Aprende ingles con La Mansión del Inglés-Learn E

Aprende ingles con La Mansión del Inglés-Learn E

Spain

Lecciones para aprender y mejorar tú inglés. English lessons to improve your grammar, vocabulary and listening skills.

Episodes

Would and Used To - AIRC152  

‘Would’ can mean soler. ‘Used to’ can mean soler also. So, how do you know when to use ‘would’ and when to use ‘used to’ when you speak about the past?

We’re going to tell you in this week’s episode of……..Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig.

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Voice message from Miguel about when to use would and used to.

Past episodes: ‘used to’, ‘be used to’ and ‘get used to’ in episode 6 - 31st Jan, 2014! ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/01/31/aprender-ingles-con-reza-y-craig-6/  )

‘Could’ and ‘would’ episode 71 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/10/04/go-and-come-could-and-would-reglas-para-leer-ingles-air71/  )

Pronunciation of ‘would’ in episode 36 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2014/11/26/more-clauses-and-phrases-pronunciation-goodwoodwould-vocabulary-the-car-airc36/  )

We use used to and would for past habits. Things that we don't do now or that are not true now.

I used to live in London.
I used to work in an office and I would get the bus to work every day.
What did you used to do in Belfast that you don't do now?

We can use ‘used to’ and 'would' to talk about repeated past actions:

When I was growing up in London I used to/would go to the park with my best friend and play football.
We'd cycle to the local park and we used to meet up with other kids to play for a couple of hours before lunch.
I used to want to stay longer, but Graham would always make sure that we were home in time for lunch.

We can use ‘would’ to talk about repeated past actions.

However, only ‘used to’ is possible when we talk about PAST STATES.

I used to live in London (XI would live in London.X)

I used to have a beard. (XI would have a beard.X)

We can use the past simple in the same way as ‘used to’ and ‘would’ to talk about repeated past actions.

Thanks to Lenuto69 from Spain for his (or her!) itunes review and 5 stars! Don't forget to subscribe on itunes even if you listen on the website or on our mobile app.

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

Email from Isabel Soley Bech
Dear Craig and Reza,
This is just to thank you for your generosity in having this free podcast.
I am listening you (I’ve been listening to you) for at least one year and I enjoy and appreciate your advice very much .
I travel a lot for business and you are with me in planes, boats and trains.
I am a strong supporter of your programme and I recommended your podcasts to all my friends and acquaintances.
Please keep doing it!
Isabel

PS: Please detail me (Please give me details about) how I can sponsor you)

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lorena
Pedro Martinez
Ana Cherta
Maria Gervatti
Nikolay Dimitrov

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 138, 139 and 140.

On next week's episode: A History of Britain in 20 Minutes

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Words in the News - AIRC151  

In this episode we're going to help you with your news vocabulary. Do you listen to the news? Are you confused with those long words they use on the BBC? We’ll help you understand them in this episode.

Take your English to the next level with Mansión Inglés audio podcasts: http://www.inglespodcast.com/  

Hi Reza and Craig ,
I´m Fancisco from El Ejido, Almeria and a long time fan . There is something that annoys me a lot and I´m wondering if other people feel the same .
The thing that annoys me is the bad use of English e.g. gonna instead of going to, wanna instead of want to, (and the most annoying one that we hear in every song these days) ain´t instead of aren't or isn't.
Does this annoy you or am I the only one? I am asking this because this is a subject that you haven´t yet covered in your podcasts. I would love if you could speak about this subject.
Kind regards,
Francisco Gutierrez.

Cortado - cortau / cuñado - cunyau - people are lazy!
Is it bad use or just different? What about written text messages?
‘Yeah’ instead of ‘yes’?
Should language be fossilized or is it constantly evolving and changing? - should there be a committee to protect language? - language police?

Voice message from Ignacio from Granada

Episode 85 (http://www.inglespodcast.com/2016/01/10/listening-to-the-news-news-and-currect-affairs-vocabulary-airc85/ )

Vocabulary often heard and read in the news

Remember that ‘news’ is an uncountable noun (some news / a piece of news / I have good news)

Revision
deadline – fecha límite, fecha tope
headlines – titular, cabecera
foreign correspondent – corresponsal extranjero, corresponsal en el extranjero
researcher – investigador, investigadora (do research, not make!)
to bury the lead
to cover a story – to report on an event or development
eyewitness reports
breaking news
newsreader (UK) / newscaster (USA) = presentador de noticias

More vocabulary
To axe - cut, cancel (axe = hacha) - More jobs have been axed at the Toyota plant.

To back (respaldar) - support, agree with. Will you back me if I ask for a pay rise?

To blast - criticise, condemn - The Prime Minister was blasted over his decision to cut government spending.

boost - increase - Huge boost in the economy

breakthrough - success - Breakthrough in fight against cancer

clash - disagree, fight - Famous author clashes with her publicist

crackdown - control, purge - Police crackdown on drugs

face (afrontar) - confront - We need to face facts / you have to face the music / Let's face it....

fury/outrage - extreme anger - Fury as police arrest famous footballer / Outrage as killer is set free

To go on the rampage - cause chaos, riot - Russian fans go on rampage after soccer match

To hit - affect - Elderly hit as temperatures drop

Plea (súplica) - request - Students’ plea for more government funding

pledge - promise - Valencia City Council pledges better transport service

probe - Investigate, investigation - Probe into paintings missing from museum

To purge - control, crackdown, get rid of - to purge something of - purgar algo de) purge on illegal drug use

To quit (dejar) - resign, leave - Politician quits education post

To raid / to swoop - attack - Police raid houses looking for terrorists - police swoop on drug den.

shake up - reform - Shake-up in police bureaucracy

To slam - criticise - Prime Minister slammed for backing the US.

To snub - avoid, fail to meet - Spanish Prime Minister snubs president

vow - promise - Home Secretary vows to reduce prostitution

We post BBC and VOA videos on our Facebook page at facebook.com/mansioningles 

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 

Another video from Mamen. If you want to see Mamen and the lovely view from here room in Biescas, go to inglespodcast.com/152 ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_aPyntL6ng&feature=youtu.be  )
She’s going to do more, like a Vlog - video log. We’ll publish them in the shownotes so that all of you listeners can get to know (conocer) each other.

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 


Our lovely sponsors are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lorena
Pedro Martinez
Ana Cherta
Maria Gervatti

Nikolay Dimitrov

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 138, 139 and 140.

On next week's episode: Would and Used To

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

 Take your English to the next level with Mansión Inglés audio podcasts: http://www.inglespodcast.com/  

 

 

 

 

English Expressions from The Sea - AIRC150  

Today you’ll learn some English expressions about the sea.

First we havea an email from Becky
Hello guys!
Congrats for your podcasts, very useful!!
I'm going straight to the point.
I'm really very confused with the use of the apostrophe in this case:
80s - 80's - '80s - 80s'
I wanna get a tattoo with the following sentence: - 80s girl at heart- (meaning i'm a big fan of the eighties music, culture, fashion..everything, or that I should have be born in the eighties, feeling of belonging to another decade.
And i wanna make sure I dont get it in the wrong way 'cause it'll stay forever on my skin.
Could you please help me out here?
Thanks a lot!!
Becky

Voice message from Juan from Jaen (the World Capital of Olive Oil - known by locals as liquid gold.)

Comment on the blog from Roberto about episode 141 when we spoke about “Go to hell!” / “Get lost!” / “Get out of here!” - ¡Vete al carajo!
“From my point of view, the real meaning of the expression "Vete al carajo" comes from the navy, where "carajo" is that small basket at the top of a main mast. I think, "Crow's nest" is a suitable word for that place in English. Just to add another meaning of the Spanish word "carajo"
Not a good place to be for sure!
Cheers, Roberto”

I think they used to send out crows to find land. (crow - cuervo)

Thanks also to Marcelo Fernandez who sent an explanation and a picture of a crow’s nest on a ship. It’s in the show notes.

Other nautical expressions:

It’ll be smooth sailing from here on (also ‘plain sailing’) - easy progress. No big waves or rough sea.

Rock the boat - to do or say something that will upset people or cause trouble. Don’t rock the boat / Don’t make waves.

Like ships that pass in the night - people who meet for a brief but intense moment and then part, never to see each other again. Has that ever happened to you?

That ship has sailed - an opportunity that has passed or a situation that can no longer be changed. - You've missed the boat.

"three sheets to the wind" - someone who has had too much to drink. It comes from a term that originally described a ship in a complete mess, with its sails flapping and moving around in the wind.

"Taking the wind out of someone's sails" means beating them in an argument, or making them feel less confident in their actions.
Originally, the term referred to a naval maneuver. One ship would pass close to its opponent and block its access to the wind. - very useful tactic in battle.

Between the devil and the deep blue sea (between a rock and a hard place) - entre la espada y la pared - When you face a dilemma. - Going to the dentist - if you go you suffer, and if you don't go you suffer!

"knowing the ropes," - someone is competent at what they do. The statement, printed on a seaman's discharge, indicated that he knew the main uses of the ropes on a ship. Yet rather than indicating that the sailor was a master, the phrase meant that he was a novice who only knew the basics of sailing.

Not the only fish in the sea / There are plenty of fish in the sea. (not the only pebble on the beach). Plenty of other suitable people, especially for a romantic relationship.

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast

Video feedback from Andres, Aarón and Mikel from Costa Rica - Love the pineapples in the background!

https://youtu.be/NHxq0VPJgII 


Difference between ‘aware’ and ‘conscious’ (consciente, darse cuenta de)

Are you aware of/conscious of the 90 second time limit on Speakpipe?
Are you aware that you only have 90 seconds to speak (XAre you conscious that….X)

Conscious suggests being generally aware of the world around you.
Aware is more specific, you are aware of certain situations or facts. - Are you aware how important this podcast is?

Consciousness comes from one or some of the five senses. It’s a state (subconscious, unconscious - not awake, passed out - desmayado/a, inconsciente)
Awareness has more to do with the mind (self-awareness) - it’s the knowledge that something exists somewhere:

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com. Or send us a video or voice message like Mikel, Aaron and Andres from Costa Rica

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lorena
Pedro Martinez
Ana Cherta
Maria Gervatti

We want to thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 138, 139 and 140.

On next week's episode: Words in the News

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mexican Wall and Eugeni's pronunciation - AIRC149  

In this episode we give Eugeni more feedback on his pronunciation and answer more of your comments and questions. This is Aprender Inglés on Reza y Craig

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Comment on the blog from Mar
Hi guys and congratulations for your great podcast.
The correct word to translate "milestone" is "hito". This is a word we usually use for business purposes: e.g. Hemos cumplido los principales hitos del proyecto.
We don't use "escalón" for that meaning.
Hope this helps.
Kind regards, Mar

“Moving to Spain was a milestone in my life.” What were some of the milestones in your life?

Voice message from Edgar Ubaldo from Mexico about the wall that Trump wants to build between the US and Mexico. Edgar says that he’s from "the place in the middle of the moon" (that's the meaning of Mexico according to some)
This is my opinion about immigration and the wall. I forgot to tell that never shall we pay that chingado muro! (we shall never pay - word order)
He also apologises for eating popcorn during his recording!

Excellent English and wonderful pronunciation!
I didn’t know that there were ex-pat communities of North Americans and Europeans in Mexico.
How dangerous is Mexico?
‘Prevent this from happening’
Please send us more messages - with popcorn!

An email from Javier from Tolosa who sent us a wonderful system for recording, learning and revising vocabulary.
“Hi Craig and Reza, how are you? This is Javier González from Tolosa,
I would like to share with you and with all your community one good practice that I use to improve my vocabulary.
Since I am very absent-minded, I have created this database in access to put the words I want to learn.
I explain all the rules of this application in the attached pdf.
I will send you too the database (empty) and a sample of the recorder.”

I couldn’t open the Microsoft Access file, but there were some nice examples in a pdf. In Javier’s system, you write the word or words you want to learn, the translation, the word family (noun, adverb, adjective etc), the sound (audio file) and example sentences.

Example: settle down - phrasal verb - establecerse, sentar cabeza - “I nearly got married, but I wasn’t ready to settle down.”

There is an option to review by double clicking in the “translation” field and then you can write the sentences. You can print out lists from the database.

Javier agreed to let us share his email address if you want to contact Javier: jabiergonzalez@yahoo.es

For learning vocabulary on your phone, I recommend the memrise app: https://www.memrise.com/

Which apps and methods are you using to learn, revise and remember vocabulary?

Audio message from Eugeni from Barcelona
“Let’s get down to business.” - to begin to get serious; to begin to negotiate or conduct business. “All right, everyone. Let's get down to business. There has been enough chitchat.”
to begin seriously doing what you need to do
Is Eugeni pronouncing the diphthong correctly in chair, bare, pair, there, parents, where, I don’t care?
Bird, flirt, shirt, skirt, nurse, first - this sound is a long schwa. Yes, you pronounce it well.

Voiced /z/, and unvoiced /s/ see and /z/ zoo

/s/ students, sit, sat, nice, decide, necessary, kiss
/z/ does, has, cruise, his, please, is, zebra, was

Advice and advise
Price and prize
Loose and lose
Niece and knees
Close and close
Peace and peas
Race and raise
Rice and rise

Italki ad read:
1­on­1
Native speakers
Convenient
Affordable
Italki gives 100 italki credits (ITC) to each paying student
For more information: inglespodcast.com/italki/    
We want to say thank you to italki for sponsoring Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig


Practice and learn the sounds of English, the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet), on the Mansion Ingles website:

http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer01_3.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer04_6.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer06_6.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer08_6.htm  
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer10_7.ht
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer08_9.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer12_7.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer14_7.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer17_3.htm 
http://www.mansioningles.com/cursointer/cursointer19_4.htm 

 

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 
Our lovely sponsors are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann
Maite Palacín Pérez
Lorena
Pedro Martinez
Ana Cherta
Maria Gervatti

We want thank Arminda from Madrid for continuing to transcribe full transcriptions.
There are now full transcriptions for episodes 131, 134, 135, 136, 138 and 139

On next week's episode: English Expressions from The Sea

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mamen's true English story and more idioms - AIRC148  

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

The difference between fake, forge, falsify and counterfeit - AIRC147  

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

How to tell Jokes in English  

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

Need and Dare - AIRC145  

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

10 more phrasal verbs that you should know - AIRC144  

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Immigrants and Immigration - AIRC143  

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Cooking Vocabulary and Our Favourite Food - AIRC142  

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Liar, Layer, Lawyer, Lower, Lie and Lay - AIRC 141  

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Quantifiers | ‘some’ ‘lots of’ ‘a few of’ ‘most’ 'loads of' etc - AIRC140  

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

The Prepositions Out, Up, Of and Off - AIRC139  

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Compound nouns - AIRC138  

Las notas del episodio y más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles están en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Shownotes and more podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Giving Advice and Using recommend and suggest in English - AIRC136  

In this episode we're going to help you to make recommendations and suggestions correctly in English.

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Audio feedback: Gabriel from Tijuana Mexico says Hi
Gabriel also wrote a message on the website inglespodcast.com (I think it's the same Gabriel from Tijuana)

Hi Reza and Craig,
I´m Gabriel from Tijuana Mex, I just want to say thanks for your podcast, the last one was great,
and I need to tell you that the first ones when you started this project where horrible, I feel (felt) that I´m (I was) in a bored (boring) class, but right now they are great!!!!!
My last words for you are, thanks and continue with the podcast, you are amazing guys.
I will continue hearing (listening to) you every time that I can.
Regards,Gabriel.

Audio Feedback: Adrian sent us an audio message on speakpipe.com/inglespodcast from Costa Rica - "can we talk about the word THE and when to use it"

We spoke about The definite and indefinite article, A, AN, THE, ZERO with Bea in Episode 41 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/01/15/the-definite-and-indefinite-article-a-an-the-zero-with-special-guest-bea-airc41/ )

Email Feedback: Francisco Espínola Sanchez from Úbeda, Jaen
Hi friends, how is it going?
The aim of this e-mail is to share some ideas and experiences with the listeners.
For example, for the last three months I have been working on my English improvement in a different way.
Neither academies, nor boring grammar books, nor that kind of stuff.
Now I just do three activities: listening to podcasts intensively, reading English literature and occasionally, doing language exchange (using skype or head to head (face to face), when it´s possible).
I carry on listening to your podcast loyally, every week. What´s more, I have found some interesting podcasts.
One is Luke´s English podcast, who is friend of yours, isn´t he?
This one requires some effort at the beginning, as Luke speaks faster than you, but it´s worth trying it.
I would say that AIRC (Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig) is more academic and Luke is somehow like a TV comedian, so both podcasts together are the perfect team!
This way, I can get at least three new episodes or so every week, so I keep continuously active.
In combination with bilingual books, this method is really working to (for) me, I feel my English improving one day after another, so I would encourage the AIRC listeners community to try it.
In my case, I am learning without noticing it at all! I have got the FCE and the next target is the CAE!

By the way, do you know Úbeda?? It´s an UNESCO world heritage city in the province of Jaén (I am consciously promoting tourism for my hometown :)
Well, sorry for the endless e-mail (and for mistakes) and thank you very much for your commitment, have a big hug!!

Francisco recommends (listening to) Luke’s podcast. He suggests we listen to it.

Luke's English Podcast: http://teacherluke.co.uk/
Inglés Diario Chris Gollop: http://inglesdiario.es/
David Palencia - Daway Inglés: http://www.dawayingles.com/

I hear a lot of mistakes with the verbs to recommend and to suggest from my Spanish students

You CANNOT say:
XI suggested him to listen to our podcast.X

With SUGGEST (proponer/sugerir) we can say:

I suggest (that) he listens to our podcast.
I suggest (that) he listen to our podcast (no 3rd person singular “s” = subjunctive - more common in formal American English)
I suggested listening to our podcast

There are 2 more formal and less common constructions that may be tested in an advanced exam:
I suggested him/Paul listening to our podcast
I suggested Paul’s/his (possessive=very formal) listening to our podcast

With RECOMMEND (aconsejar, recomendar) we can say:

I recommended him to listen to our podcast. (XYou can't say "I suggested him to listen....X)
I recommended (that) he listen/listens to our podcast.
I recommended (him/his/Paul/Paul’s) listening to our podcast
I recommended that he should listen to our podcast

I recommend hiring a builder to do up your flat rather than trying to do it up yourself.
I suggest you get a few quotes and compare prices before you make a choice.

I’d like to recommend some YouTube channels to you:
Simple English Videos - Vicki Hollett: https://www.youtube.com/simpleenglishvideos
Learn English with Papa Teach Me: https://www.youtube.com/papateachme
Amigos Ingleses - Philip and Isabel: https://www.youtube.com/AmigosIngleses


Daily videos posted on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/mansioningles/

Other ways of making suggestions and giving advice

Why don’t you…….? (+infinitive without ‘to’)
What/How about…..? (+gerund/noun)
You could (always)….(+infinitive without ‘to’)
It's a good idea to....(+infinitive) "It's a good idea to subscribe to our newsletter at inglespodcast.com ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/ )
You might want to…..(+infinitive) "You might want to subscribe to this podcast."
Perhaps you could/should….(+infinitive without ‘to’)
Have you thought about…? / have you considered….? / Have you tried….? (+gerund/noun)
If I were you, I’d...(+infinitive without ‘to’)
One thing you could do is…..(+infinitive without ‘to’)
Shall I/we…..? (+infinitive without ‘to’) NB. Only possible with “I/we”
Do you fancy……? (+gerund/noun) - "Do you fancy a cup of tea?"
Have you tried….? (+gerund/noun) "Have you tried carob chocolate?" (carob = algarroba)

Giving strong advice:
You should…
You’d better…
You must / have to….

Asking for advice

What should I do?
What do you suggest?
What do you advise me to do?
What's your advice? (‘advise’ is a verb, ‘advice’ is a noun)
If you were me, what would you do?

What problems are you facing at the moment?

Craig:
Changing from a paper diary to a digital one.
Saying no to new projects (time management)

Reza:
getting used to wearing new glasses
Putting on weight around his belly
Breathing too loudly into the microphone

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 


Our lovely sponsors are:
Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Daniel Contreras Aladro
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann

On next week's episode: How to Tell a Story in English

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stereotypes and Cultural Myths about the British - AIRC135  

In this episode we're going to help you bust some cultural myths about the UK and British people

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Comment on the website from Fleudy:
Good afternoon,I have a problem with my English.
I’ve been learning English for two years and I know a lot of words and grammar, but my big problem is the listening.
This problem have (has) been hitting(bugging) me for a long time. Please tell me what I can do to improve it.

Listen to podcasts. Search Google for your hobbies and interests and then type the word 'podcast' (for example, 'football podcast', 'movie podcast', 'tech podcast')
Also search on itunes, Google Play, ivoox, and use podcast apps like Stitcher.

http://www.apple.com/lae/itunes/ 
https://play.google.com/store?hl=en 
https://www.stitcher.com/ 

Also listen to English music and films in origianl version (and this podcast!)


Listener Feedback from Ando from Mexico
Great pronunciation! Mexicans eat a lot of tacos. The Spanish dance Flamenco, go to bullfights and are lazy because they always have a siesta and leave everything until mañana!

What about the UK?


Let’s bust some cultural myths!

1. Everyone in England speaks with either a London Cockney accent or posh like the Queen.

2. We're always drinking tea. India, Turkey, China and Ireland drink more (per head of population).
Brits drink almost as much coffee as tea. "Come round for tea" = come to our house for the evening meal.

3. We all know Sean Connery, Mick Jagger, David Beckham and The Queen personally.

4. Everyone lives in London or in houses like Downtown Abbey.

5. The food is terrible! Britain has four restaurants that have a 3 michelin stars and has the 4th, 5th and 9th best restaurant in the world, according to Trip Advisor (http://uk.businessinsider.com/tripadvisors-best-restaurants-in-the-world-2015-2015-10?r=US&IR=T) Gordon Ramsey, Jamie Oliver, Heston Blumenthal

6. It's always raining (Britain is number 46th in a list of worldwide average rainfall,
this is above countries such as New Zealand (29th) and even the USA (25th)).
It drizzles a lot in the UK.
Brits speak about the weather a lot and it's also common to see rain and bad weather in British art. Winters are longer than summer in the UK.
Do the British always carry umbrellas?

7. All Brits have bad teeth - a study by the OECD, published in The Economist, shows that Brits have some of the healthiest teeth in the world. ( http://www.economist.com/node/15060097 )

8. British people hate Europeans and North Americans.

9. The British are very reserved and unfriendly.

10 We drink warm beer.

11. The English sometimes confuse “British” with “English”, as do non-British people
(see inglespodcast.com/52) ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/05/24/phrasal-verbs-with-up-england-britain-great-britain-and-the-uk-gerunds-and-infinitives-asking-for-directions-airc52/ )

It can be difficult to tell the difference between the accents of Canadians and North Americans and between Australians and New Zealanders


How would you stereotype the Chinese? The Germans? The Brazilians? The French? (which adjectives would you use?)

How much do you think I live up to an English stereotype?

Say some adjectives and I’ll tell you which nationality you’re stereotyping.


HEAVEN
“Heaven is where the police are British, the cooks are French, the mechanics are German, the lovers are Italian, and it’s all organised by the Swiss”

HELL
“Hell is where the police are German, the cooks are English, the mechanics are French, the lovers are Swiss, and it’s all organised by the Italians.”

Thoughts on Cuisine:
“The Europeans have good food. The British have...good table manners!”


Quotes from George Mikes - a Hungarian writer who came to the UK for a few weeks, but ended up staying, obtaining British nationality and writing about the British -
“The British are brave people. They can face anything, except reality.”

“An Englishman, even if he is alone, forms an orderly queue of one.”

“The British - as the whole world, particularly the British, keep saying - are the most fair-minded people in the world.
After the Second World War they declared: ‘Let’s be fair. We’ve been Top Nation for centuries. We have done splendidly well once again. Now we must give others a chance. Let’s decline’.”


Audio message from Santiago from Argentina: Reverse culture shock


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 


Nuestra tienda de descargas: http://store.mansioningles.net/


Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.


If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast 


Our lovely sponsors are:
Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Daniel Contreras Aladro
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann


On next week's episode: Giving Advice and Using recommend and suggest in English


Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Feelings Vocabulary in English - AIRC134  

How are you feeling? How do you feel? Are you in the mood to practise English with us?
We’re looking at feelings vocabulary today in Aprender Inglés con Reza y Craig.

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

Hello Craig, this is Alberto, again. (Luis Alberto Diaz Garcia - email)
¨Please help me with a doubt. When (do) I have to use "to me" or "for me".
For example when people are talking about some topic and you have to give your opinion. Is it "to me" or "for me"?
Another example when you are in a restaurant and your girlfriend asks for fish and you ask for your meal after her (immediately). Is it "for me only salad" or "to me only salad"?
I will appreciate your help. Keep doing your excellent podcast!!
Bye guys

In this episode we're going to help you talk about your feelings.
Listener Feedback: Audio feedback from Mamen

commute is a verb. I commute to work every day.
Noun: I listened to Aprender Inglés with Reza during my commute.
I am a commuter. I commute to work every day. I have a 20-minute commute.

Feelings
I feel sad, lonely, afraid, blue, depressed, down, stressed
I feel happy, positive, wonderful, enthusiastic, energetic, confident, healthy

Voice message from Ana from Mexico: How does Ana feel and why?
(Ana from Mexico feels disappointed, upset. She doesn't feel well - because of her level of English)
I wrote to Ana and asked her for to tell us a bit more about her profession and which jobs has she applied for. She answered by email:
“I'm a manufacturing engineer and I have applied for these kind of jobs, such as a project engineer, process engineer and others jobs related to manufacturing.
I think I have not been accepted because the level of English they need is advanced, it is because global companies work with people around the world. It is required to talk about specifications of machines, materials, measures, tolerances, and more,especially over negotiations in money.”


I think her English is very, very good.
Suggestions: italki / Monica Stocker's FITA course.

Episode 43 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/02/21/how-to-have-a-job-interview-in-english-and-work-vocabulary-airc43/  )
Episode 58 ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/07/05/job-interview-questions-airc58/  )

My job interview ebook and audio.

Are the following positive or negative feelings?

Anxious - ansioso/a
Ashamed - avergonzado/a - "Craig is ashamed of his level of Spanish."
Astonished (amazed, surprised) - asombrado - "We are astonished at the number of listeners we have."
Awful (horrible, terrible) - espantoso/a
Bored (uninterested) - aburrido/a
Concerned (worried) - preocupado/a
Confused - confundido
Contented (satisfied) - contento/a, satisfecho/a
Disappointed - decepcionado, desilusionado
Ecstatic (very, very happy, joyful) - extático/a
Embarrassed (self-conscious) - avergonzado/a
Excited - entusiasmado/a
Furious (very, very angry) - furioso/a
Guilty - culpable
Hopeful (optimistic) - optimista
Inadequate (insufficient) - deficiente, inapropiado/a, inadecuado/a
Inferior - inferior
Insecure - inseguro/a
Irritated - irritado, enojado/a
Jealous - celoso/a / envious - envidioso/a What's the difference between jealousy (celos) and envy (envidia)?
Envy is when you want what someone else has, but jealousy is when you're worried someone's trying to take what you have.
Envy is a reaction to lacking something.
Jealousy is a reaction to the threat of losing something (usually someone).
“I’m envious of my friends town house and office space.” Are you a jealous person?
Mad / angry - enfadado / crazy about (in a positive way) "I'm mad about podcasting."
Peaceful - tranquilo/a
Proud - orgulloso/a
Scared (afraid) - aterrorizado, asustado
Sensitive - sensible
Suspicious - sospechoso "That man looks suspicious." / "I feel suspicious of my neighbour."
Threatened (in danger) - amenazado
Vulnerable - vulnerable
Worthless - despreciable / (cosa) sin valor - "This old painting is worthless."

How did you feel when we won the podcasting award in 2015?
How did you feel when we didn’t win it this year?
How do you feel when someone catches you doing something you shouldn’t be doing?
How do you feel when your neighbours make a lot of noise or stop you from sleeping when you need to get up early the next day?
How did you feel when you heard about Brexit or Trump’s election victory?
What achievement do you feel proud of?
Is there anything you feel ashamed of?
How do you feel about Mickey Mouse?
What makes you feel bored?
When was the last time you felt surprised?

‘THE WHEEL OF FEELINGS’ AT INGLESPDCAST.COM/134

...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think and how you feel! https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast 


Nuestra tienda de descargas - FCE, business English, Audio courses: http://store.mansioningles.net/ 


Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.


If you would like more detailed shownotes, go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast


We need $100
Our lovely sponsors are:


Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Daniel Contreras Aladro
Manuel Tarazona
Mariel Riedemann


On next week's episode: Stereotypes and Cultural Myths about the British


The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adverbial clauses, linkers and conjunctions - AIRC133  

Adverbial clauses, linkers and conjunctions - AIRC133

Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

In this episode we're going to help you with Adverbial clauses, linkers, conjunctions etc

Audio feedback from Edu from Peru
You can sign up for free English chat at inglespodcast.com
We also publish the dates and the times of the online conversaiton chat on our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/mansioningles/) and on Twitter (https://twitter.com/ - @mansiontwit)

Listener Feedback: Bruno Schvidah from Brazil sent us an email.
My name is Bruno and I am from Brazil but recently living in Copenhagen!
My weak side has been "adverbial clauses and linkers" I would really like to go through that!
For now, I wish you all a great Friday!
All the best, Bruno

We're sorry it's taken us so long to answer your question, Bruno.
We spoke about some linking words in Episode 55 (but, even though/although, however, in spite of/despite) ( http://www.inglespodcast.com/2015/06/14/linking-words-but-even-thoughalthough-however-in-spite-ofdespite-etc-shopping-expressions-airc55/ )

What Are Adverbial Clauses?
"An adverbial clause is a group of words which does what an adverb does.

Adverbial clauses (like all clauses) contain a subject and a verb. For example:

"I eat dark chocolate daily."
(normal adverb)

"I'm going to eat dark chocolate until you tell me to stop."
(adverbial clause = "until you tell me to stop")

More examples:
I never knew how wonderful life could be until I started podcasting.

I'll let you know as soon as I publish this episode.

Now that we've eaten, we can have some of that chocolate cake.

Adverbial clauses don’t have to speak about time. They can also be about contrast, cause and effect, condition etc.

Contrast:I had some chocolate cake even though I was full. (even though = aunque)

Cause and effect: I’ve put on weight this month because I’ve been eating so much cake.

Condition: I’m not going to Disneyland unless you come with me. (unless = a menos que, a no ser que)

More linkers:

In spite of / Despite - “I bought an iphone in spite of the price.” (in spite of/despite = a pesar de)
They go at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence.
“Reza arrived on time despite / in spite of missing the bus”


Instead of (en vez de, en lugar de)
“This year we’re having roast lamb for Christmas dinner instead of turkey.”


Although (aunque) / though / even though / in spite of the fact that (a pesar de que) - “Although/Even though/Though I was full, I had another piece of cake.”

"Even though" is more emphatic than "although".

“Though” can also go at the end of a second sentence in informal English:

These connectors are followed by a complete sentence. They can be placed at the beginning or in the middle of the sentence. If they are at the beginning we put a comma after the clause.

"I had another piece of cake, although I was full."

“In spite of the fact that the neighbours were making a noise, we decided to record this podcast.”

“Reza loves Berta. She rarely thinks about him, though.”

"I'm sorry, we don't have any chocolate cake. We've got some biscuits, though."

However (sin embargo) / nevertheless/nonetheless (no obstante) / even so (aun así)
At/Near the start of a second sentence:

“I was really tired. Even so, I decided to go out for a beer.” (sin embargo, aun así)

“Craig’s on a diet. However, he can’t lose any weight.”

“I didn’t like the price. Nevertheless/Nonetheless, I bought it.”

Or at the end of a second sentence in informal English:
“I didn’t like the price. I bought it, nonetheless.”

While / whereas (mientras que)
In the middle or at the start of a sentence:
“Our last podcast was really interesting, whereas/while this one is a bit boring.”
“While/whereas the last podcast was really interesting, this one is a bit boring:”

On the one hand / on the other hand (por un lado / por el otro lado)
Links two contrasting ideas. “On the one hand” can be omitted:
(On the one hand,) I think that technology has helped society in the areas of health, work, education etc. On the other hand we might be too dependant on technology and maybe to addicted to it as well.

On the contrary - al contrario
Some people say that people can’t change. On the contrary, I think they can!

We can use linkers to add information:

Moreover (además) / furthermore / besides (además) / in addition (to) (además (de)) / as well as (además de) / apart from (aparte de) / what’s more (además; lo que es más, y encima) / on top of that (además) / as well = too (también) at the end of a sentence

“In addition to jazz music, Craig also likes rap.”
Besides music and podcasting, what other hobbies do you have at the moment? - It's a nice day for a walk, and besides, I need the exercise.
I think you owe me an apology. Furthermore, you need to apologise to my wife.
Your company did not inform us of the building work in the hotel. Moreover, no compensation was offered.
Juan was at the meeting, as well as Sara and Maria.
‘Apart from Spanish, Reza also speaks French”.
“He's ugly and what's more, he's not very nice.”
"What a day! First I woke up late, then the car wouldn't start, and on top of that, I dropped my phone and broke it."
She likes tea. She likes coffee as well/too.


We can use linkers to show consequences and results:

As a result (of) (debido a,como resultado, como consecuencia) / therefore (por lo tanto, por eso) / consequently, as a consequence (en consecuencia, y entonces, y por eso) / for this reason

“Reza and I work very hard on this podcast. As a result, it’s becoming one of the most popular learning English podcasts in itunes.”
“I think, therefore I am.” - pienso, luego existo
“I wanted it; consequently, I bought it.”
“I don’t think I can help you develop this product, and for this reason I’m out.” - Shark tank

We can also use linkers to show reasons and causes:

Because (of) (a causa de, debido a) / as / since / seeing that / on account of / due to (debido a) / due to the fact that (debido a que) / owing to / owing to the fact that

As/Since/Because Craig loves Mickey Mouse (clause), he wants to visit Disney Land, Orlando.
Because of Craig’s love for Mickey Mouse (noun phrase, not clause), he wants to visit Disney Land, Orlando.


“Because of / on account of / owing to / due to our sponsor, italki we are able to continue with this podcast.”

Compare:
“We didn’t record podcasts yesterday due to* work.”
“We didn’t record podcasts yesterday due to the fact that* we were both working.”

(*also owing to and owing to the fact that)

“As / Since / Seeing that we’re hungry, we should break for lunch now.”

In order to = a more formal version of INFINITIVE / so as to
Theses conjunctions explain the purpose of something. They are more common in written English.
Reza and I started this podcast (in order) to help you improve your English.
We started our Patreon program so as to be able to pay for full transcriptions for these podcasts (go to https://www.patreon.com/inglespodcast for more details)

All the same (de todas formas, a pesar de todo)
“They offered to pay me 30 euros per hour, but I turned down the job all the same.”

We can use some linking words to show the order and sequence of things

First of all / Firstly / To begin with / To start with / In the first place (en primer lugar, antes que nada)
Second / Secondly (en segundo lugar)
Third / Thirdly (en tercer lugar)
After that / Then (después de eso, después) / Next (luego)
Finally, Lastly (por fin, por último, finalmente)
Last but not least (por último, si bien no menos importante)

Linkers for summarizing

In short / To sum up / In conclusion (en resumen, para concluir, resumir)
All in all (en suma)
In brief (en resumen)
In short (en resumen)
On the whole (en general)


...and now it's your turn to practise your English. Do you have a question for us or an idea for a future episode?
Send us a voice message and tell us what you think. https://www.speakpipe.com/inglespodcast

Nuestra tienda de descargas: http://store.mansioningles.net/

Send us an email with a comment or question to craig@inglespodcast.com or belfastreza@gmail.com.

Thanks to our Patreon sponsors who are:

Lara Arlem
Carlos Garrido
Zara Heath Picazo
Mamen
Juan Leyva Galera
Sara Jarabo
Corey Fineran from Ivy Envy Podcast
Manuel García Betegón
Jorge Jiménez
Raul Lopez
Rafael
Daniel Contreras Aladro
Manuel Tarazona
New sponsor: Mariel Riedemann


On next week's episode: Feelings Vocabulary in English


Más podcasts para mejorar tu ingles en: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 

More podcasts to improve your English at: http://www.inglespodcast.com/ 


The music in this podcast is by Pitx. The track is called 'See You Later'

 

 

 

 

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