gay

  • Leonard Matlovich

    · The Mattachine Podcast

    Memorial plaque outside of Matlovich's former apartment building. Hi guys; welcome to the podcast. This week, we’ll be covering Technical Sergeant Leonard P. Matlovich who was born on July 6, 1943. He was a Vietnam War veteran in the Air Force, race relations instructor, and recipient of the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star.Matlovich was the first gay service member to purposely out himself to the military to fight their ban on gays, and perhaps the best-known gay man in America in the 1970s next to Harvey Milk, who we’ll be detailing in a forthcoming episode. His fight to stay in the United States Air Force after coming out of the closet became a media sensation, around which the gay community rallied. His case resulted in articles in newspapers and magazines throughout the country, numerous television interviews, and a television movie on NBC. His photograph appeared on the cover of the September 8, 1975, issue of Time magazine, making him a symbol for thousands of gay and lesbian servicemembers and gay people generally.  It also mad him the first openly gay person to appear on the cover of a U.S. news magazine. I’ve placed that cover on the blog entry over at mattachinepodcast.com, so I encourage you to check it out there. According to author and San Francisco Chronicle reporter Randy Shilts, who went on to pen “And the Band Played On, a seminal dissection of the early days of the AIDS crisis, quote: "It marked the first time the young gay movement had made the cover of a major newsweekly. To a movement still struggling for legitimacy, the event was a major turning point."  In October 2006, Matlovich was honored by LGBT History Month as a leader in the history of the LGBT community. Early life and early careerBorn in Savannah, Georgia, he was the only son of a career Air Force sergeant. I will share with you that I’m actually the son of a career Air Force man, so I paid attention to his story, growing up.  He spent his childhood living on military bases, primarily throughout the Southern United States. Matlovich and his sister were raised in the Roman Catholic Church. Not long after he enlisted at 19, the United States increased military action in Vietnam, about ten years after the French had abandoned active colonial rule there. Matlovich volunteered for service in Vietnam and served three tours of duty. He was seriously wounded when he stepped on a landmine in Đà Nẵng.While stationed in Florida near Fort Walton Beach, he began frequenting gay bars in nearby Pensacola.  In a later interview, Matlovich lamented: "I met a bank president, a gas station attendant - they were all homosexual", seemingly noting on the significance of the encounters as something rare. When he was 30, he slept with another man for the first time. He "came out" to his friends, but continued to conceal the fact from his commanding officer. Having realized that the racism he'd grown up around was wrong, he volunteered to teach Air Force Race Relations classes, which had been created after several racial incidents in the military in the late 60s and early 70s. He became so successful that the Air Force sent him around the country to coach other instructors. Matlovich gradually came to believe that the discrimination faced by gays was similar to that faced by African Americans, and this remained his position until his death.ActivismIn March 1974, previously unaware of the organized gay movement, he read an interview in the Air Force Times with gay activist Frank Kameny, who had counseled several gays in the military over the years and would emerge as one of the gay rights early pioneers. He contacted Kameny, who told him he had long been looking for a gay service member with a perfect record to create a test case to challenge the military's ban on gays. Four months later, he met with Kameny at the longtime activist's Washington, D.C. home. After several months of discussion with Kameny and ACLU attorney David Addlestone during which they formulated a plan, he hand-delivered a letter to his Langley Air Force Base commanding officer on March 6, 1975. When his commander asked, "What does this mean?" Matlovich replied, "It means Brown versus the Board of Education" - a reference to the 1954 landmark Supreme Court case outlawing racial segregation in public schools.Perhaps the most painful aspect of the whole experience for Matlovich was his revelation to his parents. He had told his mother by telephone, dialing her one evening after much debate. She was so stunned she refused to tell Matlovich's father.  Her first reaction was that God was punishing her for something she had done, even if her Roman Catholic faith would not have sanctioned that notion. Then, she imagined that her son had not prayed enough or had not seen enough psychiatrists. His father finally found out by reading it in the newspaper, after his challenge became public knowledge on Memorial Day 1975 through an article on the front page of The New York Times and that evening's CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite. Matlovich recalled, "He cried for about two hours." After that, he told his wife that, "If he can take it, I can take it."Discharge and lawsuitAt that time, the Air Force had a fairly ill-defined exception clause that could allow gays to continue to serve if there were extenuating circumstances. These circumstances might include being immature or drunk, exemplary service, or a one-time experimentation (known sarcastically as the "Queen for a day" rule).  During Matlovich's September 1975 administrative discharge hearing, an Air Force attorney asked him if he would sign a document pledging to quote:  "never practice homosexuality again" in exchange for being allowed to remain in the Air Force. Matlovich refused on the spot. Despite his exemplary military record, tours of duty in Vietnam, and high performance evaluations, the panel ruled Matlovich unfit for service, and he was recommended for a General (yet under Honorable Conditions) discharge. The base commander, Alton J. Thogersen, citing Matlovich's service record, recommended that it be upgraded to Honorable. The Secretary of the Air Force agreed, confirming Matlovich's discharge in October 1975.  He sued for reinstatement, but the legal process was a long one, with the case moving back and forth between United States District and Circuit Courts.  When, by September 1980, the Air Force had failed to provide U.S. District Court Judge Gerhard Gesell an explanation of why Matlovich did not meet its criteria for exception (which by then had been eliminated but still could have applied to him), Gesell ordered him reinstated into the Air Force and promoted. The Air Force offered Matlovich a financial settlement instead. Convinced that the military would find some other reason to discharge him if he reentered the service, or that the conservative Supreme Court would rule against him should the Air Force appeal, Matlovich accepted the settlement. The figure, based on back pay, future pay, and pension, was $160,000, or roughly half a million in today’s money. ExcommunicationSometime in the early 70s, Matlovich abandoned his Roman Catholic faith, and converted to Mormonism.  He eventually found himself at odds with the Latter-day Saints and their opposition to homosexual behavior. He was twice excommunicated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for homosexual acts, first being excommunicated on October 7, 1975, in Norfolk, Virginia, and then again January 17, 1979, after his appearance on the The Phil Donahue Show in 1978.  But, by this time, Matlovich had stopped being a believer at all.Settlement, later life and illnessFrom the moment his case was revealed to the public, Matlovich was repeatedly called upon by gay groups to help them with fundraising and advocating against anti-gay discrimination, helping lead campaigns against Anita Bryant's efforts in Miami, Florida, to overturn a gay nondiscrimination ordinance (which we’ll be covering, in detail, on a forthcoming episode) and John Briggs' attempt to ban gay teachers in California. Sometimes he was criticized by individuals more to the left than he had become. "I think many gays are forced into liberal camps only because that's where they can find the kind of support they need to function in society," Matlovich once noted. After being discharged, he moved from Virginia to Washington, D.C., and, in 1978, to San Francisco. In 1981, he moved to the Russian River town of Guerneville, where he used the proceeds of his settlement to open a pizza restaurant.With the outbreak of HIV/AIDS in the U.S. in the late 1970s, Leonard's personal life was caught up in the hysteria about the virus that peaked in the 1980s. He sold his Guerneville restaurant in 1984, moving to Europe for a few months where, during a visit to the joint grave of lovers Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas and the grave of gay writer Oscar Wilde in Paris, France, he got the idea for a gay memorial in the United States. He returned briefly to Washington, D.C., in 1985 and, then, to San Francisco where he sold Ford cars and once again became heavily involved in gay rights causes and the fight for adequate HIV-AIDS education and treatment.In 1986, Matlovich felt fatigued, then contracted a prolonged chest cold he seemed unable to shake. When he finally saw a physician in September of that year, he was diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. Too weak to continue his work at the Ford dealership, he was among the first to receive AZT treatments, but his prognosis was not encouraging. He went on disability benefits and became a champion for HIV/AIDS research for the dise

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  • 00:21:42

    #66 - Coming Out, Coming Home: Interview with Michael C. LaSala, Ph.D.

    · The Social Work Podcast

    Episode 66: Today's Social Work Podcast is about helping families adjust to a gay or lesbian child. According to the website, comingoutcominghome.com, "The discovery that a child is gay or lesbian can send shockwaves throughout a family. A mother will question how she's raised her son; a father will worry that his daughter will experience discrimination. From the child's perspective, gay and lesbian youth fear their families will reject them, and that they will lose financial and emotional support. All in all, learning a child is gay challenges long held views about sexuality and relationships, and the resulting uncertainty can produce, for all parties, anger, resentment, and concern for safety and acceptance." So, how can social workers help families adjust to a gay or lesbian child? To get some answers, I spoke with Dr. Michael LaSala author of the 2010 book, Coming Out, Coming Home: Helping Families Adjust to a Gay or Lesbian Child, published by Columbia University Press. Dr. LaSala is director of the MSW program and associate professor at the School of Social Work at Rutgers University. He has been in practice for more than twenty-five years and he currently treats LGBT individuals and families at the Institute for Personal Growth in Highland Park, NJ. (www.ipgcounseling.com). Dr. LaSala recently completed a Fulbright Fellowship in Estonia where he investigated the impacts of stigma on Estonian lesbians and gay men. In addition to his book and numerous scholarly publications, you can read his blog on Gay and Lesbian Well-Being on PsychologyToday.com I had the pleasure of meeting Dr. LaSala when he came to Temple University in March of 2011. He gave a talk sponsored by Temple's School of Social Work about his federally funded qualitative study of 65 families of gay and lesbian youth, which formed the basis for his book, Coming Out, Coming Home. One of the surprising findings in his study was that some of the young people he interviewed "wanted to disclose their sexual orientation to their mothers and fathers because they believed that their parents could provide the support they needed to cope with the challenges of being gay" (LaSala, 2010, p. 55). Ok, so what's surprising about kids wanting their parents support? Well, until recently, it was just kind of assumed that straight parents wouldn't be supportive if and when they found out their child was gay or lesbian. Gay and lesbian children often found themselves disowned, kicked out of the house, cut-off financially, and even abused. As a result individual therapists and programs for LGBT youth focused on finding support networks (peers, friends, gay and lesbian adults, straight supporters), people who became the youth's "chosen family" who could provide emotional, financial and emergency support when biological families turned their backs on their LGBT kids. For decades it was standard operating procedure for professionals to support youth to stay "in the closet" until college or into adulthood when they could be financially and emotionally independent of their parents. So, ignoring the family seemed to make sense in 1980. But, according to researchers like Michael LaSala, Cindy Conley (whom you might remember from episode 62 of the Social Work Podcast), Caitlin Ryan (whom you can hear on episode 33 of Living Proof, the podcast series of the School of Social Work at the University at Buffalo) and others, ignoring the family doesn't work so well for gay and lesbian youth in in 2011. And it wasn't what the kids in Dr. LaSala's study said they wanted from their parents. There's a very practical reason for this shift: youth are coming out much younger than in the past. According to a 2006 study by Caitlin Ryan and her colleagues, kids in the USA are, on average, 13 when they come out. For professionals this means that you're not dealing with kids about to graduate from high school, or in the middle of college. You're dealing with 8th graders. And there's a big difference between supporting a graduating senior to stay in the closet for three months so that her parents won't refuse to pay for college, and supporting an 8th grader to stay in the closet for five to six years. We've also learned that that parental support matters to adolescents. Even though peer influence increases during adolescence, it turns out that parents and families are more important peers. Pop quiz - what's more important in keeping high school students from trying to kill themselves – parental support or peer support? Ok. I know that was a bad pop quiz because I set you up for the answer. But, just to be clear, it is parental support (Kidd et al., 2006). This recent emphasis on families is creating a paradigm shift in work with gay and lesbian youth. The importance of families in the health and well-being of LGBT youth was highlighted by the Institute of Medicine's first-ever report on LGBT health, published in April 2011. In that report, families were identified as "an important social structure." Now the kids in Dr. LaSala's study didn't need to read an IOM report to know that. They knew that their families were an important source of support. They also knew that coming out wouldn't be easy, and that's why they wanted to come out to their parents - so their parents could provide that support. The IOM report also said that families were "a promising venue for interventions." Dr. LaSala's study, Coming Out, Coming Home, provides valuable insight into the types of interventions that might be useful with families of gay and lesbian youth. In today's interview, Michael and I talked about the five stages that families in his study described going through before, during, and after finding out their child was gay or lesbian. We talked about some of the challenges that social workers face when a child hasn't come out to his or her parents. Michael gave some examples of practical and useful indirect questions that therapists can use with young clients whom they suspect are questioning their sexual orientation, but are ambivalent about discussing it. We talked about how managing stigma was a family affair. We ended our conversation with a discussion about empirical support for family-based work with gay and lesbian youth, as well as resources for social workers interested in learning more. And now, on to Episode 66 of the Social Work Podcast: Coming Out, Coming Home: Interview with Michael C. LaSala, Ph.D.

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  • Is Theresa May jumping on the LGBTQ+ bandwagon? With A Gay and a Non Gay podcast hosts.

    · The Gender Knot

    Theresa May recently attended the Pink News Awards – the first sitting UK Prime Minister to do so. These awards recognise people who have worked to improve LGBTQ plus life in the UK. Some people praised her for this and for a speech she gave at the awards, but others have seen it as a cynical move from a PM trying to look good in this community, because Theresa May’s voting record hasn’t always been supportive of the LGBTQ plus community.We try to untangle this with the hosts of the UK’s leading LGBTQ plus podcast: A Gay and a Non Gay – that’s James Barr and Dan Hudson.Host & producer:Nas aka Nastaran Tavakoli-FarCo-producer:Cady VogeGuests:James Barr and Dan Hudson, hosts of the podcast A Gay and a Non GayRelated links:A Gay and a Non Gay podcast https://shows.pippa.io/gay A Gay and a Non Gay present: David Bowie made me gay, event on 9th November at Waterstones, Tottenham Court Road http://bit.ly/2yYlq9S James Barr https://twitter.com/imjamesbarr Dan Hudson https://twitter.com/DANHUDSON Theresa May’s article for Pink News, July 2017 http://bit.ly/2hIueanSection 28 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_28 Theresa May’s voting record on LGBTQ plus issues http://ind.pn/2oJNmq9The Gender Knot https://www.thegenderknot.com/ and thegenderknot@gmail.com Nas https://twitter.com/NTavakoliFar Cady Voge http://www.cadyvoge.com/ Music: Government Funded Weed by Black Ant (used under Creative Commons)Sourpatch by Glass Boy (used under Creative Commons)

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  • 00:50:49

    235: Dr. Gay Hendricks - How To Make The Big Leap

    · The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

    Episode 235: Dr. Gay Hendricks - How To Make The Big Leap Gay Hendricks, Ph.D., has been a leader in the fields of relationship transformation and bodymind therapies for more than 45 years. After earning his Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Stanford, Gay served as professor of Counseling Psychology at the University of Colorado for 21 years. He has written more than 40 books, including bestsellers such as Five Wishes, The Big Leap and Conscious Loving (co-authored with his co-author and mate for more than 35 years, Dr. Kathlyn Hendricks), both used as a primary text in universities around the world. In 2003, Gay co-founded The Spiritual Cinema Circle,which distributes inspirational movies and conscious entertainment to subscribers in 70+ countries. Gay has offered seminars worldwide and appeared on more than 500 radio and television shows, including OPRAH, CNN, CNBC, 48 HOURS and others. In addition to his work with The Hendricks Institute, Gay is currently continuing his new mystery series that began with The First Rule Of Ten Episode 235: Dr. Gay Hendricks - How To Make The Big Leap Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio The Learning Leader Show "The money became an effortless byproduct of doing what I love" Show Notes: Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence: Openness to learning Great listener They do not waste time being defensive The makeup of insecure people who won't learn = Fear. A bug --> You poke it, it curls towards the center.  They are scared.  We have the same nervous system from many years ago Must acknowledge the fears -- "Don't try to out argue them or "out-facts" them" "Speak to your shared fears" when scared The 4 things we do when scared: Fight Runaway Freeze Space out Fear tries to take us out of the moment His story of going on the Oprah show -- "Being on Oprah was like having 10 shots of espresso" What is the upper limit problem? A point in success/happiness -- if you go past the point of it, you do something to knock yourself down.  Fears keep people locked in certain zones The 4 Operating Zones Zone of incompetence Zone of competence Zone of excellence Zone of Genius Most love to do? "Living full time in the zone of genius" Why you should start with "10 minutes of what you most love to do" -- Then continually bump that time up Making the leap -- Freedom, pressure. Stand up, walk your talk.  So rewarding, but can you make money? "The money became an effortless byproduct of doing what I love" Walk quietly and with passion... Auspicious things happen Life rewards expression of true genius Early 90's, Gay spent 30% of time in his genius zone, then 50%, then 70%, now 90% of time is spent in his zone of genius His zone of genius? "Be a model of creativity.  Explain complicated things in a simple way." Oprah called it "Learning to love yourself" Creativity - Conscious loving ever after -- How to access more creativity? Every day after 50 is a choice between creativity and stagnation. Move, play, create new ideas.  At age 65, Gay started lifting weights.  Must keep moving your body He wrote his first mystery novel at age 65 (Wow!) He just sold the mystery series to Netflix to turn it into a television series It's never too late to start accessing new paths of creativity Put your mind on how to create more Learning Leader = "Commitment to learn from the moment" "Life rewards expression of true genius."  Social Media: Read: The Big Leap Follow Gay on Twitter: @GayHendricks Connect with me on LinkedIn Join our Facebook Group: The Learning Leader Community To Follow Me on Twitter: @RyanHawk12

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  • 01:03:33

    MdS 43 - O mundo gay

    · Minuto de Silêncio

    No episódio dessa semana, bailemos ao som da nossa madrinha Madonna, embora tenha muito gay por aí que só ouve Sepultura. Nosso tema é o mundo gay e, lembrem sempre, o mundo é gay. Vamos nos aventurar com nosso Capitão Gay, Cacofonias, o Pit Bitoca, Roberto; a nossa Elke Maravilha, Manu; e, por que não, ir além da caricatura com nossos amados e idolatrados, Éric, que aprendeu a gostar de Madonna com o pai hétero; Rômulo, que é torcedor do Flamengo e Rafucko que já teve namorada.Neste episódio, você vai:1 – Aprender que as nomenclaturas geralmente não servem de nada;2 – Saber o que são ursos, lontras, barbies e outras subdivisões do mundo gay;3 – Descobrir que quem só come também é gay (e geralmente homofóbico);4 – Perceber que nem todo time de gay é tricolor;5 – Aprender que nem todo gay gosta de Madonna e nem todo mundo que gosta é gay;6 – Escutar leitura de perfil de homens que ainda estão no armário;7 –Entender um pouco melhor as relações homossexuais;8 –Ouvir histórias de saídas do armário;9 - Mandar seu preconceito ir pra puta que o pariu;10 - Entender de uma vez por todas que gays não querem ser mulheres;11 - Escutar um debate sobre moda hetero e gay e saber se ela existe;12 – Ouvir a leitura de comentários do podcast anterior.

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  • 00:25:00

    052: Is My Husband Gay, Straight, or Bi? In Conversation with Dr Joe Kort

    · The Australia Counselling Podcast

    Male sexuality can express itself in ways that may be difficult to understand to the general population. Many marriages have been hurriedly terminated when couples (and their therapists) have lacked the information they needed to understand their current situations when male sexuality is being expressed in alternative ways. Dr Joe Kort, who joined us in episode #8 speaking about gay affirmative therapy for the straight clinician, has recently written the book: Is My Husband Gay, Straight or Bi? A Guide for Concerned Women as a guide to help couples understand how male sexuality. This book provides the clarity, describes the choices, and (in many cases) offers hope for relationships and marriages that have been brushed off as doomed. In our latest podcast interview, Dr Kort discusses: What inspired him to write his new book Is My Husband Gay, Straight, or Bi? A Guide for Concerned Women Whether we can clearly differentiate sexual orientation between bi, gay and straight The four question test  he uses to determine a person's sexual orientation What the term heteroflexible means and how recent generations are embracing this new sexuality If it's possible for a person’s sexual orientation to change throughout their lifetime Advice he gives women who discover their husband or partner is watching gay porn or having sex with men The psychology of men who express their sexuality through having sex  with men, but don't consider themselves gay Whether women’s sexuality is more fluid than men, or if this is just a myth If a marriage can survive when the husband has been discovered secretly having sex with men How he works with couples when there is concern about the sexuality or sexual orientation of the male partner

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  • 00:26:54

    #62 - Concerns of parents of lesbians and gays: Interview with Cynthia Conley, Ph.D.

    · The Social Work Podcast

    Episode 62: Risk for suicide among gay youth has caught a lot of attention in the American media as of late. There have been a number of youth who have been bullied because they have been gay or perceived to be gay and who have consequently died by suicide. Dan Savage and friends and colleagues and supporters have put together an amazing project called "It Gets Better" (http://www.itgetsbetterproject.com/) focusing on the issue of youth suicide for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, question and queer teens.Now there is good reason for this. According to the U.S. Government's Report of the Secretary's Task Force on Youth Suicide, gay and lesbian youth bear an increased risk of suicide, substance abuse, school problems, and isolation because of a "hostile and condemning environment, verbal and physical abuse, rejection and isolation from [peers and family]" (Gibson, 1989). Social worker and pioneer gay and lesbian researcher Caitlin Ryan, found that lesbian, gay, and bisexual young adults who reported higher levels of family rejection during adolescence were 8.4 times more likely to report having attempted suicide, 5.9 times more likely to report high levels of depression, 3.4 times more likely to use illegal drugs, and 3.4 times more likely to report having engaged in unprotected sexual intercourse compared with peers from families that reported no or low levels of family rejection.So, here's the thing. Families who reject their kids are doing their kids a huge disservice. And that's the point of today's podcast. Today I'm talking with Dr. Cynthia Conley about the concerns of heterosexual parents of gay and lesbian youth. Cynthia Conley, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Work at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. Her research focuses on parental concerns about having gay and lesbian children. Currently, Professor Conley is investigating the types of clinical interventions used with heterosexual parents of gay and lesbian children to develop a best practice model to improve family cohesion during the coming out crisis. Professor Conley has worked with LGBT adolescents and their parents since the late 1990s, focusing on heterosexual parent’s acceptance of their LGBT children. She provides consultation to organizations, educational institutions, and service providers on working with families of LGBT children. She received her B.A. from Purdue University, her MSW from Indiana University, and her Ph.D. from the University of Louisville.So here's the pop quiz for you: When lesbian or gay youth come out to their parents, what concerns are their parents most likely to have? Well, I'm not going to answer - you'll have to listen to the podcast for that. And I hope you like it. So, on to episode 62 of the Social Work Podcast, Concerns of Parents of Gays and Lesbians: An Interview with Dr. Cynthia Conley. To read more about this episode, or the Social Work Podcast, please visit http://www.socialworkpodcast.com.

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  • Morris Kight

    · Making Gay History

    Morris Kight was a whirling dervish champion of LGBTQ civil rights. He cut his activist teeth in the labor, civil rights, and anti-war movements, and from 1969 on brought all his passion to bear on catapulting himself and L.A.’s gay liberation efforts onto center stage.To learn more about Morris, have a look at the information, links, photographs, and episode transcript that follow below.Mary Ann Cherry, Morris Kight’s biographer, maintains a website about Morris.  There is also a Morris Kight Facebook page.The LGBT_History Instagram account offered a concise summary of Morris Kight’s life and contributions on November 19, 2017, what would have been Morris’ 98th birthday .Morris Kight’s papers and photographs are housed at the ONE Archives at the USC Libraries.In his Making Gay History interview, Morris talks about the horrific March 1969 beating death at the hands of Los Angeles police, which galvanized local activists.  You can read about the murder here and here.Morris Kight was a co-founder with the Rev. Troy Perry, of the Christopher Street West parade, which was held to mark the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall uprising in New York City.  Read more about the organization that oversees the annual L.A. Pride Parade and Festival here.The fight over an anti-gay sign at Barney’s Beanery, a Los Angeles restaurant, figured prominently as the first major protest organized by the Los Angeles Gay Liberation Front, which was co-founded by Morris Kight (and was a sister organization of the Gay Liberation Front organization founded in New York City immediately after the Stonewall uprising in June 1969).Morris Kight co-founded the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Community Services Center in 1969. Today the Los Angeles LGBT Center is the world’s largest.In 1975, Morris co-founded the Stonewall Democratic Club..Morris Kight’s house (where he lived before his Making Gay History interview), is listed as an historic site by the Los Angeles Conservancy.Morris played the grumpy poet in Leather Jacket Love Story (1997), a film about a gay aspiring poet in L.A. He’s also the subject of the short film Live on Tape: The Life & Times of Morris Kight, Liberator (1999).Morris Kight died on January 19, 2003.  His obituary appeared in the  the L.A. Times.

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  • 00:44:38

    061: How to do Effective Counselling with Gay Men, Adolescents and Boys

    · The Australia Counselling Podcast

    When it comes to counselling gay men, adolescents and boys, it’s critical as a counsellor you understand some of the special needs and challenges of this minority population to be effective. Dr Michael Kocet is a U.S. professor and mental health counsellor who has specialised in working with gay men, adolescents and boys, as well as educating counselling students about this very specific area of counselling. He has also recently written a comprehensive book on the topic called Counselling Gay Men, Adolescents, and Boys: A Strengths-Based Guide for Helping Professionals and Educators. In this interview, Michael discusses: how he became involved in counselling gay boys, adolescents and men how gay boys and men develop psychologically important cultural issues for gay men, adolescents and boys the effects of stigma and prejudice towards gay people the most important assessment factors for developing a treatment plan critical mental health factors that can affect gay men, adolescents and boys how important a counsellor’s sexual orientation is for a gay client special needs counsellors need to be aware of when counselling bisexual people

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  • 01:05:45

    093 Special Episode: 7 Ways To Better Wellness In 2017

    · Wellness Force Radio | Discovering Physical & Emotional Intelligence To Live Life Well

    To celebrate the start of 2017, this episode is dedicated to spotlighting  7 powerful episodes and remembering what they taught us about our wellness path in 2016. It has been such an incredible year on the Wellness Force Radio podcast! There have been so many amazing guests who have opened up to us to share their stories and teach us how we can improve our health and wellness. On this episode, you will listen to seven inspiring conversations for seven steps to greater wellness in 2017. Gretchen Rubin: The Secret to Habit Change (Episode 051) Melissa Hartwig: Food Freedom Forever (episode 071) Dr. Jade Teta: The 5 Metabolic Myths (episode 067) Dr. John Gray - ADHD, Brain Health, & Sex Addiction (Episode 046) Gay & Katie Hendricks - Love vs Fear: Body Intelligence in a Modern World (Episode 055) Drew Canole - Self-Love, Juicing, and Transformation (Episode 078) Mark Divine: Creating the Unbeatable Mind (Episode 086) If you’re listening to the Wellness Force Radio podcast for the first time, this will be a unique experience for you to get in touch with the types of guests and topics we dive deep with on the show. If you're a returning listener, this will be an incredible chance for you to absorb seven powerful concepts from these world-class leaders to help you in 2017.   Gretchen Rubin: The Secret to Habit Change    "Unfortunately, we've all learned from tough experience that no magic, one-size-fits-all solution exists and that the real secret to habit change is that in order to change our habits, we must first know ourselves." -  Gretchen Rubin   According to Gretchen, the secret to habit change is to get to know ourselves through self exploration and awareness. We're not all the same and we need to understand what makes us happy and motivated to work hard.  One great example that Gretchen gave was the difference between some one enjoys simplicity vs. abundance. One person may work great in a simple environment with no clutter, but maybe another person feels energized in an office stacked with books and other collections.  Once you've found what helps you stay motivated, you can create new habits to keep that motivation going while respecting other people's differences and what motivates them at the same time.    Melissa Hartwig: Food Freedom Forever    "Food scientists have engineered chemicals and processed foods that light up the reward centers in the brain for a different reason than nature intended. Not because they provide vital nutrition, but because they're scientifically designed to stimulate our taste buds." - Melissa Hartwig   It is said that the gut is our body's second brain because if we pay close attention to it, it can tell us when we're full and what nutrition we need. During this podcast episode, Melissa discussed the difference between Satiation and Satiety and how they can help us create healthy habits.  What is Satiation? Satiation is your brain's perception that you've had enough food and you're done eating. Satiation basically occurs when you're sick of eating. Maybe your mouth is tired from chewing food, you're sick of the taste of the food that you're eating, or you're so full that you can't even eat anything else.  Satiation can easily happen when you've eaten foods such as popcorn, brownies, chocolate or any food that's difficult to stop eating once you've started. For me, it's super hard to stop eating chips with salsa and/or guacamole.    What is Satiety? Satiety takes place in the stomach when the body knows that it has enough various nutrients to be full and satisfied as far as survival goes. When you eat a grass-fed steak with green vegetables and perhaps some healthy fats, your body has had enough without you needing to over consume other foods.  How can we begin to focus on eating more foods that help us feel satiety? Focus on consuming foods that nature intended for us to eat. Stay away from overly processed foods with lots of preservatives and sugars and eat natural fruits, vegetables, proteins, and healthy fats. Focus on eating satiety foods so that you get to a place where you can trust the signals that your gut, not your brain, is telling you.    Dr. Jade Teta: The 5 Metabolic Myths    "Metabolism is designed to keep us in homeostasis and help us adapt to the stresses of the world around us whether that stress is sleep deprivation, decreased calories, over exercising, or emotional stress." - Dr. Jade Teta   During the episode with Dr. Jade Teta, he explained what the difference is between Dieters and Detectives. Dieters go by the rules, but unfortunately, this is what keeps them stuck in the same place or worse as they move form one diet to the next. Dieters follow all of these rules, but there actually aren't any rules at all, just guidelines. That's where the Detectives come in.  Detectives follow the guidelines and learn skills that allow them to be flexible and discover their own nutrition method. Why is this better than following a strict set of rules of what to eat and not eat? Because every person is different and we all have different metabolism.    The Goldilock Zone According to Dr. Teta, the key to finding the right metabolism balance and the perfect amount of nutrition, exercise, and relaxation is to follow the Golidlock Zone method.  You can get in the Goldilock zone when you have not too much, not too little, but just the right amount of: Fats Carbs Proteins Stress Exercise When everything is balanced, your metabolism is right where you want it to be. Just like metabolism, everyone's Goldilock Zone will be unique. To help you get to the Goldilock Zone, focus on HEC. What is HEC? HEC stands for Hunger, Energy, and Cravings. HEC helps you to understand if a diet is working for you. After each meal, pay attention to how your body feels, responds, and what your biomarkers are telling you.    "If your HEC is in check, then your metabolism is balanced."- Dr. Jade Teta    Dr. John Gray - ADHD, Brain Health, & Sex Addiction    "We demand the instant gratification that releases the dopamine in our brain when we're hyper stimulated.  Instead of over simulating our brains, need to bring it back it back to the present moment. We need to be happy with what's here rather than creating drama or addiction." - Dr. John Gray   Our society is always looking for the best, new thing out there. The best TV screens, the best food, the most romantic relationships etc. But our brain can also thrive on sadness, stress, and addiction.  All of these factors and more can give us instant gratification because they release high levels of dopamine in our brains. Once we've experienced this natural stimulation, we keep wanting more or we'll easily get bored. However, if too much dopamine is released into the brain, the body regulates itself and ends up lowering the amount of dopamine sensors. The higher the stimulation, the longer it takes for the sensors to return to normal.  Recover from Hyper Stimulation Not only will time help heal the body from hyper stimulation and high dopamine levels, but a healthy nutrition is key to helping the body recover back to normal.  Rather than being bored with what we have and ready to move one, we need to learn to be happy and appreciate what we have in our lives. Looking out for and buying the latest TV will only give you instant gratification; it cannot bring you pure joy and happiness in your life.  Nutrition is key, but so are minerals such as lithium. With just the right amount of lithium and another alkalizing minerals such as potassium and calcium, they can help lower our amount of stress. However, too much lithium can create high levels of anxiety.    Gay & Katie Hendricks - Love vs. Fear:Body Intelligence in a Modern World    "Love will triumph because love is bigger than fear. You can test that out in your own being by noticing what happens when you love your fear. Suddenly a whole new world opens up." - Gay Hendricks   For some people, self-love is something that can be difficult to find and tap into. However, if we don't love or honor ourselves, then we cannot honestly begin to trust and get to know ourselves.    "I saw that down at the bottom of everything, you're either in love or in fear at any given moment. That you're either open to cherishing yourself, cherishing other people, the universe around you, you're opening to listening, you're opening to being present OR you're scared about something and that shuts you down." - Gay Hendricks   To better understand ourselves, Gay suggests that we think about something that we're afraid of. We need to discover that fear, feel it, and love it. Love that fear just like you love a person and with all of that positive emotion, you can use that love as a means to start loving yourself just the way you are.    Drew Canole - Self-Love, Juicing, and Transformation    "A lot of people are trying to find what they're purpose is. When you clear your space and put yourself in a place where you can just start listeneing more, your purpose is going to show up. It's that thing that's always more or less been there, but you don't think is possible." - Drew Canole   The people that we spend the most time with can say a lot about who we are and what we want out of life. During Drew's interview with Josh, he explained how Tribe Affects Our Vibe.  Each year, Drew takes time to get a clear picture of himself. What he loves about himself, but also what he dislikes and disapproves. Do the same for yourself and then think about people who you think are the same or have similar personal growth development goals.  You create your tribe by finding and connecting with people who have the same vibe going on. People who share similar characteristics. If you are or want to be a certain way, you'll bring similar people into your life. Transforming Your Life By Finding Your WHY Drew also spoke about the Whydentity Process and discovering a why that makes us cry. This is the moment when we identify with the identity that we have in mind with who we are. Your why is your joy or reason as to why you like something. If we can find joy in something that we're doing, we can create something amazing. In the moment that you find your why, you will omit self-love, happiness, and success. So much so that it rubs off on other people and they will feel passionate about something that they love too.    Mark Divine: Creating the Unbeatable Mind    "The Warrior Master is someone who is extremely humble. It is someone who is extremely emotionally grounded and has cultivated a love for his teammates that is uncommon and also has a love for his enemies. They realize that everyone has the same essence. It's just what's layered on top that makes us different." - Mark Divine   We learned something important about the power of love and respecting other people when Mark Divine spoke on the podcast.  Sometimes, it can be difficult to open our hearts to other people. Especially if we've experienced trauma such as PTSD, it's not easy to open up after feeling shut down for so long. But if there's two things that Mark learned during his 20 years as a Marine, it's that a warrior is committed to two things: Self Mastery and Service.  However, we can't serve if we don't work on ourselves and many people do not have the training and methodology to work towards mastery. Mastery is just as important as sleeping, eating, and simply being. To reach self mastery and service, we need to grow emotionally so that our intuition can develop and our hearts become softer.  Loving Our Enemies The Master Warrior loves their enemies and recognizes that we are all humans with the same essence. We all have a being. Not only do we love our enemies, but we respect them and that is also a form of love. In returner, the love and respect we have for our enemies will help us grow stronger.      What You'll Hear on the Show 00:30  Podcast Introduction 2:40  Gretchen Rubin: The Secret to Habit Change (Episode 051) 10:00 Melissa Hartwig: Food Freedom Forever (episode 071) 18:40 Dr. Jade Teta: The 5 Metabolic Myths (episode 067) 29:35  Dr. John Gray - ADHD, Brain Health, & Sex Addiction (Episode 046) 42:20  Gay & Katie Hendricks - Love vs Fear: Body Intelligence in a Modern World (Episode 055) 47:00 Drew Canole - Self-Love, Juicing, and Transformation (Episode 078) 56:50 Mark Divine: Creating the Unbeatable Mind (Episode 086) 1:04:45  Final comments by Josh Resources Mentioned on the Show Gretchen Rubin: The Secret to Habit Change (Episode 051) Melissa Hartwig: Food Freedom Forever (episode 071) Dr. Jade Teta: The 5 Metabolic Myths (episode 067) Dr. John Gray - ADHD, Brain Health, & Sex Addiction (Episode 046) Gay & Katie Hendricks - Love vs Fear: Body Intelligence in a Modern World (Episode 055) Drew Canole - Self-Love, Juicing, and Transformation (Episode 078) Mark Divine: Creating the Unbeatable Mind (Episode 086) Damon Gameau: Breaking Free From Sugar (Episode 061)  YouTube: That Sugar Film Trailer The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg The Way of Superior Man by David Deida   Rate & Review Wellness Force Aloha! Josh here. Listen, I deeply value your thoughts, now let your voice be heard. I live to serve the Wellness Force even better based on your words, feedback, and requests. (including how these episodes can allow you to break bad habits) Thanks To Our Amazing Sponsor Want to avoid more trips to the store and save hundreds of dollars a year on superfood supplements? Check out Perfect Supplements.com Go to perfectsupplements.com/wellnessforce to get your grass-fed collagen from today's show and sign up for a free membership, plus get 10% off your entire order - just enter promo code "wellnessforce" at checkout.   Ask A Live Question For The Next Episode Click here to leave a voicemail directly to Josh Trent to be read live on the air.  You May Also Like These Episodes Food Freedom Forever With Melissa Hartwig Nir Eyal:Breaking Bad Habits, Technology Addiction, & Emotional Triggers Healthy, Happy & Harder To Kill w/ Steph Gaudreau of Stupid Easy Paleo Beyond Meditation: How To Get A Better Brain With Ariel Garten Living A Healthy Lifestyle In A Modern World With Dan Pardi Creating A Life Worth Living With Michael Strasner Get More Wellness In Your Life Download Your Free Wellness Technology Guide: wellnessforce.com/radio Don't miss next week's show: Subscribe and stay updated Did you like this show? Rate and review Wellness Force on iTunes You read all the way to the bottom? That's what I call love! I do the same thing for the people, things, and movements I care about as well. PS: Looks like you and I share the same passion. I'm grateful for you and want to extend you my email address. Write to me and let me know what you'd like to have to get more wellness in your life.

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  • 01:57:48

    631: Tyler Glenn Pt. 1 - Early Years as a Gay Mormon Teen

    · Mormon Stories - LDS

    Tyler Glenn is best known as the lead singer of the multi-platinum alternative pop band Neon Trees.   Tyler was raised LDS/Mormon in Temecula, California.  After discovering a love for music in high school and serving an LDS mission, Tyler moved to Provo, UT with his buddy Chris to form Neon Trees (named after the trees on the In and Out signs).  Neon Trees signed with Mercury Records in 2009 and went on to release three successful alternative pop albums: Habits (2010), Picture Show (2012), and Pop Psychology (2014). Tyler knew he was gay as a child, but struggled as a teen and adult to reconcile his sexuality with his LDS faith.  These struggles took Tyler to some sad/dark places, which were only exacerbated by his fame as a pop star.  At age 27 (around the release of Picture Show), Tyler seriously contemplated ending his life. In spite of these struggles, Tyler remained a full and literal believer in the LDS Church.  In 2014 Tyler decided that being a closeted gay man was contributing to his suicidality.  Consequently he came out as gay to his family, band, friends -- and to the world in Rolling Stone magazine -- prior to the release of Pop Psychology.  From this point forward it was Tyler's full intent to find and marry a gay man, and to raise children in the LDS church as a gay married Mormon.   Then, in November of 2015, the LDS church released its new policy branding same-sex married Mormons as immediate apostates, and prohibiting children of same-sex married couples from being baptized.  This policy change sent Tyler into a tailspin, ultimately shattering his plans as a believing, gay Mormon.  In this three part interview, we explore: Part 1: Tyler's early years as a young Mormon struggling with his sexuality. Part 2: Tyler's ascent (along with Neon Trees) into stardom...and the sadness/despair that followed. Part 3: Tyler's faith crisis instigated by the LDS policy change, along with his current beliefs/views regarding the LDS Church.

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  • 02:50:16

    LisezLaScience - HS-6 - Évènement #psSortDuPlacard - version complète de l'épisode 225 de Podcastscience

    · Lisez La Science

    Bonjour à tous, j'ai eu la chance de pouvoir participer à l'évènement #psSortDuPlacard organisé par PodcastScience et StripScience le samedi 27 juin à l'occasion de la marche des fiertés à Paris. À cette occasion j'ai présenté trois livres que j'ai eu l'occasion de lire et qui traitaient des études scientifiques qui ont pu être réalisées en lien avec l'homosexualité pour deux d'entre eux et de la vie de Alan Turing, très grand mathématicien et scientifique, qui était homosexuel. J'espère que vous apprendrez plein de choses en écoutant l'émission de PodcastScience dont vous pourrez retrouver l'intégralité ci-dessus. Je signale aussi que tous les dossiers présentés pendant l'émission peuvent être retrouvées sur le site de PodcastScience. Vous pourrez aussi retrouver la production pléthorique de dessins qui ont été réalisés par l'équipe fantastique de dessinateurs qui ont officié pendant l'évènement. Vous pouvez ainsi retrouver les notes de l'émission de PodcastScience, le billet chez PodcastScience correspondant à mon intervention (reprise ci-dessous), ainsi que le compte rendu qu'a réalisé Pierre Kerner pour StripScience. Un grand bravo à toutes les personnes qui ont permis la réalisation de cet évènement : l'équipe de Podcastscience, de StripScience, Xavier Durussel, Pierre Kerner, Swoog, et tout ceux que j'oublie. Vous pouvez retrouver l'intégralité du dossier que j'ai présenté ci-dessous ou bien sur le billet associé sur le site de PodcastScience. Billet présenté dans le cadre de l'event #psSortDuPlacard le 27 juin 2015 et publié simultanément sur PodcastScience  Pitch L’équipe de Podcast Science m’a proposé de réaliser un dossier sur quelques livres qui seraient intéressants de lire si l’on souhaite en savoir plus sur l’homosexualité, et la science associée de manière plus large. Je vous propose donc deux livres qui traitent de l’homosexualité d’un point de vue scientifique et un autre qui traite d’Alan Turing, grand scientifique de la première moitié du XXe qui était aussi homosexuel. De quoi vous occuper pendant les vacances si vous souhaitez de bons livres sur l’homosexualité au sens large :) Dossier Conundrum: The Evolution Of Homosexuality Le premier dont je vais vous parler se nomme “Conundrum: The evolution of homosexuality”, de Nancy Peters. Alors je préfère vous prévenir tout de suite : toutes ces références seront en anglais. Il existe juste une traduction pour le livre sur Alan Turing. Nancy Peters est une écrivain freelance vivant à New York. J’ai tenté d’avoir plus d’informations sur elle, mais mes demandes sont restées lettre morte, désolé. Ce livre relativement court qui décrit la vision de la biologie comportementale sur l’homosexualité et son évolution. Le propos est clair, illustré et toute personne souhaitant avoir une vision, plutôt haut-niveau, de la question saura trouver dans ce livre un certain nombre d’informations relativement à jour et appuyées sur des études scientifiques sérieuses. L’auteur traite de l’homosexualité sans se limiter à l’espèce Humaine, ni à une culture ou une époque en particulier. On aborde ainsi sa présence chez les primates de manière large, mais aussi dans les civilisations grecques, égyptiennes ou chez les maori. Ce livre n’a pas pour but d’être exhaustif sur l’homosexualité et ce que la science pourrait en avoir à dire, mais il sait fournir une base intéressante à qui souhaite se renseigner sur la question. Il remplit donc pleinement son office et la seule chose que j’aurais personnellement à lui reprocher c’est son organisation : certains sujets sont abordés selon un certain angle, puis l’auteur aborde un autre point, et revient ensuite au premier. En tout cas si vous êtes pressé, ce livre est pour vous ! Gay, Straight, and the Reason Why: The Science of Sexual Orientation Le second livre est “Gay, Straight, and the Reason Why” de Simon LeVay. Simon LeVay est un neuroscientifique américano-britannique qui s’est, apparemment, toujours intéressé aux structures du cerveau et aux liens possibles avec l’orientation sexuelle. Après une éducation supérieure de haute volée où il fréquenta successivement les bancs de Cambridge, Göttingen et Harvard, il réalisa la majeure partie de sa carrière dans ce dernier établissement avant d’intégrer le Salk Institute for Biological Studies où il réalisa l’étude pour laquelle il est sûrement le plus connu et qui portait sur le noyau INAH3 au sein du cerveau. Il montra en effet une corrélation entre la taille de ce noyau de neurones et l’orientation sexuelle de son possesseur. À la différence du livre de Nancy Peters, celui-ci est plus volumineux et plus long à lire. Mais cela vaudra clairement le temps que vous y passerez! Je n’ai jamais vu un livre aussi exhaustif, aussi bien référencé et aussi sérieux sur un sujet. Il est aussi différent par son approche: Simon LeVay se concentre sur l’Humain et sur l’époque actuelle et va ainsi aborder tous les axes possibles de réflexion sur l’Homosexualité (psychologie, biologie, génétique, etc) Le livre est bien structuré, l’auteur présente, pour chaque axe un certain nombre d’hypothèses, avec les études associées, les résultats obtenus, et ce qui en est ressorti, en pour et en contre. Cet ouvrage est un bon complément à celui de Nancy Peters pour qui souhaite entrer plus en profondeur dans le sujet. On pourra remarquer que Simon LeVay, dans son travail de référence et de recherche d’études sur les sujets abordés, ne cite quasiment aucune étude francophone ... Alan Turing: The Enigma Ahhh, Alan Turing! En tant que personne travaillant dans le domaine de l’informatique, il représente un dieu de la spécialité. L’un de ses esprits géniaux grâce à qui nous avons pu avoir à notre disposition cette technologie fantastique qui nous permet de pouvoir commander des cuisses de poulet surgelées à 3 heures du matin depuis le fond de notre lit. Blague à part, le travail de cet homme est juste fondamental pour notre société d’aujourd’hui. Et c’est sa vie qu’Andrew Hodges nous raconte de manière agréable et touchante. On découvre ainsi la vie du jeune Alan Turing, avec son amour de jeunesse pour Christopher Morcom, mort trop vite, et dont la perte resta ancrée en Alan pendant toute sa vie. On découvre aussi son travail lors de la Seconde Guerre Mondiale pour le décryptage des messages produits grâce à la machine Enigma. On apprend aussi à quel point il a révolutionné les mathématiques à travers son article sur les nombres calculables et les machines de Turing, celui sur le principe d’imitation avec son fameux test pour déterminer si l’on a à faire à une machine ou plus un humain, son invention de la programmation, des fonctions, etc. On ne se rend pas compte à quel point il est à l’origine de toute cette technologie, ces ordinateurs, tablettes et smartphones qui nous sont aujourd’hui indispensable. On en apprend aussi un peu plus sur la vie des homosexuels dans cette première moitié du XXe siècle anglais, et comment s’est déroulée la fin de sa vie, entre son arrestation, son procès, sa castration chimique et ses derniers jours avant son suicide en 1954. Pour ceux qui auraient vu le film, très bon film en passant, vous découvrirez la vraie histoire (sur laquelle est censée être basé le film d’ailleurs) et d’Alan Turing. Un peu moins romanesque et moins d’espionnage mais tellement plus intéressante. Conclusion En conclusion ce que je peux dire c’est que j’ai vraiment appris beaucoup de choses : sur l’homosexualité, certes, mais aussi sur ce scientifique formidable que fut Alan Turing et sur les impacts des préjugés de la société sur les homosexuels au sens large. Le suicide d’Alan Turing, pour beaucoup, conséquence du traitement consécutif à son procès et de l’atmosphère homophobe de l’époque, l’aura peut-être empêché de faire de nouvelles découvertes fantastiques et fondamentales. Dix ans se sont écoulés entre les deux articles fondateurs d’Einstein sur la relativité restreinte et générale. Imaginez ce que Turing aurait pu faire si il avait vécu plus longtemps ! Je vous conseille donc de lire ces livres, et d’en proposer la lecture autour de vous. Ceci permettra peut-être de réduire les préjugés qui rongent notre société et d’éviter aux homosexuels de subir des pressions et des discriminations. Laissons les personnes LGBT s’épanouir car elles pourront sûrement rendre le monde plus beau et meilleur pour nous tous. Vous pourrez retrouver l’ensemble des livres sur le compte goodreads de LisezLaScience. Ceux-ci seront placés sur une étagère spécifique et celle pour aujourd’hui sera LLS-HS-6 : https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/30797714-lisezlascience?shelf=lls-hs-6 Liens Les notes d'émission de l'épisode #PS225 chez PodcastScience : http://www.podcastscience.fm/?p=5669 Ce billet chez PodcastScience : http://www.podcastscience.fm/?p=5688 CR de Pierre Kerner sur Strip-Science : http://stripscience.cafe-sciences.org/articles/podcast-science-sort-du-placard-le-compte-rendu/ Page wikipédia de Simon LeVay : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_LeVay Page wikipédia d’Alan Turing : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing Les références livresques Alan Turing: The Enigma ISBN : 1784700088 (ISBN13: 978-1784700089) Auteur : Andrew Hodges Nombre de pages : 768 pages Date de parution : 13/11/2014 chez Vintage Prix : 13,34 € chez Amazon ou chez la Fnac (en français) Gay, Straight, and the Reason Why: The Science of Sexual Orientation ISBN : 0199931585 (ISBN13 : 978-0199931583) Auteur : Simon Levay Nombre de pages : 432 pages Date de parution : 06/09/2012 (Reprint) chez Oxford University Press Prix : 25,32 € chez Amazon et à 10,09€ chez la Fnac (en numérique uniquement) Conundrum: The Evolution Of Homosexuality ISBN : 1420893386 (ISBN13 : 978-1420893380) Auteur : Nancy J. Peters Nombre de pages : 208 pages Date de parution : 01/02/2006 chez Authorhouse Prix : 21,64 € chez Amazon

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  • 00:54:24

    17: Prenda-se a Faca

    · 20 Centavos

    Nesta semana, resolvemos repetir o formato "pot-pourri" (inaugurado no episódio 6), de forma um pouco mais bem humorada.Primeiro, o assunto inevitável da semana: a "arcoirisação" dos avatares no Facebook, quer dizer, a decisão da Suprema Corte dos EUA de considerar o casamento gay uma liberdade individual fundamental, obrigando os estados a celebrá-lo.Em seguida, passamos para a Grécia e sua esquizofrênica política econômica, que esta semana parece estar em um ponto crítico, com bancos fechados por falta de dinheiro, moratória ao FMI e um referendo para aceitar ou não a ajuda e a ingerência do resto a União Européia.Em terceiro lugar, o tópico que dá nome a esse episódio, a lei que vai resolver todos os problemas de violência no Rio de Janeiro: a proibição do porte de armas brancas, sob pena de multa de até R$ 24.000. Finalmente, revisitamos a guerra entre taxistas e o Uber, que ganhou novas dimensões tanto aqui quanto no além-mar. Na França (onde mais?), taxistas fizeram um protesto violento, queimaram carros e trancaram o trânsito de Paris; o governo proibiu o Uber e, em seguida, prendeu seus diretores. Enquanto isso, em São Paulo, os vereadores estão a um passo de passar uma lei que também proíbe o serviço na cidade. Casamento gay nos EUA (de 14:08 até 23:25)Em decisão histórica, Estados Unidos legalizam casamento gay (Folha de S. Paulo)Voto de "juiz que legalizou" casamento gay nos EUA viraliza (Terra)Como os conservadores da Suprema Corte explicaram seus votos contra o casamento gay (Quartz, em inglês)As passagens mais #mimimi do voto de Antonin Scalia contra o casamento gay (Vanity Fair, em inglês)Texto de Flavio Morgenstern contra a decisãoCrise na Grécia (de 23:28 até 37:51)Às vésperas de possível calote, Grécia decreta feriado bancário e controle de capital (Estadão)Grécia não pagou a dívida com o FMI; o que acontece agora? (G1) Rodrigo Constantino (sim, aquele) faz um apanhando da história econômica recente da Grécia, e como a situação chegou no ponto que está hoje. Diretor do Cato Institute, em podcast (em inglês), explica como a situação atual deixa poucas opções ao país, e ainda menos incentivo para permanecer na zona do Euro. For Spain’s Mariano Rajoy, Greece crisis is a political gift (Financial Times)Excelente episódio do podcast Planet Money sobre as possíveis consequências do referendo (em inglês)Proibição do porte de armas brancas no Rio (de 37:56 até 41:22)Pezão sanciona lei que proíbe porte de arma branca no Rio de Janeiro (G1) A lei sancionadaTaxistas em guerra contra o Uber (de 41:24 até 53:08)Protestos contra o Uber acabam em violência na França (Deutsche Welle)Uber está sendo 'cínico e arrogante', diz ministro francês sobre protestos (Folha de S. Paulo)Taxistas enviam bandeira do Brasil para apoiar protesto contra Uber na França (O Globo) Dois gerentes do Uber são presos na França (O Globo)Câmara de SP aprova projeto que proíbe aplicativo Uber (G1)Proibição da Uber: a inconstitucionalidade do PL 349/2014 do Município de São Paulo (JusBrasil) 

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  • 00:02:16

    February 9, 1971 - Archie Bunker

    · Human Rights a Day

    Archie Bunker’s All in the Family debuts television’s first gay-themed episode. With the exception of television comedian Ernie Kovacs poking fun at an effeminate character he played in the 1950s, it wasn’t until the 1970s that a gay character played on television. It should come as no surprise that the loveable bigot, Archie Bunker from All in the Family, was the one chosen to encounter that character. First aired on February 9, 1971, with the title “Judging Books by Covers,” the program produced by Norman Lear went like this: Archie’s son-in-law, Michael (“Meathead”), brings home his friend Roger who Archie thinks is gay. It turns out he isn’t, but Archie gets a rude awakening when he discovers that his long-time friend and former football star Steve was in fact gay. Bunker had a hard time coming to grips with the notion that his beer-drinking buddy was homosexual as this didn’t fit his stereotype of gay men. For Bunker, this created a dilemma of staying loyal to his friend or abandoning him because of pre-conceived notions. The episode was rather bold of Lear and his crew, especially as All in the Family had been on the air for only a month. Archie’s gay friend, as it turned out, was a one-time event. It would be six years before a recurring gay character showed up on television. That’s when Billy Crystal played gay character Jodie Dallas on the show Soap.

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  • Compton's Cafeteria Riot

    · The Mattachine Podcast

    In this episode of the Mattachine Podcast, we’ll be looking at the Compton’s Cafeteria riot, which occurred in San Francisco, in the late summer of 1966.  We’ll investigate the riot’s significance, and how it set the tone for gay rights moving forward—particularly within the scope of rapid social civil rights advancements in the tumultuous 60s.The Compton's Cafeteria Riot occurred in August 1966 in the Tenderloin district of San Francisco. This incident was one of the first recorded transgender riots in United States history, actually preceding the more famous 1969 Stonewall Riots in New York City.BackgroundCompton's Cafeteria was one of a chain of cafeterias, owned by a gentleman named Gene Compton, in San Francisco from the 1940s to the 1970s. The Tenderloin location of Compton's at 101 Taylor Street—was open from 1954 to 1972 and was one of the few places where transgender people could congregate publicly in the city, because they were heretofore unwelcome in gay bars in the city. The cafeteria was open 24 hours until the riots occurred.  Because cross-dressing was illegal at the time, police could use the presence of transgender people in a bar as a pretext for making a raid and closing the bar.Many of the militant hustlers in the neighborhood, and street queens involved in the riot were members of Vanguard, the first known gay youth organization in the United States—we’ll be covering that organization in a later podcast.  Vanguard had been organized earlier that year with the help of radical ministers working with Glide Memorial Church, a center for progressive social activism in the Tenderloin for many years. A lesbian group of street people was also formed called the Street Orphans.Cause of the riotStarting in the 1960s the Compton’s Cafeteria staff began to call the police to crack down on transgender and transsexual individuals, who would often frequent the restaurant in the neighborhood. In response to police arrests, the transgender and transsexual community launched a picket of Compton’s Cafeteria. Although the picket was ultimately unsuccessful, it was one of the first demonstrations against transgender and transsexual violence in San Francisco. On the first night of the riot, the management of Compton's called the police when some transgender customers became loud and unruly. In the 50's and 60's police officers were known to mistreat transgender people—often their behavior was sanctioned. When one of these officers attempted to arrest one of the trans women, she got angry and threw her coffee in his face. That was the flashpoint for the riot to begin. Dishes and and even furniture were thrown, and the restaurant's plate-glass windows were smashed. Police called for reinforcements as the fighting spilled out into the street, where a police car had all its windows broken out and a sidewalk newsstand was burned down. It escalated very quickly. The exact date of the riot is unknown because 1960 police records no longer exist and the riot was not covered by newspapers, which was another societal signal of how this group was ignored.The next night, more transgender people, hustlers, Tenderloin street people, and other members of the LGBT community joined in picketing the cafeteria, the owners of which would not allow transgender people back in. The demonstration ended with the newly installed plate-glass windows being smashed yet again.Effects of the riotThe riot definitely marked a turning point in the local LGBT movement. In the aftermath of the riot at Compton's, a network of transgender social, psychological, and medical support services was established, which culminated in 1968 with the creation of the National Transsexual Counseling Unit [the NTCU], the first such peer-run support and advocacy organization in the world.Serving as an overseer to the NTCU was Sergeant Elliott Blackstone, designated in 1962 as the first San Francisco Police Department liaison to what was then called the "homophile community." According to Susan Stryker, the local historian and transgender activist who spent nine years uncovering the Compton's Cafeteria saga and making it into a documentary called Screaming Queens, Compton’s Cafeteria riot was “the first known incident of collective militant queer resistance to police harassment in U.S. history." Transgender people finally stood up to the abuse and discrimination by police officers. Following the riot, transgender and transsexual individuals were allowed to live their lives more freely and openly because police brutality towards them subsided—a direct result of the riots. For example, they had much less fear of being heckled by the police department for dressing how they chose to during the daytime, in the neighborhood.The tired transvestites who clashed with police at an all-night greasy spoon here in 1966 never would have expected the city's political elite to show up for a dedication ceremony honoring their struggle as a civil rights milestone.Yet there, at the site of the Compton's Cafeteria riot, among a crowd of unusually tall women and noticeably short men were a pair of city supervisors, the district attorney, the police chief, and a transsexual police sergeant. The California Assembly and the mayor sent proclamations that"Trans has become part of polite society," said Susan Stryker,  "You can't be openly anti-trans the way you could before."Until Stryker teased it out, the story of the Compton's Cafeteria riot remained as hidden as its main characters' true identities and carefully concealed razor stubble. Now the event is quietly challenging New York's 1969 Stonewall Riots as the dawn of the modern gay rights era.While not every city is ready to celebrate the contributions of its cross-dressing citizens, San Francisco — which in 2001 extended its health insurance to cover sex reassignment surgeries for municipal employees — is no longer alone in the landscape. Across the nation, transgender residents are quickly winning rights and recognition they began to demand only recently.In the last three years alone, New Mexico, Illinois and California have updated their anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender home buyers and renters; colleges in Vermont and Iowa have dedicated "gender neutral" dorm rooms; and corporations have adopted policies for helping employees stay on the job during sex changes. "When we are getting phone calls from people who have lost their jobs, and e-mails from people who are facing violence, it's sometimes easy to think everything is still really bad," said Mara Keisling, executive director of the National Center for Transgender Equality in Washington, D.C. "But to see that people were able to stand up for themselves 40 years ago is a very wonderful reminder to us of how far we've come."The sea change is especially obvious this month as cities in the United States and Europe observe gay pride events.Although so-called "drag queens" have been a visible part of pride marches since the 1970s, gay and lesbian groups were long afraid to embrace transgender causes for fear of being tainted by the more extreme prejudice they provoked, said Matt Foreman, executive director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force. "There was a time when nobody wanted to even mention transgender issues or have transgender people accompany you on lobbying visits to members of your state assembly because that was pushing the envelope too far," Foreman said. "There was a myth in our community, and frankly I was part of that myth, that including transgender people would set our cause back.""The history of transgender civil rights and Pride was that it was OK as long as it was gay men in dresses and it was about spectacle," said Chris Daley, director of the National Transgender Law Center in San Francisco. "The shift we are seeing is that the broader LGBT community has been able to embrace not only the more comfortable parts of the community, but everybody."Observing the range of lawyers, entertainers and openly transgender professionals who were on hand as the sidewalk plaque marking the Compton's Cafeteria riot was installed, Stryker was struck by how much had changed in the last 40 years. "Back then, you couldn't be out as trans without huge costs," she said. "To see all these people honoring a bunch of drag queens who rioted against the cops is amazing."Today, a granite historical marker installed in San Francisco's seedy Tenderloin District would be unremarkable if it didn't honor men who dressed in women's clothes and once walked the streets selling sex.[Music Out]Thank you for listening to the Mattachine Podcast.  This episode was researched, written, narrated, and produced by Brad Dunshee—yours truly.  Our logo was designed by Matt Smith. If you want to support this podcast, including costs associated with producing it, please visit patreon.com/mattachine.  Any amount is extremely appreciated, to keep this thing going.In an ongoing effort to bring you fresh LGBT stories week after week, please email us at mattachinepod@gmail.com with episode suggestions.  We’ll do our best to get these into the editorial calendar.  If you like the show, please tell your friends, and please subscribe to us in your favorite podcast app.  We love reviews, so please feel free to leave one of those, as well—it really helps get the word out.  We’ll be back next week with another episode about our LGBT history, so until then, please be good to one another.

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  • 01:10:58

    Gay LeFou and Lucasfilm's Legends - The Disney Movie Review 121

    · The Disney Movie Review

    This week is a jam-packed show as we try to catch up on two weeks of news! Does a gay LeFou really make sense for Beauty and the Beast? Disney marketing kicked into overdrive this week by releasing new trailers and footage for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, and Cars 3. Plus we found out that Star Wars: The Last Jedi is plural and a new article details how Disney is making fans of the Expanded Universe (a.k.a. Legends) happy. That and much much more. For the week of March 6, 2017, this is episode 121 of The Disney Movie Review.   LeFou is Gay https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/01/movies/beauty-and-the-beast-director-talks-of-exclusively-gay-moment.html   Disney aired its First Gay Kiss http://nypost.com/2017/03/01/disney-has-its-first-gay-kiss/   Here are the Beauty and the Beast clips  (Belle) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nT1VQkTTT7M (Dinner Invitation) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKyp9Tx-NPY (Gaston) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JG6f5_37tg New Guardians Trailer (Release May 5) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duGqrYw4usE New Pirates Trailer (Release May 26) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hgeu5rhoxxY New Cars 3 footage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYKmJJB3vFY The Last Jedi is plural http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2017/02/19/star-wars-last-jedi-title-confirmed-to-be-plural-and-fans-are-freaking-out.html Shooting on Han Solo begins http://www.starwars.com/news/han-solo-smuggler-scoundrel-hero-new-star-wars-story-begins See how Lucasfilm is working with fans to include things from Legends into canon. http://comicbook.com/2017/02/20/star-wars-lucasfilm-legends-expanded-universe-george-lucas/   Here's one of the articles on Maker  https://digiday.com/media/disney-maker-studios/ There is a new Mary Poppins photo http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/entertainthis/2017/03/03/emily-blunt-mary-poppins-returns-first-look-photo/98704048/   Disney invented a room that can charge your cell phone wirelessly http://www.computerworld.com/article/3173305/emerging-technology/disney-research-demonstrates-open-air-wireless-charging.html   THANK YOU! Thank you for listening! There are a lot of ways you can spend your time, but you chose to spend time with me and I am very grateful for that. If you enjoyed today’s show, please share it with your friends on your preferred social media site.   If you’ve listened to fewer than five episodes, welcome to Disney Movie Nation! If you like what you hear, visit the website to sign-up for our email list to get more Disney Movie News. If you aren’t a fan, that’s okay too. Find another podcast you love and support the content you love! Contact me: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DisneyMovieReview Twitter: @DSNYMovieReview

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  • ScathingAtheist 175: His Ark is Worse Than His Bite Edition

    · The Scathing Atheist

    In this week’s episode, we’ll read the book equivalent of getting dicked to death by wolverines, state-mandated anal probes get two thumbs up from a Kenyan judge, and Bill Donohue will dress up like a penguin and plot against Batman. --- Click Here to make a per episode donation at Patreon.com Click Here to buy our book. Click Here to check out The Skepticrat. Click Here to check out God Awful Movies. --- Guest Links: Click Here to help Dan Arel get to the Ark Park protest Click Here to check out the HolyCrap Vlogcast --- Headlines: Creationists to counter-protest atheists at Ark Park opening: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2016/06/18/how-many-levels-of-protests-will-take-place-on-opening-day-of-the-noahs-ark-theme-park/ Donohue: Law to extend statutes on child rape was designed “to rape the Catholic church.” http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2016/06/21/bill-donohue-law-to-help-child-abuse-victims-was-really-intended-to-rape-the-catholic-church/ Police in Trenton NJ plan to bring underage curfew violators to churches in the middle of the night: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2016/06/18/kids-who-violate-curfew-will-be-sent-to-church-say-trenton-nj-police/ Hackers add gay pride stuff to ISIS Twitter accounts: http://religionnews.com/2016/06/18/hackers-add-rainbows-gay-pride-slogans-to-isis-accounts/ Canadian police break up fight over whether or not the earth is flat or round http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2016/06/15/canadian-police-had-to-break-up-a-fight-over-whether-the-earth-is-flat-or-round/ Turkish Muslim mob attacks album release party at record store in Istanbul for not doing nothing during Ramadan: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2016/06/18/muslims-attack-istanbul-music-event-upset-that-it-took-place-during-ramadan/ Man attacked with machetes for not fasting on Ramadan: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2016/06/10/man-is-attacked-with-machetes-by-muslim-boys-who-were-upset-he-wasnt-fasting/ Anderson cooper is too gay to interview straight people http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2016/06/15/bryan-fischer-anderson-cooper-is-gay-so-hes-disqualified-from-interviewing-anti-gay-politicians/ Anderson cooper goes hard in the paint on bigot: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2016/06/14/floridas-anti-gay-attorney-general-pam-bondi-taken-to-task-by-anderson-cooper-for-her-past-bigotry/ Anal probes are a legal way to determine if someone is gay: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2016/06/16/kenyan-judge-says-anal-probes-are-a-legal-way-to-determine-if-someone-is-gay/   --- This Week in Misogyny: Six months for raping an accident victim: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/03/04/state-trooper-gets-just-6-months-for-raping-car-accident-victim.html Amish couple sells 14 year old daughter: https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1303574/amish-couple-arrested-after-gifting-their-daughter-14-to-man-who-went-on-to-father-two-children-with-her/?CMP=spklr-_-Editorial-_-FBPAGE-_-TheSun-thesun-_-20160619-_-News-_-497084531-_-Image,textandlink Abortion Drone: http://thinkprogress.org/world/2016/06/21/3790692/abortion-drone-ireland/

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  • 01:17:37

    633: Tyler Glenn Pt. 3 - Tyler's Faith Crisis

    · Mormon Stories - LDS

    Tyler Glenn is best known as the lead singer of the multi-platinum alternative pop band Neon Trees.   Tyler was raised LDS/Mormon in Temecula, California.  After discovering a love for music in high school and serving an LDS mission, Tyler moved to Provo, UT with his buddy Chris to form Neon Trees (named after the trees on the In and Out signs).  Neon Trees signed with Mercury Records in 2009 and went on to release three successful alternative pop albums: Habits (2010), Picture Show (2012), and Pop Psychology (2014). Tyler knew he was gay as a child, but struggled as a teen and adult to reconcile his sexuality with his LDS faith.  These struggles took Tyler to some sad/dark places, which were only exacerbated by his fame as a pop star.  At age 27 (around the release of Picture Show), Tyler seriously contemplated ending his life. In spite of these struggles, Tyler remained a full and literal believer in the LDS Church.  In 2014 Tyler decided that being a closeted gay man was contributing to his suicidality.  Consequently he came out as gay to his family, band, friends -- and to the world in Rolling Stone magazine -- prior to the release of Pop Psychology.  From this point forward it was Tyler's full intent to find and marry a gay man, and to raise children in the LDS church as a gay married Mormon.   Then, in November of 2015, the LDS church released its new policy branding same-sex married Mormons as immediate apostates, and prohibiting children of same-sex married couples from being baptized.  This policy change sent Tyler into a tailspin, ultimately shattering his plans as a believing, gay Mormon.  In this three part interview, we explore: Part 1: Tyler's early years as a young Mormon struggling with his sexuality. Part 2: Tyler's ascent (along with Neon Trees) into stardom...and the sadness/despair that followed. Part 3: Tyler's faith crisis instigated by the LDS policy change, along with his current beliefs/views regarding the LDS Church.

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  • 01:56:08

    632: Tyler Glenn Pt. 2 - Struggling with Fame and Authenticity

    · Mormon Stories - LDS

    Tyler Glenn is best known as the lead singer of the multi-platinum alternative pop band Neon Trees.   Tyler was raised LDS/Mormon in Temecula, California.  After discovering a love for music in high school and serving an LDS mission, Tyler moved to Provo, UT with his buddy Chris to form Neon Trees (named after the trees on the In and Out signs).  Neon Trees signed with Mercury Records in 2009 and went on to release three successful alternative pop albums: Habits (2010), Picture Show (2012), and Pop Psychology (2014). Tyler knew he was gay as a child, but struggled as a teen and adult to reconcile his sexuality with his LDS faith.  These struggles took Tyler to some sad/dark places, which were only exacerbated by his fame as a pop star.  At age 27 (around the release of Picture Show), Tyler seriously contemplated ending his life. In spite of these struggles, Tyler remained a full and literal believer in the LDS Church.  In 2014 Tyler decided that being a closeted gay man was contributing to his suicidality.  Consequently he came out as gay to his family, band, friends -- and to the world in Rolling Stone magazine -- prior to the release of Pop Psychology.  From this point forward it was Tyler's full intent to find and marry a gay man, and to raise children in the LDS church as a gay married Mormon.   Then, in November of 2015, the LDS church released its new policy branding same-sex married Mormons as immediate apostates, and prohibiting children of same-sex married couples from being baptized.  This policy change sent Tyler into a tailspin, ultimately shattering his plans as a believing, gay Mormon.  In this three part interview, we explore: Part 1: Tyler's early years as a young Mormon struggling with his sexuality. Part 2: Tyler's ascent (along with Neon Trees) into stardom...and the sadness/despair that followed. Part 3: Tyler's faith crisis instigated by the LDS policy change, along with his current beliefs/views regarding the LDS Church.

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  • Inside Gay Pakistan

    · Crossing Continents

    Mobeen Azhar investigates gay life in urban Pakistan and despite the country's religious conservatism and homosexuality being a crime there, he finds a vibrant gay scene, all aided by social media. He meets gay people at underground parties, shrines and hotels and finds out what it's really like to be gay in Pakistan. As one man tells him, "The best thing about being gay in Pakistan is you can easily hook up with guys over here. You just need to know the right moves and with a click you can get any guy you want." At a gay party he meets an NGO worker who then takes him to one of Karachi's prime cruising locations - a shrine to a 9th Century Muslim saint. Mobeen meets a "masseur", who works on the street advertising his services. The masseur's real job is selling sexual services to men - with the full knowledge of his wife. And with great difficulty, Mobeen speaks to a lesbian couple, who conceal their relationship from their own parents. One of them argues that it is too soon for gay Pakistanis to fight openly for political rights and that they must find happiness in the personal sphere. Mobeen discovers that while urban Pakistanis may easily be able to find sex, being in a relationship is far more difficult. Reporter: Mobeen AzharProducer: Helena Merriman.

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