’re very similar. It’s fascinating. I feel like I’m finding out the real Marcantonio here. Where is the person behind the that the presenter. Because I am somebody who has spent my life doing training courses and presentations and that’s my job. I’ve never done this kind of thing. It was totally BA and I’m somebody very much likes to be on their own likes no one near them. And then when I suddenly go ping. That’s it. It’s performance time. And I don’t know if it’s showing off or trying to create a different persona for myself because that’s kind of not naturally me. But I do have the ability to raise my game and present a different side to myself if you know me deep down you would say to me different people that the people who know me from seeing where I allow them to see me they would say yeah you it’s like I’m on the mike as you are when you normally doing those things because I’m letting them see what they want to see. Yeah. Yeah I mean I think there’s there’s an element of that and again I want people to understand this is why we and we talked earlier about sort of what John brought to the table. And I’m you know people look at my show and say it’s it’s been it’s it’s been pretty successful in the first 11 months just overall debt is not that’s not a fluke because I didn’t just start in August of 2013 with kind of media. You know I’ve been a professional drummer my whole life. I’ve performed I’ve been on I’ve been a racer I’ve been you know a competitive racquetball player for for many many tournaments for many many years now and before that it was tennis. So I’ve always been performing in some way or the other. I I coached for five years on teaching people social media in front of huge audiences. I’ve played Red Rocks in front of 10000 people like me being on a microphone and being natural at it is not something that happened overnight. It’s a it’s this is something that you walked in with. You’ve been training for years before you turned a mike on yourself. So it’s kind of like Yeah right yeah. You were new to podcasting but not nuda trying to translate a concept from one person to an audience like that’s something you’ve been doing for a long time. So so that’s I think that it’s a bit of a misnomer within our industry that yeah anybody can you know podcast or anybody can start blah blah blah. That’s kind of cool I get it. Yes technically you can turn on an app you can go to boss jock on your iPhone and upload it to clips and you’ve got a podcast but can you do it. Well can you do it so that when someone switches from morning radio or Howard Stern or the BBC to your podcast that they don’t notice a huge drop off in quality or you know sound quality interview quality production quality that’s that’s what I try to bring the table and I think you do the same thing. So is that what you’re saying really and I’m going to play the words of Steve Jobs because he says it very well as well but no experience is wasted. It doesn’t matter what you’ve done in your life you will pull elements and you extract what you need to create your new path. Out 100 percent. Absolutely yes. Everything you’ve done up until this point is does training for you for this next phase. When I have people on their show and we have these episodes called Find your swing I want to find out everything that person has done because it find your swing is like well what do I do. Like what am I naturally gifted at how can I make money off of something that I really enjoy that I’m passionate about that’s what finding your swing is. And it’s I want to find out like what you did when you were a kid. Were you an athlete did you or you or you a professional knitter you like to knit hats. You know like what is it what do you do. And when people can start accessing those things that they’ve done their whole lives they’re really gifted and I like to find ways that we can use those talents in whatever their next business endeavor is. We call about connecting our past to build our future and here. And one of the names as come out is if you really want to know your passion really want to know what you’re naturally good at. Don’t think about what you were doing in adult life because very much you would have been taking a responsibility for a wage or whatever. Look at what you was doing as a kid when you weren’t being paid for it. And if you was a drama when you was a kid and you loved doing it then try and look at something that would do that. And he says that exactly the same way as you do it and you’ll find your swing episodes. That’s right. And I and I love those. Again that’s another instance where we totally put ourselves on the spot. I have a co-host. Her name is Dawn Mars. For those episodes and we never read the questions first. Like I only you know sometimes I glance at them to see just a copy and paste them into my Evernote when we’re doing the show. But we were reading them and answering them live and which again has another element of pressure that we’ve got to come up with an answer and these people are literally like I’ve had people that have taken what we’ve said on the show. They’ve made a business from it like the next day they’ve gone and done it. So it’s it can be a little daunting. And I was going to ask you earlier you know your show’s growing now and this this will be big your show will have a huge audience at some point and I’ve asked this with other people that are in the space. Have you yet felt this sense of responsibility that comes with that the fact that you’re speaking into a microphone and someone’s actually listening to what you’re saying. Yeah. With power comes great responsibility. And it’s funny the very first show I released I got two e-mails and they were from people I’d never met and they were saying thank you so much for putting the show out there and I thought oh my God. And from that moment of being very aware of what I’m saying or being very aware of I don’t know where my words are landing. And of also having a conversation with my wife this afternoon saying if this really takes on. Just as I want it to really take on I’m a little bit scared but I haven’t got the value to provide the audience but I won’t and I don’t know why that is because you know success is everything you want. But I suddenly felt a pressure because I can see the downloads increasing increasing increasing. I can see the work coming towards me and I’m doing this seven days old on my own. There’s not one person that helps me and I’m also balancing other responsibilities as well. So this isn’t my only so restrained I suddenly freaked this afternoon for the exact reason that you said oh my god this is power this is responsibility. I’ve got to be careful with it. Yeah. Have you also found it. I agree. I felt that in some I haven’t had yet. Hey buddy come back to me I’m like you ruin my life but I’ll show it. That’s going to have to happen right. Someone will listen to something you’ve said or I’ve said and they’re going to do it and it’s not going to work for them and we won’t have the details but they’re going to say I listened to you when you were in my life. That’s going to happen. There’s no way it that doesn’t happen. When you’re when you grow this thing to where it can go there’s no way that doesn’t happen. Well think shows a slightly different note because you teach nuts and bolts. I think with my show I talk about hope and I told you why leap of both. Yeah I really think I teach nuts and bolts because that’s that’s I feel like there’s a lot of shows that do that specifically. And I I feel like I teach more of the journey and then the nuts and bolts sort of fall from there. Well I think that’s the same thing. I think what you do you you talk about the journey you get the cogs working in your own brain and brain when you throw out the nuts and bolts which you probably don’t think have got value as such. You’re already using those cokes and you’re thinking yeah I can use that yeah I can tell you that that’s exactly what happened with me. You know I couldn’t see how to do this because I’ve never done this. But just by you having conversations with people you take the element and you take the element and you take that element and what do you do. He’s been up to you as an individual to put it together. Yeah I actually find myself pretty. I can be very socially awkward at the beginning and I sometimes I’ve actually accessed my I’ve switched into interview mode when I’m meeting someone in real life. I just watch on Mike I like my mentally switch on a podcast microphone in front of me and I found it so much easier to have conversations with people that way. So that’s kind of interesting to me is bizarre. I’m getting ready to play Steve Jobs now because I’m fascinated to see your spin on this. And this is the fulcrum of the whole show so this is a job. Don’t be free to do that of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward. When I was in college but it was very very clear looking backwards. Ten years later again you can’t connect the dots looking forward. You can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something your gut destiny life karma whatever because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart even when it leads you off the well-worn path. And that will make all the difference. When I’m going to ask a different question because I think you’ve answered it already but you will say yes you believe in it. But why do you think so many people don’t believe in that. I think that’s a lot. Most people get hung up on the how of something for example I think that we we pick a point be right we pick a point B that’s there’s the dot so I’ve got this I want to I want to do I want to have this show. And to get this show together I need this this this this this this this and we get stuck in the details of the this this this this this instead of. All right I’m going to sort of flow through this. All I want to do is get to that thing. I’m not sure how I’m going to get there yet but I’m going to I don’t really know. And by the time you get there and you look back and go wow that is not the path that all that I was going to take. My favorite metaphor. Or maybe it’s an analogy I forget but for this is if you and I were sitting at a cafe and I there was you know a three story building across the street and I said David there’s a hundred thousand pounds sitting in a bag on the roof of that building across the street. You have 15 minutes to get it. How fast would you be out the door to go get that money. I’d be on the right run the window right but you wouldn’t know how you were going to get it. You had no idea how to get to the roof of that building. You just knew you were getting to the roof. You don’t know if you’re going to you know helicopter down you know if you’re going to call the fire department to take you up there or you know scale like Spiderman but you’re getting to the roof of that building somehow. And I think what successful entrepreneurs do is they just keep their eye on that that you know that bag the bag that’s on the roof. They’re not quite as concerned about the how part. And we very much get concerned about the how part. And the second piece of that is when someone gives you an opportunity I just said this a little earlier when someone gives you an opportunity. Our instinctive reaction is to say no because of this this and this versus just instinctive to say yes and I’m going to figure out how to work out this this and this and that is a huge mental shift even though it’s very subtle. It’s just yes and no. But if you’ll find that people in your world that are really successful or really look like they’re just having a great time. They’re the ones that say yes first and then figure out how it’s going to work after and most of the people that are stuck and they don’t get from that one dot to the next dot. Those are the ones that say no because you know I I can’t live in San Diego because I have kids in school or because I can’t afford the move or because whatever we can come up with 15 different ways. But in reality all that stuff can be worked out. So I think that’s how I would respond to that and I hope that helps someone. So what scares you this is probably my final question before I send you on the mike and you can have a one on one with your younger self. As you all know and you’ve got these rocking and rolling show everything’s going well you’ve just bought these the watch you’ve finished off the last five years and everything’s good and you’ve got a lovely new girlfriend. What scares you. Well when you look at what you need to achieve. What scares me. I have to say I look at the bank being intimidated or being excited. I sort of treat the same way. So I don’t get super excited about everything and I don’t get scared about everything. I gosh I mean I don’t I I can honestly say I don’t have that for the same reason when someone said you know when I was so literally I was scraping up change so I could take in an airport shuttle for a ticket that was paid for by somebody else to go speak in front of 3000 people and that in which I was going to make $5000 or whatever that weekend. A few years ago I I literally had to scrape $8 up so I could take the shuttle like in change so I could take the shuttle to get to the airport that I had. I had $18 in my bank account at the time. And so it wasn’t enough to get the cash out of the machine. So I wasn’t worried about it. I’ve never been worried about stuff like that and I didn’t even know what success was going to look like for me. But I had a feeling that I was destined for it. And that’s the only way I can say is that it was it was very innate and I didn’t know where it was going to come from but I was very patient about it. Now I was also very patient about about you know I knew I was going to meet a great woman at some point and I was able to reach you know like you said read about a year ago but but recently. So I think that I have that that vibe that that it’s the same reason I don’t plan a lot. I just don’t. I’m living very much in the moment as I go day by day. And for better or for worse I don’t plan as much as I probably could or should. But right now I’m not really you know scared about anything. I mean I could say you know the show doesn’t grow at all. But even if it doesn’t I’m live in a great life right now. So I guess I’m not even that scared of that. OK last question before we send you back this time. Is it easier to move forward when you’ve hit rock bottom and you really did hit rock bottom. Yes it is. It’s easier for me to keep perspective on it. I just last weekend went to I went to Napa Valley with my girlfriend’s family and it was a very first class trip like from private private jet from San Diego to Napa Valley which I’ve never done before my life and everything was super exclusive super like Michelin star first class and I was like man I don’t want to be here like this. No I don’t mean like I didn’t want to be at the weekend. I just I don’t want to live in that universe of that sort of high end world. And that’s it. I I remember looking longingly at a train that goes through Napa Valley and it stops at all these different wineries and I’m kind of like Man I wish I would’ve just taken the train and gotten kind of drunk at the third winery and kept going and that would’ve been a really fun day. Instead it was like this you know 12 people serving our table kind of thing and it just wasn’t me. But my my Philly boy sort of like Kragen pragmatist personality carried me through that whole weekend thinking yeah I would be fine with stopping at a fast food place now and going to another winery. We don’t have to go to a hundred dollar plate dinner you know. And so I think if anything it’s given me perspective and there’s one more piece of perspective that in my very very lowest time and it was very low. And I thank you for not like making me go through that again like 40000 other shows have but I had a I remember the current hurricane Katrina had hit the southern United States and it just decimated New Orleans. And this was literally at my lowest time. And I remember looking on the news and seeing like a little 9 year old little black kid who everybody in his family died. Right. And he lost everything like lost every piece of memory he ever had including all of his family members. And he’s this kid who doesn’t have much of an education. He’s a minority. He doesn’t have a lot of opportunity that are coming coming to him and I remember thinking all right no matter what happens I’m a white male with a skill set in United States and that’s not and that’s not to be racially insensitive I’m looking. That was a practical. OK. So no matter what my situation is I can’t complain like I’m starting with these four advantages that a lot of people all over the world don’t have. I will be given opportunities that a lot of people don’t have and that really kept me grounded like that there was this you know that some people had to struggle to get to what I had innately by birth that I had nothing to do with. So that really kept me grounded and it still keeps me grounded to this day is that I always realize that there’s people out there that do not have the same opportunities that I knew the answer. Mike are we going to put you on the Sermon on the mike now. This is when we send you back in time lost a young Marty McFly to have a one on one with yourself and if you could go back in time. What age would you choose and what advice would you say. So I’m going to play the music and when he gets out you’re up. This is the Sermon on the mike. Here. We go with the speed of this. This man. Who. I think that first of all very handsome very very talented man couldn’t congratulate now. If you could work on harnessing that Philly attitude a little bit just over the next few years if you could take the edge off of that. Not everybody is out to get you and focus on building some relationships that you will sustain forever without having that kind of you know screw you Gene. Not Eugene. I don’t know anybody named Eugene. I’m not trying to signal that that will serve you in the future. Yeah. So to some or to to to bring that and I know that was very short but to bring that in I feel like over the last few years I’ve been able to take this. There was a bit of filea attitude like where if someone slighted me in any way that was it they were erased like done. And there was no real going back. It was partially like it was a Scorpio in me that that that’s sort of like had that stinger. And I you know it’s it’s the it’s the patience I have now which is maybe a little bit of it’s I wouldn’t say less judgment because I think judgment makes for good comedy. But but it’s just maybe being a little more empathetic to people’s situations and realizing that that people aren’t always in control of their actions and sometimes they’re going through a learning process as well. And to just instantly give them the guillotine and out of one’s life is not the most productive way to go through things. I don’t do that anymore but I did it for a number of years and I think it was just a reaction to losing my parents and it being so so much. OK Wolf I’m going to lose this anyway I might as well just cut it right off. And I think that didn’t that didn’t serve me for a long time. So I’d fix that. Michael how can our listeners connect with you sir. Well you know this. Oh I know you say you say in an American Xon is better I would say the same thing if you were speaking in a British accent. By the way you going to come on my show some time. I would love to come on your show it oh no great. And Howard Jones I want him to go. Has he been on your show yet. No he isn’t knocking me back. He said he would and not me but I’ve called a few of them that sign up for it. And then you just come down and that’s a drag. Anyway the show is called the Solar Perner hour. The Web site because no one can spell pre-New or is solo our dotcom. And if you’d like some coaching give a coaching program yet. I’ve only been focused on building you audience. That’s good. Well so if anybody needs coaching including you my friend I can’t believe you’re not in solo lab. I want solo lab dotcom and we’d love to have you in our really cool community. Mancow thank you so much for spending time with us tonight joining up those dots on the 100th episode and it’s quite the world’s longest episode of ever done as well. Please come listen. Is. Yeah we were about seven minutes past what we normally do. So come back again when you have more dots to join up because I do believe that by joining up the dots and connecting up pasts is the best way to build a future. Mr. Michael O’Neill thank you so much. And thank you.

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  • Mansion Ingles Podcast October 2013 - Aprende gramática y vocabulario inglés

    · 00:39:10 · Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free

    Hello once again and welcome to another Mansion Ingles podcast. This is podcast number 66 recorded for October 2013. En el nivel básico practicamos las colacaciones de los verbos, y también un poco de vocabulario general. En el nivel intermedio estudiamos el uso de los verbos GET, GO y HAVE y también una selección de preguntas sobre la gramática. In the advanced section, we practise more advanced collocations, and there's business vocabulary as usual, and a translation exercise, all to help you improve your English and take it to the next level. En los podcasts mensuales hablamos de los temas, vocabulario y ejercicios que salen en nuestro cuaderno mensual. Así podéis practicar la pronunciación y repasar el material del cuaderno. Si quieres recibir gratis el cuaderno cada mes, ver la trascripción de este podcast o leer los anteriores, ve a mansioningles.com y sigue los enlaces en la página principal. Antes de empezar, quiero dar las gracias a todos nuestros seguidores en Facebook. Ya tenemos más de 30,000 fans y seguimos creciendo cada día. Si tienes alguna pregunta, comentario o duda sobre el inglés o simplemente quieres hacer ejercicios adicionales, puedes encontrarnos en facebook.com/mansioningles Ok, let's start then with el nivel básico to make a noise - hacer un ruido - hacer se puede traducir como to make o to do, pero cuando va con el sustantivo a noise, decimos make a noise. Repite: make a noise. Shhh...don't make a noise they're sleeping. Who was making all that noise last night? También decimos take photos Repite: take photos - How many photos did you take? I took hundreds of photos. Estoy seguro que sabes que en inglés decimos drive a car or drive a bus or a taxi. Pero cuando hablamos de las motos, las bicicletas y los animales decimos ride - R-I-D-E Repite: to ride a bike, ride a horse, ride a motorbike. Can you ride a motorbike? Have you ever ridden a horse? I would love to ride an elephant. I rode a camel in Egypt. ¿Cómo se traduce 'llevar gafas'? to wear glasses Repite; wear -wear glasses. I wear glasses - I've been wearing glasses for years. He's wearing a jacket - Are you wearing jeans? Luego tenemos la expresión to run for the bus. Repite: the bus - run for - run for the bus. I ran for the bus this morning. ¿Como se dice suerte en inglés? - luck - Repite: luck - Luck es un sustantivo. ¿Cuál es el adjetivo? - lucky. Repite: Lucky. I'm lucky! Are you lucky? Are you a lucky person? I am. I think I'm very lucky. El verbo to book significa reservar. For example you can book a room in a hotel. Repite: to book - to book a room. Can I book a room, please? I'd like to book a room. También puedes book a table in a restaurant. Repite: to book a table. Can I book a table, please? I'd like to book a table for two, please. If you book a room in a hotel, you stay in the hotel. Repite: stay in the hotel. Where are you staying. Are you staying in a hotel? ¿Cómo se dice mandar un correo electrónico en inglés? - to send an email. Repite: send an email. Did you send me an email? I'll send you an email. I'll send you an email next week. Very good! - ¡Muy bien! También en el nivel básico este mes hemos practicado un poco de vocabulario. Vamos a ver si te acuerdas de las palabras.   A dress, skirt, trousers, shirt, socks are all examples of.....clothes. Repite: clothes. I like your clothes. I need new clothes. What do you cut your food with? You cut your food with a...... knife - K-N-I-F-E. Repite: Knife. knife and fork - knife, fork and spoon. Can I have a knife, please? Spring, summer, autumn and winter are the four....seasons. Repite: seasons. What's your favourite season? I like spring and autumn. I think autumn is my favourite season. En el inglés americano, autumn se dice fall - F-A-L-L because the leaves, las ojas, caen de los arboles. What do you usually drink tea and coffee and hot chocolate from? You drink tea and coffee from a ....cup. Not a glass, a cup. You drink Coca Cola from a glass, you drink beer from a glass. You drink tea and coffee from a cup. Repite: cup - a cup - a coffee cup - a tea cup. A cup of coffee. A cup of tea. Now, what is the name of the part of the house where you cook? You cook in the ....kitchen. Repite: kitchen. Ten cuidado con la diferencia entre kitchen and chicken. Chicken is pollo.  Repite: kitchen - chicken - kitchen. We cook in the kitchen. The chicken's in the kitchen. What's the name for the room where you usually have a shower, clean your teeth or wash your face? It's the bathroom. Repite: bathroom. Excuse me, where's the bathroom?   Ok good, now moving on to the intermediate section, Listen: 'Have you ever been to this restaurant?’  - ‘No, this is the first time.’ 'Have you been' is the present perfect tense. Listen: Have you been to New York? Has estado una vez en Nueva York? Repite: Have you been to New York? Have you been here before? Have you ever eaten Japanese food? Listen: We don’t have to be at the meeting. 'Have to' is similar to 'must' for obligation. The difference is that 'must' is often external obligation (it comes from outside the speaker) and 'have to' can be the obligation you feel inside. For example, your boss says "Everyone must go to the meeting", so you feel you have to. The government says "you must pay your taxes" so we all have to pay our taxes. A mother tells her son that he 'must do his homework', so the son tells his friend "I can't play with you now because I have to do my homework. My mother says I have to do my homework." Another difference of course is that 'have to' can change to the past: "I had to do my homework" and to the future "I will have to do my homework" or "I'll have to do my homework". We cannot say, X"I will must do my homework."X That's wrong! Repeat: I'll have to work on Saturday. - I had to work late yesterday. Do we have to go to the meeting? Listen to a different example from the same exercise: "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Listen again. Which verb tenses do you hear? "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Did is the past of do, so didn't remember is past simple. What about the second verb tense? I "had parked". Had + past participle is the past perfect tense. I had is often contracted to I'd. Repeat: I'd parked - I'd parked my car. I didn't remember - I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. (No recordaba dónde había aparcado el coche.) Repeat again: I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. - I didn't remember where I'd left my bag. I didn't remember what I'd said to her - I didn't remember what I'd done with my keys. Escucha otro ejemplo y, como antes, piensa cuales son los tiempos verbales: I was sitting on the train when suddenly my mobile rang. I was sitting - past continuous - my mobile rang - past simple. The sitting is the longer action. I was sitting before my mobile rang. I was sitting when my mobile rang, and I was sitting after my mobile rang. Repeat: I was sitting - I was sitting on the train - I was sitting on the train when my mobile rang. I was watching TV when I heard a noise. I was reading when you arrived. I was sleeping when you phoned. Here's one more example from the same exercise. Listen: Exercising before breakfast is the best time if you want to burn calories. Why is 'exercising' a gerund in this sentence? Why is it verb + ing? Well, it's because we often use a gerund as the subject of the sentence. Repeat: Exercising is good for you. Smoking is bad for your health. Jogging is a popular pastime. Reading is something I don't do very often. In the next exercise in this month's 'cuaderno', we looked at some expressions with the verbs get, go and have. Listen and repeat the sentences to practise pronunciation. Listen: How many e-mails do you usually get? Repeat: usually get - do you usually get - How many? How many emails? - How many e-mails do you usually get? Listen: Does she usually get drunk? Repeat: get drunk - usually - usually get drunk - Does she? - Does she usually get drunk? Listen: Did you have a shower? Repeat: have a - have a shower - Did you? - Did you have a shower? Listen: Did you go away for the summer? Repeat: the summer - for the summer - go away - go away for the summer - Did you - Did you go away for the summer? Listen: Did you go anywhere nice? Repeat: nice - anywhere - anywhere nice - Did you go? Did you go anywhere nice? Listen: What time did you get home? Repeat: get home - did you - did you get home - What time? - What time did you get home? Listen: Do you always get up early? Repeat: early - get up early (nota como se junta el sonido final de /up/ con el sonido vocal al principio de /early/ - up early. Repeat: up early - get up early - Do you always? - Do you always get up early? Listen: Did you go out on Saturday? Repeat: on Saturday - go out - go out on Saturday - Did you go out on Saturday? Listen: Where did you did you get your phone? Repeat: your phone - get your phone - Where did you? - Where did you get? Where did you get your phone? Listen: Where did you go for lunch? Repeat: lunch - for -  for lunch - go for lunch - Where did you? - Where did you go for lunch? Listen: Who did you have dinner with yesterday? Repeat: have dinner with - have dinner with yesterday - Who did you? - Who did you have dinner with yesterday? In the advanced section this month, we looked at some more collocations. The first of which was to make the best of something which means to do as well as possible with something that is not too promising. Repeat: I'll make the best of it. I don't like it, but I'll make the best of it. we can also say 'make the most of it'. Repeat: make the most of it. Make the most of a bad situation. Make the most of a bad job. Make the most of your time in the UK. (¡aprovechadlo!) Now, if you draw (someone’s) attention to something, you attract someone to notice or focus on someone or something. Repeat: draw your attention to - let me draw your attention to this wonderful painting. My attention was drawn to a small insect on the floor. If you jump for joy you are extremely happy. Repeat: I jumped for joy when I got my exam results. When she agreed to have dinner with me I jumped for joy. The children jumped for joy when we got to Disneyland. To draw out something means to make it longer than it needs to be. Repeat: to draw out a meeting. It wasn't necessary to draw out the meeting for so long. Why does he have to draw it out so much? Repeat: to draw out something. If you make allowances (for something) you take certain facts or circumstances into consideration. Repeat: to make allowances for. When we go to the UK we should make allowances for the weather. You have to make allowances for the age of the property. If you jump or are thrown in at the deep end, you start doing something new and difficult without help or preparation. Repeat: jump in at the deep end / thrown in at the deep end. I was thrown in at the deep end when I worked in a professional kitchen for the first time. You should jump in at the deep end and buy your first computer. Repeat: jump in at the deep end - I was thrown in at the deep end. stand a chance (of doing something) is another popular collocation. It means there's a possibility. You have a chance that something will happen. Repeat: stand a chance - Do you think I stand a chance? Do I stand a chance of winning? No, I don't think you stand a chance to be honest! You don't stand a chance of getting that job. Our last expression was to jump the gun which means to start before the starting signal. Guns used to be used to start a race. If you start before the gun goes 'bang' you jump the gun. Repeat: jump the gun. Don't jump the gun. Be patient! You're always jumping the gun. He apologised for jumping the gun.   In the Business English section this month we looked at some more business English vocabulary, and the first expression was to become head of something. This means to be in charge, to manage (ser el jefe). Repeat: She's head of sales. He's head of design. She became head of the company in March. Who's head of the department? Let's discuss means vamos hablar de.... Repeat: let's discuss the sales figures. Let's discuss your role in the company. Let's discuss the release date of the new product. outsourcing is subcontracting to an outside company. In Spanish, I think it's subcontratación o la externalización of a product or service. Repeat: outsourcing. Many companies are outsourcing their manufacturing. It's cheaper to outsource the work. Finally, the phrasal verb to run on means to continue without stopping or go on longer than expected. Repeat. Run on. What's the past of run? - ran. Repeat: the meeting ran on. - The meeting ran on for nearly three hours. - The story ran on for months. ¡Muy bien! - Very good! We also gave you some more sentences to translate in this month's cuaderno. First, you had to translate from English to Spanish. So,  I'll say the English sentences and you say the Spanish translation before I do. Then, repeat the English sentence after me to practise pronunciation. Are you ready? They didn’t want to stay here. - No querían quedarse aquí. Repite: They didn’t want to stay here. - stay here - to stay here - They didn’t want - They didn’t want to stay here. Unemployment is increasing / rising / going up. - El paro está subiendo. Repite: Unemployment - Unemployment is increasing - rising - Unemployment is rising - going up - Unemployment is going up. Don’t talk to me about economics. - No me hables de economía. Repite: economics - talk to me - Don't talk to me - Don’t talk to me about economics. The economy is beyond our control.  - La economía está más allá de nuestro control. Repite: the economy - beyond our control - The economy is beyond our control. How many beers do we have left? - ¿Cuántas cervezas nos quedan? Repite: left - have left - How many? How many beers? How many beers do we have left? How many beers do we have left? Good, now I'll read some Spanish sentences and you translate to English before I do. Then repeat the sentences after me to practise your pronunciation. OK? ¿Quieres decir que ésta es la última? - Do you mean this is the last one? Repeat: the last one - this is the last one. Do you mean? - Do you mean this is the last one? Habrá más vino. - There’ll be more wine. Repeat: more wine - There will - there'll - there will be - there'll be - There’ll be more wine. Corrieron a la farmacia. - They ran to the pharmacy/chemist (UK) /drugstore (US) Repeat: They ran to - They ran to the pharmacy - They ran to the chemist - They ran to the drugstore. ¿Por qué no querían quedarse? - Why didn’t they want to stay? Repeat: want to stay - Why didn't they? - Why didn’t they want to stay? Dijeron que tenían muchas cosas que hacer. - They said they had a lot of things to do. Repeat: things to do - a lot of - a lot of things to do - They said they had - They said they had a lot of things to do. - They said they had a lot of things to do. Well, I've got a lot of things to do also, so unfortunately that's the end of this podcast, but we'll be back with you next month as usual with another podcast based on our monthly newsletter, our cuaderno de inglés mensual. Remember, you can listen to all our previous podcasts at mansioningles.com and of course on iTunes. Si te gustan nuestros podcasts, puedes ayudarnos con una corta reseña en iTunes contribuyendo así a que más personas puedan conocernos y escucharnos. Gracias a todos los que ya han escrito algún comentario. Thank you to all of you who are writing reviews. Thank you very much for listening to this podcast, and for being part of the community of La Mansión del Inglés. Remember, If you want to contact us you can find us on Facebook. Just search Facebook for La Mansión del Inglés where you can ask questions, make comments and do exercises and practise your listening. Or you can send me an email to: mansionteachers@yahoo.es. You can also follow us on Twitter where we tweet useful links to improve your English, English slang vocabulary, quotations and much more. Our Twitter name is MansionTwit. Puedes ver el cuaderno mensual de este mes, y todos los cuadernos anteriores en www.cuadernodeingles.com/ Until next month then, keep practising and taking your English to the next level! Take care and bye for now!   The music in this month’s podcast is by Revolution Void, the album is The Politics of Desire and the track is called Outer Orbit.                                              Mansion Ingles Podcast October 2013 - Aprende gramática y vocabulario inglés   Hello once again and welcome to another Mansion Ingles podcast. This is podcast number 66 recorded for October 2013.   En el nivel básico practicamos las colacaciones de los verbos, y también un poco de vocabulario general. En el nivel intermedio estudiamos el uso de los verbos GET, GO y HAVE y también una selección de preguntas sobre la gramática. In the advanced section, we practise more advanced collocations, and there's business vocabulary as usual, and a translation exercise, all to help you improve your English and take it to the next level.   En los podcasts mensuales hablamos de los temas, vocabulario y ejercicios que salen en nuestro cuaderno mensual. Así podéis practicar la pronunciación y repasar el material del cuaderno. Si quieres recibir gratis el cuaderno cada mes, ver la trascripción de este podcast o leer los anteriores, ve a mansioningles.com y sigue los enlaces en la página principal.   Antes de empezar, quiero dar las gracias a todos nuestros seguidores en Facebook. Ya tenemos más de 30,000 fans y seguimos creciendo cada día. Si tienes alguna pregunta, comentario o duda sobre el inglés o simplemente quieres hacer ejercicios adicionales, puedes encontrarnos en facebook.com/mansioningles   Ok, let's start then with el nivel básico to make a noise - hacer un ruido - hacer se puede traducir como to make o to do, pero cuando va con el sustantivo a noise, decimos make a noise. Repite: make a noise. Shhh...don't make a noise they're sleeping. Who was making all that noise last night?   También decimos take photos Repite: take photos - How many photos did you take? I took hundreds of photos.   Estoy seguro que sabes que en inglés decimos drive a car or drive a bus or a taxi. Pero cuando hablamos de las motos, las bicicletas y los animales decimos ride - R-I-D-E Repite: to ride a bike, ride a horse, ride a motorbike. Can you ride a motorbike? Have you ever ridden a horse? I would love to ride an elephant. I rode a camel in Egypt.   ¿Cómo se traduce 'llevar gafas'? to wear glasses Repite; wear -wear glasses. I wear glasses - I've been wearing glasses for years. He's wearing a jacket - Are you wearing jeans? Luego tenemos la expresión to run for the bus. Repite: the bus - run for - run for the bus. I ran for the bus this morning.   ¿Como se dice suerte en inglés? - luck - Repite: luck - Luck es un sustantivo. ¿Cuál es el adjetivo? - lucky. Repite: Lucky. I'm lucky! Are you lucky? Are you a lucky person? I am. I think I'm very lucky.   El verbo to book significa reservar. For example you can book a room in a hotel. Repite: to book - to book a room. Can I book a room, please? I'd like to book a room. También puedes book a table in a restaurant. Repite: to book a table. Can I book a table, please? I'd like to book a table for two, please.   If you book a room in a hotel, you stay in the hotel. Repite: stay in the hotel. Where are you staying. Are you staying in a hotel?   ¿Cómo se dice mandar un correo electrónico en inglés? - to send an email. Repite: send an email. Did you send me an email? I'll send you an email. I'll send you an email next week.   Very good! - ¡Muy bien!   También en el nivel básico este mes hemos practicado un poco de vocabulario. Vamos a ver si te acuerdas de las palabras.     A dress, skirt, trousers, shirt, socks are all examples of.....clothes. Repite: clothes. I like your clothes. I need new clothes.   What do you cut your food with? You cut your food with a...... knife - K-N-I-F-E. Repite: Knife. knife and fork - knife, fork and spoon. Can I have a knife, please?   Spring, summer, autumn and winter are the four....seasons. Repite: seasons. What's your favourite season? I like spring and autumn. I think autumn is my favourite season. En el inglés americano, autumn se dice fall - F-A-L-L because the leaves, las ojas, caen de los arboles.   What do you usually drink tea and coffee and hot chocolate from? You drink tea and coffee from a ....cup. Not a glass, a cup. You drink Coca Cola from a glass, you drink beer from a glass. You drink tea and coffee from a cup. Repite: cup - a cup - a coffee cup - a tea cup. A cup of coffee. A cup of tea.   Now, what is the name of the part of the house where you cook? You cook in the ....kitchen. Repite: kitchen. Ten cuidado con la diferencia entre kitchen and chicken. Chicken is pollo.  Repite: kitchen - chicken - kitchen. We cook in the kitchen. The chicken's in the kitchen.   What's the name for the room where you usually have a shower, clean your teeth or wash your face? It's the bathroom. Repite: bathroom. Excuse me, where's the bathroom?     Ok good, now moving on to the intermediate section,   Listen: 'Have you ever been to this restaurant?’  - ‘No, this is the first time.’   'Have you been' is the present perfect tense. Listen: Have you been to New York? Has estado una vez en Nueva York? Repite: Have you been to New York? Have you been here before? Have you ever eaten Japanese food?   Listen: We don’t have to be at the meeting. 'Have to' is similar to 'must' for obligation. The difference is that 'must' is often external obligation (it comes from outside the speaker) and 'have to' can be the obligation you feel inside. For example, your boss says "Everyone must go to the meeting", so you feel you have to. The government says "you must pay your taxes" so we all have to pay our taxes. A mother tells her son that he 'must do his homework', so the son tells his friend "I can't play with you now because I have to do my homework. My mother says I have to do my homework."   Another difference of course is that 'have to' can change to the past: "I had to do my homework" and to the future "I will have to do my homework" or "I'll have to do my homework". We cannot say, X"I will must do my homework."X That's wrong!   Repeat: I'll have to work on Saturday. - I had to work late yesterday. Do we have to go to the meeting?   Listen to a different example from the same exercise: "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Listen again. Which verb tenses do you hear? "I didn't remember where I had parked my car." Did is the past of do, so didn't remember is past simple. What about the second verb tense? I "had parked". Had + past participle is the past perfect tense. I had is often contracted to I'd. Repeat: I'd parked - I'd parked my car. I didn't remember - I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. (No recordaba dónde había aparcado el coche.) Repeat again: I didn't remember where I'd parked my car. - I didn't remember where I'd left my bag. I didn't remember what I'd said to her - I didn't remember what I'd done with my keys.   Escucha otro ejemplo y, como antes, piensa cuales son los tiempos verbales: I was sitting on the train when suddenly my mobile rang.   I was sitting - past continuous - my mobile rang - past simple. The sitting is the longer action. I was sitting before my mobile rang. I was sitting when my mobile rang, and I was sitting after my mobile rang. Repeat: I was sitting - I was sitting on the train - I was sitting on the train when my mobile rang. I was watching TV when I heard a noise. I was reading when you arrived. I was sleeping when you phoned.   Here's one more example from the same exercise. Listen: Exercising before breakfast is the best time if you want to burn calories. Why is 'exercising' a gerund in this sentence? Why is it verb + ing? Well, it's because we often use a gerund as the subject of the sentence. Repeat: Exercising is good for you. Smoking is bad for your health. Jogging is a popular pastime. Reading is something I don't do very often.   In the next exercise in this month's 'cuaderno', we looked at some expressions with the verbs get, go and have. Listen and repeat the sentences to practise pronunciation. Listen:                                                                 How many e-mails do you usually get? Repeat: usually get - do you usually get - How many? How many emails? - How many e-mails do you usually get?   Listen: Does she usually get drunk? Repeat: get drunk - usually - usually get drunk - Does she? - Does she usually get drunk?   Listen: Did you have a shower? Repeat: have a - have a shower - Did you? - Did you have a shower?   Listen: Did you go away for the summer? Repeat: the summer - for the summer - go away - go away for the summer - Did you - Did you go away for the summer?   Listen: Did you go anywhere nice? Repeat: nice - anywhere - anywhere nice - Did you go? Did you go anywhere nice?   Listen: What time did you get home? Repeat: get home - did you - did you get home - What time? - What time did you get home?   Listen: Do you always get up early? Repeat: early - get up early (nota como se junta el sonido final de /up/ con el sonido vocal al principio de /early/ - up early. Repeat: up early - get up early - Do you always? - Do you always get up early?   Listen: Did you go out on Saturday? Repeat: on Saturday - go out - go out on Saturday - Did you go out on Saturday?   Listen: Where did you did you get your phone? Repeat: your phone - get your phone - Where did you? - Where did you get? Where did you get your phone?   Listen: Where did you go for lunch? Repeat: lunch - for -  for lunch - go for lunch - Where did you? - Where did you go for lunch?   Listen: Who did you have dinner with yesterday? Repeat: have dinner with - have dinner with yesterday - Who did you? - Who did you have dinner with yesterday?   Siempre me ha gustado la idea de aprender inglés con videos. Por eso te recomendamos ABA English. Los videos de ABA English son muy profesionales y están muy bien hechos.    Además de las 144 clases gratuitas de gramática en vídeo, también tienes la posibilidad de probar la primera unidad de tu nivel (hay 6 niveles distintos) y realizar todas las secciones de esta unidad para probar su metodología única de aprendizaje.    Tú aprendes inglés viendo películas cortas con subtítulos, que ya es un método muy eficaz para aprender inglés,  pero también actúas en estas películas! Es muy divertido! En la misma unidad realizas ejercicios de speaking y role play actuando en el diálogo del cortometraje que has visto!   Los cortometrajes, con situaciones de la vida real, son la base de cada unidad del curso de inglés. Llevan incorporada la tecnología de reconocimiento de voz propia.  Echa un vistazo a los videos de ABA English.com. Puedes empezar los cursos gratis sin coste alguno y además con apoyo en español. Al empezar, tienes que facilitar una dirección de email y contestar algunas preguntas básicas, pero no es necesario que realices ningún pago. Pienso que si una empresa ofrece un producto gratis para probarlo es porque es bueno y la empresa cree en sus productos.   ¡Regístrate hoy y aprende inglés gratis con video, en casa y a tu ritmo. ABA English.com! Pruébalo no tienes nada de perder. In the advanced section this month, we looked at some more collocations. The first of which was to make the best of something which means to do as well as possible with something that is not too promising. Repeat: I'll make the best of it. I don't like it, but I'll make the best of it. we can also say 'make the most of it'. Repeat: make the most of it. Make the most of a bad situation. Make the most of a bad job. Make the most of your time in the UK. (¡aprovechadlo!)   Now, if you draw (someone’s) attention to something, you attract someone to notice or focus on someone or something. Repeat: draw your attention to - let me draw your attention to this wonderful painting. My attention was drawn to a small insect on the floor.   If you jump for joy you are extremely happy. Repeat: I jumped for joy when I got my exam results. When she agreed to have dinner with me I jumped for joy. The children jumped for joy when we got to Disneyland.   To draw out something means to make it longer than it needs to be. Repeat: to draw out a meeting. It wasn't necessary to draw out the meeting for so long. Why does he have to draw it out so much? Repeat: to draw out something.   If you make allowances (for something) you take certain facts or circumstances into consideration. Repeat: to make allowances for. When we go to the UK we should make allowances for the weather. You have to make allowances for the age of the property.   If you jump or are thrown in at the deep end, you start doing something new and difficult without help or preparation. Repeat: jump in at the deep end / thrown in at the deep end. I was thrown in at the deep end when I worked in a professional kitchen for the first time. You should jump in at the deep end and buy your first computer. Repeat: jump in at the deep end - I was thrown in at the deep end.   stand a chance (of doing something) is another popular collocation. It means there's a possibility. You have a chance that something will happen. Repeat: stand a chance - Do you think I stand a chance? Do I stand a chance of winning? No, I don't think you stand a chance to be honest! You don't stand a chance of getting that job.   Our last expression was to jump the gun which means to start before the starting signal. Guns used to be used to start a race. If you start before the gun goes 'bang' you jump the gun. Repeat: jump the gun. Don't jump the gun. Be patient! You're always jumping the gun. He apologised for jumping the gun.     In the Business English section this month we looked at some more business English vocabulary, and the first expression was to become head of something. This means to be in charge, to manage (ser el jefe). Repeat: She's head of sales. He's head of design. She became head of the company in March. Who's head of the department?   Let's discuss means vamos hablar de.... Repeat: let's discuss the sales figures. Let's discuss your role in the company. Let's discuss the release date of the new product.   outsourcing is subcontracting to an outside company. In Spanish, I think it's subcontratación o la externalización of a product or service. Repeat: outsourcing. Many companies are outsourcing their manufacturing. It's cheaper to outsource the work.   Finally, the phrasal verb to run on means to continue without stopping or go on longer than expected. Repeat. Run on. What's the past of run? - ran. Repeat: the meeting ran on. - The meeting ran on for nearly three hours. - The story ran on for months.   ¡Muy bien! - Very good!   We also gave you some more sentences to translate in this month's cuaderno. First, you had to translate from English to Spanish. So,  I'll say the English sentences and you say the Spanish translation before I do. Then, repeat the English sentence after me to practise pronunciation. Are you ready?   They didn’t want to stay here. - No querían quedarse aquí. Repite: They didn’t want to stay here. - stay here - to stay here - They didn’t want - They didn’t want to stay here.   Unemployment is increasing / rising / going up. - El paro está subiendo. Repite: Unemployment - Unemployment is increasing - rising - Unemployment is rising - going up - Unemployment is going up.   Don’t talk to me about economics. - No me hables de economía. Repite: economics - talk to me - Don't talk to me - Don’t talk to me about economics.   The economy is beyond our control.  - La economía está más allá de nuestro control. Repite: the economy - beyond our control - The economy is beyond our control.   How many beers do we have left? - ¿Cuántas cervezas nos quedan? Repite: left - have left - How many? How many beers? How many beers do we have left? How many beers do we have left?   Good, now I'll read some Spanish sentences and you translate to English before I do. Then repeat the sentences after me to practise your pronunciation. OK? ¿Quieres decir que ésta es la última? - Do you mean this is the last one? Repeat: the last one - this is the last one. Do you mean? - Do you mean this is the last one?   Habrá más vino. - There’ll be more wine. Repeat: more wine - There will - there'll - there will be - there'll be - There’ll be more wine.   Corrieron a la farmacia. - They ran to the pharmacy/chemist (UK) /drugstore (US) Repeat: They ran to - They ran to the pharmacy - They ran to the chemist - They ran to the drugstore.   ¿Por qué no querían quedarse? - Why didn’t they want to stay? Repeat: want to stay - Why didn't they? - Why didn’t they want to stay?   Dijeron que tenían muchas cosas que hacer. - They said they had a lot of things to do. Repeat: things to do - a lot of - a lot of things to do - They said they had - They said they had a lot of things to do. - They said they had a lot of things to do.   Well, I've got a lot of things to do also, so unfortunately that's the end of this podcast, but we'll be back with you next month as usual with another podcast based on our monthly newsletter, our cuaderno de inglés mensual. Remember, you can listen to all our previous podcasts at mansioningles.com and of course on iTunes.   Si te gustan nuestros podcasts, puedes ayudarnos con una corta reseña en iTunes contribuyendo así a que más personas puedan conocernos y escucharnos. Gracias a todos los que ya han escrito algún comentario. Thank you to all of you who are writing reviews.   Thank you very much for listening to this podcast, and for being part of the community of La Mansión del Inglés.   Remember, If you want to contact us you can find us on Facebook. Just search Facebook for La Mansión del Inglés where you can ask questions, make comments and do exercises and practise your listening. Or you can send me an email to: mansionteachers@yahoo.es. You can also follow us on Twitter where we tweet useful links to improve your English, English slang vocabulary, quotations and much more. Our Twitter name is MansionTwit.   Puedes ver el cuaderno mensual de este mes, y todos los cuadernos anteriores en www.cuadernodeingles.com/   Until next month then, keep practising and taking your English to the next level! Take care and bye for now!   The music in this month’s podcast is by Revolution Void, the album is The Politics of Desire and the track is called Outer Orbit.                                            

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  • Cheryl Snapp Conner On How Great Content Attracts Funding

    · 00:39:38 · The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

    Cheryl Snapp Conner http://contentuniversity.com   Here's the Transcript    Hugh Ballou: Greetings. The Nonprofit Exchange live today, it’s Hugh and Russell. Russell, how are you doing today? Russell Dennis: It’s another beautiful day in the neighborhood. Hugh: Russell is in Denver, and I just moved to Lynchburg, Virginia. New place for me. Getting settled here. Cheryl Snapp Conner, who has Snapp Conner PR, she has been on the podcast before talking about how important it is to let people know about your organization. That is PR, publicity. Today, Cheryl is going to talk about her other venture, which is so essential to the work we do. It’s Content University. Cheryl, welcome to the podcast. Cheryl Snapp Conner: Thank you. Thanks for having me. Hugh: It’s always so great when you’re here. We met in 2013. Cheryl: December of 2013. Hugh: Oh my goodness. Cheryl: Yeah, it’s been a little while. Hugh: You spent an hour with me, and then you wrote this article for Forbes that just nailed what I do. You have the ability to listen and put things in the context of this written document that explains it. I love reading your stuff. It’s so well done. Thank you for spending time with us today. Cheryl: Thank you. Glad to be here. Hugh: Let’s talk a little bit. Tell people a little bit about Cheryl. I hate reading bios of people. I’d like you to say, This is who I am, and here is my superpower. I know a little bit about your superpower, but let’s also talk about why you created Content University. Cheryl: I live to communicate, and that’s a good thing to live for because it’s, in my opinion, everything. All of our business is- Everything we do, without solid communications, it couldn’t exist. It’s the currency that makes everything go. From the very beginning of my PR career, which I happened into and I think I’ve done pretty well, from the start, my instincts told me that we needed not so much hype and promotion, but better education and value add. The research is backing this up. In fact, I am very excited about some research that just emerged out of New York that proves, at least in consumer sales, if you publish an educational article about a topic, customers are 131%— that is a true number—more inclined to buy after they read the article. They trust you more, they have a more positive brand association, and you would think that they would forget that pretty quickly. Not so. A week later, the scores are even higher. That really nails it, that people get worried about giving away the farm by sharing value added information with people who aren’t customers. Just the opposite is true. That is why Content University- Everybody needs to communicate and educate on the things they are experts about. That is where we can help. Hugh: It is such a fundamental skill. I am on this podcast with two people. You may not know that Russell is a very good writer. I just write because I have a message, and then I have an editor who helps fix it for me and makes it look better. But you guys are very skilled in putting words together that are very meaningful. In 31 years of working with charities, I work with some charity every week somewhere in the country, helping build out their system, their strategy, building their teams and boards. I find that communication, in 31 years, has never failed to come up as a problem or an issue. I found that they don’t really- They talk about it, but they don’t do anything about it. Here, this is on a platter. Here is something concrete that you can do. Content University sounds sort of academic. Talk about that phase of it. How difficult is it to learn how to write better? Cheryl: Not difficult at all. Interesting you mention the academic because it is an academic who helped develop the curriculum with me. Tom Post, 17 years at Forbes, also has background at Fortune, Newsweek, Success Magazine, ABC World News Tonight. He is the editor at Forbes who I have been writing for for four years. When that company, Forbes, took in its majority investment and moved headquarters, he jumped into the entrepreneurial arena. We are very fortunate. He joined us, and he was the co-developer of this curriculum. He also has a Ph.D from Berkeley and taught English Literature at Berkeley. When I asked him about the thing that he loves most about what he has done as an award-winning traditional journalist, he said, “It’s working with the entrepreneurs, with the writers, with the people who contribute, teaching them how to do what they do better,” which is just a joy. We see so many people who are not aware of what constitutes the value added information they have, and even when they figure it out, they are not sure what to do with it. All of that is something that really gets us up in the morning. Russell, you can even hold it up. We developed a video book of our curriculum. All of that is there for anyone who participates. But we have also got Content University up, and to your point Hugh, as an email course. That is just for people’s convenience. Your email inbox can deliver you a short lesson that you can listen to, watch at your convenience. We want to make it as easy as possible to do something because it’s not that hard, and we see people getting great returns for publishing, even a little bit. So that is just something to bar in mind. Hugh: What kind of results- Speak a little more about that. I like to hear stories. Tell us a couple of stories. What have people done with this? Cheryl: Actually people have published on things as simple as LinkedIn. When LinkedIn opened its publishing platform, it’s not as easy to get instant results as it was at the start because a lot of people jumped in and did a good job, or even if they did a mediocre job, this is something new that company executives have published something and in 30 days garnered three partnerships. If you could imagine what that would do, there are some companies who are publishing just on LinkedIn and are measuring it by metrics the same as they use for their direct marketing campaigns, for their email campaigns and outreach, 5,000 contacts, what happens, how many touch points. It’s really interesting that when somebody engages with you on LinkedIn, they want to have a real conversation. They are halfway down the buying process, whereas if they saw you published on Forbes, which has its own purpose, that is a credibility marker, you certainly can’t self-promote while you’re up there. Although on something like LinkedIn, you could leave a call to action and say, “I’ve got this book, this thing you can get for free. Here is how to engage further. Here is how to subscribe.” If they go to Forbes, they will feel self-conscious. They have to register on the platform, and the comment will be something like, “Nice job. Thank you.” If they go to you on LinkedIn, they are in a dialogue. They are ready to rock ’n’ roll. That is an interesting perspective. One more anecdote that I love. A company here in Salt Lake City that went public, the new local communications came in, and realized to both her delight and her chagrin that the sales VPs had been going rogue. They had been publishing on LinkedIn because it works, because they were closing sales from it. Thinking about that, just the policy, the SEC rules that they now had to meet, and the use of these guys’ time that they don’t want to have to reinvent every wheel and the aspect of having them be consistent when they are going out, she had to quickly backpedal and wrap her arms around this situation because they were just going. They are salespeople, and they knew what works. They were just going to do it. I love that. If you are a salesperson and are motivated and know what is going to make your revenue work, that is exactly what you need to consider. Give them some help. Get a little bit of training on what can I do, what can I not do, what will have the SEC at my door. A little bit of those things. Everybody’s got some expertise others want to know about, but just learning what to do with it can make a world of difference. Hugh: I want to clarify a couple things. You had a couple things you inserted there I want to highlight. SEC is one of them. I’d like to point out to our listeners. We promoted that we’d have some other panelists today. Corey Dyer could not make it; they had a conflict. So we will do another session on driving traffic, which is really good. You stepped up so we can focus on the content piece, which in my experience is a big need. You spoke about writing within guidelines, people that are in business raising money. There is a real strict guideline the Securities and Exchange Commission, the SEC, will hold you accountable for. On the nonprofit side, we don’t deal with that because we are not selling equity, but we are raising money for donations. There is this thing called the IRS, and there are strict guidelines. We really can’t do in our promotions a call to action. We can say, “For more information.” On NPR or PBS, if you like Viking Cruises, for more information, go to Viking Cruises. They’ve been very good at talking about the benefit of what they have. We think the word nonprofit, and we dumb down. We don’t think we can make profit when really how are we going to pay the bills, how are we going to do our work, how are we going to pay salaries if we don’t have a profit? We are attracting the funding because we have defined the value we bring to the world. Part of what I’m helping people realize is there is a shift in paradigm, which means we’ve got to be very skilled at defining the value proposition. There are four million 501 somethings or tax-exempt organizations, whether they are educational or religious or associations or community or foundations or whatever. There are a whole lot of organizations, and many of them are operating below the profit line, and they can’t really fully access the money to execute their mission completely. Cheryl, I think a big part of it is they haven’t focused on creating content that connects with people. Cheryl: Right. Hugh: What do you think? Cheryl: I so agree that there are aspects of what all of them do that people are fascinated by, especially where it has a bigger agenda and mission. If people know that and know what they can do, but in an appropriate way, like you say, “You need to know in your sector the boundaries you need to commit to and meet. Make certain you do that.” There are interesting things like case studies what happens with the programs, when they are executed, what difference they make, what people should know about how to participate most efficiently and most effectively, what are the best things they can do if they could just do a little bit, where they would begin. A lot of those things are interesting. What kind of difference? For example, there is one here locally, a company called Even Stevens. You may have heard of them. For each sandwich somebody orders at this fast casual restaurant, a sandwich of equal value is provided for the hungry. This individual, he completely rewrote the rules because you think, Well, casual dining, they bring on such a small margin that’s not even possible. They had to completely rethink and redo the paradigm, but they were able to make it work. That small contribution has been able to fund the local YMCA with all of its food needs. That means that the YMCA’s other contributions can go to other purposes. They don’t have to go to food because that urgent priority has ben covered just through this restaurant. If people know that, that would make a big difference. Maybe they don’t need to contribute anything; maybe they just need to patronize that restaurant or think about what they could do in their own business model to equate to those principles. That is fascinating to anyone. That is not a sales pitch or a “Please donate.” It doesn’t violate any rules to share that kind of information. Hugh: Absolutely. Cheryl, there are so many organizations that do such good work and they don’t tell anybody. Cheryl: But there are ways to tell that aren’t bragging that just let people celebrate with them and let them know how they can learn and get involved. Hugh: There is a real synergy in Content U and what I do and strategic planning and that solution map. Russell is a WayFinder in SynerVision. I am going to give him some airtime in just a second so he can ask you some really hard questions. He likes to come up with hard questions for our guests. We constantly experience this thing of the executive or the pastor or the rabbi who says, “I don’t have time,” or “I’m not really a writer.” What is your advice to people like that? Should they appoint or recruit somebody that manages communications, or should they try to learn themselves? Cheryl: Well, potentially either or both. We are finding so many people have a message but they are embarrassed, or they think they can’t do it. But there is a hidden bucket list wish to try. So there are ways that they could test their hand, become more effective so they don’t have to be embarrassed. They may still decide at the end of that that it’s not the best use of their own time, but for having taken the training, they would become far better resources or collaborators with whomever they choose to fulfill that function. Now they are speaking from the same page. They have the same agenda. Things will go far better after they have been trained, even if they choose to have someone else partner with them after that training occurs. Hugh: I am going to ask you in a minute to walk through the experience. Russell, what have you got to ask our guest? Russell: Thank you for being here. I’ve got this course myself, and I started using it. I think I picked it up right when you launched it and started using it. I got a little bit more clarity to my writing. It’s been very helpful. Cheryl: Yay! Russell: There are some things. I was sitting here just thinking of some things that make up good content for our audience. By the way, I know that Hugh mentioned how modest a lot of nonprofits are. You get people that are social workers that think, I don’t want to be bragging. It’s celebrating, not bragging. You look at talking about all the good things you do in terms of celebrating and not bragging, and you’ll be there. But tell the audience a little bit about some of the things that make up good content. Cheryl: In a nutshell, and I think it’s the same thing I would tell somebody if they were going to publish in Harvard Business Review: Tell me something I didn’t know and wouldn’t have guessed, and then prove it. That might have been anecdotes for people who were in your program, and how did they get there? What happened when they got there? What are they doing now as a result? How could I do something similar or get involved? That would meet all of those criteria. And it’s not bragging at all. But you might give a summary statement that says, “Here’s where we are. We have this aggressive agenda to do this much for this many people. Here is where we are on that scale so far. If you’d like to join in, here are the ways you could.” It’s not an overt pitch; it’s not a sale. Anything that you know that others, it might be as simple as you’re a plumber, and you tell somebody how to unstop their own drain, and there are plumbers who back up and say, “I will never get any business if I tell people how to unplug their own drain,” but the reverse is true. You can tell people the things you hope they do. For example, my plumber says, “Please tell me you didn’t pour liquid plumber down that drain. That is the worst thing you could have done.” Just giving people that much education and saying, “Did you know the thing you would have thought is the obvious solution is corroding your drain and making things worse? So don’t do it.” Think about the things people would love to know that would surprise them that they can do something about, and you become the trusted source that people will turn to from then on. Or they will turn back because they know they can get something they consider interesting or of value. Hugh: So who needs Content University? By the way, it’s contentuniversity.com, right? Cheryl: Yes, it is. I’d say fairly well everyone, but the need is going to be at different levels. If you own a business, you need it. If you lead an organization, you need it. If you need a following so you have a tribe, an audience, people that when the day comes you publish something really important and tag it, they will have familiarity with you and know who you are and be inclined to act where that urgent opportunity comes. On that level, everyone does, but they will be utilizing it on different kinds of agendas and levels. If you are in an organization, it’s easy to say everyone in your organization needs it, but in that kind of situation, you should adopt some of the principles of employee advocacy, which means the people who would really like to participate for a number of reasons, because it helps them advance in their career, it helps the company advance, it helps them sell more, they get invited and get given a specific training that includes some boundaries and guidelines or some efficiency of scale they can use. In essence, it’s everybody, but that is a qualified everybody. Different needs for where you are and the purpose of your organization. Hugh: Places that people need really good content, you talked about LinkedIn, brochures, annual reports, presentations. We make donor presentations. We make presentations for new board members. What are some places that people need to rethink having really good content? Cheryl: The magazines that speak to your niche interest or your associations. Every association is desperate for worthy material. You could provide that. If you do it with their permission and appropriate linkage, you could share it elsewhere as well. Just make sure you are following their rules. Blogs. It’s surprising. The whole thing about educational material, I read and actually wrote in Forbes about a case study on Chargrill. I have not really thought about it. But the whole outside grill industry took a big hit in the recession, understandably so. New grills were the things people put on the last burner, so to speak, of their buying agenda. That company was one who very astutely realized if people tend to buy a grill every four to eight years, we don’t dare wait until that four to eight years has come up to reach out to them. We need to be their resource in between and all of the time, so they started publishing tips, recipes, things to make your outdoor grilling come out better, and even just putting that on their company blogsm, or if they email out making it that material, not screaming sales headlines, huge, huge, huge change for the better. For them, they gained 2% marketing share of a market that is stagnant in a terrible sector. Hugh: There is a lesson here for nonprofits. Every community, I have worked all over the country as you may know, every community, the nonprofits say, “Everybody is raising money from the same donors,” so we want to get a bigger piece of the pie. Instead of looking at making a bigger pie and being more compelling in the message and looking at new relationships, they are dumbing down. That is part of the scarcity thinking that starts with thinking nonprofit and we can’t do things. Really we can do things. To me, there is a direct correlation in being able to have a compelling message and attracting people who want to support you, either by serving or giving their time, talent, and money because their money is going to provide really good results. We don’t talk about why it’s important and we don’t talk about the impact, which is the piece you were just talking about. The company that prints Nonprofit Performance Magazine is really a mailing house. To your point, they work with charities doing regular mailing. Here is a good place of convergence of leadership and strategy and Content U. They need to create a message that is regular so it’s the rhythm of the message; you don’t just send them a message at the end of the year and say, “Hey, donate again.” What have you been doing with my money? So we talk to them about the impact of the work before we ask them for money. It’s about rhythm, the right person, and the right message. It’s 30% each of those, and only 10% the design work. Actually, if we have a fancy design in the nonprofit world, it works against you because people think you are being frivolous with your money. Does that whole scenario make sense to you? Cheryl: Yes, absolutely. It does. In fact, here is an example of something that might rock the universe of your audience’s world. If the ways people can participate with you influence their outcomes of the marketing budget, that is an entirely budget than their giveback budget. Think that through. That is a way. Every company pretty much knows they need to be doing some giveback in some way; it’s just part of what their employees and customers expect. If there are ways for people to participate out of their marketing budget, for example, if they could sponsor you in a way that they get visibility for the likes and shares and sharing of message, they are compelling more people than the people who are able to contribute some money, like buying the Even Stevens sandwich, and they get a marketing benefit, so there is another budget they can tap. Pretty interesting, huh? Hugh: It is. That is in the realm of sponsorship. That is a whole area that people don’t tap enough. What you are pointing out is there is a win-win. If you have a good brand doing good work, then why wouldn’t a company want to be associated with your brand? Cheryl: Right! It’s their marketing benefit. If you can demonstrate that for them, that is a bigger pie. Nobody has touched that very effectively yet. Hugh: No. It’s a great area to tap. It’s a win-win. Russell, you went through the program. What was your experience like? Russell: I was surprised that just going through it, you don’t just sit through lectures. You actually go over some concepts, and then you actually get your typewriter or notebook or pen or whatever you prefer and you start breaking pieces down. It shows you step by step by step how to create a compelling piece of content. It’s practical, hands-on. There are a lot of stop-starts, so I had to keep charging my impact card. It builds. The knowledge is foundational. One step builds on the other. There is really practical. You don’t need university degrees to do this. It’s step by step, and it shows you how to make your content more actionable. It’s very practical. It’s something that would be good for every nonprofit secret weapon. Your servant leaders or volunteers, as they are more widely known, are your secret weapon. When you provide a development opportunity for them, and just showing them, this is a method that is easy to access, understand, and use, those are three things for anything. Content University meets all three of those with flying colors and gives you a method. Once you learn that method, it’s about practicing and continuing to use it. It’s pretty powerful stuff. I would recommend it highly. I thought it was sold for a lot less than it’s actually worth. But it’s valuable. That is a word that nonprofits don’t use. The word value. That is what you are providing. It’s like giving up your enterprise to start it; you are out there providing value. Everybody defines that differently, but with a course like Content University, you will be able to speak to your donors, your servant leaders, the people that are supporting your programs, in a way that resonates with them. Language is everything. Not just any language, but the right language that gets your message out and doing it in a way that draws people to you. Hugh: Cheryl, what do you think of that? Cheryl: I’m so glad I know you, Russell, and I’m glad we get to collaborate and work on projects together. If I haven’t mentioned that lately, I should, so thank you. Russell: The thing about this, when you sign up for this course, and I have the impact card, it’s something you can take with you as you are traveling. I keep this right by my desk. It’s a good handy reference. It’s indexed. I can pop it right in there and go through things. Everything is a refresher. I have so many books around here and other reference materials I can hardly move. I don’t think people need more information; they need people like us that can help them make sense of it. I keep this right by my desk when I am looking at putting something together. It is a great handy reference; it’s something you can go back to again and again and again. It’s a valuable tool because a lot of people that want to work with nonprofits, you may not have a big box for budget, but you can recognize people and you can get access to different types of training because a lot of people volunteer. They look at the development opportunities. It is important to ask people what they want. This is something they can improve their communication skills. Everybody can always improve at communications, so I think it’s a pretty cool tool. I like my tech. I have gadgets here. I don’t really have that great of a memory, but what I tell people when they make funny remarks about my memory, is I lean forward and say that this is a processor, not a storage unit. Cheryl: Exactly. It might be fun to note that we have imported all of that material online. When people sign up for the course through email, one of those video segments is coming with each week’s lesson. I give the entry information that gives people the golden nuggets about here is what you are going to do with it each week to generate leads. Here is your goal. Here are some anecdotes about people who have done that and how they have leveraged that. We are also including the audio files, so if somebody just wants to listen and not need to view the video segments, they got that option as well. It’s just there, so if you missed a week, it will be there in the archive next time you enter the program. It’s there and you can listen to it at your convenience. Hugh: Great. Cheryl: Of course, you would need a web connection, and you don’t need a web connection for that device you’re using. Hugh: We live and die by the web, don’t we? People are hanging in there… Cheryl: We do. Hugh: People are hanging in there on the webcast and the Facebook. If you have questions, those of you who are on the webinar, there is a Q&A button. If you move your cursor over the window, there is a Q&A button if you want to ask Cheryl a question. Meanwhile, if you are on Facebook, just post it in the box there. If you are listening to the podcast after the fact, go to thenonprofitexchange.org, and there is a place there that you can find this episode in the transcript for this episode. Kate Lemberg does our transcriptions, and they are done quite well. You know her. Cheryl: She’s great. Hugh: We will have the links for you and all of these great tips. Cheryl, while they are thinking of questions, sometimes we have no questions, which is fine. A couple things. People listen to all of this and say, “Oh my. It sounds like a lot of work.” I want to address that. Talk people through what the experience is like. Russell took it- Russell is very systematic. He does things very much in sequence, so he manages a lot of things. He underrates his skill, but he manages a lot of things and manages them well. Talk about the experience. Then, is it a good idea- We have talked about the executives doing it, but could the executive that is running the organization go through it with some of their colleagues so they could create this whole culture of information? Talk about the experience, and is there a group learning dynamic that would be beneficial? Cheryl: Yes. We have all of those options. The very least expensive is free. Just follow my columns on Forbes. Subscribe to our Snappington Post newsletter. There is an e-book, The Definitive Guidebook to Thought Leadership on snappconner.com that you can just download. That is available. And then I do have a Forbes e-book that is on Amazon. It would set you back all of $3.83. It is Beyond PR: Communicate Like a Champ in the Digital World. Those are the least expensive ways to get this indoctrination and ideas and help. I advise everybody to do at least that. But beyond that, the email course is $199. That’s not bad. You get the 12 sessions and can do it at your convenience. We can do workshops, and that is where you will be live or via Zoom, and we include Tom Post who can answer your specific questions about your publishing needs. Then for companies, and in fact the program in the first place we developed with the needs of our enterprise customers in needs. We can go in and spend a full day with everyone in the company, which is kind of interesting, everyone who has been selected. But it would include the top executives down to the blogwriters. Sometimes even the contract writers are included so that everybody is working from the same hymnal, so to speak, the same guidelines on what the intent to do with the material that is generated. All of those options are available, but you may want to start by following my columns or consider doing the email course because that is a very easy step to take. Here is a fun note from someone else that you and I both know, Hugh. I think Russell, you know Jason Webb as well, IP attorney. He is here in Salt Lake. His office is just several blocks away from ours. He came and did the one-day session with us. The topic he chose, and in those sessions we do develop an article together live, his was how to correctly size your NDA because being an IP attorney, that sounds like a boring field of work. But he gest that question a lot. Do I need an agreement? How big an agreement? Is a handshake enough? Is 16 pages too much? How do I decide? So he wrote this article, and at the end of that day, just for fun, I sent it to our local Utah business magazine, and they loved it. They asked if they could have it and printed it as a full-page article in their legal issue. So they have the listing of all the attorneys in Utah and in Salt Lake. Some of them had paid extra; they had a highlighted feature. Then you turn two pages and there is a full-page story complete with Jason Webb’s smiling handsome mug shot. You just can’t buy that kind of credibility. Who wouldn’t scan that article and want to know what he had to say on that topic? It’s just value beyond what you can accomplish by being in a listing, even by paying for advertising. Anyway, that is another fun story I like to tell as well. Hugh: great. We have quite a variety of people listening in. David Dunworth says, “Really engaging content from Ms. Snapp Conner.” “Thank you for sharing this valuable resource, Hugh.” People are really loving what you are sharing on the gift of the e-book, Snappconner.com. There is an e-book on thought leadership. Your book on Amazon. What is the title of that book? Cheryl: Beyond PR: Communicate Like a Champ in the Digital Age. Hugh: That is a great resource. Everything I have read of yours is very good. Russell, we are winding up here. Do you have another question that you’d like to pose to Cheryl before we wrap up? Russell: Well, I don’t have any more questions. But thanks again for coming in to join us. People need to get their message out there. I will probably be asking you at a later date to appear on the Nonprofit Culture as the experts edition, which is something I do on Wednesdays. We can have a chat about that offline. I will be getting your books. This is really great actionable content. I have put some links up in Facebook for people that want to know more and where to get in and where to subscribe. Again, thank you very much, and I look forward to chatting with you real soon. Cheryl: I will as well. Hugh: We really have folks that we know that provide outstanding content for charities. All they need to do is go take advantage of it. It sounds simple, doesn’t it? Cheryl: It is simple. It is not nearly as hard as they think. Hugh: Say that again. Cheryl: It really is simple. It is not as hard as you think. Hugh: Just do it. Put on your Nikes and just do it. As we are doing a wrap-up here, is there something we haven’t covered we ought to talk about? Cheryl: I’ll give you a final tip. This one is free to everybody. Go to Forbes.com, look up my name “Cheryl Conner,” and the current article that is there, it’s featured on the Small Business Channel today, is the one about that research, how to write an educative article that will make people 131% more inclined to buy. It includes that case study about Chargrill and what they did. You will get the details right there. It’s free. Just scan that article, and you will learn something new from today. Hugh: Outstanding. You are in demand from this world-class PR agency that you run from Salt Lake City, Utah. You are creating priceless resources through Content University. Thank you so much for being a guest on the Nonprofit Exchange today. Cheryl: Thank you so much, Hugh. I’m honored.

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  • TTMIK Level 9 Lesson 1

    · 00:16:16 · Talk To Me In Korean

    This is an Advanced Idiomatic Expressions lesson related to 손, the hand. In order to fully understand and use the expressions introduced in this series, it is essential that you understand the grammatical structure of the sentences. When you come across a grammar point that you are unfamiliar with, please go back and review the related TTMIK lessons. Keyword: 손 = hand 1. 손에 익다 = get accustomed to something (익다 = to be ripe, to be experienced) → You might be familiar with the word 익숙하다, which means “to be used to” something. Here, the verb 익다 has the same meaning as 익숙하다, but with the word 손, the expression is always used in the form 손에 익다. Think of it as a task or skill being “comfortable” or “accustomed” to the hand. Ex) 아직 일이 손에 익지 않아서, 시간이 오래 걸려요. = I haven’t become accustomed to the work yet, so it takes me a long time. 2. 손을 씻다 = to be through with something (bad); to quit doing something (bad) (씻다 = to wash) → The verb 씻다 means “to wash,” so the literal meaning of 손을 씻다 is “to wash one’s hands.” While it really is used in that sense, the expression 손을 씻다 can also be used to mean “to quit doing something bad,” such criminal or illegal acts. Ex) 저는 그 일에서 손 씻은 지 오래 됐어요. = It’s been a long time since I quit doing that. 3. 손이 크다 = to have an open hand; to be very generous (usually with food that one cooks) (크다 = to be big) → When someone tends to make a lot of food when cooking, you can say that the person is 손이 크다. When this expression is used in an idiomatic way, it has nothing to do with the actual size of the person’s hand. 손이 크다 is often, if not always, used to refer to mothers always cooking more food than necessary. Ex) 저희 어머니는 손이 커서 항상 음식을 너무 많이 하세요. = My mother has an open hand, so she always cooks too much food. 4. 손에 땀을 쥐다 = to be thrilled (while experiencing or watching something) (땀 = sweat, 쥐다 = to grab) → Literally, 손에 땀을 쥐다 means to “grab sweat in one’s hand.” The actual meaning of this phrase is that you are so excited and thrilled that your hands start sweating, therefore you have some sweat in your hands. This expression is commonly used in the forms 손에 땀을 쥐고, meaning “while being very thrilled,” and 손에 땀을 쥐게 하는, meaning “to be thrilling.” Ex) 축구 경기가 너무 재미있어서 정말 손에 땀을 쥐고 봤어요. The soccer match was a lot of fun, so I felt really thrilled while watching it. The soccer match was a lot of fun and I was really on the edge of my seat. 5. 손에 안 잡히다 = can’t concentrate on something (usually work) (잡히다 = to be grabbed, to be caught) → When you say that something is 손에 안 잡히다, it literally means that something is “not caught by one’s hands” but the actual meaning behind it is that you can’t get your hands on some task or can’t concentrate on something because you are distracted by other worries or exciting things. Ex) 걱정돼서 일이 손에 안 잡혀요. = I can’t concentrate on work because I am worried. 6. 손을 놓다 = to stop working on something; to get one’s hands off something (놓다 = to let go) → When you have your hands off something, it means you are not working on it anymore. You can say 손을 놓다 when you are either distracted or discouraged and not working on something anymore. Ex) 요즘 비디오 만드는 것에 손을 놓고 있었어요. = Recently, I haven’t been making any videos. 7. 손이 닳도록 빌다 = to beg as if one’s life depended on it; to beg and plead (닳다 = to be worn down, 빌다 = to beg, to plead) → 빌다 is to beg or to plead, and 손이 닳도록 means “to the point where your hands will be worn out”, so all together, 손이 닳도록 빌다 means to plead or beg as if your life depended on it. Ex) 손이 닳도록 빌었는데도, 안 된다고 했어요. = I begged and begged, but he still said no. 8. 손을 떼다 = to pull out of something (떼다 = to detach) → 떼다 means “to detach something off another thing.” So, when you say that you detach your hands off something, it means you’ve stopped doing something. Whereas 손을 놓다, 손을 떼다, and 손을 씻다 have similar meanings, 손을 씻다 usually means to stop doing something that is bad or illegal, 손을 놓다 means “to be too distracted or tired to continue working on something,” and 손을 떼다 means “to decide to stop being involved in something from a certain moment.” Ex) 저는 이 일에서 손 뗄게요. = I will pull out of this. = I will stop being involved in this project.

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  • Interview with Les Brown

    · 01:03:24 · The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

    Interview with Les Brown Hugh: Hi, this is Hugh Ballou again, and this is a very special episode of The Nonprofit Exchange. I have over here my good friend, Les Brown. And Les is going to share with you this movement that he has initiated. Over here, my new friend Tamara Hartley. Les? Les: Yes? Hugh: We have been capturing ideas on the storyboards about this project that you have got in mind. Tell people what this project is. Les: It’s a project that is designed to make a greater impact on people on the general population and helping people to develop the tools, mindset, skillset, and collaborative, achievement-driven relationships that will allow them to create the greatest version of themselves. This is the era that the late Peter Drucker calls the Era of the 3 C’s: accelerated Change, overwhelming Complexity, and then Competition. With all the changes taking place with technology—according to the Department of Labor, over 20,000 people are losing their jobs every day, and 50% of the jobs that now exist can be done by robots—when we look at the advance of artificial intelligence and cheap labor abroad, people literally are now in an entrepreneur’s era, and they have to begin to expand their skillset so they will be able to handle what is required to be in this global economy where accelerated change is taking place. Hugh: It is so true. You see it happening every day. Les: Yes. Hugh: Every day, there is massive changes. You have a special passion for those people who are incarcerated and continue to be incarcerated. Talk about that. Les: We incarcerate more people in America than anyplace else in the world. We are making people bitter rather than better. I believe that we have to develop a higher level of consciousness on how we deal with people that have made some bad choices. My goal is, to people that are incarcerated, if prisons will allow me, to have my programs in the prison that will change their mindset, teach them how to become an effective communicator, how to develop positive, collaborative, achievement-driven, supportive relationships, how to earn money online as entrepreneurs, and how to dress like a prospect rather than a suspect. Hugh: A prospect rather than a suspect. Les: Yes, because the truth is, when people get a criminal background, they are not going to get any jobs. If they do, those jobs won’t pay much money. These individuals are not going to starve to death. They are going to find a way to feed themselves. As a result, that is why the recidivism rate is over 80%. If you had a factory that was producing products, and 80% of the products came back defective, you wouldn’t continue to use that process. There has been a slight change in how we are dealing with people that have made some bad choices in our society. Rather than throwing money at caging them, they are now looking at the possibility of helping them to learn how to read because over 76% of them are functional illiterates, giving them the skillset and giving them some support to help them to be reintegrated into society. If you go to jail, you can’t stay in public housing. If you apply for a job, you have to put down that you have a criminal background. Most employers will say, “We’ll call you. Don’t call us.” They are penalized throughout their lives, even after they have paid their debt to society. That’s not fair. My mother was once incarcerated. She sold home brew and moonshine and wrote numbers when she could no longer work at the M&M cafeteria. That was a tough time. I became a man at ten years old as a result of that. Seven children in a house that no longer had the guardian, the person who took care of us. She adopted seven of us. She said that she made a commitment when she did that that we would never go to bed hungry, and we did not. We would always have a roof over our head, and we did have that. That was a gaff in our lives that was very painful and challenging. There are a lot of good people who made some bad choices, and I believe the world consists of the caught and the uncaught. I have made some bad decisions in my life. I did some stupid things when I was younger. Thank God I didn’t get caught. I believe that God was looking out for me because when I go to the bathroom, I leave the door open a crack. I do it all the time. What did Retta say? If you can’t do the time, don’t commit the crime. Hugh: Les Brown, you have this magical ability to put concepts into powerful words and to communicate it to people. I have been in groups that have just been so excited. I know that people write you and people speak to you about how you have inspired them. Something you said, and the content you gave them, gave them substance to get them out of where they were. It’s a mind shift, isn’t it? Les: No question. To put it in another context, you are expanding their vision of themselves. When people are going through a tough time, they have a tendency to expand and exaggerate the circumstances they are going through. When I speak, my goal is to expand your vision of yourself, to begin to see that there is greatness in you, that you are greater than your circumstances. You are better than anything you are going through now or in the future. You have to affirm to yourself. I have dealt with cancer on a regular basis for 21 years. My affirmation is: “This will not get the best of me.” I have to say this to myself, “I refuse to allow this to live in my life. I am stronger than this.” We have to, I believe, program ourselves and talk to ourselves to get through the stuff we are dealing with because things are going to happen to us. Forrest Gump is right, “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re going to get.” Greater is He that is in us and the He that is in the world as a presence. There is a power that we all have within ourselves that we have not been trained how to access so that we can rise above what we are going through and live our lives from the inside out rather than living our lives from the outside in. You have to discipline yourself not to get caught up and buy into what I call the weapons of mass distractions. There are so many things that will distract you and tell you that you can’t handle this or deal with this. You have to harness your will. You have to say to yourself, “I am going to get through this.” When life has been kicking my butt, no matter how bad it is, I have an affirmation, “I am going to make it.” When I say that, I think about my mother because she went through some tough times, raising seven children that she didn’t give birth to. She had a third grade education, was a domestic worker, and had arthritis. She would say, “Arthur is bothering me.” I would ask her, “Mama, who is Arthur? You are always talking about Arthur.” She said, “Don’t worry. If you live long enough, you’ll find out.” I have Arthur in my right butt. In my behind. You know what I mean? On the right side. I was at a church service, and this lady was a healer. So I decided to get in line. She asked, “Can I help you?” I said, “Well, just touch me at the top of my head, and the healing power will go through my whole body.” She said, “I want direct impact.” I said, “Well, I have prostate cancer, and I have arthritis in my right butt.” She said, “Touching means the same.” She was not going to touch me in the groin. Hugh: Oh my. Les: This is real, I’m telling you. She gave me some prayer cards, which I still have in my underwear right now. I was going back and forth on the stage. I saw people laughing and looking past me. This was in Detroit. I asked, “What are you laughing at?” These prayer cards that I had paid $3 for had slipped out of my pants, and I had a line of prayer cards going across the stage. I said, “You all can laugh if you want.” I picked them up and put them right in my underwear. 21 years of kicking cancer’s butt. Hugh: Your whole life is changing the paradigm because of your determination and your vision for yourself. Les: Yes. Hugh: We are in Cleveland, Ohio. We spent a chunk of yesterday letting you download your vision. This is a foundation that you are starting, but it’s bigger than that. It’s more like a movement. You are talking about 80% return to prison. That is a crisis. Les: Yes. Hugh: And you’re doing something about it. This is an official notice. We haven’t named it, but you are launching the Les Brown Foundation that provides support. You are going to invite people to participate in this movement with you. We are in this room in Ohio, and we have had some really powerful conversations. This is a huge vision, Les. I have worked with charities for 31 years. This is the top of the heap. This is powerful. Why am I here, and why is Tamara here? Les: The two of you have a skillset that I don’t have. You are very knowledgeable and experienced in this area of how to set up a nonprofit, along with Sherita Herring. Part of what I want to do, two people that I know who have integrity and experience and the skillset and other relationships that I don’t have, and that can teach me. I have asked for help, not because I am weak, but because I want to remain strong. Ask for help, but don’t stop until you get it. I could have gone on to set up a nonprofit; a lot of people do that. But I wanted to do it in the right way. I wanted to have a system and a level of transparency. When people contribute to the work that we are going to be doing, they will know beyond a shadow of a doubt that the money is going where we said it will go. I believe that when you are going to do something of this magnitude, you need people in your corner that can help you do that, that know things that you don’t know, and can set it up the right way so you can accelerate your level of success. You and Tamara are two individuals I strongly believe in. I met you at CEO Space. When we look at putting something together that will outlast you—to me, greatness is living your life in such a way that the things that you create, as one Russian author said, will not be undone or destroyed after you’re gone. We are only here for a limited amount of time. I had a plan of doing an event with Wayne Dyer, and we talked about doing a PBS Special. We put it off for several months. He finally called me and said, “I am coming to Orlando. Let’s get together and do this PBS special.” Two days later, he had a massive heart attack. We have to seize the moment. I am 72. I look much younger because I don’t believe in gray hair. There is no shade in my gait. I travel around with mascara in my pocket. If any gray hair comes out, I will touch it up in a heartbeat. The only three gray hairs that show up are in my eyelashes because I haven’t figured out how to do that yet. But I’m thinking about working on getting me some Mary Kay and hooking this stuff up. My goal now is about leaving a legacy. What will be different because I came this way? I have been thinking about that as a 21-year cancer conqueror, because of God’s grace and mercy. My goal is to live a life that they could say, This guy, because of his passion and his commitment to help transform people’s lives, like somebody transformed his life, he made an impact. There are people as a result of going through his training or hearing him speak that they were never the same as a result of being in his presence. I want to make my life mean something. Most people after they die, about two or three weeks later, because their lives were so inconsequential, they just worked a job, paid the bills, and took care of the family. One day, they were out of here. I don’t want it like that. I remember talking to my daughter on the telephone, and she said, “Dad, I am here in traffic, and there is a policeman on a motorcycle in the middle of the road. He is obviously stopping traffic for a funeral procession to come by.” I said, “Okay.” She said, “I think I’m going to be here a minute.” All of a sudden, she said, “Whoa, wow.” I said, “What’s wrong?” She said, “Nothing’s wrong. A hearse just went through. Only one car was behind it. When I die, Dad, I want, because of how I live my life, there to be a long procession of cars and people coming out to celebrate my life, that I was here in the difference I made for them.” I said, “I understand that.” That is what I want. When I go, people will come out to celebrate my life because I did some good stuff. As evil prevails, a lot of good men and women do nothing. There is a lot of good that all of us can do. But one of the things that I think about often, a lady that flew over from Australia for me to train her in speaking, I asked her, “Why did you select me? There are a lot of people all over the world.” She said, “I saw you on YouTube speaking in the Georgia Dome, and you speak from your heart. Therefore, I want to learn how to speak from the heart as well.” I said, “I can teach you how to do that.” Then I stopped and said, “What is your why? What is the reason you want to discover your power voice?” She said, “When I saw Dylann Roof, a young white kid who went to an African-American church and killed nine black people, “I felt there should be another person on his side standing before the judge. He was not born with that level of hatred in him. Somebody was in his ear. Somebody twisted his mind.” Then she paused and said, “I believe the world is as it is not because a few people are violent. I believe the world is as it is because too many people are silent.” When she said that, that really grabbed me. That gave me goose bumps. I want my voice and the voices of the people I train to be a chorus to create a different kind of mindset on the planet. I believe that can be done in our lifetime. Hugh: What we are here to set up is a way for people not only to be at your celebration for your life, but to continue the celebration. In Africa, there is a saying, “When a man dies, they burn his library.” We are not burning your library. We are building it up. Les: In fact, put them in my casket with me. I tell my kids, “When I die, don’t let them do anything with me until you come down to the morgue to identify my body. To make sure that I’m gone, put a microphone in my hand. If I don’t sit up and say, ‘You’re gonna be hungry,’ you can say that Dad’s gone.” “How do you know he’s gone? Did you check his pulse?” “No, we put a microphone in his hand and his mouth was still closed.” Hugh: Oh man. You have touched the lives of so many people in person. Like you said, your YouTube and Facebook and videos that are online, people view them. When I say Les Brown to people, they are like, “Oh yeah, I saw that video.” That is one way to live on. But what I have discovered, I have known you for a number of years, and you mentioned CEO Space. I have had to follow you twice on stage. Les: You called me your opening act. Hugh: That’s right. You gave me a high five. I knew you’d either love it or hate it. Les: I thought you were quick on your feet. I saw another speaker, this former mayor of Detroit, Colman Young. He had to speak to a group of cosmetologists, all of these females. As he was coming up on the platform, he tripped and fell. Everybody gasped. When he got himself together and came up to the microphone, he said, “Obviously I have fallen for you.” I said, “You go, boy.” That was awesome. Hugh: In this last day, my appreciation for Les Brown has grown deeper, not only for your ability to recall tons of profound quotes that are relevant to what we are talking about, but also the depth of your knowledge, perception, and experience. You know what you’re talking about, and you have paid the price. I knew that. Now I really know that. I always believed it. I know because I had to follow you that you made me a better me. The first time you talked and left, and I had to come speak an hour or so later, I was getting dressed, and I was trembling. You had this group going, man. They cooled off and came back and were like, “Who is Hugh Ballou?” I looked in the mirror and I said to myself, “You’re going to go out there, and you’re going to be Hugh Ballou.” I had the inspiration from me from that session. Because you triggered something in me, and I gave myself permission to be me. You talked about that earlier. I can really understand, when you say helping people to access that greatness within them, which you talk about in a number of ways, I am paraphrasing my hearing it—I want to say to people I have known you for a while, I have known your content. I have a whole deeper level of appreciation. What this movement is about, you are creating a foundation to be able to provide resources for those people that are trapped. 80% return to prison, I heard you say. Les: Yes. Hugh: And we are talking about doing a teen program because they get into a cycle that is going to lead them there. There is the training to help people break the cycle, but you are also helping people not get in the cycle. You have some outstanding programs. Les: I want you to pause. We decide the number of prisons that we are going to build based upon the failure rate of African-American students in the third grade. Based upon that. I say if we can track failure, we can also track success. Rather than tracking people to find out what number of kids are going to drop out in the third grade, and that will tell us the number of prisons based on those numbers we extract to build, we can decide we are going to do an intervention here, and we will give them the tools that they need to transform their mindset; teach them how to become effective communicators; teach them how to develop collaborative, achievement-driven, supportive relationships; teach them how to use the Internet; to be taught or learn how to use money online and become entrepreneurs; and teach them how to dress like a prospect rather than a suspect. I was looking at television, and they had these police arrests live. They arrested this guy whose pants were below his butt. They said, “Pull those pants up.” There is a comedian years ago on television. He had a bag over his head. If you hear a guy with a bag over his head, that would be me right through the shopping mall with a big belt and popping these butts with these pants hanging so low. I don’t even have to say to pull your pants up because they will pull them up after that. That will be me. That is a level of insanity to be in that. My goal is to eradicate the age to addiction and incarceration death syndrome. The sagging started in the prisons. I had to speak in a prison a few months ago. I used to challenge young men to come on stage, and I would pay them $1,000 if they could do more pushups than me. At the time, I did 142 pushups consecutively. I went into this prison, and I asked these young guys who came into the room. They had the pants sagging. I said, “Hey, I’m an old man. Why do you wear the pants the way you do? What do you call that?” They said, “Sagging.” I said, “Sagging?” They said, “Yeah.” “How do you spell that?” “S-a-g-g-i-n.” I said, “Wow, saggin’.” If you can determine what a man will think, you will never have to concern yourself with what he will do. If you can make a man feel inferior and never have to compel him to seek an inferior status, for he will seek it himself, and if he can make a man feel justly an outcast, never have to order him to go to the back door, he will go without being told. If there is no door his very nature will demand one. I said, “Spell it again.” “S-a-g-g-i-n.” I said, “Good. Flip it. Spell it backwards.” They paused for a moment and said, “Whoa.” I said, “Yeah. That’s how you’re dressing. Yeah. That is your vision of yourself. Yeah. You think that’s cool? Yeah.” Let me tell you something. When I left there, there was no saggin’. They pulled their pants up. I never had to tell them. I believe that people are as they are because if we knew better, we would do better. We have created a culture that is an entertainment-driven culture. The average immigrant who comes to the United States has a four times’ greater chance of creating wealth, buying a home, and having their own business. Why? Even though they can’t speak the language and don’t know the culture, when they hit the ground, they are hungry. They came here to achieve. Immigrants have an achievement-driven mindset. We as Americans are spoiled. We are spoiled. Are we perfect? No. But there are things we have that we take for granted. I have traveled to over 40 countries. When I am coming through security, I say, “God bless America.” I am so glad to get back home. We are blessed. We live on the greatest country on the planet. My goal is to help people overcome the psychic disrepair that this culture has created in many cases, to help them to discover the truth of who they are that will empower them to make choices that will free them from living a small life, from infecting people with their mediocrity and begin to affect people with their greatness. Hugh: Powerful. Part of why I came and Tamara came was the brilliance that we see when you are influencing people on stage and in person. I heard you coaching people on the phone yesterday. It’s like they are the only person in the world. You give them such focus, love, and attention. I can’t imagine why they wouldn’t want to go on and be successful. You have a real, genuine interest in people. You actually care about- Everybody I’ve seen you with, you really care about them. You have a huge segment, and to be able to create sustainability, the Les Brown influence is the catalyst. What you’re creating is programs, mentoring, accountability, a whole system to help people stay on a track. Les: Yes. T.D. Jake said something I agree with. He said, “There is no success without successors.” We learn, we earn, and you pass it on. I am in this stage now to pass on the things that I have learned. I was on a plane, and they had to have an emergency landing. I became ill on the plane. I remember being on the floor after they pulled me out of my chair, and I was going in and out of consciousness. I remember saying to myself, “God, don’t let me die now around these strangers with the knowledge that I have to transform kids’ lives. Please give me some more time to do the work that I feel You have given me to do.” When we landed in Salt Lake City, Utah, and the emergency crew came on the plane with all of their instruments, they wanted to put a paddle on my chest and the guy said, “Hey, wait a minute. You, mister. I know you. You are that man who help people deliver their dreams. I got this job because of you.” He put the oxygen mask on me. “Be gentle with him as you take him up. He’s got people’s lives he must change. He can’t go now.” I mean, the tears begin to fall from my eyes. What are the chances? They say coincidence is God’s way of being anonymous. God was affirming to me that my work is not done, I have touched more people than I will ever know. He was talking to me as I was going out. He said, “How is Gladys doing?” I tell you, this has been an exciting journey. I have grown. People have blessed me in so many ways. I am here because there were people who believed in me when I didn’t believe in myself. I teach that sometimes you have to believe in somebody’s belief in you until your belief kicks in. Hugh: Yes, sir. My wife has a saying that somebody believed in her when I was nothing but potential, and I can say that, too. Les: Yes. Nothing but potential. Hugh: Tamara is here. You picked up the phone, called us, and said, “Let’s get together.” So we came. You are a man of influence. Leaders are a lot of things, but number one, leaders are influencers. You influence us as well as the rest. Tamara has a real high-level consulting career. She is leaving that to come and help put this together and make sure it is done right. Why did you say yes to being a part of this- I’m going to call it a movement, is that all right? Why, Tamara, did you say yes to this? Tamara: When we talk about Les Brown in my house, you should hear what me and my husband say. My husband is so supportive of me going with Les Brown, helping him with his vision. He says, “You’re not just doing this for Les Brown; you’re doing it for the world.” He has influence over the world. That is extremely important. I get excited about his vision, the things he wants to do. I am a mother of four. I understand the mindset and how important it is to change people’s mindsets, particularly in children. With my own children, I teach them who they really are. Sometimes it works against me. I have a 13-year-old son, and I promise you when he was about nine years old, my girls had gone out and he stayed home. I asked them, “Why don’t you take your brother with you?” They said that he is staying home today to work on his back flip. I said, “His back flip?” “Yeah, he is down in the basement working on his back flip.” I say, “He can’t do a back flip?” I go downstairs and ask him, “Son, what are you doing?” He said, “Don’t worry. I am not doing the back flips yet. I am working on it in my mind.” I said, “What?” He said, “You said if I put my mind to it, I can do anything.” You know what? You’re right. Let’s both of us put our minds on lessons before back flipping in the basement. Having four children and seeing their growth and actually inputting the things I put into them, I know how important it is to work on mindset. When Les talks about the mindset of children and incarcerated persons, I wholeheartedly believe in that, and I want to help flesh out his vision. You have a visionary, you have a details person, we work well together. Hugh: As part of my series, I interviewed Cal Turner. Cal Turner went to his executive team at Dollar General and said, “My dad founded this company. I got this job because of my genes, not because of my skill. But I have the vision. You got the skill. We’re going public.” They went public, and it was very successful. They sold it later, and everybody received a lot of rewards for that. They all stepped up because he let them step up because he was the influencer and the visionary. He said to me, “Hugh, leadership is about defining your gaps and finding really good people to fill them.” That is part of my leadership education program now. Cal has influenced me. He is older than us, just a little bit, but he is still out there sharing his wisdom. It’s not about you asking for help. It’s about you being a good leader, saying, “Here is my expertise.” What she just pointed out, you have the vision, you have the goods, and she has the details. I am pleased to be a part of this project. I am a NASCAR fan. They go faster when they draft together. Les: Absolutely. One of the things that leaders also do is they are perpetually engaged in the process of a talent hunt, looking for people who have talent, skills, resources, access, and credibility that you don’t have. We can’t do the things we want to do by ourselves. One goose can fly 75% further in formation with other geese that it could never fly by itself. Part of my training is I teach people to practice the principle of OQP, only quality people. Dr. Dennis said, “If you are the smartest one in your group, you need to get a new group.” I have seen Tamara. I know about her leadership skills, her integrity, her commitment, and she is a person who can get things done. She has propensity for detail. That is opposite of me. I am not a details person. My skill is in speaking and training people how to speak, but she knows how to put systems in to place, and complemented with your skills and knowledge, we will be able to build something that will outlive us. It will be part of the future we cannot see. That is why I am excited about this new chapter in my life, building something that will outlast me and will be here long after I’m gone, that my grandchildren and great-grandchildren—I have three great-grandsons. My goal is to build something that will continuously transform people’s lives. My children share this vision as well and work with me. I am excited about what we can produce working with you and Tamara and also with the skillset and mindset of Sherita Herring. I believe what we are putting together is going to be an incredible movement that people can see, believe in, sink their teeth into, that they want to support. We are going to train young people. My goal is to help young people develop a different kind of mindset, to reduce the bullying and suicide rates. Suicide among young people has increased over 300%. According to the Center for Disease out of Atlanta, over 3,000 people committed suicide last year in this country. More people died from suicide than traffic accidents. In the land of opportunity, where people try to outswim sharks to get here or outrun jeeps barefooted to get here, I believe that is the result of lack of hope. When there is hope in the future, that gives you power in the present. When you combine hope, methods, and collaborative achievement-driven supportive relationships, that when people take some hits, and we are all going to have some hits. We will help people to weather those storms. We will help people to have the wherewithal to weather those hits, and they will come from so many places. One doctor looked at me and said three words no one ever wants to hear, “You have cancer,” those three most feared words in seven languages. I asked, “Can you get me a second opinion?” He said, “Yes, and you are ugly, too.” Hugh: We did some drilling down on the sustainability, the continuity of this. We are going to invite people to be part of this tribe, to take on the programs. But you are going to train trainers to train other trainers. As far as the youth go, they are going to have peer-to-peer training. We are going to build a cadre of student leaders who will speak in a very different way to their peers. I think your pleasure is to start with those who are incarcerated because it is such a crisis and jails are full. Les: They are. When you look at the jails, the juvenile detention centers, the prisons at both the state and federal level, the numbers are staggering. When we look at the things we can do to give them the support and the tools they need, and the mindset that you are worth something- If you are in a prison, you are not even recognized by your name but your number. The system as it is is designed to destroy a person’s sense of self. They treat them like animals. They get out and act like animals. We can do better than that. We are the United States of America. When we look at young people today, and their behavior… I was on a bus to the airport. They have those shuttles. A lady got on with her mother, and her mother is a senior citizen. She was holding a small baby, and the mother was like eight months pregnant. You know those shuttles. They are rocky and not sturdy. If you are a pregnant woman, I got up and offered her my seat. She gladly sat down. There is a young guy sitting there. I said, “Brother, do you mind giving this lady your seat?” I was talking about the grandmother holding the baby. He said, “Hey, I paid my money just like she did,” and he wouldn’t get up. I just said, “Wow.” I felt bad for him. I said to myself, “When I see these young guys with pants below their butt or they are disrespectful and have no sense of decency, I get angry with myself. I need to multiply my self through other people so that someone else can get in their ear other than what they are listening to every day that does not give them a vision of themselves in the future and keeps them in a very limited mindset.” It’s all about mindset. He thinks, and so as he continues to think, so he remains. We spend no money on the county level, city level, state level on transforming mindsets. Not anything. That is where everything begins. We know that. They did a study on some top achievers around the world, over 3,000. They wanted to know what the common denominator was among them that caused them to reach their goals. They discovered that 85% of them reached their goals because of their attitude, 15% because of their aptitude. The training that we are going to provide is to train a trainer so that this is not surrounding and driven by a personality, but by systems and people who have a vision for our kids in the future, living in a global economy and operating at a higher level of consciousness where they can live a life of contribution as opposed to a life of liabilities. Hugh: James Allen said—you triggered a quote—in his book A Man Thinketh, “People want to change their circumstances and are unwilling to change themselves. They therefore remain bound.” Les: Yes, bound and stuck. That is where all the transformation takes place, in the mind. He also said something: You can’t destroy negative thoughts. They are like weeds. You can overpower them for a period of time, but once you stop doing the things that you do to get the clutter and the negative things out of your mind, then those negative thoughts come back with a vengeance and are stronger. When I had a talk show, King World paid me $5 million. I became so busy and caught up and preparing to be on television and going through the training to be before the camera that I stopped my ritual of reading 30-40 pages every day. I stopped my ritual of listening to Earl Nightingale and Jim Rowan and Zig Ziglar and Tony Robbins and other speakers every day because I was so busy preparing for television. Those negative thoughts came back. I forgot who I was. I was disconnected from my power. I just was not myself until after the program was cancelled. I took a hit. Things happened during that particular time, and I was not prepared to handle them. My best friend died. My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer and passed. I went through a divorce when I was married to Gladys. At that time, I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. All of these things happened within 3-4 months. Had I been in my ritual, I would have been knocked down, but I would have been knocked out that I popped. One thing I encourage people to do is maintenance work to maintain that level of consciousness so that when things happen to you, you can handle it. We have the ability to handle it. Dr. Howard Thurman, who was a mentor to Martin Luther King Jr and Mahatma Gandhi, he wrote Deep is the Hunger and The Voice of the Genuine, “There is something in each and every one of us that waits and listens for the voice of the genuine in ourselves. It will be perhaps the only guide we ever have or hear. If we cannot hear it all of our life, our days will be spent on the ends of strings that somebody else pulls.” When you live your life from the inside out, you are literally saying, “Nobody, no circumstances, no situation will pull the strings of my mindset, my attitude, and how I feel about who I am and how I show up in life.” A profound thinker. Hugh: Part of the track that you are laying down is that nurture that helps people not only continue learning, but also to stay on the track. You talked about four programs that you have now and have more in mind. What is the background on why you developed those? What are the circumstances around them? They are powerful programs. EDITED AND PULLED (46:15) Les: I was a state legislator in Columbus, Ohio. I was elected to three terms. I became chairman of the Human Resource committee and the Education committee. I was a very controversial disc jockey, educating people on the things that maintain our detriment in the ‘80s, doing editorials, legislating against police brutality and the deadly use of force. When I was in the legislature, a guy named Clarence King—who had worked with Werner Erhard to create an organization called est—one of the great icons of the South development, he came and sat in the legislature to watch me. He had heard about me being an effective communicator, and he had gotten a contract under the Carter Administration called PIC, Private Industry Council, to train people on welfare, how to transition from welfare to working and being self-sufficient. But he could not get them to be open to that. He saw me and asked me, “Would you come down and talk to them so that you can get them in the mindset to be open to what I could provide for them? If they can do that, I can train them and transform their lives from the inside out, but I can’t get them to listen.” I came down and observed. He hired me as a consultant. My job was to come in first and train them. When I spoke at graduation, I went in a room three times, and I didn’t realize it was the same group of people. They were so transformed in how they were dressed, how clean-shaven they were. They looked like businesspeople. My God, I wanted to learn how to do that. When you speak, you only have 30 minutes to an hour, but I wanted to do more than just speak and leave. These people started doing the same thing they did before I came there. I wanted to be able to create an experience that people will be preeminently transformed for and have the tools and coaches in place to review, repeat, and reinforce the principles that change their mindset. So I became a student of this, me and my mentor Mike Williams who wrote the book called The Road to Your Best Stuff. I started studying and reading everybody that put anything out there dealing with the mind. Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, The Power of Positive thinking. Zig Ziglar, See You at the Top. Winston Churchill, The Truth is Incontrovertible. Alice Metack, AT the end there it is. The New Psycho-Cibernetics. The Secret of the Ages, Robert Collier. Earl Nightingale, The Strangest Secret in the World. I read these books. I listened to these recordings, and I decided I was going to master this. What I discovered from all these guys I studied, they had the complexion of connection. I had the complexion of rejection. So I could do all the things they told me to do, but I still wasn’t going to get that promotion. So I said, Wait a minute. I had to go back to the drawing board. How did Booker T. Washington and Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman- “Pray as if everything depends upon God, but work as if everything depends upon you.” I needed to know, What do you do if you are in a system that is stacked against you? How are you going to make it against all odds? I remember John H. Johnson in his book Succeeding Against the Odds said, “There is no defense against excellence that meets a pressing public need. When you have the complexion of rejection, you have to hold yourself to a higher standard, and you have to be committed to make it happen no matter what.” You told me an incredibly inspiring story that drives my life. In 1961, John F. Kennedy asked Wernher von Braun, “What will it take for us to beat the Russians to the moon?” He said five words, and he decided to call a news conference just on those five words. He decided to risk the embarrassment of the United States of America by proclaiming to the world that we are going to the moon in ten years. We did it in eight years. Those five words were, “The will to do it.” I believe that if you are faced with being laid off; if you are going through a divorce; if you have been diagnosed with a terminal illness; if we want to reduce the teenage pregnancy rate, the dropout rate, the recidivism rate, we must incorporate those five words, the will to do it. Everything I believe comes out of that. You are going to have some resistance. You will encounter some obstacles or setbacks, but if you have a will—where there is a will, there is a way. Jesus said, “Whoseever will, let him come.” If you have that mindset, there is an energy, there is a release of power and a presence in you that will allow you to overcome what appears to be insurmountable odds and do things that you don’t even know you can do right now. I’ve seen some things, and I’ve been around. I’ve seen a thing or two. So I know these principles work. They work with me. They work with my children; I use them as guinea pigs. And it’s exciting and fun. In this stage of my life, there are people who are listening right now who can hear me in their ears, but there are a few who can hear me in their heart. Because we all have an energy signature, there are certain people when you speak, they will hear you in their heart. If they heard Tamara or me, they will only hear us in their ears because of your energy signature, something about you. I believe that as we begin to duplicate ourselves and train people and get more voices and troops on the ground giving a message of hope and peace, and create a new conversation to create a different vision of how people see themselves and show up in life, that as we begin to increase those numbers, we will decrease the level of violence and mediocrity. We will decrease the things in our society that are maintaining our detriment. As we look at the words of Elsie Robinson, “Things happen around you and things happen to you, but the only things that really count are the things that happen in you.” When people are stirred up and ignited to become a force for God, to be an instrument, to operate out of a thinking that “the least that you do unto these my brethren, you do it also unto me,” and that you have, as Horace Mann said, “We should be ashamed to die until we have made some major contribution to humankind.” Operating out of that sense of oneness that drove Mrs. Rosa Parks to step up for herself and refuse to get up and give a white person her seat and was incarcerated, there was something in her that said, “I ought to do this on this particular day” and was a defining moment in history. We all have defining moments in our lives. Denzel Washington was in a movie and said, “There are things in life that happen, and it appears like slow motion. There is before this, and there is after this. After this, nothing will ever be the same again.” When I think about Mr. Lou I. Washington, I was in his class my junior year in school. He taught me to work out a problem on the board, and I said, “I’m not one of your students. I’m here to see MacArthur Stevens.” He said, “Doesn’t matter. Do what I’m telling you anyhow.” I said, “I can’t, sir.” The other kids started laughing. He said, “You see, he has a twin brother, Wesley. He’s smart. He’s the dumb twin.” I said, “I am, sir.” He came from behind his desk as they erupted in laughter. I was standing there, tears in my eyes with humiliation. He said, “Don’t ever say that again. Someone’s opinion of you does not have to become your reality.” That was a transforming moment in my life. Even though I’ve never known my birth parents, this guy became like my spiritual father. I told Tamara, “I need to meet your mama because you look so much like me.” But he taught me how to tell time. I wanted to be like him. I watched him. He was an eloquent speaker. He was a speech and drama teacher. He influenced me. My goal is- I have a lot of spiritual sons and daughters out there who have adopted me and I have adopted them. I adopted Mr. Washington. I remember eulogizing him and being at the celebration of his life. I watched his sons from an angle. When I spoke, they looked up at me, and none of his children spoke. We called him the great communicator. I realized something as I watched them: Even though he was their father, I knew a part of him that they never knew. I saw something in him that they never saw. That to me is one of the mysteries of life. How is it that people can be raised in a certain circumstance and end up dramatically different? Mr. Washington had thousands of kids, but he only had one Les Brown. So my goal before leaving the planet is: There are some other Les Browns out there who will do what I’ve done and will go even further, who will do more. They should do greater things. In this stage of my life, I am looking for people who are hungry to do the greater work. Hugh: Tamara and I have agreed to be the arms and legs for this movement. You are the influencer. You have created magical content, and we are going to put it in a form that is accessible for more people. We are going to help you put together a plan so that people know how they can support this. There are a lot of ways for people to support it. One way is to join your tribe. There are lots of ways we are going to roll out in time. We are going to roll this out gradually. The first stage is to get some funding in. We have a link. Is it the Les Brown Foundation? Tamara: Yes, it’s lesbrownfoundation.com and lesbrownfoundation.org. We have both. Hugh: Yes. We will have it set up to revert to a page so people can vote with dollars. They want to be a part of seeing this come to reality. The dollars are like putting gas in the car. It will make this run. There is no limit to the influence this movement can have and the impact it is going to have on our country. Just think of all those people who could be productive, who could get out of that cycle. We have done a whole lot of work in a short period of time. You are very clear. We were able to capture this vision and put some tactics around it and create a strategy that other people can understand. Is there a piece of this we haven’t touched on that you think we need to share with people? Tamara: Just listening to his vision and getting people excited about what we’re doing is super important. I relaly think we have done a good job of rolling it out. Visit the website, see how you can support it. I think we have done a great job telling it today. Les: I encourage people to go to the mindset and invest in this movement we are creating. It’s helping me to seal my deal with God. I remember saying, “God, if You help me get up off this floor,” when they have an emergency landing on a plane, they only do it if you are dead or dying. So I had a colonoscopy, and I got on a plane three days later and had internal bleeding I didn’t know I had. I remember when they said, “Is there a doctor on board?” and I had passed out in my chair and they laid me on the floor. They said that the guy came and checked my pulse and I had blood on the floor under me. His hands were soaked with blood from the internal bleeding that was coming out. He said, “We need to make an emergency landing.” They said, “It will only take us two and a half hours more to Detroit.” He said, “If you’re going to do that, then just strap him on the seat in the back and call the morgue and have them waiting. He won’t make it there.” That is when they made that emergency landing, and this guy who was a part of the emergency team said, “Hey, I know you, mister. You’re that man who helps people live their dreams. I got this job because of you.” But I promised God. I said, “If You help me get through this, I’m going to go back to where I started.” I started out training youth and training in prisons. Marysville Penitentiary and Ohio Penitentiary. Jails and prisons across the country. I said, “I promise I will do Your will.” This allows me to seal that deed. I’m still here. I made a deal with God. I gave Him my word. “If You help me overcome this, I will be used by You to make this world a better place until I take my last breath.” That’s what I want to do: make people feel good, laugh, know that I am not playing with a full deck, and make a difference, make a mark. We are very blessed to be in this country and to be a blessing to others. Naomi Brown, God took me out of my biological mother’s womb and placed me in the arms of my adopted mother. I am here because of two women. One gave me life, and the other one gave me love. So I am grateful to both of them. I feel that I was chosen for this. There is a time I couldn’t admit that. but I have had too many things, signs I have seen, that I know that a hand has been on my life. My steps have been ordered. Things I was encouraged to do and to learn. I don’t know where that came from. But I believe it’s a calling. Sometimes it takes you some time to recognize it. It’s a humbling experience, to feel that you have been chosen for something. So I am humbled because of that. Hugh: Les Brown. Les: Yes? Hugh: Thank you for saying yes to this. Les: Thank you and Tamara for saying yes to me and helping me do this. I appreciate you very much, more than you know. that’s my story, and I’m stickin’ to it. Hugh: Thank y’all for being here.

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  • [Re-Release]#105: Why Doug Hitchcock's Unusual Goal-Setting Plan Will Help You Get Rid of Chaos

    · 00:29:42 · The Three Month Vacation Podcast: Online Small Business|Marketing Strategy Plan| Sean D'Souza | Psychotactics

    Who's Doug Hitchcock? And in a world full of goal-setting exercises, why does Doug's system stand out? Find out why most goal-setting goes hopelessly off the mark and Doug's plan works almost like magic year after year. Find out not just how to set goals, but how to create a stop-doing list (yes, that's a goal too). And finally, learn why most goals are designed for failure because they lack a simple benchmarking system. Find out how we've made almost impossible dreams come true with this goal-setting system. http://www.psychotactics.com/goal-setting-successfully/ ------------------------------- In this episode Sean talks about Part 1: Why most goal-setting goes hopelessly off the mark Part 2: How to set goals, but how to create a successful stop-doing list Part 3: Learn why most goals are designed for failure because they lack a simple benchmarking system Right click here and ‘save as’ to download this episode to your computer. Useful Resources Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things Done Learning: How To Retain 90% Of Everything You Learn 5000bc: How to get started on your goal setting ------------------------------- The Transcript “This transcript hasn’t been checked for typos, so you may well find some. If you do, let us know and we’ll be sure to fix them.” This is the Three-Month Vacation. I’m Sean D’Souza. Doug Hitchcock was my first real mentor and he had been bankrupt thrive. When I first moved to Auckland in the year 2000, I didn’t really know anyone. I was starting up a new business, I was starting up a new life. I joined a networking group and within that networking group I asked for a mentor. Well, no one in the networking group was willing to be a mentor, but someone did put me in touch with Doug. The only problem with Doug was he had been bankrupt thrive. Now, when I say he was bankrupt thrice, it doesn’t mean he was still bankrupt. He just pulled himself out of the hole three times in his life and there he was, at about 70 plus, and he was my first mentor. Before he starts to talk to me about anything, he asks me, “Do you do goal setting?” I’m like, “Yeah, I have goals,” and he goes, “No. Do you have goals on paper?” I said, “No.” He says, “We have to start there. We have to start with goals on paper.” That’s how I started doing goal setting, all the way back in the year 2000. Almost immediately, I got all the goal setting wrong. You ask, how can you get goal setting wrong? After all, you’re just putting goals down on a sheet of paper. How can you get something like that wrong? You can’t write the wrong goals, but you can write too many goals. That’s exactly what I did. I sat down with that sheet of paper and I wrote down all my work goals, my personal goals, and I had an enormous list. That’s when Doug came back into the scene, and he said, “Pick three.” I said, “I could pick five.” He goes, “No, no, no. Pick three.” I picked three goals in my work and three goals from my personal life. You know what? By the end of the year, I’d achieved those goals. Ever since, I have been sitting down and working out these goals based on Doug’s method. Doug may have lost his business thrice in a row, but he knew what he was talking about. Most of us just wander through life expecting things to happen. When they happen, we say they happen for a reason, but they don’t happen for a reason. They happen, and we assign a reason to it. In this episode, I’m going to cover three topics. The first is the three part planning. Then we’ll go the other way. We’re create a stop doing list. Finally, we’ll look at benchmarks and see how we’ve done in the year. Let’s start off with the first one, which is the three part planning. Does the San Fernando earthquake ring any bells in your memory? Most people haven’t ever heard of this earthquake, and yet it was one of the deadliest earthquakes in US history. It collapsed entire hospitals, it killed 64 people, it injured over two and a half thousand. When the damage was assessed, it had cost millions of dollars, and yet it could have been the disaster that eclipsed all other US disasters. That’s because the earthquake almost caused the entire Van Norman Reservoir to collapse. The dam held, and yet, if it had collapsed, the resulting rush of water would have taken the lives of more people than the Pearl Harbor Attack, the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, 9/11 and 1900 Galveston Hurricane combined. In barely 12 seconds, the top section of the dam had disintegrated and yet, the surrounding areas were extremely lucky. The reservoir was only half full that day. The aftershocks of the earthquake continued to cause parts of the dam to break apart. A few feet of free board was the only thing that stopped a total collapse. This total collapse is what many of us come close to experiencing as we try to clamber up the ladder of success. We try to do too many things and we don’t seem to go anywhere. In effect, this is like water cascading down a dam. There’s too many things and we have no control over it. What’s going to stop it? The only thing that seems to stop anything is some kind of focus and goal setting is focus. The way we go about our goal setting is the way Doug showed me. The first category of goal setting is what we want to achieve at work. The second set comprises of our personal goals. The third, this is the most critical of all, what we’re going to learn. Should we start off with the first one, which is our work goals? Well, that’s not the way we do it as Psychotactics. The way we work at Psychotactics is we look at our personal goals. Our own lives are far more important than work. What we do is we sit down, and first, we plan vacations. As you know, we take three months off. We’ve been doing this since 2004. We started our business at the end of 2002. Yet by 2004, we had decided we were going to take three months off. The thing is that your vacations also need planning. Our vacations are broken up into big breaks, small breaks, and weekends. Now the big breaks are the month long vacations, and then the small breaks are in between that. We’re go away for a couple of days somewhere, and that’s our small break. I’m saying weekends, because before I wouldn’t take weekends off. I’d be working on the weekend at least for a few hours on Saturday morning and a few hours on Sunday morning, and I don’t do that any more. Now that’s almost written in stone. It’s very hard for me to get to work on weekends. I’ll slide sometimes, but it’s very hard. The most critical thing to do is to work out the long breaks. When are we going to have those, and then the shorter breaks. That comprises that whole vacation concept, but you also have to have other personal goals. Maybe I want to learn how to cook Mexican dishes, or maybe I want to learn how to take better photographs. Now, these are personal projects. They’re not not pseudo work projects. They’re things that, at the end of the year, I go, “Wow, that’s what I’ve achieved. That’s how much I progressed.” That’s how you start off with personal goals. You plan your breaks. You plan what you want to do personally. Once you’re done with that, then you go to your work goals. We have a lot of work goals, we have the article writing workshop coming up, we’ve got the 50 words workshop, which is, how do you start up an article. We’ve got a whole bunch of things, because we’ve got products, we’ve got courses, we’ve got workshops. All of this has to sit nicely between, so that we work for 12 weeks and then we go on a break. We’ve decided that we’re not having any workshops next year. We’ve had a lot of workshops this year, no workshops next year. Now, this leaves us the chance to focus on the courses and the products. Now my brain is like that dam, there’s always water rushing over. I want to do a million projects, but then I have to choose. The article writing course is one of the things that I want to do for sure. I want to do a version 2.0 of it. The cartoon bank, I’ve been putting that off for a long time. That’s definitely something I want to do. Then I’ll pick a third one. Do I stop at three? No, but I make sure that I get these three down. The three that I’m going to do, they go down on paper. Some other projects will come up, a lot of stuff that I might not expect, and yet I’ll get all of this done, but these three, they’ll get done. Those three vacations, they will get done. Then we get to the third part, which is learning. What am I going to learn this next year? Maybe I’ll learn a software, or maybe I’ll learn how to use audio better. The point is, I have to write it down, because once I write it down, then I’m going to figure out where I have to go and what I have to do to make sure that learning happens. This is not just learning like reading some books or doing something minor like that. This is big chunks of learning, so that by the the end of the year, I know I’ve reached that point. When it comes to planning, the first thing that we’re always doing is we’re looking at these three elements, which is work, vacation, and learning. If we have to do other sub projects, we’ll do it, but these nine things get done. Year after year after year. This is what Doug taught me, he gave me this ability to focus. I consider myself to be unfocused, I consider myself to want to do everything and anything. That was the gift of Doug. In the year 2008, we had a program, it was a year long program. You probably heard of it. It was called a Psychotactics Protégé program. We would teach clients how to write articles, how to create info products, public relations. Lots of things along the way in that year. As you’d expect, it was reasonably profitable. 15 students paid $10,000, and so that was $150,000 that we would have in the bank before the year started. In 2009, we pulled the plug on the Protégé system. Why would we do that? We started it in 2006, it was full, in 2007 it was full, in 2008 it was full, in 2009 there was a waiting list. We decided not to go ahead with it. We decided it was going to go on our stop doing list. We were going to walk away from $150,000, just like that. Yes, some clients were unhappy, because they wanted to be on the next Protégé program. They had seen the testimonials, they had seen the results. They knew that it was good enough to sign up for. They knew that $10,000 was a very small investment, for a year long advancement. On our part, we realized that we had to walk away from $150,000 that we were getting on cue, every December. This is what’s called a stop doing list. We’ve used this stop doing list in our own lives. When we left India, and got to Auckland, it wasn’t like we were leaving something desperate. We were leaving something that was really good. I was drawing tattoos all day, going bowling in the afternoon, having long lunches, Renuka’s company was doing really well. They were picking up all expenses, and the only thing we really had to pay for was food but, at that point in time, we decided we had to make a break. We had to stop doing something so that we could do something different. We don’t know whether that different is better, but at that point we have to stop it, so that we can explore what is coming up ahead. There are two things that you put on your stop doing list. One, something that is working exceedingly well. The second thing, something that’s doing really badly. Or something that’s getting in your way. Now, the first one doesn’t make any sense. If something is doing exceedingly well, why would you stop it? Well, the point is that if you continue to do something, then you can’t do something else. You don’t know how good that something is until you stop doing it and then you go on to do something else. Last night, I was reading The New Yorker, and The New Yorker is one of my favorite magazines. There’s James Surowiecki saying exactly the same thing. He’s saying that Time Warner should sell HBO. HBO has now 120 million subscribers globally. It has earned over 2 billion dollars in profits last year. It’s stand alone streaming service has got over a million new subscribers since last spring. What does the article recommend? It recommends that they get rid of it, they sell it, they get the best price for it at this point of time, when they’re doing so well. What if it doubles in its value? That’s the answer we’ll never know, but the article went on. It talked about ESPN and how in 2014 it was worth 50 billion dollars. Disney owned it, they should have sold it, they could have banked the money. They could have focused on something else, but no, they kept it. ESPN is still doing well, it’s still the dominant player, but you can see that it’s not exactly where it was in 2014. The Protégé program was doing really well for us, clients were with us for the whole year. They would then join 5000 BC, we’d get to meet them. It was a lot of fun, and it generated a sizable revenue and we walked away from it. It enabled us to do other stuff that we would not have been able to do. When you say stop doing list, it’s not just the bad stuff that you have to stop doing. Sometimes you have to stop doing the things that are very critical, like next year we’re not doing workshops. Workshops are very critical to our business, but we’re not going to do the workshops. Instead, we’ll do online courses. Instead, we’ll do something else. We’ll create that space for ourselves, even though the workshops are doing really well. The other side of the stop doing list is stuff that’s driving you crazy. You know it’s driving you crazy, but you’re not stopping it. For instance, in September of this year, we started rebuilding the Psychotactic site. Now, there are dozens of pages on the Psychotactic site and I want to fiddle around with every single one of them, and do things that are interesting, different. The problem is that there are other projects, like for instance the storytelling workshop. Of course, vacations that get in the way. The point is that, at some point, you have to say, okay, I really want to do this, but I’m not going to do this. I’m going to put it off until later. This is procrastination, but it is part of a stop doing list. You can’t do everything in the same time. Last year, this time, we had the same dilemma when we were going to do the podcasts. I wanted to write some books for Amazon, and I wanted to do the podcast. Every day, we would go for a walk, and it would run me crazy. I didn’t know where to start, when to start, what to do first. I had to sit down and go, okay, what am I going to stop? I just dumped the Amazon books and started on the podcast. Now we’re on podcast number 70, and it’s not even been 52 weeks. It shows you how that stop doing list can help you focus and get stuff out of the way. Sometimes you have to procrastinate to get that point. Now the stop doing list is not restricted to work alone. You can take it into your personal life as well. For instance, I used to get my hair cut by a hairdresser, and I was dissatisfied for a very long time. You come back in, you grumble, and my wife, Renuka, she said, “Okay, stop grumbling. Go and find another hairdresser.” I ran into Shay, now Shay was cutting my hair so well, it was amazing. I wasn’t the only one who thought that was amazing. Usually, I was on a waiting list at a barber shop. I would get there, and there were two people in front of me, waiting for Shay. While a few of the barbers just stood around, doing absolutely nothing because no one was interested. Then, one day, involuntarily, Shay went onto my stop doing list. Kimmy was around and Shay wasn’t and so Kimmy cut my hair. She was better than Shay. I thought, “Oh my goodness. I should have done this a long time ago.” Then Kimmy got transferred to another branch, and now there’s Francis. You’ve heard about Francis in other podcasts. Now Francis is my top guy. There you go, even in something as mundane as cutting hair, there is a stop doing list. You have to push yourself a bit, and at other times you have to pull back and go, “No, we’re not going to do that.” The stop doing list is for good times, as well as for pressurized times. You have to decide, I’m going to stop doing it, I’m going to move onto the next thing. This takes us to the third part of planning, which is benchmarks. Now what are benchmarks? Often when we set out to do a project, say we’re going to do that website. What we don’t do is we don’t write down all the elements that are involved in doing that website because a website can go on forever, can’t it? It expands exponentially. When you are saying, I am going to write books for Amazon. Well, how many books are you going to write? How many pages are the books going to be? What’s the time frame? Where are you going to get the cartoons from? Who’s going to do all the layout? Having this kind of benchmark in mind makes a big difference. When we plan for something, for instance if I’m planning for the article writing course, which is version 2.0. I’m going to have to sit down and work out what I’m going to have to do. When I’m doing the stock cartoons, I’m going to have to sit down and work out what kind of stock cartoons, how many. It’s perfectly fine to write a top level goal. You should do that, you should say, “Okay, I’m going to do the website,” but then you have to get granular. The granular bit tells you, have I reached my destination. Otherwise, people don’t get to their goals, and that’s why they’re struggling, because there’s no clarity. Usually, you’re going to get the clarity when you have only three things to do, but even so, if you don’t have benchmarks you’ll never know when you’re reaching your goal or if you’re going to reach your goal. That brings us to the end of this episode. Summary What did we cover? We looked at three sets of goal setting, and that is your personal goal setting, your work goal setting, and your learning goal setting. Instead of having 700 of them, you just have three things that you want to achieve in the year. Three major things that you want to achieve in the year. Logically, you start with the work, but don’t handle the work. Just go to the breaks. Organize your breaks first, because you get reinvigorated and you come back and then you can do better work. First, fix the breaks and then go to the work, then go the learning. That takes care of the first set. The second thing that you want to do is you want to make sure that you have a stop doing list. Sometimes, things are working, they’re going your way, and they still have to be dropped. That’s what we did with the Protégé program, that’s what we did with our move to New Zealand, and a lot of good things have become better, because we’ve decided to move along. Sometimes, you’re just confused because you have too many things to do, and procrastinate. Go ahead. I mean, I know this about planning, not procrastination, but procrastination is a form of planning, when you have too much to do. Finally, have the benchmarks. Make your goals a little more detailed so that you know when you’re hitting those benchmarks. Plan it in a little more detail. That’s how you’ll reach your goal. This is what goal setting is about. It’s very simple. People make it more complicated than it needs to be. What’s the one thing that you can do today? Very simple. Work, vacation, and learning. Get your paper out, get your pen, and start writing. Three goals. You can start off with seven, or ten, but whittle it down to three. Oh, and make sure you write it down. When you write it down, things happen. It’s like magic when you write it down. Keep it in your head, it’s not as powerful. Write it down, it happens. If one of your goals is to join 5000 BC this year. That’s 5000 BC, our membership site. You’ll find that it’s quite a nice place to be. It’s a very warm and friendly place. It would be great to see you there. It also gives you the opportunity to be first in line for any of the online courses that we’re having. That might not seem like a big deal until you see how cool the online courses are at Psychotactics. It’s not just another information dump, you actually get the skill. If you set out to be a cartoonist, you become a cartoonist. If you set out to be a writer, you become a writer. It’s not just information that you’re getting, it’s all very practical. Being a member of 5000 BC gives you that little edge to get in there before everybody else. You have to read The Brain Audit, however. You can get that at psychotactics.com/brainaudit or on amazon. Com. If you’ve read The Brain Audit and you would like a special collector’s edition, then email us at Psychoanalytical. We’ll give you instruction on how to get the special collector’s edition. That’s it from me at Psychotactics and the Three Month Vacation. Bye for now. One of the biggest reasons why we struggle with our learning is because we run into resistance. Resistance is often just seen as a form of laziness, but that is not true at all. There are hidden forces causing us all to resist doing what we really should do. This slows us down considerably. Find out how to work with resistance, instead of fighting it all the time. Click here to get the free report on ‘How To Win The Resistance Game’. http://www.psychotactics.com/free/resistance-game/

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  • #71: How "Doug Hitchcock's" Goal Setting Worked Wonders—And Why We Successfully Use It Year After Year

    · 00:28:01 · The Three Month Vacation Podcast: Online Small Business|Marketing Strategy Plan| Sean D'Souza | Psychotactics

    Who's Doug Hitchcock? And in a world full of goal-setting exercises, why does Doug's system stand out? Find out why most goal-setting goes hopelessly off the mark and Doug's plan works almost like magic year after year. Find out not just how to set goals, but how to create a stop-doing list (yes, that's a goal too). And finally, learn why most goals are designed for failure because they lack a simple benchmarking system. Find out how we've made almost impossible dreams come true with this goal-setting system. http://www.psychotactics.com/goal-setting-successfully/ ------------------------------- In this episode Sean talks about Part 1:  Why most goal-setting goes hopelessly off the markPart 2: How to set goals, but how to create a successful stop-doing listPart 3: Learn why most goals are designed for failure because they lack a simple benchmarking systemRight click here and ‘save as’ to download this episode to your computer. Useful Resources Chaos Planning: How ‘Irregular’ Folks Get Things DoneLearning: How To Retain 90% Of Everything You Learn5000bc: How to get started on your goal setting ------------------------------- The  Transcript “This transcript hasn’t been checked for typos, so you may well find some. If you do, let us know and we’ll be sure to fix them.” This is the Three-Month Vacation. I’m Sean D’Souza. Doug Hitchcock was my first real mentor and he had been bankrupt thrive. When I first moved to Auckland in the year 2000, I didn’t really know anyone. I was starting up a new business, I was starting up a new life. I joined a networking group and within that networking group I asked for a mentor. Well, no one in the networking group was willing to be a mentor, but someone did put me in touch with Doug. The only problem with Doug was he had been bankrupt thrive. Now, when I say he was bankrupt thrice, it doesn’t mean he was still bankrupt. He just pulled himself out of the hole three times in his life and there he was, at about 70 plus, and he was my first mentor. Before he starts to talk to me about anything, he asks me, “Do you do goal setting?” I’m like, “Yeah, I have goals,” and he goes, “No. Do you have goals on paper?” I said, “No.” He says, “We have to start there. We have to start with goals on paper.” That’s how I started doing goal setting, all the way back in the year 2000. Almost immediately, I got all the goal setting wrong. You ask, how can you get goal setting wrong? After all, you’re just putting goals down on a sheet of paper. How can you get something like that wrong? You can’t write the wrong goals, but you can write too many goals. That’s exactly what I did. I sat down with that sheet of paper and I wrote down all my work goals, my personal goals, and I had an enormous list. That’s when Doug came back into the scene, and he said, “Pick three.” I said, “I could pick five.” He goes, “No, no, no. Pick three.” I picked three goals in my work and three goals from my personal life. You know what? By the end of the year, I’d achieved those goals. Ever since, I have been sitting down and working out these goals based on Doug’s method. Doug may have lost his business thrice in a row, but he knew what he was talking about. Most of us just wander through life expecting things to happen. When they happen, we say they happen for a reason, but they don’t happen for a reason. They happen, and we assign a reason to it. In this episode, I’m going to cover three topics. The first is the three part planning. Then we’ll go the other way. We’re create a stop doing list. Finally, we’ll look at benchmarks and see how we’ve done in the year. Let’s start off with the first one, which is the three part planning. Does the San Fernando earthquake ring any bells in your memory? Most people haven’t ever heard of this earthquake, and yet it was one of the deadliest earthquakes in US history. It collapsed entire hospitals, it killed 64 people, it injured over two and a half thousand. When the damage was assessed, it had cost millions of dollars, and yet it could have been the disaster that eclipsed all other US disasters. That’s because the earthquake almost caused the entire Van Norman Reservoir to collapse. The dam held, and yet, if it had collapsed, the resulting rush of water would have taken the lives of more people than the Pearl Harbor Attack, the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, 9/11 and 1900 Galveston Hurricane combined. In barely 12 seconds, the top section of the dam had disintegrated and yet, the surrounding areas were extremely lucky. The reservoir was only half full that day. The aftershocks of the earthquake continued to cause parts of the dam to break apart. A few feet of free board was the only thing that stopped a total collapse. This total collapse is what many of us come close to experiencing as we try to clamber up the ladder of success. We try to do too many things and we don’t seem to go anywhere. In effect, this is like water cascading down a dam. There’s too many things and we have no control over it. What’s going to stop it? The only thing that seems to stop anything is some kind of focus and goal setting is focus. The way we go about our goal setting is the way Doug showed me. The first category of goal setting is what we want to achieve at work. The second set comprises of our personal goals. The third, this is the most critical of all, what we’re going to learn. Should we start off with the first one, which is our work goals? Well, that’s not the way we do it as Psychotactics. The way we work at Psychotactics is we look at our personal goals. Our own lives are far more important than work. What we do is we sit down, and first, we plan vacations. As you know, we take three months off. We’ve been doing this since 2004. We started our business at the end of 2002. Yet by 2004, we had decided we were going to take three months off. The thing is that your vacations also need planning. Our vacations are broken up into big breaks, small breaks, and weekends. Now the big breaks are the month long vacations, and then the small breaks are in between that. We’re go away for a couple of days somewhere, and that’s our small break. I’m saying weekends, because before I wouldn’t take weekends off. I’d be working on the weekend at least for a few hours on Saturday morning and a few hours on Sunday morning, and I don’t do that any more. Now that’s almost written in stone. It’s very hard for me to get to work on weekends. I’ll slide sometimes, but it’s very hard. The most critical thing to do is to work out the long breaks. When are we going to have those, and then the shorter breaks. That comprises that whole vacation concept, but you also have to have other personal goals. Maybe I want to learn how to cook Mexican dishes, or maybe I want to learn how to take better photographs. Now, these are personal projects. They’re not not pseudo work projects. They’re things that, at the end of the year, I go, “Wow, that’s what I’ve achieved. That’s how much I progressed.” That’s how you start off with personal goals. You plan your breaks. You plan what you want to do personally. Once you’re done with that, then you go to your work goals. We have a lot of work goals, we have the article writing workshop coming up, we’ve got the 50 words workshop, which is, how do you start up an article. We’ve got a whole bunch of things, because we’ve got products, we’ve got courses, we’ve got workshops. All of this has to sit nicely between, so that we work for 12 weeks and then we go on a break. We’ve decided that we’re not having any workshops next year. We’ve had a lot of workshops this year, no workshops next year. Now, this leaves us the chance to focus on the courses and the products. Now my brain is like that dam, there’s always water rushing over. I want to do a million projects, but then I have to choose. The article writing course is one of the things that I want to do for sure. I want to do a version 2.0 of it. The cartoon bank, I’ve been putting that off for a long time. That’s definitely something I want to do. Then I’ll pick a third one. Do I stop at three? No, but I make sure that I get these three down. The three that I’m going to do, they go down on paper. Some other projects will come up, a lot of stuff that I might not expect, and yet I’ll get all of this done, but these three, they’ll get done. Those three vacations, they will get done. Then we get to the third part, which is learning. What am I going to learn this next year? Maybe I’ll learn a software, or maybe I’ll learn how to use audio better. The point is, I have to write it down, because once I write it down, then I’m going to figure out where I have to go and what I have to do to make sure that learning happens. This is not just learning like reading some books or doing something minor like that. This is big chunks of learning, so that by the the end of the year, I know I’ve reached that point. When it comes to planning, the first thing that we’re always doing is we’re looking at these three elements, which is work, vacation, and learning. If we have to do other sub projects, we’ll do it, but these nine things get done. Year after year after year. This is what Doug taught me, he gave me this ability to focus. I consider myself to be unfocused, I consider myself to want to do everything and anything. That was the gift of Doug. In the year 2008, we had a program, it was a year long program. You probably heard of it. It was called a Psychotactics Protégé program. We would teach clients how to write articles, how to create info products, public relations. Lots of things along the way in that year. As you’d expect, it was reasonably profitable. 15 students paid $10,000, and so that was $150,000 that we would have in the bank before the year started. In 2009, we pulled the plug on the Protégé system. Why would we do that? We started it in 2006, it was full, in 2007 it was full, in 2008 it was full, in 2009 there was a waiting list. We decided not to go ahead with it. We decided it was going to go on our stop doing list. We were going to walk away from $150,000, just like that. Yes, some clients were unhappy, because they wanted to be on the next Protégé program. They had seen the testimonials, they had seen the results. They knew that it was good enough to sign up for. They knew that $10,000 was a very small investment, for a year long advancement. On our part, we realized that we had to walk away from $150,000 that we were getting on cue, every December. This is what’s called a stop doing list. We’ve used this stop doing list in our own lives. When we left India, and got to Auckland, it wasn’t like we were leaving something desperate. We were leaving something that was really good. I was drawing tattoos all day, going bowling in the afternoon, having long lunches, Renuka’s company was doing really well. They were picking up all expenses, and the only thing we really had to pay for was food but, at that point in time, we decided we had to make a break. We had to stop doing something so that we could do something different. We don’t know whether that different is better, but at that point we have to stop it, so that we can explore what is coming up ahead. There are two things that you put on your stop doing list. One, something that is working exceedingly well. The second thing, something that’s doing really badly. Or something that’s getting in your way. Now, the first one doesn’t make any sense. If something is doing exceedingly well, why would you stop it? Well, the point is that if you continue to do something, then you can’t do something else. You don’t know how good that something is until you stop doing it and then you go on to do something else. Last night, I was reading The New Yorker, and The New Yorker is one of my favorite magazines. There’s James Surowiecki saying exactly the same thing. He’s saying that Time Warner should sell HBO. HBO has now 120 million subscribers globally. It has earned over 2 billion dollars in profits last year. It’s stand alone streaming service has got over a million new subscribers since last spring. What does the article recommend? It recommends that they get rid of it, they sell it, they get the best price for it at this point of time, when they’re doing so well. What if it doubles in its value? That’s the answer we’ll never know, but the article went on. It talked about ESPN and how in 2014 it was worth 50 billion dollars. Disney owned it, they should have sold it, they could have banked the money. They could have focused on something else, but no, they kept it. ESPN is still doing well, it’s still the dominant player, but you can see that it’s not exactly where it was in 2014. The Protégé program was doing really well for us, clients were with us for the whole year. They would then join 5000 BC, we’d get to meet them. It was a lot of fun, and it generated a sizable revenue and we walked away from it. It enabled us to do other stuff that we would not have been able to do. When you say stop doing list, it’s not just the bad stuff that you have to stop doing. Sometimes you have to stop doing the things that are very critical, like next year we’re not doing workshops. Workshops are very critical to our business, but we’re not going to do the workshops. Instead, we’ll do online courses. Instead, we’ll do something else. We’ll create that space for ourselves, even though the workshops are doing really well. The other side of the stop doing list is stuff that’s driving you crazy. You know it’s driving you crazy, but you’re not stopping it. For instance, in September of this year, we started rebuilding the Psychotactic site. Now, there are dozens of pages on the Psychotactic site and I want to fiddle around with every single one of them, and do things that are interesting, different. The problem is that there are other projects, like for instance the storytelling workshop. Of course, vacations that get in the way. The point is that, at some point, you have to say, okay, I really want to do this, but I’m not going to do this. I’m going to put it off until later. This is procrastination, but it is part of a stop doing list. You can’t do everything in the same time. Last year, this time, we had the same dilemma when we were going to do the podcasts. I wanted to write some books for Amazon, and I wanted to do the podcast. Every day, we would go for a walk, and it would run me crazy. I didn’t know where to start, when to start, what to do first. I had to sit down and go, okay, what am I going to stop? I just dumped the Amazon books and started on the podcast. Now we’re on podcast number 70, and it’s not even been 52 weeks. It shows you how that stop doing list can help you focus and get stuff out of the way. Sometimes you have to procrastinate to get that point. Now the stop doing list is not restricted to work alone. You can take it into your personal life as well. For instance, I used to get my hair cut by a hairdresser, and I was dissatisfied for a very long time. You come back in, you grumble, and my wife, Renuka, she said, “Okay, stop grumbling. Go and find another hairdresser.” I ran into Shay, now Shay was cutting my hair so well, it was amazing. I wasn’t the only one who thought that was amazing. Usually, I was on a waiting list at a barber shop. I would get there, and there were two people in front of me, waiting for Shay. While a few of the barbers just stood around, doing absolutely nothing because no one was interested. Then, one day, involuntarily, Shay went onto my stop doing list. Kimmy was around and Shay wasn’t and so Kimmy cut my hair. She was better than Shay. I thought, “Oh my goodness. I should have done this a long time ago.” Then Kimmy got transferred to another branch, and now there’s Francis. You’ve heard about Francis in other podcasts. Now Francis is my top guy. There you go, even in something as mundane as cutting hair, there is a stop doing list. You have to push yourself a bit, and at other times you have to pull back and go, “No, we’re not going to do that.” The stop doing list is for good times, as well as for pressurized times. You have to decide, I’m going to stop doing it, I’m going to move onto the next thing. This takes us to the third part of planning, which is benchmarks. Now what are benchmarks? Often when we set out to do a project, say we’re going to do that website. What we don’t do is we don’t write down all the elements that are involved in doing that website because a website can go on forever, can’t it? It expands exponentially. When you are saying, I am going to write books for Amazon. Well, how many books are you going to write? How many pages are the books going to be? What’s the time frame? Where are you going to get the cartoons from? Who’s going to do all the layout? Having this kind of benchmark in mind makes a big difference. When we plan for something, for instance if I’m planning for the article writing course, which is version 2.0. I’m going to have to sit down and work out what I’m going to have to do. When I’m doing the stock cartoons, I’m going to have to sit down and work out what kind of stock cartoons, how many. It’s perfectly fine to write a top level goal. You should do that, you should say, “Okay, I’m going to do the website,” but then you have to get granular. The granular bit tells you, have I reached my destination. Otherwise, people don’t get to their goals, and that’s why they’re struggling, because there’s no clarity. Usually, you’re going to get the clarity when you have only three things to do, but even so, if you don’t have benchmarks you’ll never know when you’re reaching your goal or if you’re going to reach your goal. That brings us to the end of this episode. Summary What did we cover? We looked at three sets of goal setting, and that is your personal goal setting, your work goal setting, and your learning goal setting. Instead of having 700 of them, you just have three things that you want to achieve in the year. Three major things that you want to achieve in the year. Logically, you start with the work, but don’t handle the work. Just go to the breaks. Organize your breaks first, because you get reinvigorated and you come back and then you can do better work. First, fix the breaks and then go to the work, then go the learning. That takes care of the first set. The second thing that you want to do is you want to make sure that you have a stop doing list. Sometimes, things are working, they’re going your way, and they still have to be dropped. That’s what we did with the Protégé program, that’s what we did with our move to New Zealand, and a lot of good things have become better, because we’ve decided to move along. Sometimes, you’re just confused because you have too many things to do, and procrastinate. Go ahead. I mean, I know this about planning, not procrastination, but procrastination is a form of planning, when you have too much to do. Finally, have the benchmarks. Make your goals a little more detailed so that you know when you’re hitting those benchmarks. Plan it in a little more detail. That’s how you’ll reach your goal. This is what goal setting is about. It’s very simple. People make it more complicated than it needs to be. What’s the one thing that you can do today? Very simple. Work, vacation, and learning. Get your paper out, get your pen, and start writing. Three goals. You can start off with seven, or ten, but whittle it down to three. Oh, and make sure you write it down. When you write it down, things happen. It’s like magic when you write it down. Keep it in your head, it’s not as powerful. Write it down, it happens. If one of your goals is to join 5000 BC this year. That’s 5000 BC, our membership site. You’ll find that it’s quite a nice place to be. It’s a very warm and friendly place. It would be great to see you there. It also gives you the opportunity to be first in line for any of the online courses that we’re having. That might not seem like a big deal until you see how cool the online courses are at Psychotactics. It’s not just another information dump, you actually get the skill. If you set out to be a cartoonist, you become a cartoonist. If you set out to be a writer, you become a writer. It’s not just information that you’re getting, it’s all very practical. Being a member of 5000 BC gives you that little edge to get in there before everybody else. You have to read The Brain Audit, however. You can get that at psychotactics.com/brainaudit or on amazon. Com. If you’ve read The Brain Audit and you would like a special collector’s edition, then email us at Psychoanalytical. We’ll give you instruction on how to get the special collector’s edition. That’s it from me at Psychotactics and the Three Month Vacation. Bye for now. One of the biggest reasons why we struggle with our learning is because we run into resistance.Resistance is often just seen as a form of laziness, but that is not true at all. There are hidden forces causing us all to resist doing what we really should do. This slows us down considerably. Find out how to work with resistance, instead of fighting it all the time. Click here to get the free report on ‘How To Win The Resistance Game’. http://www.psychotactics.com/free/resistance-game/

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  • Increase Your Reach and Donations

    · 01:01:03 · The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

    Increase Your Reach and Donations: Learn About How to Get $10K in Free Adwords [caption id="attachment_1523" align="alignleft" width="150"] Pip Patton[/caption] Pip Patton and John Zentmeyer will share secrets about how to get $10K in free Google AdWords monthly and how to drive more traffic to your website for more engagement and more publicity. Their company,  Search Intelligence LLC, based in Tampa Florida, is a digital marketing agency. 'We believe that marketing in today's digital age should not be confusing to utilize and benefit from.' We help you accomplish this by offering digital marketing services that are easy to understand and implement. Our services start with SEO and include optimized website design, social media management, video marketing and traffic analysis so you can make informed decisions about your marketing strategy. We also work with non-profits by helping them apply for and obtain a Google Grant. A Google Grant is a grant of $10,000 in AdWords advertising each month for your non-profit. You can use the grant to promote your non-profit and gain more exposure online; increase awareness, recruit volunteers, promote special events, etc. Notes from the Interview   Why do we care if people come to our websites? Need for visibility brings more of people you want to see, online is where people are looking. Not ranking on Google is like being 100 miles off the highway with no lights turned on. No one can find you! You can’t get the word out on your work if no one can find you. How do you figure out who to attract to your website?   Extensive interview with client, create keywords and Adwords to drive traffic, find out what people are searching for through online research, very few people aware of what prospects are searching for and tax status is not a factor. Online is where more search for info takes place! 1. What is a Google Grant and How Do I Apply? Google’s way to give back to the community; $10,000 month available to 501(c)3; keyword bids restricted to $2 or less; must find enough keywords to use all of the funds. Qualifications - verify status as charity; apply online; campaign (Adwords) must be ready to go when launching  2. What is SEO and why do I need it for my charity or church?  Paid v. Organic Search priority given to paid; Ranking based on most relevant to search according to Google who cater to their own customers; can use best keywords when they are paid for; Google rates the information you provide, you have to build authority; organic search provides 5 times amount of results as paid search; you have to build credibility through your results; good information adds to your authority! Facebook uses pixels attached to your website to build a “smart dat profile.” Google does not do this for you. LinkedIn relation to Google - optimized profiles are critical to building authority, it helps develop authority Organic Reach - Basics Clarity around what you do needs to be clear to Google tech; links back to high authority sites on subject helps (on page SEO) must be relevant and valuable; Google grades authority based on links from other sites, social media, or blog posts that are shared or other shared information. This all takes time using SEO. Only 18% to 20% of traffic comes from paid search. The rest is organic! The top 3 get the lion’s share! Analytics tell you what people type in to find you. Free tutorials available from Google. One-third of searches on monthly basis are different from anything they’ve ever seen before! QUUU.com Buffer and QUUU work together How do people learn how to do SEO in a way that helps them?  Creating a presence on the main social media sites use tools like Buffer (link posts to other sites); Quuu - (Aggregator of articles and information for curation); make sure you include some original content that increases engagement Basic Visibility Enhancers - get more than one account (the Big 5; Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, and Instagram); have accurate info on all sites; hire  someone who has expertise because everything changes frequently Algorithms for mobile and desktop differ, mobile friendly search is more important all the time; by 2018 it will dominate rankings; far more searches on mobile than desktop! Closing Thoughts - (John) Go through strategy form to provide the types of information they need to provide good service; stay in your wheelhouse and focus on what you know, let your SEO experts to help you get where you need to be; search terms most relevant to you Closing thoughts - (Pipp) - Take time to analyze your site and other information; video is a great tool for conversion, less than 2 minutes is best when it is engaging, speak like you are having a conversation with a single person; video drives up conversion considerably. Contact Information Search Intelligence, LLC 1520 W Cleveland St Tampa, FL 33606 (813) 321-3390 http://www.si-5.com   The Interview Transcript NPC Interview with Pipp Patton & John Zentmeyer Hugh Ballou: Welcome, everyone. We are talking nonprofit language. Our guests tonight are two distinguished-looking gentlemen, Pipp Patton and John Zentmeyer. They are in Florida on the Gulf Coast and in central Florida. They have a very defined expertise. I met Pipp on a couple trips in Orlando doing some interaction with CEOs. You must be a CEO if you are in that group. This company you have, tell me what the name of it is, what inspired you to launch this company, and a little bit about your history and expertise that you bring to this very specialized space. Pipp Patton: Thank you for having us on. My background: Over 20 years ago, I was actually in the yellow pages business. I used to work with small businesses, helping them promote themselves and growing through the vehicle of yellow pages back when the yellow page directory was the search engine of choice. Then that changed about 10 years ago. At that time, I was transitioning out of yellow pages. I enjoyed working with business owners, and the technology and the digital arena was of great interest to me. I studied it and tried to learn it. I have been now working about seven years or so in that arena with an agency model, where I help businesses be found in Google search primarily. Hugh: I used to buy yellow page ads when I had a camera shop. It was the go-to place to find out who to hire and who to solve your problems. That was a unique spot. You transitioned from that space? Was that a direct transition to the digital marketing that you do? Pipp: Yeah, pretty much. At that particular time, I left yellow pages because the company I worked for got bought out by someone else, and they didn’t treat their new acquisition people real well. So it was a good opportunity for me to leave there. At that time, my mom needed some attention and care, so I decided to stay home and take care of her. Shortly thereafter, I had been studying digital marketing and had a couple of people that I met that really needed help in that arena. I helped them, and the business evolved from there. Hugh: Awesome. To fall into that. John, you are part of this team. Talk about that. What brought you to this place? John Zentmeyer: Directly, Pipp brought me to the place. Pipp and I have done business together off and on, many different ventures, always been good buddies, and always enjoyed bouncing business ideas off each other for over 30 years now. Last year, I was making a transition, and I have owned several businesses. At the time, I was working with a group that I thought I would be at for the rest of my career, but that doesn’t always happen. But Pipp and I had always talked a lot about what he was doing and what was happening in the SEO world. All my career, I have looked for ways to bring large ROIs to companies or to my clients. SEO is a great way to do that. I have always been in the technology world, mostly automation, but this has been a lot of fun, and we have enjoyed working closer together. Hugh: Russell Dennis has been stalking you, so Russell, what did you find out about them online? Russell Dennis: John said wonderful things about Pipp online. It’s a glowing testimony. There are a number of things. There is this track record of years where you have been getting premium results. Coming from the yellow page world, I saw yellow page ads in my sophomore year of college. I made a truckload of money that summer. This was back in 1995 of course. Pipp: That was a good time to be in yellow pages. John: It probably wouldn’t work as well this summer. Russell: Probably not. I would probably go hungry over the summer. You see things like Yelp, but everything is a known directory. The only real power in that stuff is in the testimonials and getting credibility. Hugh: Awesome. That is back when a truckload really meant something. A truckload of money was worth something. Russell: That was before the exchange rates went to pot. Hugh: Oh gosh, yeah. Guys, we sent out an email today and one just a few minutes ago to tell people they could get $10,000 of free AdWords. We are going to talk about that. These are people who are in what we call social benefit work. They are running a membership organization. It has a tax-exempt status. They are running a church or synagogue, a community foundation, a cause-based charity. There are lots of people who are in education or government organizations, like down the road from me, we have an agency on aging, my peer group. We have a lot of people doing really good work. Why should we care that people come to our website? We want to direct traffic, but let’s talk about why people come. Who do we want to attract? Let’s take it sequentially. Why do we care, and then who do we want to bring to our website? Pipp: Whether it’s a nonprofit or a regular for-profit business, you need more customers, more exposure, more people to know who you are and what you do. Whether they have an interest in perhaps volunteering or donating or being involved in special events that you have, taking advantage of what you may teach, all of those things are there, so having a higher profile online will bring more of those eyeballs and ears to you. If people want information about anything, they are online. John: Take it one step further. Having a website online and not being ranked in Google anywhere is like having your nonprofit or for-profit business ministry, whatever you’re doing, out in the middle of a very dark desert with no lights. So you cannot be found. If you are providing a service for somebody in a nonprofit arena, then the idea is you want people who are looking for that service to be able to find you. That is the biggest reason that you want to expose yourself on that side. Doesn’t matter what you’re doing. If you’re doing for-profit, you want people to be able to find you. Hugh: There are lots of really good organizations doing really fine work that nobody is aware of. It would occur to me that PR is one good reason. I know people will support the cause they believe in. If they can go to somebody’s website and see the impact of the work of the charity—who are we serving, what problem are we solving—how do we figure out which people to attract to the website? That matters a lot, doesn’t it? Pipp: It definitely does. In our world, what John and I do, generally when we work with an organization, they are telling us what people are searching for to find them, or at least the basic concept. We will build campaigns around that. If we are doing SEO, then we are going to work to make their site visible for certain keywords, as an example. In the AdWords arena, it’s the same thing. You are bidding on keywords to become visible in a search. If somebody is new to an area and is looking for a specific type of denomination, they may go online to see what’s around them. If you’re not visible, you just missed out on a new member perhaps. Hugh: There are a lot of choices in life today, aren’t there? Pipp: There sure are. Most businesses, or organizations if you will, today I find aren’t really aware of how many searches there actually are online for their service or product. It’s the single largest pool that exists of prospective new customers, clients. Those are interchangeable words, even in the nonprofit world. It equates to the same thing. If you have a business or an organization, and you are working in a certain arena, there is more search for that information about that online than there is anywhere else. Hugh: Awesome. John: Hugh, you can relate to this. What happened when you got a yellow page ad? Hugh: People would call me up and say, “I see you have this.” John: They found you. Hugh: That was the go-to place. We actually went to the yellow pages last week to look for some resources for moving. We put out a line that people get $10,000 in AdWords. Talk about that program. I have one of these grants, and I don’t know how in the world I got it. Somebody helped me get it. I am still learning how to work it, but I am spending $10,000 a month. Talk about that program. How do people acquire that grant? Pipp: It’s a terrific program by Google. This is their way of giving back to the community at large here in the United States .it may be available overseas, too; I’m not sure of that. It’s a grant that they offer to any 501(c)3 for $10,000 a month to use any way the organization sees fit. The determination of the success of any advertising campaign is totally up to you. Google is providing that. The only restriction they put on it is that you can’t bid on a keyword that is more than $2. Now depending on the area you live in, larger areas, certain keywords that might fit your organization might be highly competitive, and they would be well in excess of $2. But just as you found, Hugh, if you work with somebody who understands how to dig out the keywords that still fit the proper niche that you are going after, you can find enough keywords to bid on to utilize those dollars. Hugh: I think I have 24,000 keywords in all of the things that are related to us, and we have an average position of 2.5 on a search. Pipp: That is terrific. That is very good. And you are working on a national level, correct? Hugh: I’m working with anybody who speaks English. We got Philippines, Australia, New Zealand. Pipp: There are many organizations who would be able to take the same approach. If it was a local church or synagogue, an organization like that, they might be more defined by a geographic area. But still, the exposure that they can gain from that is just fabulous, and it is a really terrific program that Google has put out there and made available to all the 501(c)3s. Hugh: How do you get it? How do you qualify for it? Pipp: It’s an application process. They just have to verify you are truly a legitimate 501(c)3. Doesn’t matter what you are promoting or what you’re about. We actually offer that service to nonprofits where we will do the application process for them. We don’t charge for that. We are pretty successful. We haven’t had anything not approved so far. Along with that application process, you have to have a campaign that is ready to go. Google sees there is a campaign in place that you are ready to turn on the minute they say yes. John: An AdWords campaign. Pipp: Yes, an AdWords campaign Hugh: You can register for that for free. If you do it on your own, you pay per click. Russell, they just slipped something in there. Did you hear what I hear? He said they do it for free. Pipp: Maybe we shouldn’t have said that, John. What do you think? John: It’s a little too late now, Pipp. You can’t put that one back in the bag. Pipp: I will say this. We don’t manage campaigns for free. I found a lot of people- The application process can be confusing to them. You can’t even begin until you get approved. We have at least been able to figure that out and are willing to do that for anybody. They can manage their own campaigns. When you get into the nitty-gritty of it, as you found, Hugh, you need somebody to help you because it would be difficult for you on your own to find 24,000 keywords. Hugh: Oh my word. And to put them in the right ads in the right places to direct them to the right page to do what we call conversions. Pipp: You have to have landing pages and ad groups and campaigns and this stuff that needs to be done to optimize it. One of the reasons you have 24,000 keywords is you want to utilize all that money and are limited to $2 a click. You have to find a keyword that might only get five searches a month, but you want to make sure you are found when those five people are searching. Hugh: It’s the misspelling of the words, too. People who spell leader wrong just as a typo. Laeder. John, you were going to say something? John: I just said the maximum is $2. It’s not that they are all $2. Hugh: I adjust them down, and sometimes I get the mileage. There is also a quality score. I have some that are 7’s and 8’s, which I understand is pretty hard to do. They rate you on the quality of the word as to where you are driving it. There are some sophisticated tools out there to watch what you’re doing. It’s just amazing. Where do people contact you to let you help them do that and start that conversation? Pipp: They can call me. Our phone number is 813-321-3390. That is our main line here in Tampa. They can go to our website. On the website you can get contact information. The phone number is there of course, and there is an email link to send us an email if you want. They can reach me via email if they like at pipp@si-5.com. Hugh: Si-5.com is the website. That is a very generous offer. It’s not a lot of work. I want to talk about the juxtaposition of SEO and the ads. Those two need to have some synergy. John, you were talking about that if you did the SEO, it would get you more mileage for less money with the AdWords. I’m surprised they didn’t cancel me. I had the grant. It had five or six campaigns going. Now I have several thousand campaigns or ad groups going. Four campaigns. But I found that no matter what I tried, I could not spend more than $300 a month. That is the maximum you spend a day, $332 or $333. I spend that every day now. But I couldn’t figure that out. So I had to get somebody to help me. That is a for-hire thing you can do. I got frustrated because I shouldn’t have been doing this in the first place. I do leadership and culture and strategy really well. I suck at that. Suck is halfway to success. Talk about why you need this if you do SEO. Pipp: It’s the difference between paid search and organic search. Whenever you do a Google search, you bring up a search result page. At the very top, the first three or four listings are going to be the paid ads. The next ten listings below that are what they call the organic or non-paid listings. Each of these listings, paid or unpaid, are the listings that Google believes are the most relevant to the search you have done. John: They are catering to their own customer. I as a Google searcher am a Google customer. They want to try to provide me the most relevant and best options possible so I am happy. Pipp: You are happy and continue to use Google. John: That’s right. Pipp: Why don’t you go ahead and talk about the percentages of where the clicks go, John? John: That is important. if I launch a campaign today, I can bid on an AdWord today, and I can get that AdWord and I can be found for that word today. Organic is a little bit different. That takes a little bit more time, authority, optimization. Google is not going to make that change quickly because again they want to make sure you actually do have good information to provide their customer when they search for a given keyword. That is why it takes time to build that authority for the organic search. What is very interesting is that the difference between the paid search and the organic search is there is about five times more volume for the organic search. That is a big deal. If you are buying AdWords and you are getting traffic, that is great because I can do it today. That is a way to get to the organic search. You can start to get traffic today but realize that over time you will have a lot more to choose from if you are getting the organic search. It just takes time. Hugh: Does Google learn, or does the effectiveness grow over time? I have listened to people talk about how they do Facebook ads. Over the weeks and months, the Facebook ads build a knowledge base and becomes more effective over time. That may or may not be the accurate description, but is there something like that with AdWords? John: The parallel would be- I guess it would be the authority that you gain by having good information and making it available so Google can read it, understand it. Your page is optimized. The information you are providing is relevant. Google will look at all of that. If I have a new page and someone finds me but my information is not very relevant, Google’s customer, the searcher, will leave. Google doesn’t like that. Pipp: I understand your question also relates to Facebook. Facebook has what they call a pixel. They want you to put that pixel on your website. Facebook learns. Facebook’s algorithm learns who clicks on your ads and who your ideal customer is, and they get smarter and smarter at putting your ad in front of people that fit a profile that is more likely to click. AdWords, I don’t believe does that. To be honest with you, my business partner is more knowledgeable than I am on the running of the AdWords campaigns. John: You should clarify that as your other business partner. Pipp: Yes, sorry. My other business partner, who is on vacation with her children right now and her husband. But I don’t believe that the AdWords does that. It’s pretty much up to us as the buyer of AdWords to optimize the campaigns and figure out what is working best. Hugh: My colleague Russell is very active on LinkedIn. I have heard you guys other times talk about authority. Russ does a lot of good stuff on LinkedIn. He has articles, and his description of who he is is very valuable. How does that play into the picture with the Google SEO and the AdWords and the whole package? Pipp: Having an optimized profile on LinkedIn, as well as other social media properties, is all important. Every one of those provides a description of you and your business, a link back to your website from a site that Google sees as high authority. When you can get a link back from a high authority site, some of that authority transfers back, and it helps you build the authority of your website. Those are all part of the mix. They don’t really have much of an effect on your AdWords, but from an SEO standpoint, those are very important elements. Hugh: Russ, did that bring up any questions or comments on your side? Russell: Keywords are important. This program for grants is something I have seen because who couldn’t use $10,000. When I read the language, there is a certain amount of traffic you have to drive. If you don’t do that, they pass it on to people who can use it. The idea of them looking at keeping their own credibility high by giving their users what they need makes perfect sense. Unless somebody has a lot of expertise in that, and I don’t think you have that on your typical nonprofit staff, is it’s a wonderful opportunity, but you have to be able to drive the traffic to keep it going. Pipp: That is correct. Google AdWords is much more complicated to optimize, and it takes some time to optimize a campaign. Usually when you are working with AdWords, you will figure the first three or four months is what you will put in to tweak and figure it out. We are managing a campaign for a chiropractor client. It’s not a big campaign or a huge amount of money, but we took it over because the people who were handling it for them were unhappy with the results they were getting. We have taken it over. We have had it about two months, and it will be another month or two before we get it fine-tuned. I was in my office just now building landing pages because they were sending all this paid traffic to their homepage. In their particular case, if you were looking for a chiropractic solution for back pain, the homepage mentions it, but it doesn’t really talk about it in depth. So it’s less likely to create a conversion or getting a phone call for an appointment than if they were landing on a page that spoke to that particular problem directly. I am in the process of building them landing pages that will help their conversion, and the better conversion you get helps your quality score. Hugh is obviously doing that well if he has some 7’s and 8’s in quality scores. Hugh: I’m not getting the conversions I want, but it has gone up dramatically in the past two months. I am starting to fine-tune it. I had some AdWords that weren’t relevant, which were bringing in some people who weren’t the right people. I wanted to come back to that piece. We want to bring the people that can find words, and we can trick them into coming, but if it’s not what they want, they will leave within a second or two. So we just wasted the money. Pipp: Then Google dings you and realizes that ad is not working. Regardless of what you are bidding, they drop you down in position. With AdWords, even if there are three or four ads at the top of the page, even if they are all bidding the same thing, if they all have the same quality score, Google rotates those around. As time goes by and one or two gain more traction because they have a higher quality score—they are getting a better click rate, even though it’s the same price or a little lower price—Google will show them ahead of the other ads. They want people to have a good experience so they keep using them. Like John said, the person doing the searching is the customer that Google is trying to please. Hugh: That’s a really important area to understand. I’m a pretty smart guy, but it’s taken me a while to wrap my head around this. I am learning it so I can bring on somebody and have them manage it. There are lots of charities doing social media, and they don’t do themselves any favors. There are lots of charities who put up pretty websites. Propeller Head makes them something nice. They say you have all these hits. I think I shared this with you, but it’s said that hits are how idiots attract success. It really doesn’t matter who comes. Hits is every time you download an image or a page or something, so you can have a lot of hits with nothing. It’s really coming back to this what do people do, the conversions, that matters. Let’s go into some of the things you know people need to learn. When you put up a webpage or site, Google looks at everything. How does this organic SEO work? John: That’s where it starts. The very first thing is that Google is a computer. It needs to make sense to Google. You can’t infer things. It has to be written and optimized such that Google can read it and understand exactly what you do, what you’re promoting, what information you’re providing. We want to make sure you have optimized it so Google can understand it. Then you want to start to look for ways to continue to build that authority. We mentioned having links back from high authority sites so Google realizes, “Oh, okay. This site thinks that they are providing the right information about this given subject.” But the big thing is it does start on the page. We call it on-page SEO. It needs to have the right information in the right format and make sense for Google. Hugh: Go back to this authority site thing. Talk a little bit more about that. Pipp: The sites that you see in organic search on the results page—those are the sites that Google feels are the most relevant, which to them means they feel they have the highest authority on that subject. Authority is predominantly gained in a number of ways, but one of the biggest is links from other sites. It might be social media sites you have. It might be other people linking to your information. Maybe you wrote an article or a blog post, and other people pick up that blog post and repost it on their Facebook page or their own blog. Through that, there is a link back to your site from another site that has relevant information. It takes time. That is why John was talking about how SEO takes time. You can buy a paid ad and be at the top of the search for a given keyword tomorrow. But with SEO, it takes time to build that authority, and it takes time for Google to trust your site. A brand new site comes up, and no matter how good your information is, it can take months for those links to build and for Google to gain the confidence and trust that you are the right one to show for search results for that given keyword. Hugh: How do these two work together, the organic SEO and the AdWords? Is there a negative dynamic we can create that cancels each other out? Pipp: No, there is nothing negative about it. The numbers are interesting. Paid search gets about 18-20% of clicks on a page. Organic gets the rest. Hugh: Whoa. 18% is paid search? Pipp: 18-20. It can be different in different niches, but that is the average. Of all the ads out there, somebody searches for a new plumber. They say “My toilet is leaking and I need a plumber,” so they search for that. There will be ads at the top of the page. Those ads will get 18 out of 100 clicks. The organic listings will get the rest with the top three getting the lion’s share. That is what SEO is. Our job is to build that authority and get an organization’s site ranked into those top three to five positions. The reason I say three to five is in many niches, there are directory-type sites that will get into that top five, and they are not direct links. Customers will avoid those and go directly to a business because they want a solution to their problem. Hugh: Yeah. People are looking for things. You can go to Analytics and other tools like that to figure out what people are putting in, can’t you? Pipp: Analytics will tell you what someone typed in in order to find you. That is certainly a great tool. Anyone who has a website should sign up and get Google Analytics. It’s a free service from Google. They offer great tutorials on learning how to digest the data. Hugh: That would be a good way to research what people are looking for, is that true? Pipp: It would be, except you don’t really have access. Google has a Keyword tool built into AdWords where you can type in a keyword and they will give you a range of how much search there is for those. Or they might come back and show no search even if there is some. It may be low, but there is some. I have a friend who often says, “It’s great how much money I’ve made from search terms that Google shows there is no search for.” Anyway. But there are new searches all the time. Google says a third of the searches they see every month are searches done in a particular manner that they have never seen before. That is constantly changing. Hugh: Give me that statistic again. Pipp: A third of all the searches that Google sees every month are done a little differently than they have ever seen before. Hugh: I thought that’s what you said. That’s remarkable. Pipp: It is. I know. John: We can’t use another term like that. I don’t think Hugh can stand it. We can’t bring him a new statistic that is blowing his mind. Hugh: That’s amazing. Russell: At this rate, his hair will start turning gray. John: It will light on fire. Russell: You have to ease up on him. Hugh: At least I got hair. Ha! Russell: This is the secret to not having any gray. You cut it all off. Hugh: Last week, we had an interview with Les Brown, and Les talks about using the mascara on his gray. He said his gray hair doesn’t last very long. He keeps looking fresh with that look. Guys, this is fascinating stuff. People put up websites, and they wonder why nobody comes. They really do stupid things on social media. It’s really social. How do people learn about this? I think we should create an academy and have a membership for people who are in charitable work to learn how to do these things. Like Russ said, they have a small staff and not a lot of money. If they started getting traffic and people found them and they raised the donor base- and actually if donors know what you’re doing, the impact you’re having, they will continue to be donors and spread the word. There is no negative aspect to tooting your horn and letting people know about it. Come back to some of my crazy ideas here. Pipp: That’s right. What you and I have talked about before is how do you create more of a presence in social media? You have the main social media sites, like Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, maybe Pinterest, Google+. How do you put out information on a regular basis? There are a couple of tools that make it easier for you to do that. One is Buffer. Buffer has the ability to post and link articles to the various social media accounts you have. There is another company called Quuu. They are an aggregator of online articles. You will probably find articles in almost any niche or subject you can think of. You can get an account for free for both of these. On the free account, you are limited to how many posts you can do and how many social media accounts you can link to, but you can link Buffer with Quuu and pick like four or five different subjects and link two articles a day to Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Every single day. Those are what they call curated content. Somebody else wrote it, it’s in your niche, and you post it as interesting information for people who are interested in your niche and what you do. But I also recommend to people they need to be doing some original content of their own. If you have these other services, you don’t have to write something every day or two to three times a week. You can do something original a couple times a month, but there is still a flow of information coming out. That creates engagement. You will build Twitter Followers, Facebook likes, and additional connections on LinkedIn all from having information that flows. John: You asked one other question, Hugh. Pipp and I spend a lot of time figuring this out. This is way full-time. There are some basic things that can be done to give your site more visibility, just some real basic things. The biggest thing Pipp said is make sure that you have a LinkedIn account, a Facebook business account or an account that is to your ministry or 501(c)3, a Twitter account, and an Instagram account, and have those connected to your website. That will sure help. You want to make sure that you have accurate information on all those places. You don’t want to confuse Google because that’s not good. You want to make sure information is accurate across platforms. Then when you want to get really serious on one of these areas, it’s probably a good idea to hire somebody who spends a lot of time trying to figure it out. It changes all the time. We use the phrase that Google has all the gold and they make all the rules. We just have to live with those. Hugh: The golden rule. John: To have an academy would be a great thing. It wouldn’t be a free academy, and it wouldn’t be part-time. Hugh: No. I was throwing out an idea. If anybody is listening and interested, we could play with it. John: It’s a great idea. Hugh: We could do the same thing with a group of people and make it a more level playing field and impact more people and have greater results. Talk about how Google changes things. They are sneaky about it. A logarithm, is that what it is? Pipp: Their algorithm, yeah. They have made a lot of changes just in the past couple of years. They have two search algorithms. One is for desktop search, and one is for mobile search. They are separate. They announced about a year and a half ago, or maybe two years ago, that they were going to put more priority on mobile search algorithm, meaning that if you were ranking on page one but your site wasn’t mobile-friendly, because it wasn’t, the mobile-friendly aspect was going to become much more important to the mobile-search algorithm, and you could lose ranking on a mobile search even if you are ranked highly on a desktop search. That was a couple years ago. Then a few months back, they announced that the mobile search algorithm in 2018 was going to be the predominant factor to ranking in the search engines period. John: And the reason for that? Pipp: Well more than half of all search is mobile. That is mostly Smartphones, but that also includes tablets. Hugh: Amazing. Russ, you have been taking this in. I think we should come up with a hard question for these guys. Let’s stump our guests. Russell: How do you stop these guys from making all of these changes? John: No, it’s a great question. But it goes back to that you have to look at it from their standpoint. They are trying to provide the best product for you and I, the guy who is searching. They are going to work really hard to get into our brains and to put that into their brain to give us the searcher the best result. What we have to be doing as SEO experts is understanding Google and where they are going and then making sure that our clients are providing relevant information for those search terms. It has to be. Otherwise, we are going to mistakenly send somebody to a client’s site, and the Google customer is not going to be happy, which is going to drop them in ranking. Russell: This is how they made Yahoo and other people disappear in the first place. John: They worked really hard at it to provide the best quality product for their client. Pipp: And they make changes all the time. They make changes to their algorithm all the time. The nice part of it is we are actually members of a very large SEO mastermind group that is worldwide in scope. Some of our peers are really smart, and they- actually before Google makes changes, they file patents. They get copies of the new patents that are filed and waiting to be approved and read it. We generally have a pretty good idea of where things are headed. Google does their best to obfuscate that, but they have to have the information in there so the guys in the patent office can say okay. We have some smart colleagues that read that stuff, figure that out, and give us a good idea of where Google is going six months or a year from now. Hugh: Part of this change is necessary. People used to pack in the keywords. Then people used to go out and do these fictitious sites with all these backlinks. There were thousands of them, and Google got smart to that. Pipp: No matter what the rules that Google comes up with, there will always be somebody who figures out a way around it. Once they figure that out, Google will figure out that they did that, and they will change the rules again. But there are some basic things. We ourselves in our company follow industry-best practice. We don’t do any blackhat. In the SEO world, blackhat is things you know you shouldn’t do, but you do them anyway hoping for a good result and hoping not to get caught. That was standard practice, even five years ago. But the things that a lot of people did and we were doing five years ago, if we did them today, they would get us penalized. Still one of the biggest things I see for people who try to do SEO on their own is they over-optimize their websites in terms of keywords. Let’s say they have 600 words of content on their homepage. They will put a keyword in there like 40 times. Google needs it there once or twice and they know what you’re about. When you start putting it in 20-40 times, you get over-optimized. You may see yourself move up in the ranking. You may even get to the bottom or middle of page two, but you won’t get further. Hugh: Wow. Pipp: it’s almost like they give you hope. I’m movin’ up, I’m movin’ up, I’m movin’ up, and boom, you hit the ceiling. You’re on page two where nobody can find you. Hugh: When you get penalized, do you stay there, or is there any way to get out of that? Pipp: You can change it. I have had a client this last year who after I had done some SEO work and were moving up nicely, he went in on his own and decided to rewrite one of the pages he wanted to rank for, and he put the keyword in there like 42 times. Then we started dropping back. I was trying to figure out why, and he happened to mention to me that he went in and changed that page. I went in and copied all the information and highlighted all the places he had done that, saying, “This needs to get fixed.” I fixed it. And we shot right back up to page one. It took a little while. When I say “shot right up,” that might have taken two or three months, but that is something that still a lot of people do. I find particularly those who try to do SEO on their own, they are looking at old information and don’t really have the resources to stay abreast of what is working today and what current best practices are. Hugh: Russ, did you have more to that question? Russell: It gets back to that notion of working within your wheelhouse and not trying to do things that you’re not good at. I definitely don’t know a lot about SEO, but I do write. What I have started doing is looking at the principles of copywriting and studying that because that is what I can do on my own. I definitely need to hire someone- I have a guy working on my website who knows a lot more of this stuff than I do. He is reoptimizing the site, but in order to help myself, I have started looking at copywriting. I put together a series on donors that talks about the information you have to have. You have to know your audience in order to get some traction. That is important. What your content contains is where the keywords are probably going to be found. Hugh: Absolutely. Good points. We are on the downside of our interview. We try to keep these under an hour because that’s a lot of time and people want to get some good content. Think about some stuff we haven’t talked about, guys. What is a thought or challenge or tip you want to leave with people? Let’s go back to the electronic media. If all of this stuff, Russ and I work with organizations to build out their strategy. We are trying to hunt and peck in the dark rather than having a synergistic plan. I wouldn’t dare get in front of an orchestra or a choir and try to direct without having a piece of music because people are all over the place. We have to have some glue to hold us together, and then people can become engaged. With that, we are very clear on what it is we offer, who it is we offer it to, the value of our service, and the impact. That gives you guys something to work around and to use your magic to bring that constituency to the site and actually do something. If I have heard you correctly, part of it is identifying the trends, finding what it is people are looking for, but also attracting the right people. On the other side, you slipped right by this, you are creating a landing page, and the landing page has to convert. It has something interesting so people don’t leave in .2 seconds, so they engage with you and learn something and want to be part of your tribe, donate, or be a part of your volunteer pool. There is a whole synergy in this thing. Let me throw it to you. Like the last time we talked, my brain is firing on many cylinders that I’m not doing right. I can’t handle much more of this, but I have a list of things to do. You will be getting a call from me about my new site. Let me throw it to John and then Pipp. As a departing thought and comment, sum up the things you wish people would do, and remind them of where they can go to find out. You have a survey or something on the site, so talk about that, too. John: We have a form that they can go through. What is the name of that form, Pipp? Pipp: Strategy form. John: We have a strategy form they can go through on the site. It leads them to give us information so we can get back to them with some knowledge of what they are trying to do. I am going to step back and go back to what Russell said. Stand in your wheelhouse. Companies that come to us, we are going to have to make the assumption that they are good at what they do. Pipp and I have a really wide range of backgrounds. Pipp has owned several businesses; I have owned several businesses. Sometimes we get more involved than we should in the whole process. But what we look to do is be the SEO expert. What we look for is our clients to bring to us “This is what I do, this is who searches for us, and this is how they search for us. Put me on page one for these three key search terms.” That is what we do. We go after those search terms. Sometimes we get deeper into the weeds than that. That is what we primarily do. Pipp: Once they have filled out our strategy form, we then produce an eight-minute video analysis where we look at their website, we look at the competition, the strength of the competition, and then tell them the opportunity that is there. If you rank for this, this is how many searches there are, this is a conservative estimate you could expect as far as visitors, and based upon a conservative conversion rate, how much that traffic would be worth to you. We like to show them how big the opportunity they are missing out on is. The other thing I was going to say in closing is something you and I have talked about before, Hugh. We touched a little bit on conversions, and we haven’t talked about video on this call. Video can be a good way to help conversions on your site, on your landing pages. If you can do a short video that deals with your business, that topic of the landing page, usually less than two minutes on your page can be a tremendous help. People like to know who they are potentially going to get involved with. You do a video that is engaging, you look at the person who is watching, you talk to them directly. You want to talk to that single person. You can do that. As I told you once before, I have an attorney client that we had ranked, and he was getting clicks to this website but not getting the conversion. We put a short video on his site, and overnight, that video tripled or quadrupled his phone calls in a week for his business. It was unbelievable how much of a difference it made. Hugh: You guys aren’t a one-trick pony. You have a whole lot of different programs and knowledge base and wisdom. That is quite remarkable. Pipp: I think that’s one of our strengths. We have gray hair, too. At least I do. I’m not sure John does. We have done a lot of things. We generally have the ability to understand what they’re doing fairly quickly and obviously work within our expertise, which is SEO and digital media. Oftentimes, we can make suggestions to other things you could be doing that could be helpful. Hugh: Thank you for jumping in at the last minute and being so gracious to share all of this information (we had a cancellation tonight). You do a lot of upfront service to people. That is a gift. Russell, thank you for being here again and asking really good questions. Russell has made some notes of the profound statements that came out of your mouth. Russell: There is one thing I’d like to sneak in before we leave. The service these guys provide is superior, premium. The thing I like about what I see in their website is when they go in there, they define some parameters. If your business or organization is at a certain point, we can help you. If you’re not at that place, then we don’t want to offer you something that will not benefit you. That is integrity on steroids, and I love it. Hugh: Russ listens and observes and comes up with some profound statements. John Zentmeyer and Pipp Patten, thank you for sharing your wisdom with our audience tonight.

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  • #58a: Why Stories Are Less Effective Without Catalysts

    · 00:26:36 · The Three Month Vacation Podcast: Online Small Business|Marketing Strategy Plan| Sean D'Souza | Psychotactics

    Storytelling struggles without a catalyst. And yet a catalyst doesn't have to be in your face. It can be quiet, almost introspective. So how do you create powerful catalysts for your stories? And then once you have the catalyst in place, how do you connect the story back to your article, podcast or presentation? -------------------- Resources To access this audio + transcript: http://www.psychotactics.com/58 Email me at: sean@psychotactics.com  Twitter/Facebook: seandsouza Magic? Yes, magic: http://www.psychotactics.com/magic -------------------- In this storytelling episode Sean talks about Part 1: What is a catalyst and why you need it in your storyPart 2: What is the point of a storyPart 3: How to use storytelling in your presentations, articles and sales lettersRight click here and ‘save as’ to download this episode to your computer. Useful Resources and Links Live Workshop: How to create well-told stories that create a bond with your audience without sounding unprofessionalArticle Writing Article: Why We Struggle To Write Articles: The Myth Of Unique ContentStory Telling Goodies: Coming Soon. Email Renuka for more details. renuka@psychotactics.com ---------------------------------- The Transcript This is The 3 Month Vacation and I’m Sean D’Souza. In 2003, I stopped watching TV. It wasn’t like I didn’t like TV. In fact, I probably liked it too much. I’d spend two, three hours every single day, watching TV. It didn’t seem like two or three hours; it seemed like just might be half an hour. I’d switch it on at six o’clock in the evening, then it would be seven o’clock, then eight o’clock and then nine o’clock. And of course, there was the morning news. In effect, I was spending three or four hours watching completely crazy stuff. At this point, my brother-in-law Ranjit moved to New Zealand. He lived with us for several months before finding his own place. In the month before he left, we had a conversation. It wasn’t a conversation really. It was more like a bet. He said that I watched too much TV, and I said, “No, no, no, you watch too much TV.” We took this bet, and the bet was that the next person that switches on the TV loses. We didn’t say what that person loses, but right after that discussion, not one of us touched that remote control. The TV sat in the corner for a week, two weeks, three weeks, four weeks. Ranjit moved out, and it still sat in the corner. We didn’t switch it on. A few months later, we put the TV in the closet and eventually we just got rid of it. What’s the point of the story? What we’re listening to here is this unfolding of the story, but right at the core of it is a catalyst and that catalyst is causing us to move the story forward because that catalyst has speeded up some action, and that’s taking us towards an endpoint. When we look at the same story without the catalyst, it becomes very boring. Let’s run that same story once again. Let’s say, my brother-in-law, Ranjit wasn’t around and that one day I decided to stop watching TV and so I kept the remote to the side. That was it, 13 years have passed, and I haven’t watched TV. It’s not as interesting, isn’t it? That one little factor that came into play, which is my brother-in-law stepping in, the bet and then both of us being very pigheaded about it and not watching TV that’s what causes all the drama. You’ve got to have a catalyst in your story, but you also have to get that story to an end point, and that is what we’re going to cover in today’s podcast. We’re going to look at this understanding of the catalyst, which could be an active catalyst or an inactive catalyst. The second thing that we look at is what is this catalyst leading to, why are we doing this whole story thing in the first place? What is the endpoint? The third thing that we’re going to look at is how are you going to use this storytelling in your presentations, in your articles, in your sales letters? We’ll take a look at some of those things. Part 1:What Is The Catalyst Let’s get started with the first thing, which is understanding the catalyst and how it can be active or inactive. If you look at the rating of all the podcasts, you’ll see a little C symbol on it. That C symbol, it stands for clean. It means that you’ll never get any bad language on this podcast, you’ll never hear any swear words, you’ll never hear anything that you would hear on another podcast. All of this goes back to one moment in time when I was in school. I didn’t use any bad language and then suddenly when I was in the sixth grade, I decided that every third word had to be a swear word. I don’t know how it started. I don’t know why it started, but the moment I’d get on to the playground with my friends at school, I would start to use the swear words. One day, my brother showed up, and he’s standing there and he’s watching me. I’m playing and using all these swear words. Suddenly I realize, “Oh, what is he doing standing there?” He’s got this evil grin on his face, and he goes and he says, “I’m going to tell daddy about this.” That’s the first moment that I realize, “Oh, all these swear words, all the stuff that I’ve been doing, he’s going to report me.” He’s my brother; I couldn’t do anything to him. He still had to get home in one piece. I go home, but now I’m terrified. I know my brother, he is going to tell his story. He is going to tell my father that I’m using all these swear words. I’m expecting some real trouble. I don’t know what the trouble is going to be, but I know there is going to be trouble. My father says to me, “Sean, I would prefer that you didn’t use bad language anymore.” “That’s it?” That was it. That was pretty much it. Over 30 years have passed since that moment and to this day, I am deeply embarrassed if I have to use bad language even by mistake. What we’re experiencing here is this concept called the catalyst. For the story to reach dramalevel, you need that catalyst. You need something to happen; you need something to speed up those bunch of events, so that you get to the other side, whatever that other side is. When we examine this, we say, “Well, what was the catalyst or who was the catalyst?” We could say that my brother was the catalyst because if he hadn’t gone on this big tell-tell mission, then I wouldn’t have had the problem. Somehow I think that wasn’t the catalyst. It was the calm. The fact that my father didn’t punish me that struck a chord. That calm, it became the inactive catalyst. When we look at the catalyst, we look at something that’s active and something that’s inactive. To me at least, the active catalyst is someone or something that’s pretty much in your face. When I told you some stories in some other podcasts about how my friend Joan, she got into the space and she asked me about my trip to New Zealand. When we were immigrating to New Zealand, she became the active catalyst. She was that one force that pushed me along the journey or did I tell you the story about my mother-in-law and how we went for a week into Northland, which is just a couple of hours from Auckland. These were the early days of Psychotactics. I took some books with me, some business books and she said, “No, no, no, we’re going on a break, and you’re not going to read anything on that break.” Here’s what I did, when they went for a walk, I read my business books, sitting in the hotel. When they went to the beach, I continued to read my business books. When I got back to Auckland several days later, I’d finished all those books. I didn’t get any walk and didn’t go to the beach, but I finished reading my books, and that catapulted me into this world of Psychotactics, which is what you know of today. When I’m looking at story-telling, I’m looking at, “Well, is this an active catalyst or is this an inactive catalyst?” To me, an active catalyst is something like the drip drip, drip that water that leak that instant fix that has to happen now. The inactive catalyst is something that is introspective that you have to think about. I would say the mother-in-law story that would be an active catalyst. The story by Joan and how she got us moving to New Zealand that would be an active catalyst. The story about my father and how he was so calm, to me that became an inactive catalyst. It became something that was introspective, something that I had to go back and think about what I was doing. If you want to segregate them into two bits, you can say, “Well, we’re going to have an active catalyst here, someone that is agitating you to move towards that destination that urgency is in place and then you see the interactive catalyst, where you ponder, and you think about it or you read a book and that book changes your life and that becomes the inactive catalyst.” Whether you choose an interactive or an active catalyst, the point is that when you’re telling a story, those elements need to be in place. When you write your story, you need to know very quickly what is that catalyst, who is that catalyst and how did it change whatever you were doing? All that bad language that I was using with my friends that was my everyday life, nothing was changing, nothing changed in that world until the catalyst came along. The catalyst became calm and then I got to a destination. Part 2: What Does The Catalyst Lead To? That takes us to our second part, which is what is the point of this story? What is the point of the catalyst? Christopher Vogler has this story telling seminar, and it’s about the hero’s journey and how the hero goes on this massive journey somewhere and then he comes back a changed person. In one of his story telling seminars, he talks about this sheriff. The sheriff decides he wants to retire, so he’s hanging up his guns. He doesn’t want anything to do with all this violence and gun slinging. He just wants to live peacefully, and while he’s going about doing this peaceful routine of his every single day, he notices this pretty woman. He sees her buying some groceries and then another time; he sees her walking down the street and slowly he’s falling in love with this woman. Suddenly, a group of bandits ride into town, and one of the people that they kidnap is the woman. Suddenly, his whole peaceful routine, it’s finished. Now, he’s got to pick up those guns and get back into this world of violence that he has left behind. Let’s assume the story unfolds as it should. He meets the bad guys. He gets rid of them. He gets the woman back, but what’s the point of the story? When I tell you the story about how Joan got us to New Zealand, there is a point to that story. When I tell you about how I read the book by Jim Collins, which is “Good to Great” and it asked me, “What can you be the best in the world at?” Well, there is a point to that story. When my father said, “Hey, Sean I would prefer you don’t use this filthy language,” there was a point to that story, and that is critical. Most people think that if they just tell the story that’s fine, but it’s not. You have to have a point through the story. As kids, we know that this is the moral of the story, and it’s not necessarily the moral that we’re looking at here. We’re looking at why are you telling me the story? When we started selling the Brain Audit, which was way back in 2002, I had written this book, this PDF and then I went to this guy who was selling stuff online. His name was Joe Vitale. Joe was very excited with the book. He said, “Hey, this book is really good, I could promote it for you.” He got us to do stuff. He got us to get our credit card system in place. He got us to get the sales page up. All of this had to be done in a week and then we were waiting for him to promote it. A week passed, and he didn’t do anything. A month passed, he didn’t do anything. Suddenly, we noticed that people were buying the Brain Audit. The point of the story is that Joe was not supposed to sell anything for us in the first place. He was supposed to be a kicking angel. What I call a kicking angle and kicking angle is someone that comes in there and kicks you and gets you moving and then moves out of the way. They don’t buy anything from you. They don’t sign up for any of your courses. They just make sure that somehow you get moving. Now, you know the point of the story because if I wrote an article about kicking angels, and I started out with the Joe Vitale story, you know Joe was the kicking angle. The point of the story is that when someone promises to sign of course or they decide that they want to come to your workshop, or maybe they just decide to promote your book, but do nothing and yet there is a point to that story. There was a catalyst that catalyst was Joe. He came and he created all of this boat rocking and then he disappeared, and that was the point of the story. His disappearance was the whole point of the story, and so you’ve got to have these two elements in your storytelling. You’ve got to know who or what is the catalyst? Is that catalyst just something that you’re thinking about? Is it something that is introspective and inactive or active like Joe, like, “Come on, get your credit cards together, get your stuff together.” Once we know that catalyst and then we need to know well what was the point of the story because that point of the story helps us reconnect to the article, to the sales, to everything else. Without that point of the story, it doesn’t matter. The story is just a story with no real connection. Part 3: How To Use The Storytelling In Your Presentations, Articles And Sales Letters This takes us to the third part, where we start to look at how do we use this in our communication, whether we’re doing sales letters or articles or presentations or anything at all, how do we use it? On the Psychotactics website, there is a product called Black Belt Presentations. In Black Belt Presentations, I talk about how we manage to sell $20,000 worth of product at a single conference. The story that precedes that conference is even more interesting. That is because I went to Australia, and I spoke at this conference and I hardly sold anything. I watched as other presenters not only sold stuff, but people were stampeding to the back of the room to get their stuff. I wanted to create that stampede, so what I have there is this whole point of the catalyst. I stood there like an idiot, watching as other people succeeded while I failed miserably. The point of the story is very simple; I needed to figure out what they did and how they did it and how I could do the same. That day when we sold $20,000 in a single hour at a conference, it goes all the way back to the point where I failed, and that point of failure was the catalyst. What is the point of the story? Well, if we were just at a party, and we’re drinking some wine and eating some cheese, it makes for some great entertainment because hey you succeeded, but what are you going to do with it when you get to the sales page? This is where stories are so effective because they help the reader to get into that same mindset that you were in. When this goes on to a sales page, and I tell the story, I can then connect it to the Black Belt series. Then you realize, “Well, if I’m going to make a presentation, if I’m going to fail, then no, I’d rather not fail, I’d rather figure out how to be able to set up my slides, how to work out, how the audience participates, how they react, I need to know all this information and me need to know how to put my presentation together.” The reason a client is going to buy the Black Belt Presentations, even though it’s not a cheap product is because of the story. The story starts them on that journey. It sends them through the catalyst and eventually there is a point that you do not want to be standing there and watching while others sell and you do nothing. You don’t always have to tell a story to sell a product, but you have to tell a story to get an idea across. Let’s say I was going to tell a story about how kindness is more powerful when dealing with human beings than say brute force or anger or frustration. Then, I could tell you the story of how my father said, “I wish you wouldn’t use that language.” Now, we have a point to the story. The whole point of the story is that you’ve created change, and so this takes you right into writing your article about change, about kindness. You start off with the story about the father and the son, you then move through the catalytic moment and then finally what’s the point of the story. It’s kindness works better and then talk about how kindness works with dolphins and dogs and people and how all the elements that you’re going to cover in your article. The storytelling that’s the whole magnet. That’s the thing that sucks me into reading the rest of the article. If you do not have the skills to tell a story and you don’t get it through the catalyst and you don’t finally get to the point of the story, well it’s a not wasted exercise, but it’s entertainment, possibly entertainment is good enough. When you’re in business, when you’re writing that article, when you’re writing your sales letter, you need to be able to tell those stories using this catalyst. Summary Let’s summarize what we have covered today. We covered three things. The first thing is the catalyst and how we can have that active catalyst and the interactive catalyst. The active catalyst is something urgent. The roof has just fallen, you have to fix it. Your friend runs into you while you’re grocery shopping, and she says, “No, no, no, you have to get to New Zealand now.” Then there is the inactive catalyst, something you read, something that’s introspective. The catalyst alone is not that important if there’s no point to it, so there must be a point. It’s like, why is this happening? Why is my brother-in-law stepping into my life and taking a bet with me about the television? It’s changed my life. I stopped spending two, three, four hours. I thought I was spending just a little time in front of the TV, but when I stopped watching TV and when I threw it out and gave it away that’s when I realized, “Oh my God, I was spending so much time in front of this stupid device that taught me nothing.” There was a point to the story, and it wasn’t just entertainment. Now, it could be entertainment, but in business, you’re going to have to connect it to something that you’re selling or something that you’re telling. If it is something you’re telling, like an article, then how does it connect? We saw that with the Black Belt Presentation, the whole story could then fit in, so that you would decide, “Well, yes I don’t want to be in that situation,” or if I’m talking about my father’s story then I could connect it to kindness and how kindness works very well in changing the perception of other people. There you have it, the catalyst, the point of the catalyst and then how to connect it back to whatever you’re telling or whatever you’re selling. What’s the one thing that you can do today? Well, the one thing that you can do today it start off with the point of the story. Why are you telling the story? What change do you want to occur? When you do that, then you have to go out and seek the story that fits into that point. You can work it from there forward. It’s not easy. We have to learn how to do this, but always there has to be the point. Otherwise, it’s just entertainment. Talking about entertainment, have you been to a Psychotactics Workshop? Well, there is one showing up in Nashville, Tennessee on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th of December, and then we go to Amsterdam, the Netherlands on the 15th, 16th, and 17th. Psychotactics Workshop is a lot of fun. I know lots of people promised fun, but this is a lot of fun and you learn systematically, just like you’ve been learning on this podcast, there is a system and by the end of it, you are exceedingly good at story telling. That’s the goal. The goal is not to give you information. Information will come to you in notes and like in all workshops, there will be slides and presentation, but most of the time you will be working and having fun in your groups and learning to write stories, which is what the goal is after all. You go to www.Psychotactics.com/story-telling-workshop. You have to read the Brain Audit before you get there. You can get the Brain Audit at Psychotactics or on Amazon, but you have to have the Brain Audit, otherwise you cannot attend the workshop and learn how to tell stories like really good stories, stories that you can use in your articles, in your podcasts, in your presentations, on your website, on your About Us page, pretty much everywhere. Storytelling is a craft. You can learn it and you can become very good at it. You also want to check out the membership at 5000bc.com. That’s where we hang around, where there’s lots of information, but also where I am on a consistent basis, answering questions. That’s 5000bc.com and as always I’m on Twitter and Facebook at Sean D’Souza and Sean@Psychotactics.com. Bye for now. Do you want to write that article, because you do have something to say?  And your audience wants to hear it. So what is stopping you? Find out ‘Why We Struggle To Write Articles (And The Myth Of Unique Content).

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  • Engaging Your Board in Funds Sourcing

    · 01:03:10 · The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

    Giselle Jones-Jones shares her wisdom on engaging board members in fund sourcing. Here's the Transcript Russell Dennis: Welcome to the Nonprofit Exchange brought to you by SynerVision Leadership Foundation. I am your host, Russell Dennis. Thank you for joining us. Our guest today is Dr. A Giselle Jones. She is the founder of The Write Source, technical writing and consultation services. She is a writing advocate for community leaders, pastors, administrators, and the like, all sorts of nonprofit entities. She is here to share her expertise with us today. Thank you, Giselle. Welcome. Glad to have you here. Giselle Jones-Jones: I am glad to be here. Russell: All right. So Giselle, tell us a little bit more about the woman underneath the cloak. Giselle: I see myself standing like Wonder Woman with my cape flying in the wind. Russell: Tell us about your superpowers here. Giselle: I’ll tell ya, I am empowered by the people whom I have had the privilege to write for and to work for. They are really the wind beneath my wings. I can’t claim any of the success on my own. It’s because I have been in the right place and been equipped to be the right person for these people. I like the way you emphasize The Write Source before because that is exactly what I do. The w-r-i-t-e. I do the writing. We’ll talk a little bit more about that in just a little bit. But the woman underneath the cloak, the woman wearing the mask, the woman who is in the background. Again, my name is Giselle Jones-Jones. I am a Jones twice. I married a Jones. I have ben writing now, filling the majority of my professional life, and how I demonstrate that in my day job, so to speak, is as a teacher. I am a professor of English, of literature, public speaking, so that is my day job, and that is what gives me my passion. My students give me my passion. I do that and have been doing it since 1990. That tells my age, Lord have mercy. But I have been doing that for many years, and I learned my greatest lesson. I once heard that the teacher is twice taught. Again, I look at everything really as a privilege, and I take everything that I do as building blocks to do the next thing. Teaching, that gives me what I need to do what I do in my evening job, in my weekend job, in the-extra-time-that-I-have job, which is working for the nonprofit, which is working for the charity or the ministry or the professionals who have a desire in their hearts to do something to make a change in their community. Where I come in is exactly how I see my students. My students on the first day of English 101: Composition, “I hate to write. I don’t want to do it.” I have to struggle with them throughout the semester. On the other end of it, they are happy for the journey. But it’s the same thing with the charities, with nonprofits. There is this fear, there is this force that is in the air, and they absolutely fear the writing process. Preparing that proposal just causes dread and so they have a desire to do something in the community. They want to do something great, but they often stop in their tracks. When they face that in order to write a grant, it needs to read well, etc, they come looking for the grant writer, that person, and that has been me for organizations again who I have been privileged to work with as a freelance writer. I created The Write Source to cover me as the freelance grant writer, and that is how I have operated over the course of these 20+ years that I have been The Write Source. Meeting Hugh on August 26—that was just a little over two weeks ago—founder and president of SynerVision, opened my eyes to the possibilities that I was working out this summer and building of the infrastructure of my company to duplicate myself a few more times so that I can reach more people and help more people. Again, this opportunity today is a blessing. The past two weeks dealing with Hugh, I have been on a rollercoaster ride already. It’s been fantastic because it’s putting me in a place of impact to help people more, for me to do more and to build upon what I’m doing even more. That is a little bit of who I am. I’m a mother of three. I have two in college, both of my two girls, and I have a boy who is 12. I’m a wife of a wonderful man who is a musician like Hugh and a director. Again, I am privileged to be his wife. Here I am, before you now. I have shared a little bit about my passion, what makes me get up, what is my mission for life, walking in my purpose, walking in my destiny, all of that. Russell: I’m glad to have you here just looking at your bio. You are a tenured professor at just about every university in the state of Carolina. Giselle: Oh, stop. Russell: Your client list reads like a who’s who. It’s phenomenal. More hands makes the work lighter. Giselle: That’s right. Russell: I’ve been a part of this SynerVision team and signed on as the first WayFinder. We have been building momentum and now things are starting to take off. It’s really great to have expertise to leverage because you can do more. A lot of nonprofits feel like they’re alone. How much does that play into the struggle that people have with writing grants? I know that a lot of times, at my first nonprofit job, my first day on the job, the travel planner came and dropped a package on my desk from the Department of Education and said, “I’ve seen your writing sample. You’ll do okay. I’m right next door if you need some help.” I had never written a grant. Talk a little bit about that intimidation that most people have and what makes it seem like such a difficult process for most folks to achieve. Giselle: You said it. I mean there is nothing more dreaded than being given the RFP coming from a federal grant that requires 20-25 pages of information, demographic studies, all those things you have to do, plus giving a face and a personality to the organization. That is a lot. The fact that you were a gifted writer helps, but think about those who lack the skills to write. They feel alone. They feel like they’re on an island by themselves, and again, those grants go often unwritten. That’s money that that organization did not get because people stop in their tracks. It’s for that very reason it is dumped on one person’s desk, and that one person feels it is his/her job to do it by him/herself. That is wrong. The team approach is absolutely the best way to go about this. I think that the idea that you offer grant-writing workshops and support the grant writer, that is promoting it the wrong way. It has to come from the point of view that a team effort, with the grant writer sitting at the helm delegating responsibilities—Yes, that can be that person’s role, but that person needs the help of experts across the board everywhere from just even designing the document itself. You need someone who goes and gathers the information. All of these pieces go walking past the background in accounting who can put together that top-notch budget that is tight and that is ready to go. All of those elements for one person to handle, who is a gifted writer but may not have the expertise in those other areas, can get overwhelming. Again, having those people on board, having those people who are trained and equipped and ready to contribute to the team, is the best way to approach grant-writing or proposal-writing, period. That body of people, really from the standpoint of all funds development, all funds, all resources, from not proposal-writing because you can’t put all your eggs in one basket either, that team will follow the organization and work with that organization, with donors, with sponsors, with all of that because the same documentation is needed, the same writing is needed. That team of people who are equipped and ready to help the nonprofit, the charity, the ministry, they follow them from beginning to end and let them know they’re not alone. That is overcoming that particular person who is given that file on the desk, that RFP. No, if that does happen, that person sitting at that desk should pick up the phone and call that team and call a meeting and let’s go over this. Let’s look at this and delegate. Let’s look at who needs to do what so we can pull this together. Russell: Our first question came from Jolyn. She asked, “Do you know of any grant funding for a holistic healer or complementary healing services for PTSD?” Giselle: Oh my goodness. I would think that there will be federal funding, and I do have a list of those from the Center of Disease Control, federal dollars that go toward those military who have suffered. There is funding, yes, there is. As a matter of fact, I am going to keep searching for that, and I will make that available. I think there is a chat forum on here, and I will type those in as I find them. Yes, there are federal dollars that are available for that, yes. Russell: We will get those in there to you. Giselle: Yes. Russell: There we are. We’ve got a phone number for Karen. There is information we can follow up with in the chat. I have put the web address in the Facebook chat and the Zoom chat forums: http://www.thewritesource.org. That is where you can reach Dr. Jones. As always, our lines are open for more questions. Jolyn already has a 501(c)3 set up, and she knows about practitioners. There are some people that I want to put Jolyn in touch with who are doing different types of things, nontraditional and complementary healing. I will put her in touch with some other people online. My next question is that you have been working. I know you met Hugh a couple of weeks ago, and you have been talking about setting up what you call an office of funds development and collaboration. This is something that other nonprofits can do for themselves. Tell us a little bit about setting that type of thing up. Giselle: Especially because Hugh approaches what he does through SynerVision with the team approach, team is very important. So having a funds development office is really the next step in line for what he needs to do. It takes the pressure off of him so that he can continue to be creative, so that he can continue to do his workshops, his symposiums, but to have this particular office to continue to fund what he does as he helps organizations and boards fund what they do, the team approach handling how they go about procuring and sustaining their funds, this particular office would be the liaison between the workshops and the symposiums that are held to local implementation. This office would provide guidance after they have received the trainings. this particular office will follow them. And it’s got two branches, two arms. It will continue to fund the endeavors of SynerVision because its vision is large. Its vision is still evolving. That one side is important. But then those whom SynerVision develops and trains, they will continue support. This office will be here to stay ahead of the game with resources, with staying trained and relevant and current about what is being offered to charities and nonprofits across the board because again people have various needs and they are trying to impact change in their local communities in various ways. This office will be equipped to be the support for both sides, for SynerVision and for those whom they serve and develop and train. It is still a work in progress. Again, this is a two-week relationship that is blossoming, so we’re putting some meat on the bones per se, so that is where we are at this point. It is exciting. Hugh and I are talking every day. He says, “Giselle, what do you think about this? I am going to put these ideas together. Let’s put a proposal together to begin to make this happen because it needs to happen.” That is where we are as far as that is concerned. This particular office is critically important. It seems like a natural next step for SynerVision to have this particular office available. Russell: And it is. The work here that SynerVision is doing is designed to help nonprofits increase their capacity to serve others. Training and development is very important. It’s something that will attract people to you to serve on your board and for volunteers. Having a process, we’re all about helping put processes together that will empower you to work more efficiently, that will tell you to go off and find others to collaborate with. Fundraising is like a lot of other things. My whole role is to help nonprofits build high-performance organizations. There are four steps to that, and the first is having a solid foundation where you look at all of the things that you have. You look at all of your assets. You look at what you want to try to do and what you want to try to achieve. As you bring people in, you find out what drives them, what makes the work important to them. Once you understand why you’re doing what you’re doing, you can start putting a solid foundation. Talk a little bit about the importance of an overall strategy. I’ve seen a lot of organizations go out and take a scattershot approach where they are applying for grants, they are looking at pockets of funding and saying to themselves, “Oh my God, that’s a lot of money. Maybe we can go after this.” But they don’t stop to look at whether that particular funding source is the right one. Giselle: That’s exactly right. Again, the process is very important. I believe the gift that I have is making sure the voice of the organization tells the story. It is what draws the potential donor to them, which gives value both ways, which shows why the organization is so important and why they are so important to do the work they want to do in their community, and why it won’t be done any other way. It’s important then to connect with the potential donor that has the same value that in giving their money and making a contribution, they will be a part of that value. That I think is important, but what I do and have done is to go and pull the voice out of the organization. Who are you? It’s activating voice. I came up with my own class that I’ll be teaching that is called Voice Activated. It is. It’s just that. Who are you? What is it that you want to do? Whose lives are you trying to impact? First, you have to know your purpose. Everybody wants grants. I get phone calls every day, “I need a grant. I need you to write a grant.” Okay. Why? Let’s back up. Let’s take a couple of steps back because you can’t go find the grant first and then write the grant to it. You have to have a purpose first. You have to know who you are first. You need to have in mind the person or the thing that is being impacted. You create a story around that. Those are the steps. You begin with you have to know who you are, and then we can look at- You have an idea, you know what it is you want to do in the community, you go from idea to how it is going to impact the community. You then look at, if given the money, if you get the funds, who is going to implement it. What is that going to look like? How are you going to sustain yourself if you don’t get that grant funding? What happens after that? Do you have a sustainability plan in place? from idea all the way to sustainability with implementation in there as well, those are the necessary steps it takes, but where we spend the most time is that first base. We have to know who we are, why you’re doing it, and thinking long-term or short-term and then long-term. Coming up with that kind of strategy, sitting with the organization, hashing that out will help. We can’t do anything else until we know who we are. That is exactly how I teach my classes. That is how I teach those first steps in composition. You have to know who you are. Once you can find that out, I can tap into that voice and help to create your story, to create the emotional attachment. All those things that go along with pulling people into knowing why that particular idea or why that particular act of service is so important. Russell: That’s it. That is the second step of how to develop a high-performance nonprofit: creating an effective action plan. Once you look at what you’re trying to do, it’s a matter of, Okay, what do we need to do first? And breaking it down into simpler steps. It’s really important to be clear on who you are. Then you measure everything you do. This is probably a place where a lot of organizations struggle because they got an idea for what they want to accomplish, but they are not exactly sure how they want to measure it. There are two things. The third step of building a high-performance nonprofit is staying on track. When it comes to your programs, there is an evaluation component. That is an essential piece of every grant and of developing programs. A lot of people don’t account for resources to do evaluation when they have put a proposal together. The other piece is benchmarking, which is, Okay, how do we compare to other nonprofits doing similar work in the same industry? How are we doing comparatively? Talk a little bit about that, about measuring what you do and how to quantify that because some people look at their work and say, Well, we can’t really put it in the dinner table on the spreadsheet, but you still have to show some results. Giselle: That’s right. That part is very important. That is what stops people at first base. Because that is a very integral part, the objectives, you have to have clear objectives that can be measured. Those things, as a part of the proposal writing process, have to be considered while we are sitting at the table: how we want to measure this, what are the outcomes, what are the expected outcomes, and then what we want those variables that we use in order to test it. A lot of people, a lot of organizations that I work with, only think short-term. They are very short-sighted and think they want to do a program for only one year when they are working with students to help improve their ELG scores, for instance. Okay. How are we going to know whether or not what you have done as far as the programmatic have impacted these young people? How are you going to test that from year to year? Are you going to follow them for just one year after they have successfully perhaps passed the ELGs their first year? Or are you going to continue to follow them until they graduate? Those are things you have to consider. Then you are addressing subliminally how long your program is going to be, from one year to four years perhaps to eight years to follow with that. All of those steps in between of parents being an active part, they have a great deal to do with whether or not the objectives are being met because they see things as concerns that say that program that involves those children you are trying to help improve those scores, parents see things at home. They need to see some things changing at home. Organizations in a community, they also have input on seeing the growth and development of that child. There are many things to consider as you think about evaluating these programs. That is what we consider at the beginning: How do you draft an objective that can be measured? What other evaluation tools will be there? Yes, sir, those are very important parts of the proposal process that have to be discussed up front. Having a team there to contribute also helps, not just one person trying to think of all of these things themselves. Having the team approach helps. Russell: It does, it does, it does. It’s a long-term plan; the sustainability and the funding should be thought of in terms of taking a long view. What will happen over the course of time. This is pretty critical. A lot of people struggle with that. Some do, some don’t. You teach people how to go about working these processes in. Tell us a little bit about how you approach teaching people to quantify that because quantifying it and talking about how you measure- The fourth piece of building a high-performance nonprofit is communicating the value that you bring to people. That plays into getting people to bet on your team and to fund you, looking at what is that value and how do you communicate that in terms that are important to the funder? Giselle: Wow. Again, you have touched on something that involves a mindset shift. I say that because every organization has to develop a culture of giving, a culture of fundraising, a culture that supports at all odds giving what is needed in order to operationalize that particular idea. From understanding what philanthropy means, understanding that the culture involves even on the board level that boards have to be involved in the process of thinking through what their fiduciary responsibility, why it’s so important even for them to give to the idea because buy-in is difficult if the board doesn’t support it 100%. Being able to quantify the value is a complete and total buy-in from everyone who is internal to the organization. That is a mindset shift. It is a culture that has to be cultivated. It has to have been there and sitting around the table making sure that everyone understands the value of the organization, understands the value of that particular community of people because again, yeah, we can quantify numbers. But those numbers represent people, and those people are the ones that have the issues. Understanding and feeling out why it is so important to activate that voice and being able to connect on a donor level to the individuals being impacted is important. The organization, the people in that organization, the board and the members, all those who are a part are a part of something else bigger and greater happening. Those kinds of things, when they are happening and filled with momentum, it is easier to get the kind of quantifiable results that we are talking about. It is easier to begin to do that, and where the community is seeing it through everything that is written and written well through the newsletters, through all these things that are showing people what is happening, they are constantly involved. That is also creating a culture around that particular organization. The more that they know about what’s happening, the greater the instances they will continue to give. That organization is not just a one-time giving opportunity. You want this to be a sustained relationship in that good or bad you have where we need to grow, you have the stakeholders meeting. Those kinds of things need to constantly happen so that it will increase opportunities for organizations and charities to give. That is what I see as far as that is concerned. My particular experience over the years is being the lone ranger so to speak, being that lone grant writer and desiring to have a team around me that I can continue to train in the classroom is one thing, but in my business, to have that as I have been working with these people over the years, I understand why it’s so important now. Being that lone ranger, like you said earlier, receiving all of these grants and all of these people who want that services by myself, is daunting. It is very overwhelming. Understanding why it is so important to have a team to surround the board, the team to surround the individual who is interested in making an impact in the community, is so very important. I am glad for that question because that speaks to the heart of getting the kinds of results and those statistics that will grow and follow that organization so that they stay open and ready to continue to receive the funding that they need. That is what you read often. I read an article just recently that said before you become a nonprofit, read this. Don’t do it. Find other ways to do it because it is daunting, it is overwhelming if you think that there is only one way to go about funding, and you are trying to do it on your own. This is an excellent question for the culture has to be developed. A culture for philanthropy, a culture for giving. Russell: It is. I just got another question from Jolyn. She says that, “I have been a lone ranger for too long and am ready to create a team and need to know where to start.” Giselle: Tell her to call me. My number is- hahaha. Jolyn, will you be on my team? She needs first of all, and I am building my infrastructure as well. In putting myself out there, I am attracted to so many people who have such great gifts. But you need some skilled writers on your team. You have to duplicate yourself at least three or four times. You need to have a few people who are skilled. You also need to have someone who is your accountant, someone who is good at putting together a budget. That is a very big part of this. Then someone who understands data. Your question about being able to measure growth, you need people who are experienced in that to be on your team; someone who can look at data management is a critical role. Having someone who deals with that, and then it would not hurt to have a good fundraiser, someone who can sell you the bottled water that you already have beside you. There are some people who are just gifted at that. But to have someone who doesn’t mind going out and being the face of the organization, you need someone like that. just a few people around you, and then you will continue to grow. It wouldn’t hurt for you to also consider some interns. Get interns. I launched an internship and had the pleasure of working with some dynamite young people. I have worked many places, so it wasn’t difficult for me to make a couple of phone calls and get some recommendations for some young people who are gifted. The areas that I used them is not just for writing, but I also began to train them in sales. I had a young person who was my PR representative. She was fantastic. Then another one who was very good at technology and web design. Those things help. Then all of them being part of this younger millennial generation, they were all social-media savvy. That helped. Someone who is gifted at that as well. All those key parts were to help the organization because all those things are needed to help put them into the forefront of the community. Jolyn, call me. We can talk. We can continue to talk. Russell: Make sure you get the number. Giselle can put that number in the chat. Another question that Jolyn had was: How do I get people to come on board when I don’t have funds to pay them? Giselle covered some of that masterfully. There are opportunities out there where you have students, internships. There are opportunities to get pro bono work if you have an idea how to do that. Worth exploring pro bono as a means. Pro bono is not great for anything you need in a hurry, but pro bono is another opportunity for you to get services. When the whole concept of pro bono was launched, it was centered around the legal profession. But any type of professional organization or any type of profession almost bar none today, you can find some organizations that do pro bono work. That is something that you can talk with Giselle about. I’d be happy to talk with you about that if you have questions on that as well. That is very important. Thank you for that. Giselle: Fantastic. Russell: The word “culture” is something that you used. I read a study that was centered around funding. They took a sample of about 2,700 nonprofits of all sizes to find out what sort of fundraising practices they had. There was a lot of reliance on the development director, or there is a single person that a lot of them rely on, usually the development director. This person, they didn’t all have processes set up because fundraising is an all-hands-on-deck adventure for nonprofit. Oftentimes, it’s left to one person, and there is not what they call a culture of fundraising, which is having everybody that is associated with the organization participate in that. It starts with leadership, particularly your board of directors. Talk a little bit about that importance of having your leadership be involved and how a culture of fundraising can help you be more sustainable. Giselle: Another excellent question. Having all of your leadership on board is critically important. I believe that the buy-in that can be shown on the outside is critically important. Culture has to do with personality also, the personality of the organization. You attract people who are most like you. The organization itself as you embark upon events in the community and those things that you want to help promote the idea that you have, it is best to operate as the team and not just a one-person show. That is not the way it should be handled. I appreciate the study that you’ve mentioned and that you increase your opportunities to be successful when you are approaching it from the partnership, from the group approach, as opposed to that lone ranger. You increase your opportunities. That is what is really all about. Even the collaboration between organizations that are like-minded shows that you really have the community at the center of what you’re doing and not just your individual organization, but you’re wanting to collaborate, you’re wanting to partner. That in and of itself can change a community. The personality of the community as well, knowing that people are there to help them, people are there who do care about their particular needs. Those things are important. Yes, operating as a board, being trained as a board, going together to receive the same knowledge, puts them all in a better position to make a greater impact. I agree wholeheartedly with that study. I have not read that, but I agree with it wholeheartedly. I do. I am messing up my screen, Russ. Do you see something over here to the right? Russell: No, I don’t. You haven’t shared your screen with the audience, so you’re okay. Culture of fundraising, there are a lot of different types of cultural mindsets. One is a culture of innovation. That is an organization that always wants to try new things. A culture of learning. That is an organization that invests in development, in building your people. That is the opportunity you have to offer some of your volunteers, or as we like to call them, servant leaders. Development, and it can be training in a specific area that is of interest to them. These are things, when you don’t have cash that you can offer development opportunities, you can offer opportunities for people to exercise their creativity and build a portfolio. It would be a wonderful opportunity for a student of marketing to come in and build a social media strategy. Giselle: Oh my goodness, yes. Russell: They get to put that in their portfolio, and you get some expertise from people that are learning. You have undergraduate students who can work as interns, and you have graduate students that can work as fellows for more robust studies and this type of thing. The opportunity to get support really rests in what people value. The word “value” is something that more people associate with business. I don’t hear people talking in terms of value. When somebody sets up a profit-making business, they do it to deliver something of value that people will pay for, that they can offer at a profit. This is what we’re doing. We have to operate at a profit, and it’s called surplus in nonprofit circles. The bottom line is the same regardless of your tax status. If more money goes out the door than comes in, you’re done. Or after a period of time. It’s about sustainability and keeping the steady flow of funds coming in. A lot of people look at grants, but there are so many funds to come in through other means, too. Grants are something that people associate with nonprofits, but when you get in-kind services, such as pro bono, that is a different matter. You get sponsorship. Individual donations come in a lot of forms. There are current checks. But individuals may plan for when they are away, they want to leave a legacy. So you have planned giving. You have capital campaigns. You have all sorts of things. There are a lot of things that you can do. It’s important to have a diverse base of funds. But you have got to build relationships to get those. A lot of people think in terms of grants. Giselle, what sort of things have you done with people that you go in to write grants for to help them be more sustainable? I know when people talk to you initially a lot of times they are thinking in terms of grant funds. But there are other options. How do you help people explore those other options? Giselle: Let’s say that first grant is not funded, or somehow something happens and they don’t get their 501(c)3 in time, they wonder what they can do in the interim. Well, in those cases, I have worked with the organizations to partner with another organization with a 501(c)3 to serve as a fiscal sponsor. As a matter of fact, that occurred about a year and a half ago with an organization. They are just coming back from Brazil now, but the Global Missions Group has partnered with a church inside Silo City. Silo City is serving as a fiscal sponsor so that they would have the sponsorship they needed in order to write those grants. But they also have a very robust, as you say, board. They have each invested a certain amount so it could sustain those short trips that are taken in order for them to do the exploratory kinds of work because they build churches in Brazil. They do that to make sure those kinds of operations occur. Then they go out and seek those sponsorships, those people in the community and from the churches that are like-minded, that are missions-oriented, and they pledge those. They become their own rope. They have their *audio interruption* and they ask for donations that way. When you have something that is pressing, and the grant is low-hanging, it’s out there, you can’t get to it, but you know there are things you need to do, you have to get creative. Like you said, you have to be innovative. You have to come up with some creative ways quickly to go get what you need. That one organization, I want to use them as the exemplar. They are wonderful. They have come up with strategic partnerships. I have helped them to cultivate that and behind the scenes to create all the documentation they need in order to do it. But they have their street team. They go out and visit these churches. They carpool. They go where they need to go and to spread their particular program or the mission of their program, and they made it happen. Then grant dollars started coming in. But all of those things working in concert helped. They are one organization that made it work against all odds. They knew what they needed to do. They believe strongly that their particular organization has something to do for the building of God’s kingdom. They wanted to spread the word by building churches in places where the word is not shared. They were about business. They are two retired gentlemen. They knew that was their purpose, and they brought me on to help to be that person to help them find all of the resources necessary. We had all kinds of campaigns. They sold T-shirts. You name it, they did it. They used social media. They had the street team. They had their passion, their heart; they wore it on their sleeves. Everywhere they went, people gave. People gave because they believed and had evidence to show that they had done this and that more work needed to be done, that their mission is far from being over because there are still people who are unreached. That is an example of what is done in the face of not perhaps receiving that grant or when you are in waiting mode but there are people out there, organizations out there, who will serve as fiscal sponsors. You have those who come up with multiple fundraising ideas and then they began to implement those. The more passionate you are about what it is that you do, you have to be creative and think outside the box. That is where I come in to make sure that the written pieces, the documentation, follows their dreams, follows their action plan, follows everything. The sustainability part, that was a part of your question as well. On the other end, sustainability, to follow up reporting is important. People forget that, and their organizations end up being audited because they are not turning in the paperwork that is needed to follow up what they have done. You are funded, but then you have these periodic reports that have to be submitted. You have to show what you are accomplishing via newsletter, whatever it is to show the community and those people who have given what you’re doing. That has to continue. The Write Source has been that follow-up aid for technical writing as well. My work continues to follow the organization. I have done that with these organizations that I help. It doesn’t stop with getting the grant. You have to have a sustainability plan in place. You have to include in your budget those contractual fees that cover periodic evaluations. From the funders, you have to give way to them coming to visit your site. They are a part of the process. They are a part of your big picture once you see that funding. All of those pieces are important to understand upfront that just wanting a grant involves multiple layers. Understanding those layers will equip them to be able to receive it and continue to receive in the future. Yes, sir, you are exactly right. Russell: There is an awful lot packed in what you said. It really starts with, as you put things together, talking with people who you are going to serve, people who will pay for your programs. It’s really understanding what is important to people. Keep your measures down to the things that are most important. If you design the program carefully so that it’s not an extra burden on the people delivering services, but actually collect information, you will have more success, and there are ways to do that. This business of collaboration is going out and bringing other entities in. When you look at in your foundational process, the skills that you have on hand and the skills that you may have gaps with, that helps you bring collaborative partners because when you have core inner values that are alike, and you get these complementary skillsets, you can work together. Everybody is working to their strengths, not trying to fill weakness. Everybody is doing what they do best. That increases the leverage exponentially that you have working together to actually get some impact. It is critical to collaborate with other people in that way. Bring that impact forth. It’s a wonderful way to go about doing things. Working with other people is important. I did put Dr. Jones-Jones’ phone number in the chat. Giselle: Thank you. Russell: You have an onsite link for an automated calendar, don’t you? I want to put it out there on Facebook and in the chat so people can go to that automated scheduler and book time with you. Giselle: I am going to let that happen in a few minutes because I do want to make that available. Yes, sir. Russell: Automation is important. Technology is our friend when it works. Giselle: When it works, yes, sir. Russell: When it works, it’s a thing of beauty. Giselle: I see that she says she doesn’t see the phone number. Okay. Russell: I typed it in. Scroll up to about 12:44. I put it in about 13 minutes ago in the chat. Giselle: Okay. Russell: I can copy it again and put it up again. Giselle: Wait a minute, I see that. Russell: I will put it back in there because there have been a lot of comments in there and the feed has been scrolling away. That is how folks get ahold of you. It’s really been a pleasure. I’m thankful to all of our panelists, to all of our folks who have attended and asked a lot of great questions. There is a toll-free number there, 888-426-2792. I need to get that in the comment section of Facebook as well. This hour has gone very quickly. What sort of closing thoughts do you want to leave our audience with today? Giselle: Again, the need for a team approach to proposal writing, I can’t express that enough, having been one who has experienced the burden by herself, who has also been successful, and I’m thankful for that. Having worked with organizations and having them funded close to a million dollars speaks to the gift that I have and how I have been able to use it over the course of these 20 years. But I think having the team approach, now having more who are on the board, understanding how important it is, and even with the collaboration with Hugh and SynerVision, just how many more people we are going to be able to impact. I am excited about those possibilities. I am excited about this collaboration with SynerVision because I know that he is moving forward, and you are moving forward, Russell. I believe that our paths, this is destiny. You are already on that path, and my path has joined yours. You are moving forward and upward. You are impacting people. Now utilizing the skillset that I have, I believe that we are going to really make a difference in a lot of people’s lives. The world needs us. A lot of people are hurting in the world. I do believe that at the heart of nonprofits and the heart of charities, they do have a heart for the people. That is how I see myself. I am a person who helps the people who want to help. What greater legacy could one leave in knowing that I have given myself and my life and my skillset I was given- I have been given this skillset. To be able to use it in a way, a meaningful way, to help organizations that have this fear of writing these proposals and understanding that is just one of many ways to go about giving the resources, now being a part of SynerVision and helping to create this infrastructure that will be there to support the people that come through SynerVision and are trained and the local implementation to know that you have a god in between to help make that happen. I couldn’t be happier. I couldn’t feel any more in position and aligned to do greater things. I tell my students all the time, “Just use me.” I know that’s bad. But I am at that place. “Just use me.” Use me. I am a student. I am still learning. As a matter of fact, I learned a great deal on this podcast today from you, Russell. I stand greater because of this experience. I am humbly here. I am one who is willing to serve. I am here. Russell: Dr. Giselle Jones. It’s really been a pleasure to have you here. I am looking forward to working with you to serve other people. These phone numbers out here for those of you who are watching on Facebook and would like to speak with Giselle at greater length, 888-426-2792, toll-free. Or 336-681-1863, local, to Greensboro, North Carolina area. If you want to discuss other matters, you can book a discovery session with me. We can do it live or online. Go to bit.ly/bookruss. Get yourself on my calendar. Let’s talk. Synervision Leadership, we are building the community. We are building our online offerings. There will be much more to come. We will be doing live events in your area somewhere in 2018 as we roll out SynerVision, and we will have more webinars, online offerings, and such. Go to www.thewritesource.org for more information. This is Russ Dennis and Hugh Ballou thanking all of you who have joined us on Facebook. Be sure to tune in next week. We will have a panel on diversity where we will talk about diversity and how that strengthens nonprofits. Until next week on the Nonprofit Exchange, this is Russ Dennis. For those of you who are on Facebook and would care to join me, there is the Nonprofit Culture of Success show that we run weekly. That is something I host tomorrow. Dr. David Gruder is my guest. Next Wednesday, our own Hugh Ballou will be my guest. Thank you once again, and I look forward to seeing you again next week on the Nonprofit Exchange.

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  • Six Essentials to Attract Limitless Publicity

    · 00:59:04 · The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

    Shannon Burnett-Gronich has come a long way since her days as a single mother of two, struggling to make ends meet. Through hard work and a focus on helping others find success, Shannon has developed into a successful, multi-faceted executive. Her expertise has enabled her to help hundreds of people with business development and personal growth by training and coaching them in marketing, event production, networking, and much more. Shannon has spent ten years building an international conscious business community, focused on helping small businesses grow through education, marketing, and cooperation. Known as the owner of an exclusive "Million Dollar Rolodex," Shannon has successfully attained over $3 Million in F-R-E-E press, and has taught hundreds of people how to do the same. Shannon has appeared on television, radio, and in the press, and has co-authored the Amazon #1 best seller "Law of Business Attraction - The Secret of Cooperative Success" with T Harv Eker of the Millionaire Mind.   Shannon Burnett-Gronich has produced over 300 events and conferences since 2001 with 100+ exhibitors and 100+ volunteers. She discovered that most sponsors, speakers, and exhibitors do not have the education or plan to be successful. In order for them to continue to come back year after year, Shannon developed a simple system to train businesses and their teams in the fine art of conference excellence - helping them get the results they want and make more money. She also has been an exhibitor of multiple booths that required planning, marketing, team training, sales, database building, and follow-up. She has the ability to systemize and implement a plan for follow-up so that all leads turn into cash. This is through investors, joint venture partners, product sales, and sponsors. Shannon's event production clients include Dr Linda Hole, Jim Self, Stewart Levine of Resolution Works, Dr. Gary Null - America's #1 Health Guru, and T Harv Eker. - Secret to the Millionaire Mind.   Notes from the session: Secrets for a Great Press Release 1. Tagline that sizzles (12 to 14 point) Think Like Magazine Editors (Checkout at grocery store) 2. Introduction - Invite people to talk about challenge or problem (Quote someone famous as substitute) Lean toward statistics 3. Body - Quote yourself as an expert (preferably from other publicity from known sources) 4. Solution - What the remedy is 5. Call to action to readers to use information, go back for more 6. Contact information   Media Kit Contents - Expert Power Bio, Press Release, Company Pieces, Action Photos, Sample Media Done, Articles or Clippings About You, Fancy Annual Report   www.shannongronich.com/powerbio   The Interview Transcript   Nonprofit Chat with Shannon Gronich Hugh Ballou: Greetings, it’s Hugh Ballou. We are in this session of the Nonprofit Chat. We have had a series of really good interviews. Tonight is no exception. We have a special guest tonight, Shannon Gronich. Shannon is a dear friend, and we collaborate a lot together. Shannon has presented at my leadership empowerment symposiums multiple times, and each time, she adds more and more value to what I do. Shannon, welcome to the Nonprofit Chat. Shannon Gronich: Thank you so much for having me. I love the work that you do and really appreciate all of the individuals that you have touched in my life with your skill of how to build a high-performance team and how to collaborate and all that you do. Thank you, Hugh. Hugh: Great. Thank you. We are better when we work with good people, and I enjoy the collaboration that we share. I know things about you. You do a lot of things. You produce events and get sponsorships. Tonight, our channel is about creating the documents and the story to get picked up for free publicity. Tell us a little bit about your background in doing this and how you got to that level of expertise. Shannon: Thank you. That is a great question. I have always been doing events and bringing people together, ever since I was in high school, when I would throw parties and bring people together. When I started doing events, I looked at the marketing budget and the expense of that and how to grow that because a lot of times, you can spend money on marketing and not get the results you want. We were doing a local conference here in Florida and getting about 500 attendees, which is an incredible amount of individuals. So we studied how do we get picked up by TV and radio and print? We cracked the code for developing a press release that anybody can do. You don’t have to be a great writer. You don’t have to be a nonprofit even, even though this is for nonprofits. You do have an edge because of your nonprofit status. We were able to use this system for our event, and in one press release, we went from 500 to 2,000 attendees. The article got picked up in multiple places. Since then, I have helped attain millions of dollars of free publicity, not only for multiple events, but for multiple projects and individuals and lots of variations in between. Hugh: You have a book on this topic. What’s the book called? Shannon: Media Magic: Instantly Get Radio, TV, Print, and Internet Press to Give You Limitless Publicity. Hugh: Where can people find it? I guess you can find it on Amazon? Shannon: Yes, you can find it on Amazon. If you get it there, Hugh, I always say to email me, which is in the back of the book, a receipt because I will give you a free copy of a training with Jay Abraham’s ghostwriter that is just powerful. If you get it from Amazon, send me the receipt. Or you can go to my website shannongronich.com and instantly get that recording, too. Hugh: Great. That is a super offer. I know your content is stunning and absolutely works. This publicity thing, in my first book, I had a chapter on publicity. When I worked in St. Pete, I developed personal relationships with all the media, so when I sent in my announcements, they knew who it was from. And I knew how to make it complete so they would be able to print it. They said that was very rare because people would give them in all kinds of forms, and there would be things missing, like what time the event was and where to go in the properties, where it was. I developed a template that had a checklist of important things. I also found that a lot of people, and this was in church music, I had open events that were accessible by everybody, so it was important for me to get the word out. I do find that for many years, publicity was an afterthought. If you wait until the week before, it is too late. I find that that is a common thread with people running a charity or some sort of church program. We are so busy producing the event that we forget about the publicity. Let me run a paradigm by you. I encourage people to appoint someone in the organization to be in charge of communications, which would include event publicity, internal and external communications. There would be one person to develop the system, and that person needs to have certain qualifications. Do you find that that works in groups you have worked with? There is some person dedicated to sharing information? Shannon: Absolutely. Whomever is dealing with the event, whether it be the marketing coordinator, the person in charge of marketing, or the event coordinator, they do need to look at that plan. You hit on a sore spot for a lot of people. I have had people call me ten days before their event. Now, we have worked miracles and have done in the daily. Ideally, if you are looking at a project, if you can be 120 days out, 90 days out, then you can start building those relationships with publications, trade magazines, bi-monthlies, monthlies, quarterlies. We have a beautiful magazine here in our area that comes out four times a year, so you have to plan way ahead to get into their calendar of events or articles or anything like that. Hugh: Would you talk a little bit about that timeline? I encourage people to go backwards from the event. When you are thinking about all of these different types of publications, it’s a challenge because magazines have a different kind of lead time. It’s the publication day, but there are different kinds of lead time. There is a flow with this. Talk about working backwards from the event. Shannon: Absolutely. Then I want to be certain to share the six essentials that go with it. Working backwards, I always invite people- One of our greatest assets is our media list. We hear our greatest asset is our contact list, which is absolutely true. Another huge asset is our media list. With the media list, I use a simple Excel sheet. I also have them in my CRM system. But I use a simple Excel sheet that has name, publication deadlines, key contacts, but also I target writers or contributors because they can sometimes get us in to publications easier or expedite that process. At least, when you start creating that list, find out where you want to be. Locally seems to be the easiest. You do want to have on your vision board to target big publications and magazines. However, starting local and getting that media list together is key. Find out who does quarterly, monthly, weekly, daily. How about radio shows? You do this chat once a week, and you probably book it out a few months in advance. I even know radio hosts who are booked out six months in advance. The more lead time you can give with an event- I like to have at least 120 days so you can start building those relationships. As you have a relationship with media, it’s a lot easier. You can do exactly like you said, Hugh: “Hey, I have something that is coming in.” Let them know your timeline, and they can work within it. But especially as you are building that new relationship, you do need a little bit longer. Hugh: Absolutely. I used to worry about bothering people with my stuff, but it is their job; they are looking for stuff! We are actually helping them do their job. Isn’t that right? Shannon: Yes, there is thousands of dollars of free publicity with everybody’s who is watching this name on it right now. They are looking for stories. Now they are not looking for free advertising. This is that fine line. They are looking for good stories. I focus on these three primary things. We have all heard of negative news and things like that. You can buy in and tap into some of that. But the three things that I focus on are education; community outreach, which is where a lot of events tie in, community giveback; and human interest. They love human interest, overcoming adversity, challenges that somebody may have. You may ask what this has to do with a nonprofit. How does this benefit me? When people see Hugh Ballou has overcome—Hugh, I am sitting here trying to say something you have overcome, but I have never heard you overcome any challenges. But when they read that, they are going to go, “I need to know about Hugh. Let me connect with him. Who is this individual?” Hugh: I am getting over being bashful. You have hit on a subject, which is so key. Russell David Dennis has joined us. Welcome, Russell. I like his three names; he doesn’t usually use them, but I think there is a rhythm to it. I ran a pretty good music program in a major church in St. Pete, Florida, across Florida from where you are in Melbourne. I did really good events. There was a person- I had relationships with writers in music to critics. I had writers that did business. St. Pete Times was my customer, so St. Pete Times had different people who did different writing for different topics. I built a relationship with all of them. There was one time I had Sir David Wilcox, the Queen’s Musician, coming from England. We were doing this big-deal concert. I sent in my announcement to the calendar listing, just modestly sending it. The person sent it back to me and said, “We can’t publicize this church event. It’s not of general interest.” So I went to the music critic, and they jumped on it and did an interview. I had a front-page picture of the rehearsal with Sir David and my choir, which was much better than a calendar listing. This guy being a music critic knew this was a nationally renowned conductor that we were bringing to St. Pete, Florida, and they jumped on it. It was to their advantage to run the story, which they did. It didn’t fit one person’s model, but it fit another person’s model. I could have gone back to her and gone “Nyah, nah, nah,” but I didn’t because it didn’t fit her model. It fit the other model. Just because somebody said no, like you said, you have different people who have different slants, we can go to another place and it might be of interest to them. Do you have a story around- It’s not doing the run-around, but finding the fit, the proper thing to say. Shannon: A lot of people say, “What do you say? You have the press kit together. What do you do?” That is where in the media list, I do identify multiple people. You know we have a bull’s eye and aim darts at it? I imagine having a handful or fistful of bull’s eyes and I send them out to multiple people. I say, “I’m not sure where this goes. Maybe you can direct me.” Most of the time, where it gets to where it’s going, they have heard about it from different locations, so it tends to have more impact or attention. Hugh: The other thing I think is important to know is that you are sending it to the real person. You have checked to make sure it is the right person, and you spell their name correctly. Shannon: I am old-school on picking up the phone as much as possible and getting their permission and letting them know to expect it. Also to follow up and expect multiple No’s, No I didn’t get it, No I didn’t read it, No it’s the wrong department, No we don’t want to print it. My biggest success was when I was rejected 13 times, and they ended up calling me when they were going to print. They said they had remnant space. Once they did the layout, they realized they had one space, and they did a full-profile picture and an entire article. Hugh: Love it. That is amazing. You slid by something here that I want to come back to. The press kit. What is that? Shannon: That’s a great question. That is the six things we have talked about. There are six things to be ready for the media. The first thing is your press release. Having what it is that you are doing. I have a simple system that is one page, double-spaced, title at the top. It’s very much story-focused as opposed to advertising. You even quote yourself as an expert. When you quote yourself as an expert, I wouldn’t say, “Shannon, author of Media Magic.” I would say, “Shannon, author and marketing strategist,” or something very general because when they look at it and if it looks like you want free press, there is a higher chance of it ending up in the trash. We keep it very simple. The press release is one thing that you want to have ready to go. When you call them or connect with them, they will say to send it over. The other thing is I like people to have ready their expert power bio. An expert power bio- I say power because this is a story about you. If you are a nonprofit, this can be a story about your board or individuals who are involved. Having this ready tends to get people to pay attention and notice who you are, and you are not having to sell yourself. The third thing is company pieces. Do you have brochures or business cards? Have those items ready to send out on a moment’s notice. Is there an event flyer you are working with? Sample PR that you have been a part of. Have you been on radio or TV or articles? Sample PR that you have contributed is great. The next one is things that have been written about you, the third-party writing. Those are other items. The last two is your order form. I don’t always send this in with the press release. But having that ready because a lot of times, individuals want to know what you offer. Tell me more about who you are and what you offer. Have that ready so they can get an overview is key. The last thing is action photos. Action photos are you in action. I know that we want to update our headshots and have those, but do not send those in with a press release. You are really wasting your time unless they ask specifically for a headshot. You always want to do what they say to do as opposed to what I say to do. I am teaching you a format that has worked, but you want to follow what they say. Hugh, can I share a little story about action photos? Hugh: I love it. You know I had a photo career previously, and I see a lot of really stupid pictures. People standing around smiling is not credible. It’s not very interesting. Shannon: Action photos. What happened with me is when I was first learning this formula, they asked if I had any photos. I said yes and sent in a headshot. All I got was a real small article and that was it. I started looking at what they were really looking for. The next time, when they asked if I had an action photo, I said yes and put together a picture of me and a woman standing in front of a booth or display. I am looking at a brochure pointing at it with her. This was our action photo. They gave us a quarter page for the photo and then a quarter page for the article, and it was huge. They really love things that make it stand out. So I send in a few things when we submit the press release so they can pick and choose and connect with an image. Hugh: That’s a really good list. I want to make sure we get a numbered list and put it on the website. If I heard you right, nonprofits stand a good chance of getting free publicity because of the kinds of work that we do. Did I hear that correctly? Shannon: Absolutely. Everybody, yeah. But nonprofits have an advantage because many times, they hit all three of those things: the human interest, the community, and the education. If you can tie in all three, that can be more powerful, but it only takes one. Hugh: And you talked about the bio. I guess there is a whole methodology around that, and you speak about that in your book. But why are the leader and team bios important for getting free publicity? Does that lead to more attendance, more donations? What is the net result? Why do we have those bios included? Shannon: With the bio, and Hugh, I think I did get your permission, I am going to give them my 12-step system for free. If they go to shannongronich.com/powerbio, they can get the 12-step system that I take people through. There is actually a 13th step, which is listing your contacts or clients, even if it is a past company you have worked with. I found by adding that number 13, there has been gems, as I have talked to people, where Delta might have been a client for them. They sometimes forget key names they are able to share. So please get that. Why it’s important is that one of the most challenging things for individuals to do is to talk about themselves or what people might consider bragging. It is the most powerful thing to stand out in the crowd and get people to pay attention and notice you. I found that in the bio process, it really speeds up that- if you are working with a door, and they want to know who you are and what you are doing and why they should entrust you with their money, they could see this is who you have worked with, this is what you have accomplished, this is what you stand for, it makes it easier for them to write a check. You are actually not having to talk as much. With the media, they want to know who this is. Why do I need to pay attention to this individual? Hugh: Wow. Shannon: With your board, especially with donations and grants, I know that is a separate topic, but it’s important. They want to know, even with media, who is on the board and who is running this organization and to be able to share and showcase it, you have some supportive, whether it be big names or their skillset, that this is not just a whim. Or if it is just getting started, you have really positioned it with some leaders. Hugh: You want to position yourself as a professional. You are giving us professional tools. I know sometimes people have asked questions about bragging about what they have done. It is just a factual representation of what you stand for. That way, the person on the other end can choose what they want to extract if they want to print some of that. So those are really good points. I want to go back to the website of shannongronich.com/powerbio. Russell, what do you think of all this? You spent a lot of time working in the nonprofit sector, and there are so many people who keep things they do a secret. Russell Dennis: A lot of them don’t want to talk about themselves because they feel like it’s bragging, or they are a little bit apologetic about it. It’s important to talk about what you are doing. People want to know what it is that you’re doing. They are interested. A lot of times, some nonprofits you get social workers, and they are uncomfortable talking about value or bragging, it sounds salesy or markety. You are marketing. You want to present an image and you are telling people about what you are doing. Bob Proctor talks about it: What’s so great about that? You have to talk about what’s great and what people are getting out of it in the terms that mean something to them because it’s not about you. Hugh: Bob Circosta. The Whizcat. You had the Bob part right. I know we know both of them. So Russell, you pinged a couple ideas here. Shannon, we framed this, at least from my limited perspective, in promoting upcoming events. What about continuing to share the important things we are doing, the big successes, as a follow-up to an event or as an ongoing communication with the media? Is that any different than promoting an event or something coming up? Shannon: Even an event, there are ways you want to craft it. What education piece can you contribute? What education piece is your nonprofit? They are always looking for that type of information. If there is something in the media that is happening now that you can piggyback on, that can really get you some traction and mileage. I am just going to use this example. We had one woman tie in Donald Trump in her article and media, and they picked it up and went wild with it. If you are in real estate and the real estate market, something is happening with that trend, see what is in the media and what people are talking about. If there is a way to craft around a story what is happening there, that is a great way to get some steam. Hugh: Is that called newsjacking? Shannon: Yes. I like that. Hugh: Yeah. You can get some extra buzz, can’t you, if you piggyback on what is going on. It could backfire though, couldn’t it? Shannon: Yeah. I am always real mindful of religion and politics. Don’t let that stop you. You just want to be careful. You’re right, Hugh. What I have noticed about marketing is that 100% of the time they are inaccurate about something. I just had to always be thankful for what I got. I have had them spell my last name wrong. There is 100% of the time something has been incorrect. I am grateful for it. I have had bad press. I have also worked with people who have had bad press. There are different levels of bad, but there are also different ways of twisting that. One of my bad press stories, they took a picture of our event road sign, which had our website and our phone number and our company name, and it said, “Road signs are loitering our town.” It was negative news. But it was a half-page photo, so that was great. I had another friend come to me with something that was horrible for her when it happened. She was in a lawsuit, and different things were coming up. She was nervous about her event. She wondered if she didn’t do her event, if that negative news would be really bad. They kept writing about her in the paper. They even mentioned her event, and her event sold out like a month in advance. But she was a woman making a difference in the world. Her event was around empowering women and leaving an impact and human trafficking. Despite her personal drama going on, she was a woman with purpose and passion, and she had to keep focused on her vision and mission through doing this. It turned out to be just incredible for her. Hugh: So getting attention and getting to what the essential message is. If I’m hearing you also, we want to set ourselves apart and define what is so important about what we are doing. That is what Russ was talking about with the Whizcat. I have seen a lot, and written a lot, of bad press releases. Give us some of the worst practices and how you would change that. You have seen some bad ones, I’m sure. Shannon: Yes. People spend thousands of dollars on publicists, and then they come to me and say, “Nothing got picked up.” So I look at their press release, and it’s an ad. All it is is selling. That is the number one mistake: taking a press release and selling yourself. If you are paying for advertising, that is something that would make sense. But a lot of times, they don’t pick it up. Don’t put your logo on the top. That is free advertising. I know people have that style, but I found that if you just put the tagline at the very top, add a number if you can- The one I said for my event, the tagline was “85 ways to improve your health in six hours or less.” We had 85 booths, it was a six-hour event, and it was around health. That was a very creative way. People are like, “What is this?” and it got picked up. Do as much as you can to not market yourself. Also, keep it one page. Keep it simple. Double-spaced. Less is more. This concept of more is more is going out the window as a whole in life. I found that less is more because that gets them wanting to connect and ask questions. I know this is off the press release, but you also have to remember that you are talking with them. When you are interviewing them or picking up the phone and they say, “Tell me about this story,” don’t talk at them for ten minutes. Just give them this snippet. “I want to share 85 ways to improve your health in six hours or less. It’s a great event. I think you guys want to know about it. We want our community to know.” Less is more in each aspect of this to where they are kind of pulling it out of you. Hugh: And the less needs to be valuable. Think about what the essential message is. Back to what Russ said a minute ago, why they should care. We need to hit with the why piece of this. These elements are really good. This goes for social media posting as well: I see people hammering really hard and selling. Getting some coverage, whether you want people to retweet it or share the post or you want the media to pick it up in publications, you can’t be arrogant about what you’re doing and press it out there like you are selling them a used car. I find that very helpful. Shannon: And the other key piece with the publicity is- Do you care if I go through and tell them what the key components are? Hugh: Go for it. Shannon: This is one of the ways I find it’s simple to get millions of dollars in free press. The tagline is at the top. Usually in 12-14 font, 5-7 words. Sometimes it can be a little more. Make that sizzle. The way I have learned to make things sizzle is an ongoing practice, not worrying about what the article is saying, but how to write a tagline. Next time you go into a grocery store, look at Oprah or Cosmo, these magazines that have spent billions of dollars in learning how to craft press releases. Take a picture and look at them and figure out how to use it in your business. “Three strategies, nine tools, how to,” those educational pieces are very easy. Use that to start training your brain to look at what works. If you search “Hubspot blog generator,” you can actually put in three nouns and it will help you come up with catchy titles. It’s not perfect. You can play with it. But it will help you get that idea of what is going to get them to pay attention. That is the absolute number one most important thing. Then you go into the introduction, which is the second most important thing. That is where most of the time I invite people to talk about the challenge or the problem. It’s best if it has stats, numbers, and references of where you find that information. That is really powerful. That is the number one thing I would select. If you cannot for some reason identify a problem, then you can quote somebody famous. Paul Pilzer is an economist I have used. Einstein, I have seen individuals use. You want it to be relevant. But try to lean toward the stats and talking about the challenge. Usually, 2-3 sentences at the most. Real short and sweet. Allow them to want to pay attention a little more. The second paragraph, there are only three in this process. The second one is the body. In the body, you always start with quoting yourself as an expert. When you quote yourself, it’s a formula. You do beginning quote, states Hugh Ballou, transformational leadership expert. With Hugh, I would put Forbes-recognized because guess what? Forbes is a big name. That’s a little different than Media Magic. You want to put that big name, but otherwise, keep it general. Then end quote. You are quoting yourself as an expert. It’s a statement. It’s not a quote like you would put in social media. It’s more of a statement about what the problem is that you are a solution for or why it’s important to address that. Then you give a few more sentences. It could be five or seven sentences because you want to keep it on one page, double-spaced. That is where you start talking about the solution and driving them toward- if it’s a solution for stress, you might give them one solution. In the third paragraph, the call to action could be, “Go to my website to get this information.” Do not sell in the press release. It could be a call to action to the readers or the publisher. This press release is something that could help our community, or it can be a call to action to the readers. Take this information to make your nonprofit go to the next level. At the very bottom, you put your contact information, phone number, and website. Hugh: As tax-exempt organizations—Russ can weigh in on this with his experience in the IRS—we have to be very careful with a call to action because we are not selling, and we can be classified as unrelated business income if we are selling a program or a call to action. When you advertise or do an interview on public radio or TV, they are very restrictive. You can say, “For more information, go to,” and it’s typically the homepage of the organization. As charities, we have to craft those statements very carefully. Russ, do you have any more wisdom on that point? Shannon: I just want to say it’s actually best to do that whether you’re a nonprofit or not. The more you can stay away from selling any type of thing, the better it is. Thank you for bringing that up as far as the rules of nonprofits. Hugh: Russ, do you have some wisdom on that? Thank you, Shannon. Russell: Sure. As far as the call to action for nonprofits is building a good story and telling people where they can get more information. You want to give more information. If you can hit them with facts about the problem you solve and why those facts are important, that is what matters. We ned to move forward on this and take action to solve this problem. Find out how you can get involved. You leave it at that. With a nonprofit, you really have to hammer the problem and why it’s important to the people you are trying to reach. Hugh: Russ has noted the steps you just went through with the press release in the chat box. I encourage people to register at nonprofitchat.org to get the notes, which will then send you to the archives so you can get all the history of the nonprofit Exchange. We used to do a separate chat and exchange, and the hashtag was #nonprofitexchange on Twitter, which still goes on simultaneously with this live interview. We found that we wanted to incorporate more energy into one event. So interviewing experts and providing worthy information brings a whole lot of value. We are targeting nonprofits, but this works for businesses, too. I don’t think there is anything I’ve heard that wouldn’t work for business publicity, right? Shannon: Correct. Hugh: Thinking about some of the things you have talked about before, the elements of the press kit, is there somewhere on your site that people can get that checklist for the press kit? Shannon: It might be in one of my blogs, but I am not certain. Hugh: I want to see if Russ can grab those five. Go ahead, Shannon. Give us those five. I think it’s worth repeating. Some people call it a media kit, a press kit. If I understood, you are doing a physical kit that is hard-copy. Shannon: I have it on my website. I have a Media Access to different radio shows, things I have done in the past. When we talk about showcasing what you have done in the past, either things you have participated in or written about you, having those are great. I do like to have something. There are environments I go into, like CEO Space, to have something that is in a folder or include a disc of you. Most of it I put on the website or send in an email for that initial contact. Hugh: Got it. So the things in the press kit are? Shannon: The expert power bio. The press release. Company pieces. Hugh: Company pieces like? Shannon: A brochure, business cards, flyers about the events, anything regarding your company. Action photos. Hugh: Action photos. People doing stuff. Shannon: Yep. Sample media that you have done, anything you have participated in. And then articles or clippings about you. Hugh: Love it. Was that too fast, Russ? Shannon: As a nonprofit, if you have a fancy annual report, or things you have, I would consider the end report as a company piece that a nonprofit has that you can include in that. I would suggest it anyway. Hugh: If you are sending an email, you could include a link to that website, if it is a lengthy report. Sometimes they are. The reporter could go and search that out. Part of what you ran by before, I’d like you to say more about the title. I find that the title can make a huge amount of difference. You mentioned a way to come up with snazzy titles. I use the Google Keywords tool, and I put in what I think is a good title and it gives me other words around that. It helps me think about other words that maybe I didn’t think about. You mentioned using Hubspot, and they have a blog title generator. Shannon: Yeah, that’s really great. As you are out looking around, see what’s out there. What I found that numbers are the most powerful. That gets people to know, “Okay, there is a system here. This is synchronized.” There is an ending. For some reason, if you can tie numbers into your taglines, that is the best. Looking at how to’s. My personal human interest was, I sent it smaller, but they printed, “Paralyzed woman heals with ancient Chinese exercise,” incorporating how you overcome adversity. If you are doing charity work and have an impact on a family or in your mission, you can tie that into the tagline. Hugh: Speaking about- Shannon: I don’t say any names. Some individuals will say- I wouldn’t say “Hugh Ballou is coming to Melbourne.” This is how a lot of people write press releases. I would say, “Forbes-recognized transformational leadership specialist coming to Melbourne.” I wouldn’t mention the name because the name won’t mean anything in the title. But the Forbes would. Hugh: Got it. This is a gold mine of very useful information, Shannon. Let’s give the name of your book again. Shannon: And then Robert Green has a question on Facebook that I want to answer if he is still with us because I love Robert and I know you do, too. I put you two together. You can get the book at shannongronich.com or on Amazon. You can send in the receipt, or if you do it on my website you get it right away: I give you Jay Abraham’s ghostwriter’s training on copywriting. It is Copywriting Secrets. Shannongronich.com. Media Magic: Instantly Get Radio, TV, Print, and Internet Press to Give You Limitless Publicity. Hugh: It was a while ago that you wrote it. Shannon: That is a long one. Hugh: That is a testimony. He is a well-read man. Shannon: One of my favorite things in the book that a lot of individuals talk about is I have actually given power words. These power words are really groovy, especially around putting around your power bio. It gets you to think of things like “articulated, created, developed.” Those are verbs that are action/results oriented. There is hundreds of them. I alphabetize them. That right there, people say they look at it all the time. It is a great resource. Hugh: Outstanding. Russell, of course you have read that book, right? Russell: I have. I highlighted a few pieces. It’s always good to remind myself when I get stuck for action words in a blog post. This is right here in my office. I remember Shannon’s action words and flip it to the page. You can say the same thing with several different words. One of the mistakes I see a lot of nonprofit leaders make is when they are writing things, particularly grants, they use passive language. That was a habit I had for a long time. When you are using that passive language, it doesn’t convey the message as quickly and succinctly, so you want to use these action words in grants. Especially when you are quantifying your results and how you are going to measure what you’re doing, you want action words. When you are talking about what you are going to accomplish, you want to use these action words. We have the number of people who are on food stamps, for example. You want to have these action words there so they are operative and available. In the press release, it has to be short, snappy, and get them to *audio cut* Shannon: Russell, do you find that when you’re submitting a grant- And I want to make sure we get to Robert Green’s question. Do you find that when you’re submitting a grant that them knowing they have media exposure, do you ever submit where they have been in the media, with publicity, with grant proposals? Russell: Depends on what the request for proposal asks for. If you have been highlighted or featured, that is always a piece to add to your credibility. In most bios for board members and that type of thing, the important things you put in there are these are the things we have done. If you have gotten those numbers or results for things you have done in the past with other projects that go into that, that is pretty powerful. It adds to the credibility. You have that in the press kit. I would add that into the nonprofit press kit. Who has funded you? Who have you worked with? What results have you managed to get with other or similar programs, especially if you are following up with something? Now let’s take it to the next level and have people come back to learn more about it. Hugh: Really good advice. That whole thing, Russ, about passive language- Russ is a gifted writer, as you might guess, so he pays attention to those things. There is a huge difference in how people are going to receive it. Shannon, what is this question that has been lingering out there? Shannon: Robert Green, with Think Global Start Local, says, “I am on a mission to inspire people to do more planned giving to support nonprofits in general, and one in particular. This is a sophisticated proposition. This is really about shifting people from being considered donors to meaningful donors. Is this something I can craft into a well-written press release or a story?” Absolutely, Robert. I can see a few angles with that. One is the education piece of letting people know the benefits of that, the impact they are having. There are other benefits, like tax benefits. Thinking about the education piece of the benefits. Also, if there are any meaningful stories that can be crafted around this of individuals who have done the meaningful donation, there is probably a number of angles you can take with that press release. Hugh: Thank you, Robert, for that really good question. Sometimes the donations are like a sympathy card. What we want to do. That paradigm shift he is suggesting is so important. We want meaningful supporters who make meaningful donations. I think what people want to know is what is going to happen as a result of my donation? You referenced it when you said what is the impact of the work that you do? Russ talked about it when he said earlier on about the why piece. I keep going back to that. If you have a why piece, why do people need this? To couple it with the impact, and you quote yourself and others in your organization, then they know you have the leadership ability with you and your team to actually accomplish it. There is also a rhythm of getting information out, Shannon, isn’t there? You want to be covered on a regular basis so the cumulative impact is stronger than a one-time release. Shannon: This is where if I could leave individuals with anything is scheduling this as part of your operations. It is a meaningful and worthwhile and impactful way. Especially fi you are a nonprofit where you are struggling and don’t have much of a marketing budget. I tell you that if you are spending anything on marketing, incorporate this free publicity piece because you can actually expand your marketing dollars even beyond that. Hopefully my story of taking an event from 500 to 2,000 people shows you the value of putting time and energy into this. I have had thousands of dollars in one particular project in publicity and am able to turn that into some great things. Please look at this as part of your operation and plan is getting that coverage on a regular basis. Sometimes you get it and they say, “This isn’t going to work,” so you have to tweak the tagline. Even with an expert who has done it a number of times, most of the time, I nail it now, but as you are learning how to do this, you are building relationships and moving things forward. Yes, you should be every week spending time getting yourself out there. Hugh: I want to invite people to check out Nonprofit Performance Magazine at nonprofitperformance.org. We do useful articles. The next edition will be on boards. Shannon, if we wanted to craft a press release on the new board member or the importance of the people on our board, would that seem to be newsworthy if we have high people in our organization doing good work? Speak a minute about that. It seems self-serving or kissing up to people, but in the other sense, it is celebrating a person who has a lot of connections and a lot of value to the community, and they are putting the value into the work we are doing as a charity. Is there a press release piece around new board members or new board initiatives to celebrate the power of the board that we have? Shannon: Absolutely. I would try in your press release to keep it as singular-focused as possible. If you have six people on your board, look at doing some individually. But a new board member would be welcoming. Focusing on what their expertise is that they are bringing to the table. If they are somebody like Hugh Ballou who has been in Forbes, you can name drop. Russell: Shamelessly, at that. Hugh: I love it. I love it. Shannon: It’s true. You are such a prime example of when you have had certain levels of accomplishment that are internationally recognized, those are opportunities to name drop and leverage that with your board. It’s telling the story where we are welcoming this new person. Here is what they are bringing to the table. Quoting them. This is a place to quote them on the impact they are going to be leaving here. Quotes are real short and sweet. It’s one sentence with you in the middle. Hugh: Love it. Think about a parting thought. Maybe there is another tip or thought you want to leave us with. Shannon, you have given us some very useful stuff in this interview, thank you so much. As we are winding down and wrapping up this hour, which has gone way too fast, what is a parting tip or thought you would like to leave people with? Shannon: I just want to share one of the biggest transformations that I see in this media kit process. That is the power of the expert power bio. I did give you the 12-step power bio at shannongronich.com/powerbio. Going through this process and creating that, I have seen this for me personally be able to get wages like an attorney. I have seen individuals get speaking gigs that they didn’t necessarily get before. The expert power bio is usually one of the first places I start with people because it has the greatest impact on the results that we have in multiple areas of the nonprofit. When you are talking to donors or media, when you are looking at proposals or agreements, if you don’t have that, put energy and time on that because right now, there are thousands of dollars of publicity waiting for you. There are stages waiting for you. There are radio interviews waiting for you. They just need to know who you are and why they want to pay attention. Hugh: Wise words. Russ, thank you as always for being so diligent in capturing the sound bites that matter. Shannon, thank you for sharing your wisdom with the nonprofit world. Shannon: Awesome. Thank you, Hugh, for your work. I can’t say enough for how grateful I am and all the lives you have touched in my world at our events. Hugh is on our executive team, so he is just a rock star. Thank you, Hugh. And thank you, Russell. I love you, too. Russell: Good to see you again. I love this. Like I said, this book is in my office. Shameless promotion. It is best to let your friends recognize you, Shannon.  

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  • ETH045 - Being A Net Control

    · 01:06:07 · Everything Ham Radio Podcast

    Hello everybody and welcome back to the Everything Ham Radio Podcast! In this episode we are going to be talking about Net Control , we talk about the Columbia Amateur Radio Club from Columbia, SC  in our amateur radio club spotlight, we talk about some upcoming events/contests and Hamfests for the next two weeks and wrap it up with some news from around the hobby!   Tech Corner - How To Be A Net Control   Characteristics of a Good Net Control   Good Listener Ear to Hand Multitasking Speaking Clearly Good Handwriting or computer skills Good under pressure Decision making skills   Member Accountability   Always know where you net members are located, and always make sure that everyone is accounted for. There is nothing worse than someone not answering a roll call, or ending a net and someone not checking secure and you have to go and look for them. If you don’t know where they were, you don't even know where to look. Just like my role as a 911 dispatcher, it is your responsibility to do everything in your power to make sure that those that you are “working” with” go home safely.   Know your radio   During an emergency is not the time to find out that you don't know how to do something on your radio. Make sure that you know how to do all the functions with your radio before you are put in a position where you HAVE to know how to do something and you can't figure it out. It is also a good idea to make sure that you have your radio manual with you as well. That way in case you don't know how to do something or you have forgotten to do something you can always look it up.   Whether the radio that you will be using during a net is your own personal radio or if you go to a location like an Emergency Operations Center to run the net, you need to train using whatever radio you will be using. If you will be using a radio that is not yours, you should always try and use it as much as possible before you have to use it in an emergency situation.   Know your logging program(if you use one)   Short of using a pen/pencil and paper, make sure that you understand how to use whatever you will use to do your logging with. If you are just going to use a pen/pencil and paper, make sure that you write neat enough to where others can read your handwriting, especially if someone will be taking over from you.   If you will be using a computer program, make sure that you know how to use the program well before you need to use it during an emergency. Make sure you understand all the functionality of it and how to start the program in case it crashes on you or if you are the first one to use it during a net.   Mistakes Happen   If you make a mistake, acknowledge it, correct it and move on! Everyone is human and everyone makes a mistake. The difference is if you make a mistake, you need to acknowledge it and correct it. This will not only make sure that everyone that is listening to you has the correct information, but it will also help earn their respect for you as a net control operator.   Think before you key up   There are two things that are my biggest pet peaves when it comes to taking on the radio. One is when you don't listen to whats going on and I have to say something twice or more. The second is when people key up to give a weather report or something and they  say something then they will say like ahhh or ummm and then something else and then umm again and it just take forever to get done saying whatever it is that they are trying to say.   When you have something that you need to say on the radio, think about what you are going to say, get all your thoughts together and then key up, say it and unkey. Not only does this make whoever is talking look like they don't know what they are doing, but it also reflects on the organization for not training them enough and it ties up the frequency for other people to use that have something to report as well.   Use Standard Phonetic Alphabet   When you are operating on a net, make sure that you use the official International Phonetic Alphabet. If you use something other than that, the receiving person will have to think about it more than if you use the standard alphabet. I talked with one person on the radio one day that had a suffix of CFS and he identified himself as Chicken Fried Steak. While it may be “cute”, it still took me a extra second or two to realize what his callsign was. Partly because it wasn't the standard Charlie Foxtrot Sierra and partly because I was laughing when I heard it.   Have a Backup   There are two backups that you need to have planned for on a net, a backup net control and a backup frequency. Both should be announced at the beginning and during the net. You should have a backup net control in case something happens to you station during the net or if you need to take a bathroom break or a phone call or something. I have been on several nets where something has happened to the net control stations equipment and they just all the sudden when silent. One person I know that was running a net and his house got hit by lightning and everything got fried. There wasn't a backup in place and the net was in limbo until someone took over for him.   The other thing that you need to make sure that you have in place is a backup frequency. Just like that something could happen to your own station, something could happen to the repeater that you are using as well. If lightning were to strike the repeater and knock it out, the whole net would come to a halt. If you have a backup repeater or frequency in place and everyone knows it, if no one responds to you, you could automatically change to the backup frequency and continue with the net.   Be Respectful   No matter what happens either before, during or after a net, ALWAYS be respectful to who you are working with. If you don’t have the respect of those you are working with, things could be very stressful for both you and those you are working with.   If something happens during a net or event that was done against what you asked the person to do, don't talk to that person about it during the net or in front of others. Handle what needs to be handled during the event and afterwards, pull that person aside and talk to them about what happened. Don't jump down their throat or chew them out, talk to them civilly and with respect. The way that you talk to them could have all the difference in the world in later interactions.   Pace Yourself   Being net control can be very demanding on you. There is so much going on, multiple frequencies and radios to monitor, phones, other people and so much more. It is very easy to get overwhelmed. No matter how good of a net control that you are you need to pace yourself. Never stay as net control for more than two hours at a time. If you have the personnel, change every hour or thirty minutes depending on how busy you area in the net.   If at all possible, stagger your helper shift and your net control shifts. Have the first hour of your shift as a helper with someone else as net control. After an hour take over as net control and a new helper will take over for you. An hour later, you rotate out, your helper rotates to net control and a new helper takes over as helper.   Tactical Call Signs   Tactical call signs are probably one of the most useful things that I use as a net control. A tactical call sign is a word used to describe a location where a station is located at. For example, if you are running a net and you have two shelters, a Red Cross building, and an EOC. If each location has two operators at them, you may never know who is at the radio as net control. So if you call a location by call sign, you might have to call a couple times because you don't know exactly who to call.   Instead use a tactical call sign like Shelter 1, Shelter 2, Red Cross, and EOC. By doing this, no matter who is at the radio at that location, they will know who you are calling.         Amateur Radio Club Spotlight The Columbia Amateur Radio Club   Website: http://w4cae.com/   The Carolina Amateur Radio Club is a service-oriented club and has been in existence for more than 40 years. Originally known as the Carolina Repeater Society, it was an offshoot of the Palmetto Amateur Radio Club (which is the oldest South Carolina amateur radio club, having been founded in 1928 on “the Horseshoe” at the University of South Carolina). Around 1976 the club name was changed to the Columbia Amateur Radio Club to include a broader range of interests, not just repeaters. From the beginning the club was active in promoting amateur radio, giving classes for new hams, and maintaining a testing team.   Meetings First Monday of the month at 7:30pm at the SCETV Telecommunications Center, 1041 George Rogers Blvd, Columbia, SC 29201   Repeaters 146.775 - PL 156.7 Ft. Jackson 147.330 + PL 156.7 Columbia   Nets Every Sunday and Wednesday Evenings at 8:30pm on the 147.330 Repeater   Activities Annual Picnic Field Day Workshops License Classes Testing Sessions Bike Races Walk-a-thons Hamfest - in 2016 it was on the first Saturday of April.       Upcoming Events     NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Nov 25 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 25 CQ Worldwide DX Contest, CW 0000Z, Nov 26 to 2400Z, Nov 27 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Nov 30 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 30 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Nov 30 and  1900Z-2000Z, Nov 30 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 1 UKEICC 80m Contest 2000Z-2100Z, Nov 30 NRAU 10m Activity Contest 1800Z-1900Z, Dec 1 (CW) and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 1 (SSB) and  2000Z-2100Z, Dec 1 (FM) and  2100Z-2200Z, Dec 1 (Dig) NCCC RTTY Sprint 0145Z-0215Z, Dec 2 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 2 NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 2 ARRL 160-Meter Contest 2200Z, Dec 2 to 1600Z, Dec 4 TARA RTTY Melee 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 3 Wake-Up! QRP Sprint 0600Z-0629Z, Dec 3 and  0630Z-0659Z, Dec 3 and  0700Z-0729Z, Dec 3 and  0730Z-0800Z, Dec 3 TOPS Activity Contest 1600Z, Dec 3 to 1559Z, Dec 4 Ten-Meter RTTY Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 4 SARL Digital Contest 1300Z-1600Z, Dec 4 ARS Spartan Sprint 0200Z-0400Z, Dec 6 QRP Fox Hunt 0200Z-0330Z, Dec 7 Phone Fray 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 7 CWops Mini-CWT Test 1300Z-1400Z, Dec 7 and  1900Z-2000Z, Dec 7 and  0300Z-0400Z, Dec 8     *Information taken from the WA7BNM Contest Calendar     Hamfests     11/25/2016 Fair Lawn ARC Ham Radio Auction - Fair Lawn, NJ   11/26/2016 OARC Hamfest in the Woods - Okeechobee, FL   12/03/2016 Fulton County Winter Fest - Delta, OH SSRC 2016 HAMFEST - Ocala, FL Superstition SuperFest 2016 - Mesa, AZ   12/04/2016 LCARC Amateur Radio Swap/Hamfest - Madison Heights, MI     *Information taken from the ARRL Hamfest Calendar       News Rocky Mountain Division Director Dwayne Allen, WY7FD, Overcomes Challenge to Win Election   11/18/2016ARRL Rocky Mountain Division Director Dwayne Allen, WY7FD, has won election to a 3-year term. As Vice Director, Allen assumed the Director’s seat last January, after the Board of Directors elected former Director Brian Mileshosky, N5ZGT, as Second Vice President. Allen outpolled challenger Garth Crowe, WY7GC (ex-N7XKT) 1112 to 528 votes, to win the seat in his own right.Ballots were counted November 18 at ARRL Headquarters. The Rocky Mountain Division Director’s seat was the only contested election for the 2017-2019 cycle.Allen served previously as Wyoming Section Manager, from 2005 until 2007. New terms of office begin on January 1, 2017, at 12 Noon Eastern Time. Work Continues to Strengthen Relationship between Amateur Auxiliary, FCC   11/17/2016 Work continues to promote the visibility of Amateur Radio enforcement within the FCC, the ARRL Executive Committee was told recently. The EC met on October 22 in Rosemont, Illinois. ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, chaired the session. ARRL General Counsel Chris Imlay, W3KD, reported that meetings have been held with the FCC concerning more effective FCC use of the volunteer resources of the Amateur Auxiliary (Official Observers) program, the current FCC-ARRL Amateur Auxiliary Agreement, and the development of a new Memorandum of Understanding that better incorporates the Amateur Auxiliary program — especially in light of the FCC’s recent closing of field offices and reduction of Spectrum Enforcement Division staff. The EC directed Second Vice President Brian Mileshosky, N5ZGT, to continue work on the review and revitalization of the Amateur Auxiliary, in cooperation with the FCC, to ensure active use of the Amateur Auxiliary program. In other FCC-related issues. The EC provided guidance in the domestic implementation of the worldwide Amateur Radio allocation at 5 MHz, agreed upon at World Radiocommunication Conference 2015 (WRC-15) last fall. Delegates to WRC-15 reached consensus on 15 kilohertz-wide band, 5351.5-5366.5 kHz, with stations limited to an effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) of 15 W.   Imlay, in conjunction with ARRL International Affairs Vice President Jay Bellows, K0QB, and Midwest Division Director Rod Blocksome, K0DAS, will review of the National Broadband Plan, with an eye toward determining any impact it might have on Amateur Radio allocations.   In addition, Imlay and West Gulf Division Director Dr David Woolweaver, K5RAV, will meet with officials of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and congressional offices to address the effect on Amateur Radio antenna systems between 50 and 200 feet tall of new painting and lighting requirements required under the FAA Reauthorization Act (H.R. 636).   ARRL CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF, told the panel that several new educational initiatives under way, and, as those pilot programs are assessed and refined, the programs will be made available to the Amateur Radio community.   In his report, Bellows told the EC that the IARU Administrative Council has begun preparations to represent Amateur Radio at various meetings to be held in advance of World Radiocommunication Conference 2019. Minutes of the October 22 meeting are available on the ARRL website.     New ARRL Repeater Directory Will Leverage Crowdsourcing Technology   11/14/2016ARRL partner RFinder, the creator of a web and app-based directory of Amateur Radio repeaters worldwide, will supply all data for the 2017-2018 ARRL Repeater Directory®. RFinder will employ its crowdsourcing technology to aggregate timely and accurate information for the Directory, marking the first time crowdsourcing has been put to use in the production of an ARRL publication. “Crowdsourcing” is a means of using data gathered from public resources — in this case, repeater owners and frequency coordinators — via the Internet to obtain the necessary listing information more quickly and flexibly. Including RFinder’s data in The Repeater Directory will help users seeking the most complete listing of on-air repeaters. The Repeater Directory will continue to publish repeater listings according to state, city, frequency and mode.Although RFinder’s data is primarily user supplied, ARRL has invited volunteer frequency coordinators to contribute their coordination data to RFinder. RFinder has setup an online portal to accept uploaded data from coordinators. Every coordinator that supplies repeater data to RFinder will have its listings credited as coordinated repeaters both in the RFinder smartphone apps and web listings, and in the hard-copy Repeater Directory.As part of this program, RFinder will make the RFinder database available to all frequency coordinators free of charge, with the exception of the Apple iOS version app, which requires a $9.99 license. The Android-compatible database is a free download.“We believe this will help you in your coordination activities, as it will provide you with a complete map of machines, both coordinated or not,” RFinder said. “It will also assist coordinators to bring uncoordinated machines into coordination.”ARRL earlier this year established an agreement with RFinder to be the membership association’s preferred online resource of repeater frequencies. RFinder’s steadily growing worldwide repeater database now includes more than 60,000 repeaters in some 170 countries around the globe. RFinder listings are dynamic, regularly reflecting new, updated, revised, and deleted information.RFinder is integrated directly with EchoLink on both Android and iPhone and provides the ability to share repeater check-ins on Facebook, Twitter, and APRS. RFinder is integrated with RT Systems and CHIRP radio programming applications and has a routing feature that lets users find repeaters worldwide over a given route. Video demos of RFinder features are available on YouTube.ARRL had previously discontinued its own products that supported digital listings of repeater data including the TravelPlus for Repeaters™ software and its own apps.RFinder is $9.99 per year. Subscribe to RFinder by visiting http://subscribe.rfinder.net/ from your iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, or from your Android smartphone or tablet.RFinder also includes the ability to report radio jamming anywhere. Those without a device or subscription can file reports online. Individuals or entities responsible for coordinating anti-jamming activities also can request access to view jamming reports for their area. Southern Florida Assistant Section Manager Ray Kassis, N4LEM, SK   11/17/2016ARRL Southern Florida Assistant Section Manager Ray Kassis, N4LEM, of Cocoa, Florida, died unexpectedly on November 9. He was 69. Licensed as WB4CTZ in 1966, he served the ARRL Southern Florida Section for many years in various capacities, most recently as Space Coast District Emergency Coordinator (DEC) and Assistant Section Manager (ASM).Kassis had been the Brevard County Emergency Coordinator (EC) since 1991, and he was instrumental in constructing several mobile communications units in the area. He was the owner of, and air personality on, WWBC radio, where he maintained a second ham station.p“We have suffered a great loss in our Section family with Ray’s passing,” said Southern Florida Section Manager Jeff Beals, WA4AW. “Ray was a dear friend and a valued member of my section staff.”     Thanks for stopping by today. If you like what you have heard on my podcast or read on my blog and would like to know how you can give your support, check out the Support page! You can make a one time donation through Paypal, become a monthly contributor through Patreon or shop on Amazon through my affiliate link.   If you have not done so already, please subscribe to my site so that you will receive emails when I publish a new post or podcast episode. It's super easy! Just fill out the form below: Once you click on the Sign Me Up button, you will get an email from me with a link that you will need to click on. Once you click on that link, you will start receiving emails from me. I hate spam as much as anyone does, so I promise you that I will not sell or rent your email address to anyone! Also, check me out on Facebook and follow me on Twitter. Links to these and all the other social media sites that I am on can be found in the menu at the top of the page under Social. Until next time... 73 de Curtis, K5CLM

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  • #61: What Does It Take To Be Super-Human? A Deep Dive Into The Reality of Business

    · The Three Month Vacation Podcast: Online Small Business|Marketing Strategy Plan| Sean D'Souza | Psychotactics

    Starting up is always rough—and especially when you're a small business that at first has no clients and no credibility. In this episode, 5000bc member, Christopher Cook talks to Sean D'Souza about how to get over the inner chatter. How to get past those starting blocks and whether it's possible to be superhuman. -------------------- Useful ResourcesTo access this audio + transcript: http://www.psychotactics.com/61Email me at: sean@psychotactics.comTwitter/Facebook: seandsouzaMagic? Yes, magic: http://www.psychotactics.com/magic How to get reliable answers to your complex marketing problems?(http://www.5000bc.com/)Brain Audit: Why Clients Buy (And Why They Don’t) (http://www.psychotactics.com/products/the-brain-audit-32-marketing-strategy-and-structure/)Goodies: How To Win The Resistance Game(http://www.psychotactics.com/free/resistance-game/)-------------------- In this episode Sean talks about Part 1: Why Roadblocks Are UniversalPart 2: Why Talent Is Not InbornPart 3: How To Successfully Get Rid of Self-Doubt -------------------- The  Transcript This is indeed The 3 Month Vacation and I’m Sean D’Souza.   Back in the year 2000, I was still a cartoonist and I was doing both cartooning and marketing at the same time. At that point, I decided that I wanted to be the best in the world at marketing, but that meant that I had to start up. I had to start up all over again. I don’t know much about marketing. I hadn’t read that many marketing books and this whole factor of starting up was hard enough just as a business. I was also new at New Zealand. I just moved in from India and so it was like a double start up. Often people ask me this question, “How did you manage? What was the start up like? Does this internet marketing thing work just for some people and not for others? These are the questions that Christopher C was asking me and this interview is about that. It’s about debt start up, the obstacles. It’s a whole bunch of questions that Christopher C decided, “Let him answer it,” so here I am answering it. Interestingly, as I was going through this whole interview and listening to it, it seemed like almost a compellation of many of the podcasts that I have done before. We’re covering topics like roadblocks and mindset and routine and you probably heard it before. It’s just a different version of it you could say. It’s on Skype, but it’s still live and we started out with roadblocks. Christopher asked me what the roadblocks are, what do I see as roadblocks in day-to-day life. The thing with roadblocks is that most people think that it only happens to them and it’s not true at all. Part 1:Why Roadblocks Are Universal The first thing is that roadblocks are universal. They don’t care about you and don’t care about me. Their only real purpose in life is to teach you a lesson. When people don’t learn the lesson the roadblocks pop up again and again and again. When you learn that lesson, they disappear and other roadblocks show up. If you don’t deal with the roadblocks in the first instance, they pile up and they become bigger and bigger and bigger and that’s the part that people don’t get. They think that somehow the roadblock is going to disappear and it doesn’t disappear. It’s there specifically to teach you a lesson. I’ll give you a simple example. We have several websites. Over the years, we’ve made them very popular or they’ve become popular and so they attract hackers. In 2014, 3 of our websites attracted hackers. They didn’t really tear it down, but they created enough havoc so that we had to change our whole system. We had to from Dune to WordPress. We had to move all the stuff across and now we’re in the process of redesigning all 3 websites, which is it might seemed like just a simple project but considering the size of our websites that’s about probably conservatively a year, a year and a halfs’ work and this is working very quickly. We ignore that. We ignore the hackers. They’ve been sniping away and then we’ll just fix it, a little bandage here and there. Then eventually they came in a big way and got us blacklisted on Google and all those kinds of things. That’s when we had to pay attention and this is what I see as roadblocks. I see that everyone has them and if you don’t do something when you have the time to do it, which of course we don’t, then they will come back again. Part 2: Why Talent Is Not Inborn The second question is something that I’ve heard many times before and that is, “You, Sean, have natural talent and skills and I don’t have these skills and I don’t have this talent. If you’ve been following me for a while, you know that I don’t believe in inborn talent.” That’s a completely different topic, but the question was, “You seemed to be superhuman that is Sean, you are superhuman. You get so much stuff done. You draw cartoons. You cook. You write books. You do workshops. You do all of this stuff.” This is not me praising myself. This is just what Christopher brought up. He said that at some level it’s intimidating. At some level it feels like only some people can do it. Is it true that just some people can do it or can anyone do it? That’s when I launched into my answer. They’re exactly right. The reason why I said they’re exactly right is because the person I am today was not the person I was 10 years ago or the person I was 20 years ago. When I look back at what I could do 10 years ago or 12 years ago, it was a lot less than I could do today. I knew a lot less than I know today. I’m not just saying I read more books or did learn some more stuff and went to more seminars. What I’m saying is that even a simple task like writing an article, a simple task like writing an article would take me 2 days, 2 whole days. I don’t know many people that take 2 days to write an article, but it was sure frustration for me. It sounds like marketing, because I sell an article-writing course and it sounds like a good thing. You take 2 days to write an article, now you do it in 45 minutes. It was a reality and the problem was I didn’t know how that article would turn out. The question of me doing any podcast, the question of me doing any webinars, any speeches, anything of that sort it was totally out of the question. The first time I spoke when I got to Oakland I forgot what I had to say. We had to take it in mid-break. When I wrote my first book, it was only 16 pages. We put some cartoons in it and it became 20 pages. When I look at all the cartoons that I did back then, they were pretty amateur and people say, “Yes, but at least you could draw.” Sure I could draw, but I couldn’t write. I couldn’t speak. I couldn’t do a lot of things that I can do today. Not only am I good at what I do today, but I can be very quick and very effective so I’m not the same person. When you say someone is superhuman, it means that along the way that person has spent a lot of time and a lot of effort and continues to spend a lot of time and effort to get to that superhuman status. You know this to be true because you look at top performers. You look at the top tennis player in the world, the top swimmer, the top runner. You can say you can go blue in face saying that they have natural abilities, which we will talk about, but look at what they’re doing. They’re still in the track 4 or 5, 6 hours a day. They still have coaches. They still have all kinds of training. Then you look at yourself and you think, “I manage to get half an hour of listening to a podcast last week because I was too busy.” I’m sorry but it’s not going to happen by magic. The way to get to that level where you are superhuman is to be able to do something that superhuman people do. The reason why they got to superhuman and I’m sorry that I’m referring to myself as superhuman; that was not the goal, the point is that I see myself completely differently from 6 months ago or a year ago or 2 years ago or 10 years ago. As much as I like, what I’m doing right now I like the articles that I write. I like the cartoons that I draw. I like the stuff that I do. I know that it will be totally crappy in my own eyes 10 years from now. I know that because I’ve learned so much I will change so much, everything will change. Everything has to change because that’s how it works. At this point in the interview, we shifted into the key elements or keystone. Keystone is the foundation on which a lot of things are built. The question was, what keystone elements do you need to be superhuman? I’m still not comfortable with superhuman but since that’s the term being used in the interview, we continue with the term superhuman. I’ll go and get my kryptonite on the side. I think the first element is that it has to be daily. You have to take an analogy of brushing teeth. You can brush once a week. You can brush once a month. You can brush once a year. It totally depends on you. What sets in is a factor of decay and your reign is exactly the same. It’s not going to turn on lights and keep them on if you decide that you’re not going to learn. It just going to switch them off or it’s going to put them in dimmer setting. You know this because you can learn something and you can forget about it and then you learn it again and then it comes up a little brighter. Unless you keep adding to it, unless you keep polishing and unless you have what is called a daily routine it’s not going to work. There is no way on earth that you can be where you want to be unless you have a daily routine. It might be just 15 minutes. You might just take a walk for 15 minutes and listen to something and you never remember anything. You don’t have to remember anything. You just have to listen. Just listen to it like radio, just like you went for a walk with a friend and you listen and you can’t remember 99 percent of what they said. That 1 percent when you add it up, add 1 to 1 you think they would end up as being 2, but it doesn’t end up as being 2. Eventually, the 1 percent plus 1 percent plus 1 percent becomes exponential and suddenly you jump up 20 percent and then 50 percent and that’s how it works. The first thing is definitely that you have to do something on a daily basis. How long? I can’t say. I spend at least an hour learning every day if not longer and I have a very busy day, busier day than most. The second thing that you have to look at is a teacher. You have to. You can waste so much time trying to work your way through a system that if you don’t find the right teacher then you’re just wasting time. The point is how do you find the right teacher. It’s the same thing as trying to find the right spouse in life or right girlfriend or boyfriend or friend for that matter. You have to reject a lot of people. If you go out there and say, “I’ll go to the first person that’s promising me all these instant happiness and riches and stuff,” that’s what you get. You get no instant anything. The teacher makes a huge difference. The daily stuff makes a huge difference. Part 3: How To Successfully Get Rid of Self-Doubt The third thing is just that a lot of people have to get rid of the self-doubt. It doesn’t matter who you are and how successful you are. You are going to have self-doubt. There is no one on the planet who doesn’t have self-doubt. The doubt performers they all have self-doubt. What they do is they have to work out a system to get rid of the self-doubts so that when they run their next race, they’re thinking, “I might not win this race,” but they still end up with the gold medal or the silver medal. Maybe they showed up in that race, but the next race and the next race and the next race. I hate to nail anything down to keystone stuff but this is it. If you find the teacher and the teacher will have a system, they will have a group and you do something daily that helps you get rid of the most critical element that stops you, which is self-doubt. This took us at the topic of daily routine, what I do every single day to make sure that my daily routine stays daily. The thing that you have to do is when you create a habit, you’ve got to understand that there is a cue, routine, and reward. These 3 elements have to be in place. Cue is like an alarm clock. You wake up on cue and then there’s a routine. You put on your shoes and you go for a walk and then there’s a reward. The point is that without that reward in place, the cue and the routine are not going to happen. You decide I’m going to listen to podcast every day or I’m going to read every day. What’s the reward? That’s what I would ask first, what is your reward? If you don’t have the reward every single day, there’s a very good chance that’s it’s going to fall by the way. There’s a pretty good chance that your cue will set up, your alarm will set up, you’ll get into your shoes but then you’ll decide it’s raining I’m not going to go. Cue, routine and reward have to be in place but first you have to ask yourself what is the reward. Some people say, “I don’t need the reward. I have to be self-motivated.” No, no, no, that’s not how it works. You first figure out your reward if you want to learn something what happens at the end of that something, if you want to do something what happens to the end of that something. When people do courses, for instance, the first time we did a workshop that’s speaking engagement very early in our career in 2002. I spoke at this event and there were about 30 people in the room and most of them bought this PDF from me. Right after we did that, we went out. We bought a bottle of wine and we celebrated and I still have that bottle with me; the empty bottle obviously. The point that the reward matters, every time when you have the reward in place you know. This is what going through this whole routine. Once you have that in place you then have to seek out what is called group, because an individual is not usually capable of going by themselves. When you have a group, the other persons buzz you on. They say, “Are we going for a run today?” You go, “We’ll go.” Having these elements in place make a difference. This is how I go for a walk every day. When I go for a walk, I have my iPhone with me so I listen to podcast or I learn languages or I do stuff like that. I listen to audio books so for 1-1/2 hour I’m learning. Some days I’ll just speak to my wife. We’ll brainstorm, but at the end of that there’s a cup of coffee. Then I have my cup of coffee and I come back and I’ve learned something and I’ve done something and that’s the reward. You have to determine the reward and that’s my routine. That’s how I go about stuff. At this point in the interview, Christopher brought up something that I’d mentioned when I just started doing watercolors. You may or may not know the story but in 2010, I went out to learn watercolors. I’d gone to several courses and learn anything. I went to this guy Ted and he told me that I should practice every day. He said, “Get watercolor book and just paint every day.” I decided to paint what I did every day, which is just my life. When I started, I mentioned in 5000bc, which is the membership site, and in the forum I said, “I’m starting on this watercolor journey. I’m not very good at it but I will be in 2 years’ time.” That is what Christopher brought up. He said, “That mindset stayed with me the fact that you said you will be good in 2 years’ time.” I’ll give you a better thing than that. I’ll give you an analogy. Imagine for some reason you went blind. It sounds terrible and I wouldn’t want to be blind, but lots of people go blind for whatever reason. What’s going to happen in the next year, for one, you’re going to be able to find your way around the city almost by yourself. That’s the first thing that’s going to happen. The second thing is you’re going to learn a brand new language that you’ve never encountered before, which is braille. Third, you’re going to be able to hear stuff. Because of how your brain functions, you’re going to hear stuff more profoundly than ever before because you can’t see anymore. When you look at the mindset of what happens to a blind person in a year’s time, they have got 3 sets of you can call them skills that they never had before. It is beyond any doubt that if you decided that you’re going to do something and you do it on a regular basis, you will be better in a year’s time. You don’t have to do much. You don’t even have to have a great teacher. You don’t have to have a great system. You can get there, say, record a podcast everyday. You can, say, do a drawing every day. It’s not going to be very fulfilling because what are you going to do. No one sees it. No one looks at it. The point is that after a year you will be better. If you find a good teacher and you find a good system and you do all that other stuff then you will be a professional in year’s time. It’s not an if or a but, but it is a guarantee. You will be professional in a year’s time. That’s how blind people learn to type. That’s how they learn to write. That’s how they learn to read. That’s beyond any doubt. Then we came full circle with the hardship bit. We talked about scarcity, about not having that skill or resources and how to still go forward. A lot of people they believe that they can’t make that they don’t have the skill. They don’t have the resources. Frankly speaking nobody does. A lot of people when they say they don’t have resources they don’t really understand what they’re saying. I didn’t grow up in a very poor family. I grew up in a middle-class family, but even so I didn’t have access to a library. I had to go out there and buy my books. My father had to subscribe [the stuff 19:44]. A lot of the things that people take for granted especially in western countries you can go to the library. You can get any book you want. You have an internet connection. You have all these things. Even if you just look at yourself going back 25 years, you didn’t have an internet connection. You didn’t have so many things like a mobile phone, all these things that you take for granted today. In that sense, you are quite deprived. You may do with what you had and you were very creative. It’s when a person becomes saddled, all those equipment and this excess that they become worse at what they’re supposed to do. Probably the smartest people work with very little information. They work with very little resources and information is one of those very critical resources. One of the things that stop people consistently is this information. They go, “If I have more information about this house then maybe I’ll buy it. If I have more information about how my business is going to go in six months then maybe I’ll do it.” The people who succeed on a consistent basis they don’t have this resource. They have the same resource as you. They have the same amount of information as you and what they do is they do it anyway. They go ahead anyway and then they keep going and they find the group, they find a teacher, they keep going, they keep going, they keep going. What happens over time is you just get very quick at something. As I said, I used to take 2 days to write an article, it takes 45 minutes. I now have one day and another 14 hours of whatever to play with. What you are really doing is you have to understand that to be very good at what you do you have to work with very little information and just keep going. The second thing that I would add just to finish this off is that something that I had to learn which is rest. We’ve take three months off every year, but the point is that even so I wasn’t taking weekends off. Let me clarify what I mean by that. I wasn’t working the whole weekend but I’m going on a Saturday morning and then I’d work for a few hours and then before I knew it, it would be 9:00 or 10:00 and then someday maybe two or three hours. The downtime is critical. You can’t compensate for downtime. If you don’t take a break, if you don’t disconnect your email, if you don’t disconnect your phone, you are going to find that your work is not as good. When people go and they say, “We went on a vacation,” and all they did was see 700 monuments, that’s not a break. When you were on your weekend and you just check email, that’s not a break. Your ability to work when you have to work goes down and you get more and more tired, more exhausted and then eventually there’s nothing left. There’s no energy left. That’s pretty much what I’d say. Summary: That brings us to the end of this podcast. What we’d covered was the whole concept of roadblocks and how we think that someone else is superhuman. They’re not really superhuman. They just started along time ago and what they did was continue. A lot of people stop. They pause. They think that the other people are somehow succeeding because they have some special gene. If that other person has special gene, it is just to persist over and over again until they get it right until they eliminate all the errors and that makes them what other people call them which is superhuman. The second thing that we covered was this concept of keystone habits. We found that you have to have to work on it like your toothbrush. Your toothbrush does a job and it does it very well. If you can think of your learning and your application as a daily routine, then it changes everything. The third thing that we talked about was the future and how you have to have a mindset for the future that you might not be very good at watercolors today, but in two years’ time you will be. You might not be very good at podcasting today, but in 2 years’ time you will be. It doesn’t matter what you undertake if you go about it with dedication and you find the right teacher. Even if you don’t find the right teacher you still in 2 years’ time you will be far down the road than where you are right now. If you stop today, you’ve just wasted 2 years. In 2 years’ time, you will still know nothing and that is the reality for most people. That brings us to the end of this podcast. We still have the storytelling workshop in Nashville, Tennessee on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th of December and then the 13th, 14th and 15th of December is in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. People wander why they have to tell stories and it’s the flipside of the coin. You have logic and you have facts and you have to have stories, because stories they keep the audience alive and they keep things memorable. You can run on facts and logic alone, but who’s going to remember your story? Who’s going to pass it on? Storytelling is incredible. You read The Brain Audit and you’ll find that almost the entire book is one of storytelling. Read The Brain Audit and also join us at 5000bc.com. If you want to go ahead you need a group and that group is in 5000bc, we don’t have these spammers and these loud mouths. We largely have a group on introverts even though I’m an extrovert. Join us at 5000bc.com and if you like to come to the workshop it’s at psychotactics.com/story-telling-workshop. That’s me Sean D’Souza saying bye for now and here’s to your talent 2 years from now. How much is enough? And where do you stop?It’s easy to get all wrapped up in this whole concept of passive income and how smart it seems. Yet, you can work yourself crazy if you’re not careful. You can work too much, do too much? And even vacation too much. Click here to find out more about—The Power of Enough. (http://www.psychotactics.com/power-enough-critical-sanity/)

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  • Mansion Ingles Podcast June 2013 - Aprende gramatica y vocabulario ingles

    · 00:43:05 · Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free

    Aprender ingles gratis con La Mansion del Ingles. Un podcast para mejorar la gramatica, el vocabulario y la pronunciacion del ingles. Una leccion del ingles con ejemplos y ejercicios. Learn English free with podcasts from La Mansion del Ingles. Improve your grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. This English lesson contains examples and exercises. Hello once again and welcome to another Mansion Ingles podcast. This is podcast number 62 recorded for June 2013. Este mes, en el nivel básico practicamos el afirmativo y el negativo del pasado simple y las preposiciones. En el nivel intermedio enfocamos en la diferencia entre any, some, either and neither y el vocabulario de la personalidad - character and personality. In the advanced section, we practise vocabulary with some  advanced collocations, and there's business vocabulary as usual, and a translation exercise all to help you improve your English and take it to the next level.  En los podcasts mensuales hablamos de los temas, vocabulario y ejercicios que salen en nuestro cuaderno mensual. Así podáis practicar la pronunciación y repasar el material del cuaderno. Si quieres recibir gratis el cuaderno cada mes, ver la trascripción de este podcast o leer los anteriores, vete a mansioningles.com y sigue los enlaces en la página principal.  Ok, let's start then with el nivel básico. Voy a decir algunas frases en el afirmativo, y tú tienes que cambiarlas al negativo. Por ejemplo, yo digo "She is a teacher." Tú dices: "She isn't a teacher." OK? Luego repitas la frase negativa para practicar la pronunciación. Ok. 1. I like classical music - I don't like classical music. Repite: I don't like classical music. 2. He plays tennis - He doesn't play tennis. Repite: He doesn't play tennis. 3. She is divorced - She isn't divorced. Repite: She isn't divorced. 4. They are students - they aren't students. Repite: They aren't students. También puedes decir they're not students. Depende como se hace la contración del They are not. Puede ser they're not o they aren't. Repite: they're not students - they aren't students - They're not Spanish. They aren't Spanish. 5. She likes photography - She doesn't like photography. Repite: She doesn't like photography. Very good! Now, también hemos practicado algunas preposiciónes. Las preposiciones son difíciles en inglés por que muchas veces son diferentes al traducir las al español. Pero no te preocupes demasiado porque si haces una falta con una preposicion la gente van a entender lo que quieres decir. No es una falta grave. Pero, hay que intentar aprender las poco a poco - little by little - poco a poco. Escucha: They sometimes go snowboarding in December. In december. Cuando hablamos de los meses en inglés, decimos la preposición in. Repite: in December. We go in December. In June - I never go in June. - In March - My birthday's in March. Escucha: The Tourist Information Office closes at five o’clock. Cuando hablamos de la hora en inglés, empleamos la preposición at. Repite: at five o'clock. It closes at five o'clock. At 8.30 - I finish work at 8.30. - at 7 - I have breakfast at 7. Escucha: She was born on May 12th. - Ella nació el 12 de mayo. Cuando hablamos de los días, utilizamos la preposición on. Repite: on May 12th - born on May 12th. She was born on May 12th. - On Monday. I work on Monday. - On Saturday. I don't work on Saturday. On Thursday. See you on Thursday! Escucha: My keys are in my coat pocket. Muchas veces la preposición in se traduce como 'en'. Escucha: In my pocket. - en mi bolsillo. My keys are in my coat pocket. - Mis llaves están en el bolsillo de mi abrigo. Repite: In my pocket. In my car. It's in my car. In the house. It's in the house. In the office. They're in the office. Escucha: Where can I try on this shirt? - ¿Dónde puedo probar esta camisa? to try on es un phrasal verb (un verbo compuesto) Los phrasal verbs llevan un verbo y una preposición o un adverbio o a veces ambos. To try on significa probar ropa. Repite: try on - try on clothes - try on a shirt - try on shoes - Please try on the jacket. Do you want to try on the dress? Ok, moving on to the intermediate section, we practised the difference between any, some, either and neither. Let's look at either and neither first. There are two possible pronunciations. Listen: either/either - neither/neither. Repeat: either/either - neither/neither. either se puede traducir como: cualquiera de los dos y neither como ninguno (de dos) Either student can take the test. - (Uno de los estudiantes puede tomar el examen.) Neither student can take the test. - (Ninguno de los estudiantes puede tomar el examen.) A veces el neither va con el nor y sirve para unir dos oraciones. En este caso significa: “ni” Por ejemplo: “Ni cafe ni té”. “Neither coffee nor tea”. Neither puede también significar “tampoco”. Por ejemplo: “I don't want to go. Neither do I.” - Yo no quiero ir. Yo tampoco (ni yo). Escucha y repite algunos ejemplos: I don't like Lady Gaga. Neither do I. Neither the Tower of London nor Buckingham Palace were included in the tour. I neither sing nor dance. I can't swim. Neither can I. Either (o either) puede significar: ni, o, cualquiera, ninguno/a, alguno/a, tampoco, ni siquiera. Listen and repeat: You can have either tea or coffee. Which would you prefer? Either, I don't mind. We'd like to buy either the blue one or the red one. We don't mind. Either of them. Who are those two women? I don't know either of them. I can't speak French. I can't either. I don't like Alejendro Sanz. I don't either. (También puedeo decir "Neither do I:" I don't like tennis. - I don't either/neither do I. OK, let's talk about some and any. Usually, we use some in positive sentences and any in negative and question sentences. Listen: afirmativo - I've got some biscuits. Do you want one? negativo - Sorry, I haven't got any money. pregunta - Have you got any brothers or sisters? Repeat: I've got some biscuits. Do you want one? Sorry, I haven't got any money. Have you got any brothers or sisters? Listen and repeat some more examples with some and any: I don't need any help. Repeat: I don't need any help. You've got some coffee on your shirt. Repeat: - You've got some coffee on your shirt. Did you buy any wine? Repeat: Did you buy any wine? There somebody at the door. Repeat: There somebody at the door. Are you doing anything this weekend? Repeat: Are you doing anything this weekend? This project will take some time. Repeat: This project will take some time. I don't want anything to drink. Repeat: I don't want anything to drink. Has anyone seen the dog? Repeat: Has anyone seen the dog? Would you like some beer? Repeat: Would you like some beer? Are you going anywhere this summer? Repeat: Are you going anywhere this summer? We also use any in positive sentences when we mean "It doesn't matter which" - no importa que You can visit us any time. Which direction should I take? - Any one. It's up to you. I like any jazz music. Repeat: You can visit us any time. Which direction should I take? - Any one. It's up to you. I like any jazz music.   Also in the intermediate section this month we studied some adjectives of character and personality. Vamos a ver si recuerdas. What do you call a person who doesn’t like sharing or giving things. The opposite of generous. - mean Someone who likes giving orders and telling other people what to do. - bossy What's the adjective for a lively person who likes to be doing something all the time. - active Do you know the opposite of active? - inactive. People, usually children, who get everything they want even when they shouldn’t. - spoiled A person who isn’t interested in anybody but herself/himself. He/she thinks he/she is the only person who exists. - selfish A person who is aware of the feelings of others and is considerate. - thoughtful Somebody who thinks money and possessions are more important than anything else. - materialistic Someone whose feelings are very easily hurt. - sensitive. Be careful of the false friend sensible. Remember sensato - sensible and sensible - sensitive. What's the name for children behaving badly and not doing what they are told. - naughty And finally, a person who is in good physical condition, who does a lot of exercise and doesn’t tire easily after hard physical work.                 - fit - We also say to get fit. to get fit or to be fit. I'm fit = estoy en forma. I'm trying to get fit - I go to the gym to get fit. Are you fit? OK, listen to the adjectives again and repeat them after me to practise pronunciation. mean bossy active - inactive spoiled selfish thoughtful materialistic sensitive sensible naughty fit If you like these podcasts, remember that you can buy complete lessons for only 1 euro and 40 centimos (the price of a cup of coffee) from our online shop - nuestra tienda online. Tenemos un curso entero de nivel principiante y básico. Puedes encontrarlas en mansioninglesdescargas.wazala.com that's: mansioninglesdescargas - todo junto - punto . wazala.com. Cada leccion vale solo 1.40 euros y dura approx. 1 hora y cada leccion está en el formato mp3 y lleva su trascripcion en formato PDF. Así puedes aprender inglés haciendo ejercicio, limpiando la casa, en el coche, caminando con el perro y en todo el tiempo muerto que tienes. Mejorar tú ingles con las descargas de la mansión del inglés. Bueno, también puedes encontrar la dirección de la tienda en la trascripción de este podcast. In the advanced section, we looked at some collocations. For example to play truant. That's when you don't go to school and you go shopping or you play football in the park. Have you ever played truant from school? I don't remember ever playing truant. I liked going to school most of the time. In American English you can say to play hooky or to skip a class. The next expression was to put your foot in it. If you put your foot in it or put your foot in your mouth, you do something by accident which embarrasses or upsets someone. For example, I really put my foot in it when I asked her if she was pregnant. to hold a meeting is to have a meeting about something but the verb to hold is a strong collocation with meeting. You can also hold a reunion of old school friends, hold a business meeting and hold an online meeting on the Internet. If you put two and two together, you understand something by using the information you have. For example, I didn't know his wife had left him, but when I saw that all her clothes and her things and her car were gone, I put two and two together. To put your foot down means to assert something strongly. For example, Pepito's boss put her foot down and refused to accept any more bad behaviour. She put her foot down. To play a trick on someone or play a prank on someone es hacer una broma - to do a trick that affects someone. For example, Somebody played a trick on me by hiding my shoes. Did you ever play any tricks on your teacher at school. We used to play tricks regularly, but not with all the teachers, only some of them. To hold down a job means to keep it possibly in the face of difficult circumstances, as in "He held down the job for a year before handing in his notice". To hold a record for something means to have the record for an event or an achievement. For example, She holds the world indoor 800 metres record. To play havoc with something means to cause someone to have trouble doing something. Listen: Strong winds played havoc with her golf game. It can also mean to damage something. For example,  Stormy conditions played havoc with the fishing. Put your feet up means to relax, especially by sitting with your feet supported above the ground. For example: You go home and put your feet up, love. I can't wait to finish work and put my feet up. to hold your breath means to stop breathing for a short period, on purpose. Do you hold your breath when you dive into the water? I can't hold my breath for very long. But it can also mean to wait or delay until something special happens and it's often used in the negative. For example, I expect to get paid for last month's work this week, but I'm not holding my breath. It's often late. Or another example, do you think there'll have free drinks and sandwiches at the meeting? Don't hold your breath! o sea, "no te hagas ilusión". Don't hold your breath! Finally, to play a part in something or play a role in something means to participate in something in a specific way. For example, I hope to play a part in the development of the new product. He played a big part in the success of the company. Listen to the collocations and expressions again and repeat them: play truant put your foot in it hold a meeting put two and two together put your foot down play a trick (on someone) hold down a job hold a record play havoc with (something) put your feet up. hold your breath play a part in (something)   In the Business English section we looked at some more business English vocabulary, and the first word was merger. A merger is the combination of two or more companies, either by the creation of a new organization or by absorption by one of the others. I think in Spanish it's fusión. Repeat: merger - mergers and acquisitions. In order to save the business, they merged with another company. The phrasal verb to set aside means dejar a un lado. We set aside some money for a holiday. It's good to set aside money for emergencies. Have you set aside any money for anything recently? I haven't got any money to set aside! Another phrasal verb was to bring in which means to include. The example was "I would like to bring my partner in on this discussion." To bring someone in on something. Shall we bring her in on the secret? I don't think it's necessary to bring them in on this deal. Notice that this phrasal verb must be separated. You put the object between the verb and the particle. You say bring her in on it but not Xbring in her on it.X If you make sound decisions you make good decisions. He makes sound business decisions. Repeat: He makes sound business decisions. We can trust him. He makes sound decisions. Feasible means possible, doable. In Spanish viable, o realizable. It's not a feasible project. We can't do it. Repeat: It's not feasible. I'm sorry, but it's not feasible. It's not economically feasible. The word demographic is similar in Spanish, demografía. Listen and repeat the pronunciation: demographic. The demographics show that income went down. We have to examine the demographics. To rule out means to eliminate. Listen: We can't rule out the possibility that we'll need another round of investment capital before the end of the year. Repeat: rule out - We should rule out the possibility of a merger. Don't rule out the competition. You may hear or read companies speaking about their mission statement. Especially of it's a North American company. According to the dictionary, a mission statement is "A summary of the aims and values of a company, organization, or individual." For example a mission statement for La Mansión del Inglés could be "To help Spanish speakers learn and improve their use of the English language." or something similar. Does your company have a mission statement? If not, what do you think it should be? You could write it in Spanish and then try to translate it into English. If you need help to check your mission statement, ask us on Facebook. We also gave you some more sentences to translate in this month's cuaderno. First, you had to translate from English to Spanish. So,  I'll say the English sentences and you can say the Spanish translation. Then, repeat the English sentence after me to practise pronunciation. Ready? 1.I only believe what you tell me. - Sólo creo lo que tú me dices. - I only believe what you tell me. 2.Could/Can you call a doctor? A German Shepherd has bitten my left leg. - ¿Puedes llamar a un doctor? Un pastor alemán me mordío en la pierna izquierda. - Could/Can you call a doctor? A German Shepherd has bitten my left leg. 3.I was hoping that you remembered how I got this tattoo. - Estaba esperando que tú recordaras como conseguí este tatuaje. - I was hoping that you remembered how I got this tattoo. 4.If the shoe fits, you can call me Cinderella. - Si me queda la zapatilla, me puedes llamar Cenicienta. If the shoe fits, you can call me Cinderella. 5.I don't own that penguin, it's a rental. - No soy el dueño de este pinguino, lo alquilo. - I don't own that penguin, it's a rental. Good, now I'll read some Spanish sentences and you translate to English. Then repeat the sentences after me to practise your pronunciation. OK? 1.¿Sabes cuanto él gana? - Do you know how much he earns? - Do you know how much he earns? 2.Él llevaba unas gafas oscuras. - He was wearing dark glasses. - He was wearing dark glasses. 3.Mi nivel está por encima del de ellos. - My level is above theirs. - My level is above theirs. 4.Tienen que llegar antes de la fecha tope. - They have to arrive before the deadline. - They have to arrive before the deadline. 5.Siempre le encantaba bailar. - He always loved to dance. - He always loved to dance. Well, that's all we have time for on this podcast, but we'll be back with you next month as usual with another podcast based on our monthly newsletter, our cuaderno de inglés mensual. Remember, you can listen to all our previous podcasts at mansioningles.com and on iTunes. Si te gusta este podcast, puedes hacernos un gran favor y escribe por favor una corta reseña en iTunes. Si escibes una reseña en iTunes más personas pueden escucharnos porque subimos en el 'ranking' de iTunes. y también puedes darnos algunas estrellas, si te gusta nuestros podcasts. Thank you very much for listening to this podcast, and for being part of the community of La Mansión del Inglés. Remember, If you want to contact us you can find us on Facebook. Just search Facebook for La Mansión del Inglés and join our growing community of fans. Or send me an email to: mansionteachers@yahoo.es. You can also follow us on Twitter. Our Twitter name is MansionTwit. Puedes ver el cuaderno mensual de este mes, y todos los cuadernos anteriores en www.cuadernodeingles.com/ Until next month then, keep practising and taking your English to the next level! Take care and bye for now! The music in this month’s podcast is by Revolution Void, the album is The Politics of Desire and the track is called Outer Orbit.                                            

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  • CA082: 10 ways to build the self-love habit

    · 00:41:10 · Changeability Podcast: Manage Your Mind - Change Your Life

    It’s all very well knowing we should love ourselves but how do we do it?  Find out how with these 10 ways to build the self-love habit. ‘To love oneself is the beginning of a life-long romance.’ Oscar Wilde What a lovely quote from the unique and fantastically brilliant Oscar Wilde but what did you think when you read it? Did you think that’s a clever little quip, or it’s a bit over the top or fanciful? Maybe you think it’s narcissistic or you haven’t thought of loving yourself as a romance with yourself. Whatever thoughts came to mind are an indication of your view towards you and self-love. Self-love is an inner love and acceptance of who we are and how we are. Last week we talked about what self-love is and why we all need it, in our blog posts and on the Changeability Podcast (episode 81). We looked at 6 ways or clues that show us we’re not being loving towards our self.  We understand what self-love is and why it’s good for us, we’re looking out for those times we’re not being self-loving, but how do we go from the ways we tend to behave where we’re not being loving to ourselves, to growing our self-love until it becomes the norm or a habit. 10 ways you can build a self-love habit for yourself Choose yourself Give yourself permission to do what you want.  Don’t wait for others to give you permission.  You might think this doesn’t apply to you, but ask yourself if there’s anything you want to do in your life or at work where you’re waiting for someone else’s permission to do it.  You might not have realised it before, but tacitly you’re waiting.  It can be more explicit or obvious in our close relationships. You seek someone’s permission before starting something new or maybe even to go out.  This isn’t about not caring about what your family, partner, boss or colleagues think. It’s about not holding back from being who you want to be or doing want you want to do because you’re scared or reluctant to ask or because you think you need someone’s permission.  When often it’s an excuse for procrastination and you don’t need that permission at all – you only need your own permission.  So give it to yourself. Create ‘You time’ and use it Neglecting your own needs was one of the key signs for not loving yourself and this is the antidote.  Make space in your life for you. One practical way to do this is to make time for you.  Carve out your own personal time to do something that pleases or excites you, or enhances you or your skills in or just makes you feel better.  This is a time when you put yourself first. This doesn’t mean you don’t look after children or do your job well, but it does mean there is a time when you’re not putting other first. When you create ‘you time’ you become a better parent, wife etc. You set a great example to your family and colleagues of one of the ways of being an effective person, and send a strong message that you matter and want to be treated as if you matter.  You matter enough to yourself to spend time on yourself and tend to your own needs and desires and they need to respect that.  And they will respect that – even it it takes a little while to get you and them into the swing of it. If you find this an uncomfortable prospect, ask yourself if rushing around, doing lots of things for others, however worthy, is feeding an underlying limiting belief (like I need to be busy or look after everyone else to be valued) or is it because you really want to do it. Be realistic and double it. Unless we’re talking about SMART goals you don’t normally hear us talk about being realistic. However, we’re not talking about a lack of ambition or not having big dreams or goals;  this is about being realistic about what you can achieve in a given timescale. Or to put it another way – don’t overstretch yourself or take on too much.  One of the times we hear our inner critical voice is when we get impatient or cross with ourselves that something’s taking us too long or we’re not as far along with a project as we think we should be.  When you find yourself signing up for something, whether for you or someone else, stop and ask yourself Am I being realistic here? Can I really get this done in this time or am I expecting too much of myself What will be the price of doing it in this timescale – will I have to stay up all night to finish it or will something else I really want to do suffer? However long you think something is going to take – double it! Or even triple or quadruple it depending on the sort of person you are.  This is about self-knowledge. Basically don’t give yourself so many things to do.  Don’t think you can fit in ten things before you go out for that appointment when you’ve only got tine for two – you’ll either fall short and be disappointed with yourself or be late! Examine your beliefs around being busy and time.  Is your time something to be used or enjoyed? Do you feel that you have to be rushing around filling up every moment in order to be valued? Because let us tell you - you don’t. Learn to say no This fits with the above three and is one very practical way to help you accomplish them – to choose you, create and use your time and curb your expectations of yourself. Learning to say no is a very practical skill. You learn it by doing it – but there are a couple of techniques to help you. If you’re the a person whose automatic reaction is to say yes, then you want to break that automatic response – which is a habit. One easy way to do this is to buy yourself some time .This doesn’t mean you won’t say yes to a request, but that you will not automatically say yes – without thinking about it.  To give yourself some time say ‘I’ll get back to you’ (if you might need a little while) or say ‘I’ll go and check my diary or calendar’. This gives you the option to think about it and obviously see if you have something on or not.  But it’s not just about if you are free, but if you actually want to say yes or not.  Don’t just say yes because you’re free. You can even practice saying no. Start with very small things, or when it doesn’t really matter. Once you’ve done it a few times it will get easier and you wont feel you’re letting people down.  Watch out for being a people pleaser and thinking that people will only like you if you say yes. Be kind and gentle on yourself Much of the time we can be quite hard on ourselves – I should have done this or why didn’t I do that or can I do more or why didn’t I achieve that or why did I fail to reach that goal.  This is not self-love and can be rectified by being kind and gentle on yourself. Do you sometimes expect more from yourself than you do from other people? We often have higher expectations and standards of ourselves than we do of others. But if you want to love yourself more - then accept you’re not perfect, and life will be a lot easier. Perfectionism is a scourge and one to be avoided or downgraded.  Doing a good job is great but there comes a point where it tips over into more than good enough to the detriment of you and your performance. So be kind to you.  Be gentle. Give yourself a break – both physically, in real terms but also figuratively speaking. Calm your inner critic Your inner critic is never going to go away completely and that’s a good thing.  It’s helping you stay safe and keeping you on your toes or on track, pointing out when something could be improved or isn’t helping you – but it can also be detrimental to your happiness and to loving yourself. So accept your inner critic for what it is.  An inner voice trying it’s best to help you out – albeit in a often misguided way.  It is working from the confines of its experience of you and the world and that’s not your inner critics fault, it’s just a matter of fact.  So you need to help it to see where it’s not helping you and retrain it to be more supportive and helpful. Accept that your inner voice and critic is a part of you.  And loving yourself also means loving this inner voice but that doesn’t mean that you need to accept everything it says or let it stop you making the changes you want in your life. Be aware of it, listen to what it’s saying but don’t accept it as the truth.  Examine it and take notice where it’s helpful or overrule it where it’s not.  You can even talk to your inner critic – ask it why it feels like that, thank it for it’s observations and opinions, answer back by suggesting ways in which you can modify your behaviour. Sometimes it will be telling you the truth, maybe an uncomfortable truth, But often it’s reflecting the results of the experiences you’ve had throughout your life – particularly in your formative years. This experience might have left you thinking you’re not good enough in some way, or your behaviour is inappropriate or you’re veering into new and therefore dangerous territory. Listen out for your inner critic, acknowledge it, see what’s underneath it, accept it, deal with it, negotiate or quieten and calm it. One of the best ways to raise your awareness and calm and quieten it is through our next suggestion. Be mindful One of the ways to address, put into practice and tick off the things we’ve talked about so far, is to be mindful and practice a simple form of meditation. Because when you meditate you put yourself first – you are with yourself in that very moment – your mind might be thinking about a million things but you bring it back to the present moment and are aware of you.  This is your time – so you’re taking or creating some ‘you time’. And you’re setting a specific time – however small that might be – to use for yourself and be realistic about it.  In that time during your meditation you’re bringing a calm awareness to yourself and what’s going on in you (including your inner voice) and around you at that time. Find your energy Look for what energises you. If you don’t know, search for it, find it and do it.  It might be something creative like drawing, painting, writing or speaking. It might be something physical like playing a sport, swimming, dancing or walking – it might be taxing but could be gentle and be about getting your body moving or getting out in nature. It might be something that gets your adrenaline pumping or where you get lost in the zone. For us it’s singing and being on stage – it’s thrilling and nerve wracking and fun and challenging and all those things – it’s not always a pleasant feeling but is ultimately energising.  That’s what you’re looking for - something for you that makes you feel alive Develop yourself This incorporates making time for yourself and choosing yourself or putting your self first (not all the time but some of the time) and takes it a step further by taking a positive decision to develop yourself.  Congratulations because you could say that by reading this or listening to our personal development podcast you are doing this right now. Developing yourself involves leaning a new skill or changing something you don’t like about you or your life or improve yourself.  It takes effort but the effort is worth it – because by spending effort on yourself you show yourself that: you are worth spending time on you’re worth developing you deserve to improve or change things for the better or do things that are going to ultimately make you happier and more fulfilled. One of the keys to personal development is getting clear about what you want and then finding the best way to achieve it – and that means setting clear goals around what you want to achieve for yourself (and of course for your family and friends and community). There’s nothing more self-affirming than achieving something that means a lot to you. So self-love means developing yourself – and at BrilliantLivingHQ.com you’re in the right place to do that. And we have something coming up soon if you want a systemised supported way of doing that – you find out more here. Know you are enough – and believe it Knowing you are enough is the start, and it’s a great start, but it’s one thing to know it intellectually and another to believe it.  That means taking it to the next level.  The things we’ve been talking about will help you to know it – and as you make them part of your life you will come to believe it.  Because creating and building a self-love habit like any habit requires thought and action and repeated action until it becomes an automatic way of thinking and behaving. And one of the best ways to accelerate this process of building a self-love habit is to use self-love rituals to implant the thinking and behaving.  But that’s for next week! Episode 82 of the Changeability Podcast Listen to episode 82 of the Changeability Podcast to hear us talking about all of this and more. And if you like the show please let us know by email at hello@BrilliantLivingHQ.com and by leaving a review on iTunes – we love reading them! Goals challenge If there’s somethine you know you’d like to change in your life then you’ll want to know about our forthcoming goals challenge! We’ll be sharing more about this soon but just want to let you know that if you want to be involved in the first group (and you surely do!) – you can sign up at BrilliantLivingHQ.com/goals to get on the list. We’ll send out more details when we have everything finalised. But it’s going to be exciting – or we’re excited anyway!

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  • April 2013

    · 00:32:07 · Aprende ingles con inglespodcast de La Mansión del Inglés-Learn English Free

    Aprender ingles gratis con La Mansion del Ingles. Un podcast para mejorar la gramatica, el vocabulario y la pronunciacion del ingles. Una leccion del ingles con ejemplos y ejercicios. Learn English free with podcasts from La Mansion del Ingles. Improve your grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. This English lesson contains examples and exercises.  Hello once again and welcome to another Mansion Ingles podcast. This is podcast number 60 recorded for April 2013. Este mes, en el nivel básico practicamos el pasado simple y los contarios. En el nivel intermedio enfocamos en la diferencia entre los verbos SAY y TELL and also we look at some confusing words. In the advanced section, there are some animal idioms and more collective nouns that we started studying last month. There's business vocabulary as usual, and a translation exercise all to help you improve your English and take it to the next level. En los podcasts mensuales hablamos de los temas, vocabulario y ejercicios que salen en nuestro cuaderno mensual. Así podáis practicar la pronunciación y repasar el material del cuaderno. Si quieres recibir gratis el cuaderno cada mes, ver la trascripción de este podcast o leer los anteriores, vete a mansioningles.com y sigue los enlaces en la página principal. Ok, let's start then with el nivel básico. El primer ejercicio trataba del tiempo verbal pasado simple. Escucha y repite algunas frases del dialogo. Escucha: Did you have a good holiday? Repite: good holiday - have a - have good holiday - Did you have? Did you have a good holiday? Escucha: Where did you go? Repite: go - did you - did you go - Where did you go? Escucha: We went to London. Repite: London - to London - We went to London. Escucha: We found a wonderful hotel. Repite: - hotel - a wonderful hotel - We found - We found a wonderful hotel. Did you fly? - Repite: fly - did you - did you fly? No, we didn't fly Repite: We didn't fly - No, we didn't fly. Escucha: The flights were too expensive. fly es el verbo (volar) y flight es el nombre (vuelo). Repite: flights - the flights - too expensive (demasiado caro) Repite: too expensive - The flights were too expensive. Escucha: We drove there. El verbo drive (conducir) es irregular - drive - drove - driven. Repite: drive - drove - driven. We drove - We drove there. Escucha: It took about 24 hours. El verbo take también es irregular. Repite: take - took - taken. It took - 24 hours - about 24 hours - It took about 24 hours. Escucha: We stopped every five or six hours. Repite: hours - five or six hours - We stopped - We stopped every five or six hours. We had a great time. Repite: We had - we had a - We had a great time. - We had a great time. Escucha: I improved my English a lot. A lot significa mucho. Repite: a lot - My English - my English a lot - I improved - I improved my English a lot. We spent too much money. too much es demasiado - too much money - demasiado dinero. to spend (gastar) es otro verbo irregular. Escucha: Spend - spent - spent. Repite: spend - spent - spent. We spent - too much money - We spend too much money. What did you do? Repite: do - did you - did you do - What did you do? - What about you? What did you do? Escucha: We didn't go anywhere - Repite: anywhere - didn't go - didn't go anywhere - We didn't go anywhere. We stayed in Barcelona. Repite: We stayed - We stayed in Barcelona - we stayed in Barcelona. Very good! ¿Muy bien! A continuación hemos revisado algunas contrarios. Contrarios en inglés son opposites. Voy a decir una lista de palabras y tú tienes que decir los contrarios antes que los digo yo. Después, repite los contrarios para practicar la pronunciación. ¿Listo? ok. good – bad black – white big – small / little old – new / young off – on cold – hot true – false expensive – cheap wrong – right married – single Very good! ¿Muy bien! Ok, moving on to the intermediate section, we practised the difference between say and tell. After tell, we usually say who is spoken to and we do not put to before the object. - No ponemos el to antes del objeto. Por ejemplo, decimos Tell me your name. No se dice XTell to me your nameX. After say, we don't have to say who is spoken to. If we do, we put to before the object. Con say si se puede poner el to antes del objeto. Por ejemplo, podemos decir What did your boss say to you? - Pero no se dice, XWhat did your boss say you.X Tell means to inform or instruct. For example: Tell me how to do it. It's common to use tell in the following expressions: tell a lie / tell the truth, tell a story,  tell me his name, y decimos say something, say something in Chinese, for example. Say something in French.  Say 'yes'. Repite: tell a lie / tell the truth, tell a story, say something in Chinese,  tell me his name, say 'yes'. Listen and repeat the following sentences. Why didn't you say goodbye? OK, Tell me what you need. Who said that? Tell her to shut her mouth. Say something in French. Pepito told his girlfriend a lie. Don't tell lies. Tell the truth. Tell me that you love me. Sorry, did you say something? You don't tell me anything. Have you told your boss? Sorry, what did you say? Please say 'yes'. The second exercise in the intermediate section was about confusing words, and we looked at the words prevent, protect, divert, avoid and guard. Listen and repeat some examples.  Avoid means evitar and when it's followed by a verb the verb is a gerund (un gerundio). Listen: I avoided speaking to her. Repeat: I avoided speaking to her. He always avoids going to meetings. The verb protect (proteger) is usually followed by an object. Repeat: It protects me. I try to protect her. The case protects my phone. Divert in Spanish is desviar Repeat: divert the traffic. We were diverted. The noun is diversion. Repeat: diversion - The was a diversion. Prevent is impedir and it's usually followed by an object and the preposition from. To prevent something from happening or to prevent someone from doing something. Repeat: They prevented me from doing it. She prevented him from going. Don't prevent me from trying. The last word was guard which can be a verb or a noun. To guard someone or something and a guard (guardia). A security guard es un guardia de seguridad. Repeat: security guard. Police are guarding the terrorists. You can say that someone is under guard. They are under guard at a high security prison. If you like these podcasts, remember that you can buy complete lessons for only 1 euro and 40 centimos from our online shop - nuestra tienda online. Tenemos un curso entero de nivel básico, y estamos haciendo lecciones nuevos de nivel principiante ahora mismo. Creo que hay 2 o 3 leccions ya en la tienda de nivel principiante. Puedes encontrarlas en mansioninglesdescargas.wazala.com that's: mansioninglesdescargas - todo junto - punto . wazala.com. Cada leccion vale solo 1.40 euros y dura approx. 1 hora y cada leccion está en el formato mp3 y lleva su trascripcion en formato PDF. Así puedes aprender inglés haciendo ejercicio. limpiando la casa, en el coche, caminando con el perro y en todo el tiempo muerto - ¿Se dice esto en español; 'tiempo muerto'? En inglés se dice 'dead time' es el tiempo que estas haciendo una tarea (por ejemplo limpiando los platos) y puedes hacer otra cosa a la vez como mejorar tú ingles con las descargas de la mansión del inglés. Bueno, puedes encontrar la dirección de la tienda en la trascripción de este podcast. In the advanced section, we had some animal idioms. Listen and repeat some example sentences. It's about 30 kilometres, as the crow flies. Stop making such a pig of yourself. Don't let the cat out of the bag. It's a secret. Be brave! Come on! ¡Animo! You must do it! Don't chicken out. He's as blind as a bat. He can't see a thing. Be careful! You're like a bull in a china shop. She's got a bee in her bonnet about something. Something's not right. I can I smelt a rat. Ok, moving on to collective nouns. What do you call a collection of fighter jets? It's a squadron. A squadron of fighter planes or jets. If there's a big crowd of people and all you can see are faces you can call it a sea S-E-A of faces. Do you say that in Spanish, ¿un mar de caras? - a sea of faces. Wolves, lobos, many wolves together are a pack of wolves. When soldiers, police etc. fire automatic weapons you can say there was a hail of bullets. Bullets son balas. The bank robbers came out in a hail of bullets. Many papers together can be called a bundle of papers. There's usually a bundle of papers on my desk (I'm not very tidy). You can also have a bundle of clothes, and there's usually a bundle of clothes in the corner of my room too! I must get organised. Seagulls are gaviotas, the collective term is a flock of seagulls. Of course, we can also have a flock of sheep. Notice I said 'sheep' for the plural and not XsheepsX. It's an exception. But we don't say a flock of goats (cabras), we say a herd of goats. H-E-R-D. A herd of goats. Finally, if you hear many rumours (rumores), you call it a spate of rumours. S-P-A-T-E - A spate of rumours. There's a spate of rumours going round the office about our new boss. Listen and repeat these collective nouns after me.  a squadron of fighter jets a sea of faces a pack of wolves a hail of bullets a bundle of papers a flock of seagulls a herd of goats a spate of rumours In the Business English section we looked at some more business English vocabulary, and the first was the phrasal verb to set up. To set up a business means to start a business. Repeat: to set up a business. To set up a company. We set up our business last year. The next phrasal verb was to look through. I looked through the documents. You can also look through a book (hojear un libro). I looked through the guide book, but I couldn't find the hotel. Would you mind looking through these instructions? Next we had the phrasal verb to walk someone through something, which means to guide someone or to explain something in detail. - To walk someone through something, Repeat: Can you walk me through it? Can you walk me through your sales strategy? Let me walk you through the legal side of the agreement. One by one means one at a time, uno por uno. I looked through the papers one by one until I found the one I was looking for. If you are a temp, you are a temporary worker. Temp can also be used as a verb. I'm temping for the company until something better comes up. I've been temping for six months. If you give feedback, you give your opinion about something. I was given positive feedback on my presentation. Please complete these feedback forms before you leave the meeting. Let me have your feedback by email. The word compliment (cumplido) collocates with the verb to pay, so you pay someone a compliment. Repeat: to pay a compliment. She paid me a lovely compliment - She paid me a lovely compliment on my work. I get embarrassed when people pay me compliments. If you are snowed under, you are very busy. Repeat: I'm snowed under - I'm snowed under at work - I'm totally snowed under this week. We also gave you some more sentences to translate in this month's cuaderno. First, you had to translate from English to Spanish. So,  I'll say the English sentences and you can say the Spanish translation. Then, repeat the English sentence after me to practise pronunciation. Ready? It was a wonderful/marvellous experience. - Fue una experiencia maravillosa. - Repeat: It was a wonderful experience. - It was a marvellous experience. This is the end. - Éste es el final.-  Repeat: This is the end. Things are never clear. - Las cosas nunca están claras. - Repeat: Things are never clear. What did you do? - ¿Qué hiciste? ­- Repeat: What did you do? "Suck the prawn's head." (or "the head of the prawn") - Chupa la cabeza de la gamba. - Repeat: "Suck the prawn's head.", or "Suck the head of the prawn") Good, now I'll read some Spanish sentences and you translate to English. Then repeat the sentences after me to practise your pronunciation. OK? Llevan tres meses casados. - They’ve been married for three months. Repeat: They’ve been married for three months. Antes había más gente aquí. - There used to be more people here. Repeat: There used to be more people here. Estos resultados son un poco mejores. - These results are a little better. Repeat: These results are a little better. Las corbatas no son necesarias. - Ties aren’t necessary. / Ties are unnecessary. Repeat: Ties aren’t necessary. Ties are unnecessary. ¿Hubo tormentas? - Were there any storms?  Repeat: Were there any storms?  Well, that's all we have time for on this podcast, but we'll be back with you next month as usual with another podcast based on our monthly newsletter, our cuaderno de inglés mensual. Remember, you can listen to all our previous podcasts at mansioningles.com and on iTunes. Si te gusta este podcast, puedes hacernos un gran favor y escribe por favor una corta reseña en iTunes. Si escibes una reseña en iTunes más personas pueden escucharnos porque subimos en el 'ranking' de iTunes. y también puedes darnos algunas estrellas, si te gusta nuestros podcasts. Thank you very much for listening to this podcast, and for being part of the community of La Mansión del Inglés. Remember, If you want to contact us you can find us on Facebook. Just search Facebook for La Mansión del Inglés and join our growing community of fans. Or send me an email to: mansionteachers@yahoo.es. You can also follow us on Twitter. Our Twitter name is MansionTwit. Puedes ver el cuaderno mensual de este mes, y todos los cuadernos anteriores en www.cuadernodeingles.com/ Until next month then, keep practising and taking your English to the next level! Take care and bye for now!   The music in this month’s podcast is by Revolution Void, the album is The Politics of Desire and the track is called Outer Orbit.                                            

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  • Avoid Leadership Burnout with Outsourcing Staff

    · 00:47:04 · The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

    Nathan Hirsch is the CEO of FreeeUp.com and the COO of Portlight. Nate has been an entrepreneur in the eCommerce industry since 2009 and has grown into a leading expert in the field with experience managing multi-million dollar businesses. He has extensive knowledge in creating business systems and processes, personnel management, hiring remote workers, the Amazon Marketplace, and advanced sales tactics. He is passionate about sharing his knowledge with others and has been featured on leading industry podcasts, webinars, and blogs. Nate is determined to build FreeeUp into the top hands-on platform for hiring remote workers where thousands of businesses and remote workers are connected. If you're interested in connecting with Nate, shoot him an email at Nathan@FreeeUp.com. The Transcript NPC Interview with Nathan Hirsch – 6/13/17 Hugh Ballou: Greetings, everyone. This is the Nonprofit Chat. Tonight’s guest is Nathan Hirsch. I just met Nathan a month ago. I was smart enough to recognize this guy had talent, so I am giving myself credit for that. I posted a little information about you, and I’d prefer for guests to give us a synopsis of what brings you to this discipline that you do so well. I’d like to say your company is called Freeeup.com, and it’s an outsourcing company. The reason I wanted you on this series is because I see so many people who are working at the leadership level that are overfunctioning and doing way too much. We are going to talk about how to leverage time by putting in part-time employees. Nathan, speak a little bit about your journey and why you are so good at what you offer. Nathan Hirsch: It’s funny. When I first talked to you, I was like, “My mom owns a nonprofit.” I’d seen her journey from being a one-woman show to finally retiring and upgrading the location she was at, having a huge staff, taking more and more off her plate. I got that business, entrepreneurial, delegating mentality from a very young age. When I was in college, I started a textbook business trying to cut off the school bookstore because I was mad at them for ripping me off and giving me pennies on the dollar when I thought I could get more. Before I knew it, I had lined my college dorm room buying people’s books. That led me to Amazon.com because you don’t sell books for very long without learning about Amazon. Before I knew it, I was running this multi-million-dollar drop-shipping business on Amazon, working with all these different vendors and suppliers, selling stuff out of my college dorm room. It was just me doing everything, from filling orders to answering customer emails. I was driving myself crazy. I was going to college at the same time, trying to have good grades, trying to balance a girlfriend and a million other things that happen while you are at school. I remember going to my accountant one day, and he was like, “So, when are you hiring your first employee?” I was like, “Why would I do that? I don’t want to give my money to someone else. I really enjoy what I’m doing. This is fun. I am going to work seven days a week.” He just laughed in my face. After that meeting, I quickly got to hiring. I opened up an office and moved stuff around. I ended up getting rid of that and making my company remote. I always ran into hiring dilemmas because I would make really good hires, things like Connor, who was my business partner for a long time. But then I would make bad hires, who cost me time and money and set me back. Although I got better at hiring, the amount of applicants got greater and greater because I was hiring for all these different things. Yes, I perfected this hiring process, but then I found myself in the interview room six hours a day interviewing people, going through multiple rounds and resumes, only to find that some of them, even though I’d vetted them properly, still didn’t work out and cost me money. So I got really frustrated at that and thought there had to be a better way. There had to be a company where I could tell them what I wanted—if I needed a graphic designer, I don’t want to wait three weeks to get one by vetting through fifty applicants. This is what I need, and I could get them by the end of the day. This is how I came up with the idea of Freeeup, where instead of the marketplace being a free-for-all, it is very organized. People apply to get into the marketplace, they are heavily vetted, we make sure they have a good attitude and communication, and we make them available to clients so they can get access to talent quickly, no matter what it is. Hugh: I love it. Our co-host, Russell Dennis, has joined us. Russell, say hello to Nathan. Russell Dennis: Good afternoon. Good to meet you, Nathan. I love the concept of Freeeup and pre-vetting virtual assistants because they are practically everywhere. I have just had that one follow me on my Twitter feed who looks like they are doing the same thing or something similar. These agencies are starting to turn up, but I haven’t seen anything quite like what you are doing before. Nathan: Thank you. Great to meet you as well. You’re right. There are so many different agencies and marketplaces. I have hired from all of them. I kind of took what I liked and what I hated and put together a concept that really works for business owners. The downside of agencies is you never know who is doing the work. You don’t get that one-on-one touch. A lot of times they switch people behind the scenes and you don’t know about it, so the quality goes up and down. The problem with the marketplace is the time and effort it takes to get a good freelancer, and if you invest the training and they decide to quit, there is no one held responsible for that, and you have to start right over. With Freeeup, we have our no-turnover guarantee, where we cover replacement training costs if anyone ever quits. That was the concept behind it. It has been a lot of fun so far. Hugh: Having run multiple businesses and church programs and non-profit programs, hiring people is not a skillset that I had. I have it now. Previously, I had a lot of bad hires. You have come at this very early in your life. You have developed this level of expertise. Russell has worked inside a non-profit for 11 years. He also worked for the IRS, so he had to visit a lot of nonprofits, I guess. This whole thing of accomplishing our mission is very elusive, and we are so passionate about it that we just jump in and forget that in this realm of the charity, there are people who will step up as community leaders and work with us. They will say, “I want to help.” There are some tasks that we need to have somebody who is paid, that regular work ethic that someone will do what we have assigned them. There is an exchange of value for pay. We can do that in a charity, actually delegating some things. Part of what we teach at SynerVision about leadership is learning to take things off of your plate. I guess the piece that you just talked about is having the confidence that the person is going to be capable of accomplishing it. We invite people who have businesses and expertise. We are talking about Freeeup, which is Nathan’s business. The people that referred Nathan to me were our friends in Phoenix who do the background checks, former military intelligence people. If they said he is clean, it’s good. Nathan, we have to get over this fear of having somebody else do the work. From a leader’s perspective, I have noticed you have a team around you that performs at a pretty high standard. Speak from your own personal perspective. How were you able to make the transition to getting things off of your plate, delegating them? Nathan: Sure. Whenever you talk about delegating, you have to be in the mindset that the business has to work for you. You can’t work for the business. If you find yourself trying to catch up and clearing out customer emails and calling everyone back and doing this Excel project and building the website, the business isn’t working for you; you are working for the business. You have to get out of that mentality. You have to get into the mentality that you are a delegator as the owner of the company. There should be a specific thing, or a few things if you are very talented, that you are really good at, that your core competency can really help you excel at. You need to identify those things. If you are good at sales, 80% of your time should be sales. If you are customer service, you should be building customer service programs. If you are a website developer, you should be constantly upgrading your website, and other people should be doing those other things. It’s really important that you get into the mentality that the beginning of every day is getting your team organized before you get yourself going. The first thing I do every day is I have a list of people and prioritize them. I go to them one by one, following up with what they are doing, making sure they are on the right track, making sure I answer any of their questions to get them to the next level because if they are sitting there waiting, that is incredibly unproductive. I am not going to start on my project because I get them going. On top of that, I make sure things are constantly running at full speed, whether it’s someone working at night or someone working on the weekends. Even when I am on vacation, the business is not going to stop. My whole thing as a business owner is to get into the mentality that I have to get this train running. It takes a lot of organization upfront to build that team, which we will talk about, but the end goal is to have a team that never stops, that keeps moving forward whether you are there or not, and that you are contributing value when you are there to keep them moving further and further along. Hugh: We think, and I’m saying we because I am not innocent of any of this, we are essential to the work of the organization when in fact, we don’t need to be essential. We are the cheerleaders; we are the visionaries. It’s the people we bring on board that actually perform the duties that are important to the success of the organization. That thing you just talked about is a paradigm shift. Did you have to make a paradigm shift to make a mental flip that you were going to learn to delegate? Or did that come easily to you? Nathan: I came easier to me than it did to my business partner Connor. I remember when I first started delegating after that meeting with the accountant, it becomes addicting. I am a business owner. I am passionate about what I do. I like getting things done. All of a sudden, when I added a few people, I realized I was getting four times the amount of work done, and not only that, but they were doing the work better than I could even do it. They were talents that I didn’t have. When I realized that, then it became easy. You almost become lazy as a business owner because it’s like, “Yeah, I could spend the next three hours doing Quickbooks, or I could pay someone $40 to do it for me.” You just start passing stuff off your plate. You get a lot more done, which leads to more revenue and expanding your company, which leads to hiring more people. It is a really great circle once you get those wheels churning. But I remember my business partner Connor managing the company one day when I was on vacation, and he was literally doing everything. Every single tracking email at my Amazon business, he was responding to. When I came back from vacation, I sat him down and said, “You’re stuck. If this is how you want to do business, you are never moving forward. You can’t be my business partner. You are just going to be in this spot forever. There is no way to be on top of your business if you are doing every little thing. You have to take stuff off of your plate. You have to get over that fear of letting go. It’s not until you actually do that that you can accomplish something as an entrepreneur. No matter how big or small your business is, you are going to hit a ceiling, a road block. Right now, if you get sick for two weeks—I had shoulder surgery a month ago. Nothing stopped, things accelerated. I got my team motivated to work because I wasn’t there, and a lot of stuff got done while I was out. You have to look yourself in the eye and figure out if that is going to happen in your business while you are out. Hugh: David James Dunworth says, “The real measure of a successful leader is that the operation operates as or more effectively and smoothly when the boss is not there. I call the job of establishing systems and processes to get that point is owner-proofing.” That is getting out of the way, isn’t it. Owner-proofing. We have launched some questions during the interview. You sent me some good questions, and we are sharing them out there on social media. The first one: What would you do if you had two extra hours each day? Russell, what would you do if you had extra time every day? Russell: Two extra hours. I would probably be outside walking. Definitely would be outside. It’s not a cloud in sight. It’s about 82 degrees here. That is what I would be doing. I took a break today to walk outside and get around. I love the fresh air. I made a decision to get in a really good condition this spring. I made major changes to my diet. From my last doctor’s appointment about five weeks ago, I am down 27.5 pounds. And I am sleeping better. Hugh: Wow. I was with a client today, and they had a management team of about 14 people. They were talking about one of the aspects of one of the department’s work, and they were streamlining and automating. They estimated it would save 3.5 hours a day of the employees, which totally revamped how they were going to assign duties in that department, which is huge. They are installing some automation, which frees up people with a higher level of skill from doing something routine to utilize that skill. Nathan, what would you do with two extra hours if you had them? Nathan: I think that’s the difference between running a lifestyle business and trying to get back toward that lifestyle versus a workaholic. For me, when I am freeing up time, which I am constantly doing because I get more and more on my plate, I am just freeing up my time to focus on some other part of my business. I like working ten hours a day, and I am doing that no matter what. If I free up three hours, I may take an extra day off here and there, but I am reinvesting it back in the company. That content video that I didn’t have time to make, now I have time for it. That PR company that I never called back, let’s give them a phone call. For me, I am freeing up time to get more time in my business that focuses on sales, marketing, and expansion. If I am not doing something that focuses on sales, marketing, and expansion, my business is stalling. I am not moving forward as fast as I can. I owe it to the other people on my team to do that. We have all been around that boss where all they do all day is walk around and look over your shoulder. My mentality is if you are doing that, you are not doing what you are supposed to do as a leader. You are not progressing anything forward. You are not making a process better. You are not fixing anything for the future. And you are definitely not growing and expanding your company. Yes, there is a time and place to double-check work and make sure everything is going well, but the goal should be to free up your time for anything that involves expansion. Hugh: Why do you think that it’s so hard for people to do that? Nathan: Expanding is hard. Get to a point in your company that you are comfortable. You are making money for the first time. You have a stable client base. Anything past that is unknown territory. What happens if you invest in advertising here? What happens if you do 20 phone calls for lead generation and you get rejected 20 times? People don’t want to do what it takes to get to that next level of your business. You eventually stall out. There are people who are very comfortable running a $1 million company or a $4 million company instead of being like, “Hey, every year, I want to grow non-stop. Yes, I am setting goals and guidelines, but if I didn’t get bigger from year to year, I did something wrong that year. I am too involved, or I made a bad decision, or I wasn’t focused on expansion.” A lot of it is fear. Fear is incredibly motivating or unmotivating when it comes to people. Along with delegation, it is something you need to let go of. As a business owner, you need to figure out how to take your business to the next level, whether it is taking that online mastermind class or reading a new book or trial and error, which I am a huge fan of. Figure out a way to free up your time to take the business to the next level. Hugh: I’d like to point out that expansion becomes easier after you get older and your metabolism slows down. Not what you were talking about, I don’t think. Russ, do you want to piggyback on what he just said? That is so aligned with our philosophy at SynerVision. Russell: It very much is. With that extra time for me, I was thinking I needed to take better care of myself so I can do things. Over the course of the day, if I am not learning something or out here reaching out to people or trying to grow that business, then I am in a place where I need to look at getting some of the smaller things off my plate. I have been leveraging technology. I have some people I work with here in my office who are here to help me do some things. I have been able to get more traction by connecting with other people who can help me along in my process, and that is true for anybody. The people who are clients of mine, I actually help them do that. What you are talking about is filling gaps. Those don’t necessarily have to be weaknesses. It could just be things we simply don’t want to do or are not the best use of our time for what we need to do. Nathan hit that on the head: What am I best at, and what are the things only I can do? Those are the things I try to attend to, and I try to hand other things off and find other ways to get them done. Hugh: So true. Once we can hand off things, we can focus on what we are supposed to be doing and what we do best. Really, Nathan you talked about what kind of business, a lifestyle business. When we are in business, we need to stop and look at our life plan and make sure the business is fulfilling our life. You are getting ready to go to Mexico in a couple of days. Sounds like you got your act together, boy. Nathan: Yeah, I mean I have assistants who monitor my Skype and my email almost 24 hours a day. It took a lot of time and training and investing. There will always be some frustration. You hire four people, and maybe one of them doesn’t work out. They can’t be a reason to give up. You have to learn from those experiences, come up with better systems, come up with better processes, and figure out a way to do it because your competitors are going to do it. At some point, they are going to figure out how to automate it, how to hire the right people, how to make it so their business is getting bigger while you sleep. You have to figure out a way to do that. Hugh: Absolutely. I didn’t mean to call you “boy.” I am three times your age, so the perspective… Nathan: You can call me “boy” then. Hugh: That’s right. And you’re not catching up either. The next question that we posted out there, and I did talk about the real time research that people tell me they are struggling with leadership and burnout, the Meyer Foundation did a research project a few years ago and found that the burnout rate for nonprofit executives is 45%. 75% of executives are looking at the door as a way out. We feel like we are trapped and have to do too much. Let’s flip that coin. We are focusing on burnout, we don’t have enough money or time, nobody volunteers. Let’s flip it over. If we weren’t burned out, what would that mean? What could we accomplish? Nathan: If you’re not resting, if you are burned out on a day-to-day, week-to-week basis, you are not going to have the productivity that you can. You won’t hit your potential. You’re not going to motivate the people around you. You’re going to be short. You’re going to talk down to people. You’re not going to figure out a way to take your business to the next level. The easiest way to get burned out is by doing a lot of things you shouldn’t be doing. I spent years of my life entering data into Quickbooks. I would get hundreds of orders every week, and at the end of every month, I would go in and reconcile them. It would literally take me hours and hours and hours. If I could go back, I would honestly yell at myself. It was a terrible decision. I could hire someone from the Philippines to do it for $8 an hour. They would probably have been more prepared than I was and done a better job. There were times I would wake up at 5 am to do these Quickbooks. It was a complete waste. I could have woken up rested, ready to go, on to expand my company. Hugh: We don’t call those mistakes. We call those learning opportunities. Nathan: Exactly. One more thing. When I started Freeeup and had all these clients, I started bookkeeping. The first thing I did was hire someone else to do it right from the very beginning. Hugh: Damn. That’s good. All right. Russell, what would you do? You’re not burned out. You probably experienced in your career lots of burned out leaders, didn’t you? Russell: I have run into a lot of burned out leaders. I became one because I found myself at the back end of my career working as a tribal administrator. And I had 70 employees. But I didn’t relinquish my development responsibilities. That was burning the candle at both ends there because I didn’t understand delegation. Even though I had other people there, I didn’t understand at that point in time how to hand things off. I found myself in time constraints. Everything was a crisis. I found myself overfunctioning and doing things that would have been better to hand off to other people. Nathan: Like what? Could you give us an example? Russell: Some examples there would be working on grants and trying to get those ahead in time. Working on budgets and approving other projects. I should have been able to rely on my program directors to get that done, but at that time, I was a bit of a micromanager because I wanted to do what I wanted to see the organization do well. That was a part of a hard education coming through. That was really a baptism by fire. I had to learn to do a lot of things and learn to do a lot of things other people didn’t know how to do. At that point in time, I learned how to teach other people. But the largest number of people I had working for me prior to that was five when I was in the Air Force. A bit of a shift to go from five employees to 70. Nathan: Absolutely. That is where a lot of people get frustrated, too, is that teaching side. There are two ways to go about hiring. You hire someone who is really talented and is bringing their own experience to the table to do something that you can’t, or you are hiring someone to come in that may have some kind of background but you are teaching them your system, your way of doing it. A lot of people, especially the first few hires, don’t know how to teach. They don’t know how to give that information to someone else and do it properly and have someone get the same results or even similar because a lot of times it’s worth it if someone can do it 85% of what you can. You want to take it off your plate. A lot of people can’t accomplish that. They get frustrated and think they can’t hire, when a lot of times it comes down to their teaching, how they trained them, how they integrated them, and how they motivated after they taught them. Once you give someone the keys on how to do something, how did you make sure you were getting the most out of them every day because if you did it yourself, you would get the most out of it every day. Hugh: There are also things I do okay, but I have people who can do them better than me. Once I can back off of that and accept they are going to do it differently, the responsibility rests on the leader to identify the ending point. What is the outcome? What does it look like specifically? We are there to mentor people. There is a huge difference from micromanaging to mentoring, to empowering people. Let’s talk a bit about equipping ourselves as leaders. Suppose we want to free up and got a really good person to do some administrative assistance. The responsibility is on the leader to have a really good plan so that when someone comes in, we can define the quantifiable outcomes. As you are working with leaders who haven’t been successful or are new at having someone else to delegate things to, what kind of advice do you give them as far as being able to quantify the end result and empower anybody, your people or others, to accomplish those goals? Nathan: Sure. The first thing you have to understand is that no matter who the person is, you need them more than they need you. They can go out and get another job. You are the one who is investing training, resources, and your own time, which is invaluable. You are the one who is putting it all in. You have to be the one to get out of it. You go into it talking down to someone or being mean or not with a positive attitude, and you will get burned in the end, not them. They will walk away being like, “This boss was terrible. I hate him. I’m going to get a new job.” That’s step one. Step two is identifying what you want. What are your goals? What are your expectations? I see so many clients who will give someone an assignment and just walk away and go back to exactly what they were doing without outlining any goals or expectations. The worker, if they are good, in their mind they will look back and go, “I have client A, B, and C, and they liked it this way. I am going to do that.” If that client comes back a week later and gets the assignment and says, “This isn’t at all what I wanted,” then the worker is baffled because they have been doing this the same way the entire time, but no one set their goals and expectations. That is why I encourage our workers to not start anything until that discovery or scope is lined up. Even if the client is too busy or says, “You should know what to do,” that is not acceptable because that just leads to issues at the end. The worker has to step up and make sure that discovery happens so the work gets done. Hugh: I want to capture the sound bite. When you don’t have a clear definition of what you want, it leads to issues. We are setting up conflict if we do that, don’t we? Nathan: Absolutely. A mess is bound to happen. Yes, there are all-star workers out there who can read the client’s mind and do the job without any instructions, but the majority of the time, there is going to be some kind of issue. It will also save you time and energy. There will be revisions. Even if you are someone who likes revisions, if you just set a discovery and scope up front, it will save you a lot of time. It’s worth it. Hugh: Wow. Russell, you want to weigh in on this issue? It’s a big one. Russell: Yeah. It creates that accountability, and when the worker becomes involved, they have that accountability. Once it’s clear they understand what it is you want and you send them away, it’s like the Colombo technique when I was auditing businesses in the IRS. This is how you outsmart a lot of $500 an hour attorneys. You walk in and ask questions like a second grader until you are absolutely clear on what it is they are saying. I found that they volunteered more information. They probably thought I was the village idiot asking questions until they got the tax bill from their clients, and it looks like this guy is smarter than he looks. You want to be flexible, but you want the result. You don’t want a lot of wiggle room on that result. But flexibility as far as how to get it. You leverage that talent, and they will approach stuff in ways I would never think of. It works better for them. It doesn’t matter how they get it done as long as they got that standard that is set and they know what’s expected and they deliver, and that is what I am all about: delivering that ned result. Hugh: Just for Nathan’s benefit, he is stealing my lines. I am smarter than he looks. That is the one I use often. Last time I used it, somebody said, “That’s a good thing.” Russ, you’re so right. What is really annoying to the team members is when the boss does things they are not the expert at. If we started inventorying the things we’re good at but not excellent at, and maybe someone else should be doing it. I am sure you interview people who do it all, and it is hard to convince them that someone could do it better, save them time and money, free up their time. How do you approach that conversation? Nathan: I get to that point now where I rarely do anything that isn’t directly involved with something I am really good at. I realized it’s a total waste of time, and it usually ends up backfiring. I usually have to redo it down the line anyway. Even if I put something together makeshift that lasts me a few months. So I usually want to get it right the first time. What I tell clients is a story I have with my business partner Connor. We rarely fight; we have an awesome relationship. The biggest fight that we had, the time that things escalated the most, led to the best conversation. We were sitting out on our patio. We had been stepping on each other’s toes, and there was a lot of uncertainty on who was doing what. We found an activity online where we would tell each other what we were good at and what we were bad at. Connor was like, “Nate, you’re a bad writer.” I was like, “Connor, you don’t delegate properly.” We went back and forth on this for a solid hour until we had a list of everything we were good at and everything we were bad at. Can we work together? We noticed fortunately that we had a lot of complementary skills, as we were polar opposites in terms of skillsets, which was why we had such success earlier on. From there, it was fairly easy to divide everything. I am not going to do anything with writing, so Connor, you have the blog, the website. I’m better at talking on the phone, so I handle all phone calls. We were clearly able to divide the line, and as we hired people, we would have them work under us to where it related, where it was relevant. What I advise people to do is have an honest conversation with you, your employees, and your business partner to figure out who is good at what, and, I think Russell said this earlier, to identify where the holes are at because usually you don’t get that perfect synergy where everything is covered. You realize you don’t have a bookkeeper on your team or a developer. Those are the next steps. Hugh: I can see where people starting out in the first stages of a charity or a business need to do a lot of things. From the very beginning, especially in charities, we have all these people who want to give their time. There is an emotional release of I have to do it to feel worthy when that’s not true. You have a vision. You do what you’re really good at. And you allow other people to perform up to their highest standard and fulfill their passion. If it is worthy work, there are other people who want to join us in that work. We just have to be better at recruiting them and telling people why it’s important and what impact they are going to have in the lives of others. Russ, you might know better than I, but there are something like four million 501(c) somethings with 10s and 6s and those that are government. There is an abundance of charitable organizations in this country. Many of them have a really good mission, and many of them are compromised in that mission because of the kinds of things we are talking about here. The culture is a reflection of the leader, and as John Maxwell says in his Law of the Lid, the organization cannot grow any further than the leader’s ability to let it grow, to lead it. Finding really talented people to work around you is one of those strong secrets. If we were all to ask ourselves, “What could we take off our plate if we had someone who worked a certain number of hours?” There are two sides to this. What could we take off our plate, and what additional important thing could we do if we had that kind of assistance? There are two sides to that question. Nathan. Nathan: I always recommend starting small. Very few companies, especially nonprofits, will just start off hiring six full-time people and take everything off their plate. It has taken me two years of running Freeeup to get to that point and a few years into my first company as well. But what I did do was hire someone to run my social media page one hour a day. It cost me $7 a day. It took it off my plate. They did a great job in building that. Then I mentioned Quickbooks. Let’s get someone in place once a month to do that. So I get an entire day back at the end of every month. In the beginning of every day, I spend the first hour answering customer and client emails, so let’s hire someone to answer these emails an hour before I wake up so I can get a head start on every day. I started small with those three hires over the course of four to five months, and it freed up my time to invest back into expansion. From there, the business grew. So we just had a good month, and let’s hire a fourth person for four hours a day to do some small tasks. The beginning of the day is a little hectic for me, so it’d be nice if I had someone on there who I could just assign different papers to write or projects to do or contacting clients. I put that person in place, and I got an extra few hours every day, so I invested that into expanding my company. You get the point. That is the correct and proper way to go about it if you are a nonprofit, if you have a limited budget. If you are ahead of that curve and making money, then you can go ahead of that and start hiring people for 20 or 15 hours a week and start taking this off your plate. Have a meeting. Once you get your time back, have a brainstorming session on what you should be doing so you can maximize that extra time. Or if you are a lifestyle business, figure out where you are going to go on your next vacation. Hugh: An hour a day is five hours a week. That is 25 hours a month. That is 300 hours a year. If we just outsource something for an hour a day, that is quality of life. Wow. Russ, what are you hearing here? Russell: I am hearing that I should get somebody to do my email because the pile is growing. I could do that. I could have somebody do some of the email and some of the posting. I have some things automated. That has been my big push of late is to get some things automated. I have been doing some rework on my website and some other things are in the works. As I get more resources, I am going to get more people involved. It’s a lot of hours, and I don’t mind a lot of hours, but those hours could be spent a little better because I am still doing a lot of small things. Hugh: Aren’t we all. Nathan: A quick note on email. I have a lot of clients who notice those emails are piling up. It costs you business not to respond to emails. It costs you opportunities. You have to find a way to get on top of your email. That should be step one. Hugh, if you emailed me and I didn’t respond back for a week and a half, I would not be here right now potentially. There are people out there who respond fast. You have to figure out a way to do it. That is just one example. There are other parts of your business like falling behind on taxes and stuff like that that you have to figure out a way to keep up. Sometimes the only way to do that is to hire an assistant for an hour a day. Russell: Several times a day, I clean out my email inbox, and I don’t leave it over the weekend. I do get response to it, but the point is that I am cleaning it out, and it’s time that I am spending cleaning it out to make sure I don’t miss anything that I need to gain. It’s that time cleaning it out. Hugh: We offer these sessions to nonprofit leaders to offer some best practices and good business tips for charities. Like Russ said, you can’t help but think about yourself. I teach people that we are always working on our skills. Even old guys like me can learn new things. Nate, you brought up some really good stuff. Nate Hirsch is principal at Freeeup.com. As you see, he has a lot of energy and a lot of wisdom for such a young guy. You have done a lot in such a short period of time. Thank you for being here tonight. As we wrap up, I am going to ask you to do a parting thought for people. What is some wisdom you’d like to leave us with, a tip or a closing thought? Nathan: When you are hiring, you want to hire people that are passionate and have a great attitude about your company. If you are hiring someone—I don’t care if it’s the smallest project—if it’s one graphic design project, get someone who is emotionally involved. Get someone you can tell actually cares about you and your company. You will get a better result. You will never know when you will use someone again. You also don’t know how it will affect the people around you. If you bring someone in who has a bad attitude, even for a day, even for a very small project, that can have lasting effects on your business that can last months. Make sure you are bringing in high-quality, high-caliber people for every little thing. Just because you have something due, don’t take a shortcut and give it to someone who could ruin your business down the line. That is my word of advice. It’s something I wish I knew upfront. I became addicted—for example, I needed Excel work done, and I would hire someone who had a bad attitude but were very good at building this formula. When they were building these formulas on my computer at my desk, I realized they were interacting with all the other people on my team. And the next week was a terribly unproductive week because everyone had the mentality that Nate would go around and hire any Joe-schmo that he could find that wasn’t passionate about the company. It took me a while to get that back on track. That is a good piece of advice that I wish I had when I was hiring the first time. Hugh: That is excellent advice. Everything you said in this interview has been spot-on with what Russell and I teach. We have reframed the word “consultant” to “Wayfinder,” and we help people find the way to better leadership. Nathan Hirsch of Freeeup, thank you for spending your hour with us tonight. Nathan: Yeah, thanks for having me. Don’t forget to check out Freeeup.com. Right at the top, you can book an appointment with me and I can talk to you about your business. If you mention Hugh’s name, you get a dollar off your first worker forever. It’s free to sign up with no monthly fees. Hugh: My name is worth a dollar.

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