alex

  • Live Video: Tips and Techniques for Creating Great Content

    · 00:40:07 · Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

    Do you broadcast live video?Want to learn how to create an engaged following?To discover what he's learned from broadcasting over 1,000 live streams over the last two years, I interview Alex Khan.More About This ShowThe Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing.In this episode, I interview Alex Khan, the founder of Attractive Media, a German social media agency that helps businesses with live video. You can find him online at alexkhan.tv.Alex shares his formula for beginning and ending live video.You'll discover how Alex makes his live videos look more professional.Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below.Listen NowYou can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher.Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show:Live VideoAlex's StoryAlex started his first website in the late 1990s, back when email open rates were incredibly high. In 2005, he became managing director of Attractive People, a social network. In that role, Alex discovered what builds trust and how people behave on social networks.In 2012, Alex founded Germany's first mobile marketplace for fashion, which another company later acquired.Alex continued working behind the scenes in social media until 2015, when Twitter acquired Periscope for $100 million. After a company acquired his own app, Alex says he was curious about what a $100 million app could do. In March 2015 on the first day Periscope became available, Alex downloaded it and it immediately blew him away.Alex knew that driving engagement builds trust and increased visibility; however, creating engaging content was (and is) a challenge. Periscope helped Alex solve the engagement challenge because he could start a one-to-many conversation from anywhere at any time. Alex says it's still fascinating that you can reach so many people for free.In the beginning, Alex directed his live videos with his employee as the Periscope star. They created fun content such as jumping in a pool, which had nothing to do with Alex's area of expertise. After a few weeks, Alex's business partners shared their concern that this fun content wasn't professional, especially because Alex was COO of the company. Alex agreed that their point was valid, so he decided to change his subject matter.With 10 years of experience in social media, Alex knew people would have questions about how to use this new platform. He decided to use his expertise to help people understand how to build their audience with live video.I ask Alex to share a snapshot of his audience today. Alex says that in only two years, he's built his audience from nothing to 230,000 followers and 55 million hearts on Periscope. Through cross-promotion, Alex has attracted a total of 400,000 followers on social media. To build that audience, Alex says his experience working in social media, building companies, and training people gave him the necessary expertise, but live video technology was also a critical gateway.Listen to the show to learn about Alex's first live broadcast on Periscope.Advice for Going LiveAlex says that even after doing more than 1,000 Periscope broadcasts, he still gets nervous. For Alex, three questions spin around in his head when he thinks about going live: "Who are the people watching me? Will they like me? What will I tell them?"Alex has found that his viewers are regular people who are early live video adopters and curious about what he has to say.When you provide something that's valuable, Alex believes people will like you. He says the key is to educate, inspire, or entertain viewers.As far as what to tell viewers, Alex believes people watching live video are always interested in five topics:

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  • Ep. 12: Alex Barker - Being a Life A Chemist

    · 00:34:30 · Chasing Dreams with Aimee J.

    Chasing dreams is not an easy thing to do. There will be setbacks. There will be discouragement. There will be failure. But it’s what you do in those times that determines if you will be an overall success or not. Today’s guest on Chasing Dreams is Alex Barker. Alex is the host of “The 66 Day Experiment” and a very busy guy. He’s a pharmacist by day and entrepreneur every morning as he takes 2 hours of every day to work on his podcast, his writing, and lots of other stuff. In today’s candid chat with Aimee J., Alex shares his journey, lessons learned, and tons of other great stuff you won’t want to miss. So grab a drink and some note paper so you can jot down the inspirations that hit you as you listen to this episode. TWEET: It’s not about the destination, it’s about the journey. How is your journey going? A habit of sending Video emails to people he appreciates or wants to connect with. Alex and Aimee met at Podcast Movement 2015 and they hit it off immediately. Aimee  knew right away that she needed to have Alex on the Chasing Dreams podcast. But something that sealed the deal for Aimee was that Alex sent her an email with this simple text in the subject line, “I Made You A Video.” The body of the email included a link to the video. Aimee couldn’t wait to watch the video. Simple, but very effective. Alex learned to do that from someone who once sent HIM a video email and he’s been doing it regularly ever since. He finds that it makes him stand out and gives him a touch point with people in a way that they’ll never forget. Aimee J. is proof of that. Hear other great tips like this from Alex as you listen. A passive income stream was the wrong goal to be chasing, or at least he was chasing it at the wrong time. When Alex Barker first started trying to “make money online” he was learning a lot from the podcasts he was listening to. Pat Flynn and many others touted the “passive income” idea and Alex bought into it. He tried everything: ebooks, Udemy courses, autoresponders, you name it. What he discovered was not that passive income was a bad idea or was wrong, but that he was shooting for something that was probably more in his future than in his present. His main goal in the present was to earn extra income as fast as possible to pay off personal debt and give his family a better lifestyle. So he switched his focus and changed his actions… which is not an easy thing to do. You can hear what he did instead, and how it’s going for him on this episode of Chasing Dreams, with Aimee J. It’s not always about the destination, it’s about the journey. Alex Barker’s path toward entrepreneurship didn’t work out the way he thought it would. But that hasn’t stopped him… and THAT is KEY. Many people don’t get to the destination they assumed they were headed toward or don’t get there as quickly as they thought, and give up on it. But Alex kept going. He flexed, he pivoted, he reassessed when necessary, and he has continued pursuing his dreams even as the dreams themselves have morphed into something different. That way he’s been able to enjoy the journey every step, even the hard and disappointing ones. Alex’s journey and his perspective on it are a refreshing encouragement in the hard pushing entrepreneurial world we live in. You’ll be encouraged by his story as he shares it with Aimee J. in this episode. Resistance is real and it most often comes from inside you. There are moments in every Dream Chaser’s life when your own heart and mind seem to resist the goals and dreams you’ve set before you. It could be as simple as the urge to stay in bed for another hour. It could be as serious as wanting to give up altogether when you hit a significant challenge or roadblock. Alex Barker has a story that’s filled with moments of resistance, and his belief is that the things that makes the difference in those moments are the habits you’ve built, good or bad. Take a half hour out of your day to hear how Alex deals with the resistance in his own soul, and how he pushes forward consistently in spite of it. You’ll love his perspective. TWEET: When failure or discouragement hit, it’s your habits that will sustain or wreck you OUTLINE OF THIS EPISODE: [0:49] Introducing Alex Barker - life Alchemist. [3:06] Alex’s explanation of a video email he sent to Aimee J. [4:36] How Alex is able to wear so many hats, and why he’s doing it. [7:50] The beginning of “Making money online” in Alex’s story. [8:50] How Alex discovered that the journey he was on was all wrong. [11:21] It can be easy to get lost in the cause… and how and why Alex reevaluated. [15:06] It’s not always a destination, it’s about the journey. [16:05] Even as we fight for freedom, we’ll hit resistance of various sorts. [18:59] Resistance and the help of coaches, masterminds, and accountability. [23:03] How Alex deals with the temptation to take things off his plate. [25:08] The Rapid Fire game with Alex. [27:24] What happened to Alex in the game? [29:53] An inspiring quote Alex loves and the story of Thomas Edison and the development of the light bulb. ALEX’S RECOMMENDATION: “There is no such thing as a failed experiment, there’s only feedback.” RAPID FIRE GAME! - Category: Pies A back and forth response game based on the category chosen. The first to pause too long or give a patently false answer is the loser. Who’s going to win it? RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE: www.66DayExperiment.com - Alex’s website. Go to get your free course! Pat Flynn TWEETS YOU CAN USE: TWEET: What if you had a personal board of directors? How would that benefit you? TWEET: It’s OK to be weak, as long as you’re not weak everyday. Hear more on this episode TWEET: There is no such thing as a failed experiment, there’s only feedback ~ Alex Barker

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  • Ep. 239 - Alex Berenson: How to Write a Page-Turner

    · 01:34:09 · The James Altucher Show

    Alex Berenson had the dream job. But he was unhappy. And perhaps it even scarred him in some ways.   He switched it up. To his true dreams. To the dreams he had for himself since he was a child.   I want to do this.   First off, Alex has written 11 bestselling thriller novels. Alex knows how to get the reader to turn the page and ask, “What happens next?!”   This is an unbelievably hard skill.   But it’s not the  most  important skill when you are moving into your dream job.   I will tell you the most important skill. And Alex explains more clearly how he did it when we are in the podcast.   The most important  skill is to have this weird sort of “active arrogance”.   Here’s the gap: The best in your profession have skills, experience, and they know how to sit down and DO something every day.   The beginners: they WANT to do something. They PLAN to do something. They SAY they will eventually do it. They THINK they have the skills they need.   But they never do it.   The ones who succeeed. They have the arrogance to think they can just simply sit down and do it. .Despite not having the skills. Despite being total amataurs. They simply sit down and DO IT.   By doing it, you LEARN the skills, you DO the job [a first novel in Alex’s case], and you get better.   DOING is the only way to succeed. Most poeple stop before this point. Alex didn’t.   And thank god. Because his 11 bestsellers have been lifesavers for me. A way for me to dream. A way for me to escape.   Here’s how Alex did it: [6:25] - Create your own universe   “In 2003 and 2004, I went to Iraq for the paper,” he said (he worked at The New York Times). “The war had ended, supposedly… we deposed Saddam. Most reporters go during the ‘active phase,’ so The Times said any cub reporter could put their hand up and go. So I put my hand up.” Then he came back and realized he had stories. And John Wells was born. Alex has written 11 bestsellers. All page-turners. I wanted to know what made him start writing thrillers. I’ve always thought of writing fiction. I still wonder if that’s what’s next.   Here’s what he told me, “In my universe, nobody lies to me. They can lie to each other, they can even lie to themselves, they cannot lie to me.” [11:00] - Some luck goes unnoticed   “Coming back to the states was a shock,” he said. “The wastefulness of this country really smacks you when you’ve been away for a while, certainly in a place like that.”   “What do you mean? What’s an example?”   “I think the example that struck me is the electrical grid.”   We take it for granted that the lights go on. And then use them like crazy. I live in NY. The lights are always on. It doesn’t matter what time. And I never think about it. “American is a place of abundance,” Alex said. “I guess that’s a good thing. It’s better to be rich than poor but realize that 80% of the world is never going to live in conditions anything like this. It really does just smack you in the face to realize how lucky we are and how little we realize that.” [12:00] - Choose yourself I asked Alex if he thinks we’re becoming complacent as a society. “Thats a real fear,” Alex said. There are two sides. One side is if you give people everything will they stop wanting to work? Will they say they have enough. And give up.   But then the other side is you work so hard and go nowhere. “The flip side of that is if you make the system so unfair that nobody believes hard work can get you ahead, they’re not going to work either.”   And I think that’s why work should be more than a paycheck. There has to be a vision. And following that vision is how you choose yourself.   [15:00] - Have a little arrogance   Alex said a lot of reporters want to write novels. He was one of them. But there’s something that separates those who write from those who don’t...   “I did something arrogant,” he said. “I wrote a novel.”   So I wondered if that’s part of the formula? Do all novelists have some arrogance to write something totally made up and think other people will want to read it?   “Of course,” Alex said. “Are you kidding? It’s the craziest endeavor. ‘I’m going to create this world with these fake people and I want you to believe they’re real. And I want to make them come alive for you.’” [17:17] - Finding aspects of you I’m curious about the characters. Like dreams, where do they come from? Is it a manifestation of yourself? Of people you know? And who leads the story? Is it the writer? Some writers say the characters are so strong psychologically that they lead the story.   Alex got his answer from his wife. She’s a psychiatrist. She says John Wells is a projection of Alex’s most idealized version of himself. “He’s strong, he’s very capable, he’s so tough. Women love him, men fear him, sheep want to be with him, ya know he’s tortured because he’s committed all this violence over the years, but he’s essentially a good guy.”   I wonder what it would be like to create my own universe and then ask a doctor to read into me. But I only know what I create if I start creating.   [19:22] - How do you survive? His books are 400 pages each. And that’s before everything gets cut down and reformatted. He used to write before work. Now it’s his full time job.   “So how do you survive? How do you sit through it?”   “Writing the books is mentally painful,” he said. “I make the characters suffer. Because I’m suffering.” [26:13] Who’s your hero?   I wanted to know more about Alex’s hero. He could’ve made the everyman. But instead he chose a spy, someone who in danger. Maybe it’s a reflection of who we want to be. Someone with real freedom.   Alex said. “When you have nothing to lose, when you don’t care if you live or die, you have incredible freedom.”   Alex doesn't have that freedom. He told me how he was almost kidnapped in Iraq. “People thought I was spy,” he said. ““I had a very close call. I mean everyone has a close call, but I had a very close call”   “What was your close call?”   “Ya know, I don’t like to talk about it.”   I couldn’t let this go. When someone comes on my podcast, I have one chance to ask them everything I want to know.   “Could we please talk about it?”   “I found a notebook that a Shia fighter kept… It was just a tiny green notebook. It was in the rubble of a building. And I took it.”   “They saw you pick it up?”   “No… I was dressed like a local. I had a goatee. I had my haircut shorter, but no one was going to be fooled into thinking I was Iraqi. No one who REALLY looked at me. And I didn’t speak arabic”   People got suspicious of him.   “The question was, ‘What are you doing? Why do you look like this? Why are you trying to pass… you’re not one of us. And once that happened, it just spiraled.”   “So you reached a point where you got scared,” I said.   “Oh, no no no no. It was much worse than that…”   [34:16] - Get stories I wanted to know how Alex got back home. He was detained. And almost martyred.   These experiences lead to his novels. Now, he had stories to begin fueling the John Wells series.   [43:34] - Write everyday People ask Alex how he gets his inspiration.   “I have a mortgage to pay and I have a contract. I can’t wait for inspiration.” He says he makes progress everyday.   [44:30] - How do you get people to turn the page? Alex turned the tables. He asked if I wrote a page-turned.   The answer’s no. I tried. I’ve tried for 20 years. He said one key is to let people read your work. I’ve never let anyone read my fiction. I want to know the beats.   We broke them down.   “I’m kind of the wrong person to ask about structure,” he said. “My books violate the normal structure of genre fiction.”   But I find this is true with all peak performers. They can’t explain how they do so well. It comes natural to them. So getting into the finer nuances takes effort.   I dug. And here’s what I found…   [54:54] - Finding structure In the beginning, the main character is involved in something bad Then he solves it And he’s given a grace period of relief Then he goes through something worse… Alex said, “You have to have a mission and within that mission there has to be sub-missions.” It could get worse. “It depends,” Alex said. Sometime the main character gets help from somewhere else or a clue is revealed. Anything can happen.   [58:20]  - They key to a great ending... Eventually it ends… But here’s the key. You need a cool solve.   So I asked, “What’s a cool solve?” This is another great example of an expert knowing his craft better than the inner workings of that craft…   We went through a ton of examples. And finally landed on this:   You have to build. “For Wells, there’s always tensions. Your always asking, ‘How far will this go?’ You just got me to explain it better,” Alex said.

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  • 触不到的恋人 The Lake House · 主播永清,潇雨 NO.107

    · 为你读英语美文

    关注微信公众号:为你读英语美文,获得更多图文资料关注新浪微博:为你读英语美文,和我们交流互动主播:潇雨,永清文稿:《触不到的恋人》The Lake House 台词录制地点:湖南,北京为你读英语美文的主播们生活在世界各地,或许,我们的生活没有什么交集,但我们却有一个共同的约定:每周三,在电波里和你相遇。今天,潇雨在湖南,永清在北京,隔空为你讲述一个关于等待的故事,故事里有一座Lake House和一对触不到的恋人。一位建筑师与2年后的一位女医生相遇了,他们的爱情通过屋外的神奇信箱互相传递信件中萌生,时空交错成就了一段刻骨铭心的凄美爱情故事-《触不到的恋人》这是一期难度很大的节目,为了录制节目,潇雨和永清又重新刷了好几遍电影。潇雨对照电影,敲下每一句台词,永清把录制好的音频,切分成几十个片段,结合电影,花了三个晚上进行后期制作。然而,最考验默契的,是潇雨和永清怎么样在不同的地方和时间录出对话的效果。戴上耳机,跟随潇雨和永清来到the lake house, 我们也希望看到你的留言和评论哦。场景一:女医生Kate Forster因为工作繁忙,搬离了郊外的河边小屋。临走时她在信箱里放了一封信,希望下一位住客能帮忙处理信件。不久,她来到了旧址,发现信箱里面有一封来自建筑师Alex Wyler的来信,信一封接着一封。原来他们所处的年代相差了两年,他们惊讶之余也成为了对方的笔友。Kate: Dear new tenant, welcome to your new home. As the previous tenant, let me say…I hope you like here as much as I did. I filed the change of address with the post office, but you know what a crapshoot that can be. So if anything slips through, would you do me a favor and forward my mail? I’d appreciate it. My new address is below. Thanks in advance. PS. sorry about the paw prints by the front door. They were there when I moved in.Alex: Dear Ms. Forster: I got your note…and I’m afraid there must be some kind of misunderstanding. As far as I know, the lake house has been empty for several years. Maybe your note was intended for the Sandburg house down the shore, since no one has lived in this house for years. But I’m curious about the paw prints.Kate: Dear Mr. Wyler, I’m very familiar with the Sandburg cottage…and I can guarantee I never lived there. So let me try again. I used to live at the lake house, then I moved. Now I lived at 1620 North Racine in Chicago. I’d appreciate it if you would forward my mail if you get any. Oh, by the way, it’s 2006.Has been all year, ask anyone.Alex: 2006? What does she mean 2006?Dear Ms. Forster, I went to 1620 North Racine, and it’s not there. It’s just a construction site. From the pictures it looks nice, but not for another 18 months. What am I missing here? Maybe you got the address wrong, because you got the date wrong too. How is this possible?Kate: Impossible I know. Not possible…but it’s happening. Maybe we should introduce ourselves properly.场景二:Kate和Alex开始通信,并互相介绍,他们讨论2年后的世界是什么样子,并惊讶地发现,他们养的居然是同一条宠物狗-Jack. Kate: I’m a doctor, dedicated to curing the sick. At least, trying to.Alex: I’m a architect. I like to build. And while I wouldn’t say my current project is ideal, it allows me to be here, in this place, and that’s enough for now. But tell me something, if you’re working in a hospital in Chicago now, where were you before, in my time?Kate: Two years ago, in your time, I was working in internal medicine in Madison.Alex: Tell me about the future. What’s it like in the years 2006?Kate: I’m afraid the world’s pretty much the same. Of course, we all dress in shiny metal jump suits and drive flying cars...and no one talks anymore because we can read each other’s minds. But the...the truth is, man from the past, not much has really changed in 2006. Speaking of the past, I’ve been thinking of the paw prints. How is this possible?Alex: Well, I think we have the same dog.Kate: Oh, yeah? What’s yours like? According to the vet, mine is eight years old in my time, eh...six in yours. She is skinny, has sad eyes, snores, and sleeps like a person. I don’t know why, but I call her Jack.Alex :( to the dog) Hello, Jack.场景三:Kate忙于工作,很久没有回信,收到回信的Alex开心不已。Kate: Sorry I haven’t made it to the mailbox lately. It’s been a long week. All night shifts.Alex: Good to hear from you. I thought you left me. You should know that you’re my only connection to the future. How come we never talk about the things we like?Kate: Well, let’s see. Reading the classics to Jack.Alex: Who’s his favorite?Kate: Dostoyevsky.Alex: For me, this city, on a day when the light’s so clear…that I can touch every detail, every brick and window in the buildings I love. Okay, your turn. Favorite things.Kate: Where to start? Okay. When I smell the flowers before I see them. When it starts to rain just as the picnic is ending. And I love the smell of Jack’s paws.场景四:两人讨论Kate最喜欢的书 Persuasion by Jane Austen(简·奥斯丁的《劝导》)Alex: Kate, have you…read Persuasion?Kate: What?Alex: By Jane Austen.Kate: I know who it’s by. Yeah, it’s…it’s my favorite book. Why did, why did you bring something like that up? What made you bring that up?Alex: I just… A friend of mine gave it to me recently, and I was wondering…what it was about.Kate: It’s…it’s wonderful. Yeah. It’s about…about waiting. There two people, they…they are…they meet. They almost fall in love, but the timing isn’t right. They…they have to part. And then…years later, they…they meet again. They got another chance. You know, but they don’t know if too much time has passed, if they waited too long, if it’s…you know, too late to make it work.Alex: Why do you like that?Kate: I don’t know.Alex: No. Don’t gat me wrong. I mean, it’s beautiful in a kind of…场景五:两年前的今天,Kate在Riverside火车站遗忘了一本父亲赠送的书;Kate向Alex 提议,请身处于两年前的今天的Alex帮忙找这本书。Alex来到车站,找到了这本书,却和Kate擦肩而过。Kate: My dearest Mr. Wyler, Are you willing to play a game with me? Two years ago today, I was taking the 145 train to Madison from the Riverside station and I forget something there. It was a gift from my father. If you find it, can you please put it in the mailbox? It would mean a lot. Yours, Kate.Alex: Kate, I found it. I have it with me. One day I’ll get it to you. Trust me. I know how important it is to you. You might not remember, but...we saw each other. At least, I saw you. You never told me how beautiful you are.Kate: Well, maybe you saw somebody else. That was a bad hair year for me.Alex: Long brown hair, gentle, unguarded eyes.Kate: Okay, okay, okay. You saw me. But I still don’t know what you look like.Alex: Well, why don’t we just get together in the future, and you can let me know what you think.场景六:Alex和Kate约定,两年后的明天(也就是Kate的明天),在芝加哥最负盛名的餐厅相见,但Alex没有出现。后来,Kate发现,Alex之所以没有出现,是因为Alex赴约时丧生于车祸。于是,Kate跑到湖边小屋的信箱,写信告诉Alex不要赴约,正是这封信,拯救了Alex的生命。Alex等待了两年,来到湖滨小屋,和Kate相见,有情人终成眷属。Kate: You weren’t there. You didn’t come.Alex: I don’t understand. Something must have happened. I’m sorry. I’ve got two years, Kate. We can try again.Kate: No, Alex, it’s too late. It already happened. It didn’t work.Alex: Don’t give up on me, Kate. What about Persuasion? You told me. They wait. They meet again. They have another chance.Kate: Life is not a book, Alex. And it can be over in a second. I was having lunch with my mother at Daley Plaza, and a man was killed right in front of me. He died in my arms. And I thought about all the people who love him, waiting at home, who will never see him again. And then I thought: what if there is no one? What if you lived your whole life and no one is waiting? So I drove to the lake house looking for any kind of answer. And I found you. And I let myself get lost. Lost in this beautiful; fantasy where time stood still. But it’s not real, Alex. I have to learn to live the life that I have got. Please don’t write anymore. Don’t try to find me. Let me let you go.Alex, I know why you didn’t show up that night. It was you at Daley Plaza that day. It was you. Please, don’t go. Just wait. Please. Don’t look for me. Don’t try to find me. I love you. And it’s taken me all this time to say it, but I love you. And if you still care for me, wait for me. Wait with me. Just wait. Wait. Wait two years, Alex. Come to the lake house. I’m here.垫乐:Rachel Portman - The LakehouseRachel Portman - Tell Me MoreRachel Portman - SunsetsRachel Portman - PawprintsRachel Portman - Il MareLily Allen - Somewhere Only We Know主播:潇雨,永清 | 制作,发行:永清文字及垫乐归作者或版权方所有图片源于网络微信公众号:为你读英语美文官方新浪微博:@为你读英语美文荔枝FM 搜索【为你读英语美文】收听邮箱:readenglishforyou@163.com

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  • #56 Trenne Verantwortung von Schuld / Wie du aufhörst mit dir selber zu hadern

    · 00:25:26 · Stärke Deine Stresskompetenz

    In dieser Folge zeige ich dir wie du durch die Trennung von Verantwortung und Schuld Zugriff auf dein eigenes Leben bekommst und wieder ins handeln kommst. Wenn eins der Sachen auf dich zutrifft, höre diese Folge: – Du haderst oft mit dir selbst – Du steckst in einer Krise – Du warst schonmal in einer Krise – Du möchtest gut gerüstet sein, falls du mal eine Krise hast Ich wünsche dir viel Spaß beim Hören und schreib mir gern bei Facebook, Instagram oder per Mail (Jacob@Drachenberg.de) wie du diese Folge fandest. Dein Jacob Shownotes: Du willst, dass ich auch mal einen Workshop oder Vortrag bei dir auf der Arbeit oder in deiner Firma gebe? Schreib mir gern via Mail an: Jacob@Drachenberg.de  mit den Betreff: "Workshop" für mehr Informationen Du möchtest per (Skype) Coaching mit mir speziell auf deine "Baustellen" eingehen und ein entspannteres Leben führen? Dann schreibe mir einfach eine Mail mit dem Stichwort: "Coaching" an Jacob@Drachenberg.de und du bekommst weitere Informationen Die 7-Punkte-Anti-Burnout-Checkliste kostenlos runterladen: >>>Klick hier"Gesunde Stressbewältigung"

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  • 626: Surviving Reparative Therapy with Alex Cooper, Author of Saving Alex Part 2

    · 01:15:59 · Mormon Stories - LDS

    This is a recording of my interview with Alex Cooper recorded on March 16, 2016 at Velour in Provo, Utah.  Alex Cooper, along with Dr. Joanna Brooks, are the co-authors of the new book Saving Alex.  Alex was accompanied in this interview by her attorney, Paul Burke.  We were also honored to have Tyler Glenn (Neon Trees) perform three musical numbers for us on this special night.  Audio/video from this interview can be found below. A description of the book follows: When Alex Cooper was fifteen years old, life was pretty ordinary in her sleepy suburban town and nice Mormon family. At church and at home, Alex was taught that God had a plan for everyone. But something was gnawing at her that made her feel different. These feelings exploded when she met Yvette, a girl who made Alex feel alive in a new way, and with whom Alex would quickly fall in love. Alex knew she was holding a secret that could shatter her family, her church community, and her life. Yet when this secret couldn’t be hidden any longer, she told her parents that she was gay, and the nightmare began. She was driven from her home in Southern California to Utah, where, against her will, her parents handed her over to fellow Mormons who promised to save Alex from her homosexuality. For eight harrowing months, Alex was held captive in an unlicensed “residential treatment program” modeled on the many “therapeutic” boot camps scattered across Utah. Alex was physically and verbally abused, and many days she was forced to stand facing a wall wearing a heavy backpack full of rocks. Her captors used faith to punish and terrorize her. With the help of a dedicated legal team in Salt Lake City, Alex eventually escaped and made legal history in Utah by winning the right to live under the law’s protection as an openly gay teenager. Alex is not alone; the headlines continue to splash stories about gay conversion therapy and rehabilitation centers that promise to “save” teenagers from their sexuality. Saving Alex is a courageous memoir that tells Alex’s story in the hopes that it will bring awareness and justice to this important issue. A bold, inspiring story of one girl’s fight for freedom, acceptance, and truth.

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  • 625: Surviving Reparative Therapy with Alex Cooper, Author of Saving Alex Part 1

    · 01:02:12 · Mormon Stories - LDS

    This is a recording of my interview with Alex Cooper recorded on March 16, 2016 at Velour in Provo, Utah.  Alex Cooper, along with Dr. Joanna Brooks, are the co-authors of the new book Saving Alex.  Alex was accompanied in this interview by her attorney, Paul Burke.  We were also honored to have Tyler Glenn (Neon Trees) perform three musical numbers for us on this special night.  Audio/video from this interview can be found below. A description of the book follows: When Alex Cooper was fifteen years old, life was pretty ordinary in her sleepy suburban town and nice Mormon family. At church and at home, Alex was taught that God had a plan for everyone. But something was gnawing at her that made her feel different. These feelings exploded when she met Yvette, a girl who made Alex feel alive in a new way, and with whom Alex would quickly fall in love. Alex knew she was holding a secret that could shatter her family, her church community, and her life. Yet when this secret couldn’t be hidden any longer, she told her parents that she was gay, and the nightmare began. She was driven from her home in Southern California to Utah, where, against her will, her parents handed her over to fellow Mormons who promised to save Alex from her homosexuality. For eight harrowing months, Alex was held captive in an unlicensed “residential treatment program” modeled on the many “therapeutic” boot camps scattered across Utah. Alex was physically and verbally abused, and many days she was forced to stand facing a wall wearing a heavy backpack full of rocks. Her captors used faith to punish and terrorize her. With the help of a dedicated legal team in Salt Lake City, Alex eventually escaped and made legal history in Utah by winning the right to live under the law’s protection as an openly gay teenager. Alex is not alone; the headlines continue to splash stories about gay conversion therapy and rehabilitation centers that promise to “save” teenagers from their sexuality. Saving Alex is a courageous memoir that tells Alex’s story in the hopes that it will bring awareness and justice to this important issue. A bold, inspiring story of one girl’s fight for freedom, acceptance, and truth.

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  • King of Podcasts Tells Us How He Launched 5, Made Millions, with Alex Blumberg of Gimlet Media

    · 00:22:28 · The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life

    Ep 164 Alex Blumberg, the host of StartUp and CEO and co-founder of Gimlet Media. Listen as Nathan and Alex talk about the Freedom Journal, a notebook designed for users to set and accomplish their goals effectively. YOUR $100: Remember to subscribe to the show on itunes then text the word "nathan" to 33444 to confirm that you've done it to enter to win $100 every Monday on the show. Do this now. Stop reading this and do it! Click here to join the top tribe and instantly learn how Nathan made his first $10k at 19 years old: http://nathanlatka.com/startertribelive Top Entrepreneurs join Nathan Latka daily inspired by, Art of Charm, Pat Flynn, John Dumas, Entrepreneur on Fire, Chalene Johnson, Lewis Howes, School of Greatness, HBR Podcast, the StartUp podcast, Mixergy, Andrew Warner, AskGaryVee, and the great hosts of BiggerPockets! 3 Key Points: As podcasts grow as a medium, expect to see an increase in production value and overall quality. Advertising on podcasts is extremely straightforward because sponsors can clearly evaluate how many people they’re reaching. For even seasoned veterans like Alex, creating a quality podcast can take a lot of time, money, and manpower (6 months, 100K, varied staff). Time Stamped Show Notes: 01:00 – Nathan’s introduction to today’s show 01:37 – Alex joins the show 01:49 – Gimlet is a digital media company that focuses primarily on audio. 02:27 – Alex and his team at Gimlet has raised 6 million for the business. 04:08 – His podcast StartUp generates revenue through ads. 06:05 – Alex estimates that his CPM on this podcast is higher than the average radio station. 06:28 – As podcasts as a medium mature, Alex expects them to grow in production value. 07:05 – Alex describes his 6-month process when creating a new podcast.  07:55 – It takes roughly 100K from start to finish when making the first episode. 09:18 – Alex’s old colleagues from his career in public radio have come to work at Gimlet. 10:40 – Each individual show produced by Gimlet Media generally has its own team. 13:22 – Alex uses SoundCloud to keep track of listeners for a particular audio. 14:39 – Advertising on podcasts is very straightforward and works well for Alex’s sponsors. 15:49 – Sponsors advertise in accordance to a contract with Alex’s podcasts. 17:09 – Alex makes over 1 million dollars per podcast. 19:16 – Famous Five Resources Mentioned: Growth Geeks – The way Nathan hires growth hackers on a per project basis for things like info graphics, blog posts, and other growth projects Gimlet Media – Alex’s business @abexlumberg – Alex’s twitter LinkedIn – Alex’s LinkedIn Creativity Inc. – Alex’s favorite book Mark Zuckerberg – CEO Alex follows Steve Jobs – CEO Alex follows Google Docs – Online tool John uses. Famous 5 Favorite Book?— Creativity Inc. – by Ed Catmull and Amy Wallace What CEO do you follow?— Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg What is your favorite online tool?— Google Docs Do you get 8 hours of sleep?— No If you could let your 20 year old self know one thing, what would it be?—Be more patient. Listen to The Top if you want to hear from the worlds TOP entrepreneurs on how much they sold last month, how they are selling it, and what they are selling - 7 days a week in 20 minute interviews! Join the Top Tribe at http://NathanLatka.com/TheTop The Top is FOR YOU if you are: A STUDENT who wants to become the CEO of a $10m company in under 24 months (episode #4) STUCK in the CORPORATE grind and looking to create a $10k/mo side business so you can quit (episode #7) An influencer or BLOGGER who wants to make $27k/mo in monthly RECURRING revenue to have the life you want and full CONTROL (episode #1) The Software as a Service (SaaS) entrepreneur who wants to grow to a $100m+ valuation (episode #14). Your host, Nathan Latka is a 25 year old software entrepreneur who has driven over $4.5 million in revenue and built a 25 person team as he dropped out of school, raised $2.5million from a Forbes Billionaire, and attracted over 10,000 paying customers from 160+ different countries.   Oprah gets 60 minutes or more to make her guests comfortable to then ask tough questions. Nathan does it all in less than 15 minutes in this daily podcast that's like an audio version of Pat Flynn's monthly income report. Join the Top Tribe at http://NathanLatka.com/TheTop

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  • #78 - Alex Rubalcava - “If You're Going to Be an Angel Investor... You Have to Be Devoting Significant Time to It"

    · 01:25:38 · The Meb Faber Show

    In Episode 78, we welcome angel investor, Alex Rubalcava. As Meb and Alex are friends, we start with Meb recalling the first time he met Alex over some egg tacos. Alex goes on to give us more about his background, which took him from pension funds, to dot.coms to VC investing. Meb asks for more information on Alex’s group, Stage Venture Partners. Alex tells us that Stage is a classic seed venture fund. They invest in enterprise software companies that are about a year or two old. They look for companies that have a product in the market and are generating some early revenues. This dovetails into a broader discussion of how Alex landed on being a seed-stage investor, and the VC climate here in L.A. The guys talk about what Alex looks for, the size of the investment in a typical round for him, and where good ideas come from. It's not long before Meb references our podcast with angel investor, Jason Calacanis. We received a great deal of feedback after that show from listeners eager to start angel-investing. But Meb juxtaposes that interest with William Bernstein’s idea that most people shouldn’t invest their own money. Meb asks Alex if seed investing is harder than the way it’s presented. Alex responds with some interesting points about seeing the deal, understanding the deal, and winning the deal. In short, to see the right deals, you have to be in the right places, actively participating in the community. If not, you’ll never see the next Uber. To understand the deal, you must recognize what you’re seeing. Lots of people passed on Facebook, AirBnB, and Uber, because they didn’t have the vision to see what it could be. And in terms of winning the deal, often, the really great startups are oversubscribed, meaning they might need $2M of funding, but have $20M worth of interest. So it can be a challenge to convey your value to a startup to win a seat at the table. The guys then discuss how most of Alex’s deal flow comes across his desk. They discuss incubators, accelerators, going to conferences, calling people, you name it. But at the end of the day, Alex tells us he’ll look at about 1,000 start-ups this year, but will only make eight-to-ten investments. This bleeds into a conversation about the attrition rate as startups move throughout the funding process. As you’d guess, there’s a huge failure rate. The guys discuss the drop-offs through the various rounds, as well as the major reasons for them. Meb also asks when to double down on your bets? As part of this conversation, Alex tells us how attrition rates really vary by sectors. He discusses how investors in the consumer-based sector who didn’t get in on the big dogs like Facebook, Twitter, and Snapchat didn’t see anywhere near the returns that they would have otherwise. Meanwhile, other sectors have far more companies with successful exits (just not as monstrous as the Facebooks et al) – as Meb says, “more singles, doubles, and triples.” A bit later, the guys discuss the idea of “why now?” When Alex is considering an investment, the founder must be able to effectively answer “why now?” Many times, the idea is there, but the timing isn’t, perhaps due to cost, or the market simply isn’t ready. This eventually morphs into a conversation about the three biggest risks that a founder faces when starting a company: building the product, hiring the right people, and getting the customer. Meb switches gears, asking about about syndicates and funds. Are they right for investors looking to get exposure to angel investing? You’ll want to hear Alex’s perspective on this. He tells us that “If you’re going to be an angel investor…you have to be devoting significant time to it.” He goes further, saying that unless it’s close to your job, angel investing isn’t likely to be great for most people – yet investing in angel funds might be a good answer. Alex goes on to give us his reasons, and tells us there are some great angel investing funds that are worthy of consideration. He even mentions specifics. There’s way more in this episode, including the little-known angel-investing tax benefit that can save you millions – literally… Where Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning are likely headed… A mnemonic Alex uses to sort through the hype… And of course, Alex’s most memorable trade. All of you would-be angel-investors will be feeling the FOMO (“fear of missing out”). What are the details? Find out in Episode 78.

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  • 029: Discovering Your Entrepreneurial Personality Type With Alex Charfen

    · 00:59:46 · The Entrepology Podcast

    Alex Charfen first became an entrepreneur during his teenage years and learned some very important lessons about business through early failures. At his peak of his financial success, he found himself incredibly unhealthy and stressed out. Understanding he needed to change, he created a wildly successful real estate business with his wife and began living life on his own terms.   Finally, when Alex was ready to sit down and write his own book to help entrepreneurs, he had to take a step back and ask himself, who exactly, is an entrepreneur? What makes someone want to even become an entrepreneur? This is how his book, Entrepreneurial Personality Type, came to be. He realized through all the years of working with entrepreneurs and wildly successful business people, they all had one thing in common. They were outliers. They were risk takers, and society thought they were just strange.   On this week’s episode, Alex discusses his book, why entrepreneurs are wired differently, and their beneficial purpose to society, and how entrepreneurs can use this knowledge to prosper in their own professional and personal lives.   Key Takeaways: [2:25] Alex has spent his career trying to figure out what makes entrepreneurs tick and, through that, he’s found that there are key entrepreneurial personality types that make us who we are. [3:20] How did Alex first get started as an entrepreneur? [6:15] When you read books about successful people, there are very clear distinct patterns for why these people became successful. [9:55] Life sometimes throws you curveballs. At 22 years old, Alex became a fortune 500 consultant. [11:25] At 32 years old, Alex was unhealthy and he had to make a shift in his lifestyle. He ended up opening a real estate  business with his wife. [13:00] One day, Alex decided to sit down and write a book about all the things he’s learned about business over the years, but when he sat down to write his target audience, aka entrepreneurs, he couldn’t figure out who they really were. This shocked him. He’s worked with entrepreneurs and highly successful people all his life, how could he not know who they were? [14:30] So, instead of writing about the book he had initially intended to, he wrote Entrepreneurial Personality Type. [17:00] What is the Entrepreneurial Personality Type book about? [18:00] Personality type one: The Caretakers. [19:20] Personality type two: The Communicator. [20:35] Personality type three: The Coordinators. [22:35] Personality type four: The Hunters. [23:55] The hunter group is the smallest group out of those four. The hunters are entrepreneurs. They are the trendsetters, but they’re also seen as intimidating and scary. [27:25] What kinds of differences has Alex noticed between male and female entrepreneurs? [38:45] Alex mentioned at the height of his financial success, he was at his unhealthiest. What has his health journey been like over the years? [42:05] If you’re not optimizing yourself, then you’re not optimizing your business. [46:25] What does Alex want his legacy to be? [50:10] Take this month’s quiz at meghanwalker.com/entrepologyquiz. [50:50] Let’s look at Alex’s key performance indicators! [59:30] If you enjoyed our conversation and would like to hear more, please subscribe to The Entrepology Podcast on Stitcher or iTunes. We would also appreciate a review.     Mentioned in This Episode: Legacy Facebook Group Charfen Entrepreneurial Personality Type, eBook by Alex Charfen Momentum Podcast for the Entrepreneurial Personality Type   Tweetables:   “We are the smallest part of the human species. The Hunters make up the smallest group, and the rest of the world simply doesn’t understand us.”   “They call us risk takers, intimidating, frightening, and scary. We do things that just don’t make sense and are illogical.”   “We’re fundamentally different from the rest of the world. We get up everyday and demand that the world improve.”     MORE ABOUT ALEX CHARFEN   Alex has studied greatness for decades and here is what he has found: All of the notable entrepreneurs down through history have a great deal in common with each other, and, quite frankly, very little in common with the rest of the world. They share The Entrepreneurial Personality Type (EPT) with all of its quirks and idiosyncrasies. They are a restless bunch with an intrinsic need to move and build and strive. His own remarkable entrepreneurial journey reflects that.   His professional career started at the tender age of eight. Economic factors forced the emergency sale of his family’s business, making it necessary for him to start working, selling things with his dad at a local flea market. He quickly found that, unlike the rest of the world he lived in, the business environment felt safe. He innately understood it. The exchange of money for goods and services made sense. He grew and continued to learn about commerce, reading voraciously about the great business minds down through the ages. In his teen years, he began to launch and build businesses of his own, sometimes failing and sometimes wildly succeeding. His high flying Florida real estate business became a victim of the 2008 downturn, but he rebounded by turning that tragedy into a thriving business built around helping others in real estate understand the world of distressed properties, of which there were many at the time. For that, homeowners and real estate experts are eternally grateful. In fact the U.S. Treasury Office has data that shows that Alex’s CDPE process shortened the recovery of the foreclosure crisis in this country by at least five years.    Now, Alex has turned his attention and resources to what is without a doubt the most important work he believes he will ever do- helping other EPT’s prosper and understand themselves so they can make the difference that they are intended to make. His book, The Entrepreneurial Personality Type, published in 2016, has become the handbook for his restless tribe around the world looking for answers. He has obviously struck a resonant chord with his findings and his continued learning and discoveries on the subject. He’s spoken on the biggest stages, appeared on TV and in print for major media outlets such as MSNBC, CNBC, FOX News, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Investor’s Business Daily and AmEx OPEN Forum to provide his unique views and insights. His next book, Momentum, will publish in early 2018.     CONNECT WITH MY GUEST   TWITTER: https://twitter.com/alexcharfen   FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/charfen   INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/alexcharfen/   YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/charfen-social   CALL TO ACTION   Understanding your personality type, helps you take steps forward so you can make the world a better place. Discover your personality type and share your findings in our Entrepology Facebook Group. Because when you are accountable, you are helpable.

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  • TLS #113: A huge dose of life, business & relationship inspiration for 2016 with Alex Ikonn

    · 01:09:14 · The Lively Show

    Welcome back to The Lively Show - 2016 edition!I’m so excited to be back in the host seat with an exceptionally wonderful + inspiring episode with Alex Ikonn.If you’ve been following The Lively Show for some time, you’ll know that Alex is the co-author of The 5 Minute Journal (his partner, UJ Ramdas was on the show in 2014), and his wife, Mimi Ikonn (a famous YouTube vlogger), came on the show in 2015. Like Mimi, Alex came from (very) humble beginnings, and is now living in London, travels frequently, and runs several successful businesses. In today’s episode, Alex is sharing the actions, rituals, and mindset shifts that have helped make his dreams a reality at just 28 years old. This episode is perfect for anyone who wants to learn how Alex has cultivated a beautiful, Value-driven marriage, career, and outlook on life.[Tweet "“I’m the only one responsible for my life.” - Alex Ikonn"][Tweet "“We all have a certain truth within us.” -Alex Ikonn"][Tweet "“Have a gratitude mentality as soon as you wake up.” -Alex Ikonn"][Tweet "“Your brain in a very powerful machine.” -Alex Ikonn"][Tweet "“Start believing that it is possible.” -Alex Ikonn"][Tweet "“Believe, keep believing, and keep taking actions to making that belief true.” -Alex Ikonn"] IN THIS EPISODE YOU’LL FIND OUT ABOUT  Alex tells us how he got to where he is today after immigrating from Russia to Canada to pursue a better life. He’s tells us how his parent's divorce was a positive influence on him and how gratefully he was to be raised by a single mother. Alex tells us how he came from being a troubled child involved in drinking, drugs and crime and took responsibility for his own life.   He describes the story of how his mother brought home Tony Robbins tapes and how that inspired Alex as a teenager. Alex talks about his “gratitude walk” and how that changed his mind and attitude for success in his life. He tells us once he reframed his mindset, he saw all the successful people around him only as inspiration. Alex shares the two biggest things that make the biggest difference for him and his wife's life and strengthens their relationship. He talks about the reason he vlogs and how that affects their daily relationship.  Alex tells us what his biggest resistance he has in his life and his career. He gives us advice for those seeking to fulfill themselves in life by believing the possibilities. SHOW NOTES The Lively Show with Mimi IkonnOvercoming DisabilityAnthony Robbins' Personal Power IIThe Lively Show with Brooke CastilloThe Obstacle Is the WayTheBingoTheory.com LISTEN TO THE SHOW   PS - Join me for one of my two free online Intention Setting Workshops to learn how to set Values-based intentions for every area of your life in 2016!

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  • Boost E-Commerce Sales and Make More Money with Alex Harris

    · Starve the Doubts

    Alex HarrisIn this episode, Starve the Doubts host Jared Easley interviews marketing optimization expert, Alex Harris.Alex is the mastermind behind AlexDesigns.com where he improves web stores to make more money over the next holiday season, drive more traffic, and strengthen sales and leads to maximize their return on investment. Since 2001, Alex has been doing conversion rate optimization for eCommerce websites.Recently named #4 in Top 25 Most Influential Conversion Rate Optimization Experts, Alex is also the host of the Marketing Optimization Podcast. He is also the author of the new book Boost E-Commerce Sales and Make More Money: 300 Tips to Increase Conversion Rates and Generate Leads.Plus! We have a new segment on the show called Tweet Summary. Check out Alex’s tweetable tweets with regard to certain interesting topics like quick wins and promotions.In this episode, you will learn about:How Alex got started with his podcastThe challenge of consistently putting out contentHow podcasting was a game-changer for himWhat gives you more credibilityLearning from John Lee Dumas’ Fire Nation Elite Mastermind GroupCreating his own Mastermind GroupThe key to making more money onlineWhat great things podcasting has done for AlexWhy Alex doesn’t see himself as a “growth hacker”The power of surveysWorking on his book and what readers can expect from itThe “quick wins” processThe impact of going to meetupsWhat’s so special about the podcast communityWhat conferences to go toItems mentioned:How Jared and Alex met at the WordPress meetupHis down year in 2013 - looking into personal developmentHow Jared’s podcast presentation inspired and influenced Alex to start his podcastHow podcasting helped him in consistently putting out great contentInterviewing the best people in his industry gave him credibilityBecoming the top influencer in his nicheJoining John Lee Dumas’ group Fire Nation EliteGetting feedback as the key to making money onlineHow Alex learned about marketingHow to grow your online business through getting feedbackSurveysDifferent platforms have different avatarsIn his book Boost E-Commerce Sales and Make More MoneyCreating a membership site to figure out people’s pain points in making money onlineGetting all feedback and applying them to a bookDesigned to help eCommerce site owners that have reached that plateau and breaking through it to make more moneyGoing from general to specificDifferent pages of your site presenting different strategies to increase your conversionsTweet SummaryAlex’s tweetables on these topics:PromotionsIncreasing loading speedQuick winsA deep dive on quick wins:Top pages organized by bounce rate and trafficFiguring out how to make more money out of your individual pagesThe impact of going to meetupsThe one advice that changed his lifeWordPress MeetupLocal podcast meetupWhat Alex loves about the podcast communityAlex recommends going to niche, small conferences:The Podcast MovementMichael Hyatt’s Platform ConferenceVisit www.alexdesigns.com or tweet Alex @AlexDesignsAlex’s final thoughts for the listeners:“Talk to as many people as you possibly can, because you’re going to start to realize things about your own show, about your own personality, and what people want to hear.”“Gather the voice of your audience and use that back in your marketing to help serve them better.”

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  • 647: Tai Lopez Owns 50% of $89/mo MentorBox.com, 800 Units, $80k In Initial Test for Self Help Box with CEO Alex Mehr

    · 00:24:15 · The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life

    Alex Mehr. He’s the founder of Zoosk, which filed to go public in 2014. His current venture is MentorBox, a unique and new self-help concept. Before that, he was an aerospace scientist at NASA. Famous Five: Favorite Book? – How to Win Friends and Influence People What CEO do you follow? – Jeff Bezos Favorite online tool? — Trello Do you get 8 hours of sleep?— I try at least 8 If you could let your 20-year old self, know one thing, what would it be? – “To take more risks”   Time Stamped Show Notes: 01:10 – Nathan introduces Alex to the show 01:43 – Zoosk announced to go public for $200M 02:24 – Zoosk decided to stay independent, so they didn’t pursue going public 02:44 – When you go public, you make projections about the growth rate and what you want to do financially 03:05 – The expectations from the public market for tech companies who go public are different than those who do not 03:14 – Alex and the team didn’t want the company to push hard for a quarter by quarter growth 03::50 – Zoosk was launched in 2007 04:00 – Alex and his co-founder split everything 50/50 04:21 – Alex and his co-founder have worked for 8 years and they never had a problem 04:40 – Alex and Shayan have different domain expertise and they respect each other’s’ domain expertise 05:30 – Zoosk has grown rapidly until 2014 05:36 – “But the company was not profitable” 06:40 – Alex still has his equity and is part of the board 07:36 – Zoosk is growing again 07:53 – MentorBox is a self-education self-improvement education box 08:07 – Alex has always been a book reader his whole life 08:33 – Alex would gift his friends books all the time 08:43 – 10% of the population’s primary method of learning is reading 08:50 – There are 4 methods of learning: auditory, visual, reading, and kinesthetic 09:20 – The idea of MentorBox is a subscription for business books that Alex thinks everybody should read per month 09:38 – MentorBox makes the information concise so that you can study the main concepts in 10 minutes 09:46 – MentorBox delivers in 4 formats 10:28 – Tai Lopez is Alex’s co-founder 10:41 – 7 years ago, Tai and Alex met at an online gaming conference 11:05 – It turned out that Tai reads 1 book a day 11:40 – Tai and Alex have a 50/50 deal with MentorBox 12:03 – Alex had a landing page to test MentorBox 12:19 – They had a video that explained the product 12:27 – Tai has a large social media following so he tested his ad on his social media 13:05 – In the first test, they were able to sell $80K worth of product 13:22 – MentorBox is priced at $89 a month 13:50 – MentorBox’s retention 14:14 – MentorBox’s space is education subscription 14:40 – Average retention in the space 15:12 – Tai and Alex knew that MentorBox would be a sustainable business 15:38 – LTV and CAC are both high 16:18 – MentorBox also relies on word-of-mouth marketing 16:37 – The cost per box drops depending on the volume 17:26 – MentorBox buys from distributors and publishers directly 17:48 – MentorBox is looking at getting directly from the author 18:18 – The number of books MentorBox has bought from Ryan Holiday 19:15 – The Famous Five   3 Key Points: The public market’s expectations for companies that go public are very different and can put on additional pressures that, otherwise, wouldn’t exist. Do what you love AND share what you love doing to other people. Be a risk-taker – you’ll learn more that way.   Resources Mentioned: The Top Inbox – The site Nathan uses to schedule emails to be sent later, set reminders in inbox, track opens, and follow-up with email sequences Organifi – The juice was Nathan’s life saver during his trip in Southeast Asia Klipfolio – Track your business performance across all departments for FREE Acuity Scheduling – Nathan uses Acuity to schedule his podcast interviews and appointments Host Gator– The site Nathan uses to buy his domain names and hosting for the cheapest price possible Audible– Nathan uses Audible when he’s driving from Austin to San Antonio (1.5-hour drive) to listen to audio books Freshbooks – Nathan doesn’t waste time so he uses Freshbooks to send out invoices and collect his money. Get your free month NOW Show Notes provided by Mallard Creatives

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  • Alex Rusch | Die Gründung eines eigenen Hörbuch-Verlages | Unternehmer | Marketing | Erfolg | Business

    · UNLEARNING - Erfolg Non-Konform | Der Podcast für

    EP:039 | Alex Rusch | Heute haben wir den Alex Rusch im Gespräch. Und Alex S. Rusch ist Gründer verschiedener Unternehmen wie des Rusch Verlages, des Aufsteiger-Verlages, des Alex Rusch Instituts und der Zeitschrift „Noch erfolgreicher!“. Zudem ist er noch Autor zahlreicher Hörbücher, Büchern, DVDs, Erfolgspakete und Kongress-Veranstalter. Und diesem Interview wirst du erfahren wie es Alex geschafft hat innerhalb kürzester Zeit einen Erfolgsverlag zu gründen und wir sprechen über Marketing, Unternehmer-Fehler und welche Dinge du unbedingt beachten solltest, um erfolgreich zu werden. Inhalte des Interviews mit Alex Rusch Wie Alex Rusch die Rechte an Think and Grow Rich erhalten hat was du beachten musst, wenn du dir Rechte an einem Buch sichern willst Wie sich Alex  von anderen Verlegern abgehoben hat Welchen Tipp Alex Rusch hat um seine Marketing-Fähigkeiten garantiert zu verbessern Hörbücher die auf Büchern mit Millionenauflagen beruhen - 26 Titel Was war die größte Lernerfahrung für Alex Rusch in seinen Anfangsjahren Welche Tipps Alex hat, um seine Zielgruppe zu definieren Was er gemacht hat, um mit seinem Verlag am Anfang erfolgreich zu sein. Welche Tipps Alex Rusch hat wenn man komplett neu startet Welche Tipps Alex zur Positionierung hat und welche Fehler man unbedingt vermeiden sollte Was sind die größten Unternehmer-Fehler die Menschen beim Start machen können Wie Alex seine Ziele setzt Willst du dich kostenlos zum Webinar anmelden kannst Hinterlasse bei iTunes eine Bewertung zu diesem Podcast. Schreibe wie dir die Folge 039 mit Alex Rusch gefallen hat (optional). Klicke hier und abonniere meine Facebook-Seite (optional). Schreibe eines SMS (TIM + deine E-Mail Adresse) an die 71117 (falls du aus Deutschland kommst) oder an die +491786662111 (für alle anderen Länder). Dadurch erhältst du die Folge bequem auf dein Telefon.

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  • Alex Wackii - Trance In France Show Ep 300

    · Trance In France Show

    Subscribe now to our free membership area and get access to lots of exclusive advantages (type the link into your browser) : www.tinyurl.com/TIF-registration ___________________________________________ The French Guest 01.Omnia, Ira vs Ferry Tayle & Static Blue, Arty vs Mike Foyle, Signalrunners vs Diddy, Dirty Money vs Axwell vs Mat Zo, Ilan Bluestone vs Fatboy Slim vs Mat Zo, Porter Robinson (Alex Wackii intro WTP3 mashup) 02.Orjan Nilsen, Marc Sixma vs Darude vs Dada Life - Mafioso vs Sandstorm vs Kick Out The Epic Motherfucker (Alex Wackii mashup) 03.The Thrillseekers vs Fatboy Slim vs W&W & Ummet Ozcan - Synasthesia vs WTF?! vs The Code (Alex Wackii mashup) 04.Marc Sixma & Jerome Isma Ae - Refused 05.Skytech - The Other Side 06.Protoculture, Nhato vs Heatbeat vs Joop - Liquid Logic vs The Future vs The Day Will Come (Alex Wackii mashup) 07.Orjan Nilsen vs Calvin Harris vs Ayda vs Ernesto vs Bastian - Xiing vs Flashback vs Magic vs The Thrill (Alex Wackii mashup) 08.Martin Garrix - Animals (Broning remix) + lots of vocal cuts (Punk, Tsunami, Fire Wire, Knife Party) 09.Marc Simz vs Bellini vs Snap vs Push vs System F - Forbidden City vs Strange World vs Exhale (Alex Wackii mashup) 10.Sander van Doorn - Direct Dizko 11.Alex Wackii - Match point 12.Driftmoon, Solarstone vs Pendulum - Howl To The Moon on The Island (Alex Wackii mashup) 13.Alex Wackii - Budapest 14.Daniel Kandi vs Tiesto - Symphonica Comes Again (Alex Wackii mashup) 15.Alex Wackii & L5where, Lee Osborne, Adele - Revival vs Questions vs Skyfall (Alex Wackii mashup) 16.Alex Wackii & Tomac - Montreal 17.Alex Wackii vs Armin Van Buuren - Ode To Felix Save My Night (Alex Wackii mashup)

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  • Alex Wackii - Trance In France Show Ep 250

    · Trance In France Show

    The French Guest 01.Dinka - Polarity (Alex Wackii & Julian Wess remix) 02.Mat Zo vs Adele vs Tiesto, BT, Hardwell - Skyfall vs Superman vs Loves Comes Again (Alex Wackii supermashup) 03.Jaytech,Audien vs Pendulum - The Island Multiverse (Alex Wackii mashup) 04.Rafael Frost vs Anna Lee - Ring my Bell In The Air (Alex Wackii mashup) 05.Adam Kancersi vs The Ceasers - Jerk It Orion (Alex Wackii mashup) 06.Rafael Frost vs Diddy Dirty Money - Coming Smash (Alex Wackii mashup) 07.Julian Wess, Alex Wackii & L5where vs Tomcraft - Limitless vs Loneliness (Alex Wackii mashup) 08.Alex Wackii & L5where - Switch 09.Kyau & Albert - Another Time (Alex Wackii & L5where remix) 10.Lee Osborne - Questions (Alex Wackii & L5where remix) 11.Alex Wackii - Ode To Felix 12.Marc Simz vs Push vs Tom Fall - Forbidden Stilness vs Strange World (Alex Wackii mashup) 13.Lee Osborne - Eurostar (Alex Wackii & L5where remix) 14.Moebius - The Exodus (Alex Wackii & L5where remix)

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  • El Bar : huis-clos misanthrope

    · 00:25:46 · NoCiné

    [DERNIER EPISODE DE LA SAISON 2, REPRISE DE LA SAISON 3 DE NOCINE LE JEUDI 14 SEPTEMBRE !]Dans un un bar madrilène, des habitués qui n’ont rien à voir les uns les autres sont attablés. L’un pousse la porte, sort, et se prend une balle dans la tête. Ainsi débute le huis-clos tendu d’Alex de la Iglesia, avec une belle mise en place et une galerie de personnage très intéressante, mais avec quelque chose de moins percutant que d’ordinaire au niveau du scénario. Toujours très subversif et sarcastique, la critique acerbe des médias est toujours là, la charge contre la chape de plomb que la morale fait peser sur la société aussi. Sauf que dans ses précédents films, même quand l’hystérie carnavalesque qu’on lui reproche ou que l’on admire fait partir ses films dans tous les sens, reste toujours à la fin une forme d’humanité. Mais pas dans El bar, où l’ironie finale est absente. Signe d’une pente misanthrope pour Alex de la Iglesia ? Pris au piège (El Bar) est disponible en France en VOD le jeudi 31 aout, et en DVD / Blue Ray le mardi 5 septembre (L'Atelier d'image / Condor Entertainment)Podcast animé par Thomas Rozec avec Yannick Dahan, Stéphane Moïssakis et Alexandre Hervaud.RÉFÉRENCES CITÉES DANS L’ÉMISSIONMi gran noche (Álex de la Iglesia, 2015), Les sorcières de Zugarramurdi (Álex de la Iglesia, 2013), Mes chers voisins (Álex de la Iglesia, 2000), Balada triste (Álex de la Iglesia, 2010), Un après-midi de chien (Sidney Lumet, 1975), Jorge Guerricaechevarria, Un Jour de chance (La Chispa de la Vida, Alex de la Iglesia, 2012), Action mutante (Álex de la Iglesia, 1992), Le Jour de la Bête (Álex de la Iglesia, 1996), Perdita Durango (Álex de la Iglesia, 1997), 800 balles (Álex de la Iglesia, 2002), Le Crime farpait (Álex de la Iglesia, 2004), La Chambre du fils (Álex de la Iglesia, 2006), Crimes à Oxford (Álex de la Iglesia, 2008), Muertos de risa (Mort de rire, Álex de la Iglesia, 1999), Torrente (Santiago Segura, 1998), Tim Burton CRÉDITSEnregistré le 04 juillet 2017 à l’Antenne Paris (10 rue de la Vacquerie, Paris 11ème). Production : Binge Audio. Direction de production : Joël Ronez. Chargée de production et d’édition : Camille Regache. Direction générale : Gabrielle Boeri-Charles. Moyens techniques : Binge Audio. Réalisation : Jules Krot. Générique : "Soupir Articulé", Abstrackt Keal Agram (Tanguy Destable et Lionel Pierres). NoCiné est une production du réseau Binge Audio www.binge.audio.

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  • AA Ep. 272 - How to Make 7-Figures a Year on YouTube

    · 01:01:01 · The James Altucher Show

    I think I'm in love with Mimi Ikonn. Oh, and also her husband Alex Ikonn. Don't want to confuse anyone! When I was a kid I didn't think I would be happy unless I was a "millionaire". Some kids in my school said they were millionaires and they would make fun of anyone who wasn't. I asked my dad what he was worth. He said $2. Maybe that scarred me so much that I always make sure to have wads of $2 bills on me at all times. A year or so later his company went bankrupt. So he wasn't worth the same anymore. In his mind, he was worth ZERO. For the rest of his life he sat in the living room, depressed, and listened to music. When he was a little boy he loved music and won an award. At some point we all return to what we loved as a child. I suppose that means I will return to comics, Judy Blume, and spying on people. A few weeks ago I met Mimi Ikonn and Alex Ikonn. I was insanely curious about them. How come? Because Mimi makes videos of herself, delivers real value to people, and then makes over a million a year because of those videos. I don't know how old Mimi is. She's much younger than me. She's much younger than my father ever was when I was alive. He would've liked to live her life. So Claudia and I asked Mimi and Alex if we could interview them. Because they seemed very happy also. The podcast comes out later today but here's the summary. This is a simple post. How to make a million. I am absolutely sure the same techniques that worked for Mimi and Alex can work for anyone. I had them lay it out step by step. A) EMOTIONS Mimi became obsessed with beauty and hair. She and Alex watched before and after videos of women who were getting hair extensions. "They seemed much happier after getting extensions," Alex said. "Whenever there are strong emotions about something you know there is an opportunity." So Mimi started making videos of herself discussing hair and beauty and hair products. "I never thought I would get more than 1,000 views," Mimi said. "But I loved doing the videos. And I wanted to share my love for the topics with as many people as possible." Now she has had a quarter of a BILLION views on her videos with 2.7 million subscribers. B) HUB AND SPOKE People ask: "How do I get traffic to my blog". Or "how do I get buyers of my book." or "How do I get people to follow me on Twitter." A lot of it is about loneliness. We sit in our house writing blog posts and then hit Publish. We want family to love them. We want friends to love them. And then we want the world to love them. I'm really just talking about myself. I know when people enjoy things I do, I feel as if I have a family. I'm happy. At least until the next post. Mimi loved making the videos but needed traffic. So they did the only two-step technique that gets traffic online for anything you want to do. Well, make it a three-step technique. 1) Love Know more, love more, express more, bleed more, than anyone else. Was Mimi the only one doing videos on beauty and hair? No. But maybe she put more passion into it. 2) Spread the Love Alex would take images and posts and links to her videos and spread them on Pinterest, Instagram, blogs, other sites and have them all point back to her YouTube channel. I call this "the Hub and Spoke" approach. Youtube was the hub, with a dozen or so spokes reaching out to popular sites that all would link back to the hub. 3) Make more Love No matter what you do - some will be good and some will be bad. Not every video or post is going to have views. So you do more. When you do more, several things happen: a. More people find you b. You rank higher on search c. You improve d. People who find you start clicking on your older videos so now they start to get more views. The "Make More Love" technique always works. Michelle Phan did 54 YouTube videos before she made a massive hit. Hugh Howey had already ten novels before he published "Wool" which became a massive bestseller. Clayton Christiansen applied for NASA for 18 years in a row before they accepted him. Make more love. C) 1000 PEOPLE Note she said she only thought she was going to get 1000 viewers. The number 1000 keeps coming up with people who have HUGE audiences. Kevin Kelly wrote about this in a great post called "1000 True Fans". He writes about it kk.org. He also talks about it on my podcast. Tim Ferriss talks about how every one of his posts he makes sure he's going to deliver value to at least 1000 people. Of course he delivers much more value than that. But 1000 seems to be the right number that people who know seem to focus on. Keep focusing on delivering value for a 1000 and then they tell 2 friends and so on and next thing you know you have a quarter of a billion views, five bestsellers, movies being made about you, you go into space, your own makeup lines, and on and on and on, depending on what it is you love. D) BUY LOW, SELL HIGH Alex and Mimi noticed that many of the other beauty videos were talking about a specific brand of hair extensions for women. So they went to my favorite place in the world - the mall. "We saw these products were priced at $500," Alex said. "So then we went on Ali Baba and saw the same products being sold for $100. We then went to the manufacturers and saw we could buy directly for $50. The exact same products that were being sold for $500." They borrowed from mom. Borrowed their full amount off of their credit cards. And they placed an order. Then, I imagine (they did not tell me this) they prayed. E) SOFT SELL Mimi talks about many products on her videos. She expressed a radiant, confident personality and talks about everything she is wearing, what her habits are, what products she uses. She NEVER sells anything. But underneath the video is just a link. www.luxyhair.com. The orders came in one at a time. Then 100 at a time. They sold out of their inventory, paid everyone back, and bought more. In their very first year (2010) they had over a million in revenues. Ever since then they've had more than a million a year in profits. Never once using the words "buy this" anywhere. F) QVC-A The most successful people have a model for their success. I think that's why I enjoy Peter Thiel's "Zero to One" book so much. Or Peter Diamandis's "Bold". Or Marcus Lemonis's TV show "The Profit". Each book has a different, but very very simple, model for how to achieve success or how to judge which companies are successful. Mimi and Alex developed their own model, they stick with it, and have used this simple model to keep jumping from success to success. Alex explained it to me: Q - Quality Everything they do is quality. The cameras they use for videos ("But not overdoing it, because this is YouTube and not television," said Mimi). The setting they use and how it fits their message. The products, etc V - Value Mimi is not trying to sell anything in her videos. She explains what she does and how she does it. She does the research and believes in the products. Rather than asking, she is giving. "When you give a billion dollars in value," Alex said, "you get a billion dollars or more back." C - Consistency I read a book about television once by TV mega-executive Grant Tinker. He was Mary Tyler Moore's husband, ran NBC for awhile, and then ran MTM productions producing such shows as "The Mary Tyler Moore Show", "Bon Newhart", and a dozen other super hit TV shows. I only remember one thing in the book. He said, "whenever they changed the time or date of a show, then that show would die. If you moved a show from Tuesday at 8pm to Thursday at 8:30pm then you just lost your whole audience." Mimi said, "if you are going to put out a video once a week, put it out once a week. Put it out the same day each week if you can. Don't do once a month. Don't do random. Your audience starts to anticipate and look forward to your shows and knows when to expect them." A- Authenticity Mimi only talks on the videos about what she believes in. There's no fluff. There's no pitch. She's exuberant and it shows on each video. H) LESS Mimi and Alex were working 80-100 hour weeks. They had the money in the bank. They had achieved their goals. They loved what they were doing but when you hit a lifelong goal you start to ask, "is that it?" They got depressed. Goals are a myth. Our ancestors for 200,000 years didn't have goals. Every day started from scratch: hunt, forage, eat, sex, sleep, wake up to a new day. Then we were told to find our "goals". And now everyone asks, "I'm 17 years old and feel like I've accomplished nothing in life. What should I do?" Learning to find happiness with less is true wealth. Claudia and I recently got rid of most of our belongings, for instance. Then we started cancelling most meetings that I had set up. Sometimes it was hard. I had agreed to an event and then I would cancel. Ultimately we are the sum of our experiences and not the sum of our belongings. There is nothing wrong with making money but it is only one small part of living a life of comfort, of compassion, of calm. Mimi and Alex started to focus more on the other things that were important in their lives. "And you know what happened?" Alex said. "The more we did that, the more money we made." – – – I really enjoyed talking to them. I am always curious how people made money through a channel like YouTube. Now I know and I think it can be replicated by anyone who is willing to do all of the above. I'm afraid I don't have a face for YouTube. Or Instagram. And I'm not even sure I have a face for podcasting. But I think I love doing what I do. And I like having the time to explore other interests and ideas. And then sometimes I like doing nothing at all. There's nothing wrong with that also. – – –   P.S. NOT SURE WHAT TO DO WITH THE REST OF YOUR LIFE? Great new resource shows clever way to start a business, get a new job, find a retirement career, publish a book, make extra money in your spare time, and more.  

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  • 077 JSJ Monocle with Alex MacCaw

    · 00:50:12 · All JavaScript Podcasts by Devchat.tv

    Panel Alex MacCaw (twitter github blog) Joe Eames (twitter github blog) Jamison Dance (twitter github blog) AJ O’Neal (twitter github blog) Charles Max Wood (twitter github Teach Me To Code Rails Ramp Up)Discussion01:13 - Going Rogue Video02:12 - Alex MacCaw Introduction 029 JSJ Bower.js with Alex MacCaw and Jacob Thornton JavaScript Web Applications: jQuery Developers' Guide to Moving State to the Client by Alex MacCaw The Little Book on CoffeeScript: The JavaScript Developer's Guide to Building Better Web Apps by Alex MacCaw02:44 - Monocle Alternative for Hacker News03:39 - Speed Alex MacCaw: Time to first tweet sinatra MVC Framework Synchronicity10:48 - SEO Google Webmaster Tools The Google Webmaster Video on Single-page Apps / SEO Alex MacCaw: SEO in JS Web Apps14:01 - The Social Aspect of Monocle/Community17:09 - Caching17:47 - Google Website Optimizer18:26 - Responsiveness21:00 - Client-side & Server-side25:11 - Testing for Performance PageSpeed Insights28:39 - The Design Process sinatra sequel31:44 - Sourcing.io Sourcing.io Signup34:15 - InspirationPicks MicroFormat Tool (AJ) Google Markup Helper (AJ) Gmail Markup Schemas (AJ) OUYA (AJ) TowerFall (AJ) Final Fantasy 7 (emulator) Final Fantasy 7 (PC) (AJ) Sunlounger (Joe) Pebble Watch (Joe) ng-conf (Joe) Book Yourself Solid: The Fastest, Easiest, and Most Reliable System for Getting More Clients Than You Can Handle Even if You Hate Marketing and Selling by Michael Port (Chuck) Coder (Alex) List of Ig Nobel Prize winners (Alex)Next WeekWorking From HomeTranscriptALEX:  The rain in Spain falls mainly on the plain.[Hosting and bandwidth provided by the Blue Box Group. Check them out at BlueBox.net.] [This episode is sponsored by Component One, makers of Wijmo. If you need stunning UI elements or awesome graphs and charts, then go to Wijmo.com and check them out.] [This podcast is sponsored by JetBrains, makers of WebStorm. Whether you’re working with Node.js or building the frontend of your web application, WebStorm is the tool for you. It has great code quality and code exploration tools and works with HTML5, Node, TypeScript, CoffeeScript, Harmony, LESS, Sass, Jade, JSLint, JSHint, and the Google Closure Compiler. Check it out at JetBrains.com/WebStorm.]CHUCK:  Hey everybody and welcome to episode 77 of the JavaScript Jabber show. This week on our panel, we have Joe Eames.JOE:  Hey there.CHUCK:  Jamison Dance.JAMISON:  Hey friends.CHUCK:  AJ O’Neal.AJ:  It'sa mia, it'sa AJ.CHUCK:  I’m Charles Max Wood from DevChat.TV. And before I introduce our guest, I just want to make a quick announcement. Tomorrow as we’re recording this, so when you get this episode it will be last Friday, is my Freedom Day. It’s the day I got laid off from my last full-time job and went freelance. So in honor of that, I’m putting together a video. I’ve called it ‘Going Rogue’. Yes, I know that there’s a political thing around that, whatever. Anyway, I called it ‘Going Rogue’. You can get it at GoingRogueVideo.com.It’s basically the first year of me going freelance. I’ve just talked through how it all went. The mistakes I made, the things I learned, the things I did right, and just gave general advice to anyone who’s looking to go freelance. Or if you’re interested in some of the challenges that come with that, it’s a video that I’m putting together to kind of explain that. Like I said, it’s free. You can get it at GoingRogueVideo.com. Yeah, I’m pretty excited about it. I’m also excited about Freedom Day.Anyway, we also have a special guest today, and that’s Alex MacCaw.ALEX:  How do you do? Thank you for having me.CHUCK:  You’ve been on the show before, but it’s been almost a year. Do you want to introduce yourself again?ALEX:  Well, I’m mostly a JavaScript programmer.

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  • 077 JSJ Monocle with Alex MacCaw

    · 00:50:12 · JavaScript Jabber

    Panel Alex MacCaw (twitter github blog) Joe Eames (twitter github blog) Jamison Dance (twitter github blog) AJ O’Neal (twitter github blog) Charles Max Wood (twitter github Teach Me To Code Rails Ramp Up)Discussion01:13 - Going Rogue Video02:12 - Alex MacCaw Introduction 029 JSJ Bower.js with Alex MacCaw and Jacob Thornton JavaScript Web Applications: jQuery Developers' Guide to Moving State to the Client by Alex MacCaw The Little Book on CoffeeScript: The JavaScript Developer's Guide to Building Better Web Apps by Alex MacCaw02:44 - Monocle Alternative for Hacker News03:39 - Speed Alex MacCaw: Time to first tweet sinatra MVC Framework Synchronicity10:48 - SEO Google Webmaster Tools The Google Webmaster Video on Single-page Apps / SEO Alex MacCaw: SEO in JS Web Apps14:01 - The Social Aspect of Monocle/Community17:09 - Caching17:47 - Google Website Optimizer18:26 - Responsiveness21:00 - Client-side & Server-side25:11 - Testing for Performance PageSpeed Insights28:39 - The Design Process sinatra sequel31:44 - Sourcing.io Sourcing.io Signup34:15 - InspirationPicks MicroFormat Tool (AJ) Google Markup Helper (AJ) Gmail Markup Schemas (AJ) OUYA (AJ) TowerFall (AJ) Final Fantasy 7 (emulator) Final Fantasy 7 (PC) (AJ) Sunlounger (Joe) Pebble Watch (Joe) ng-conf (Joe) Book Yourself Solid: The Fastest, Easiest, and Most Reliable System for Getting More Clients Than You Can Handle Even if You Hate Marketing and Selling by Michael Port (Chuck) Coder (Alex) List of Ig Nobel Prize winners (Alex)Next WeekWorking From HomeTranscriptALEX:  The rain in Spain falls mainly on the plain.[Hosting and bandwidth provided by the Blue Box Group. Check them out at BlueBox.net.] [This episode is sponsored by Component One, makers of Wijmo. If you need stunning UI elements or awesome graphs and charts, then go to Wijmo.com and check them out.] [This podcast is sponsored by JetBrains, makers of WebStorm. Whether you’re working with Node.js or building the frontend of your web application, WebStorm is the tool for you. It has great code quality and code exploration tools and works with HTML5, Node, TypeScript, CoffeeScript, Harmony, LESS, Sass, Jade, JSLint, JSHint, and the Google Closure Compiler. Check it out at JetBrains.com/WebStorm.]CHUCK:  Hey everybody and welcome to episode 77 of the JavaScript Jabber show. This week on our panel, we have Joe Eames.JOE:  Hey there.CHUCK:  Jamison Dance.JAMISON:  Hey friends.CHUCK:  AJ O’Neal.AJ:  It'sa mia, it'sa AJ.CHUCK:  I’m Charles Max Wood from DevChat.TV. And before I introduce our guest, I just want to make a quick announcement. Tomorrow as we’re recording this, so when you get this episode it will be last Friday, is my Freedom Day. It’s the day I got laid off from my last full-time job and went freelance. So in honor of that, I’m putting together a video. I’ve called it ‘Going Rogue’. Yes, I know that there’s a political thing around that, whatever. Anyway, I called it ‘Going Rogue’. You can get it at GoingRogueVideo.com.It’s basically the first year of me going freelance. I’ve just talked through how it all went. The mistakes I made, the things I learned, the things I did right, and just gave general advice to anyone who’s looking to go freelance. Or if you’re interested in some of the challenges that come with that, it’s a video that I’m putting together to kind of explain that. Like I said, it’s free. You can get it at GoingRogueVideo.com. Yeah, I’m pretty excited about it. I’m also excited about Freedom Day.Anyway, we also have a special guest today, and that’s Alex MacCaw.ALEX:  How do you do? Thank you for having me.CHUCK:  You’ve been on the show before, but it’s been almost a year. Do you want to introduce yourself again?ALEX:  Well, I’m mostly a JavaScript programmer.

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