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Technological and digital news from around the world.

Episodes

DECODE: Whose Data is it Anyway?  

DECODE is a new EU project aimed at giving people a greater sense of control over their own data. Click talks to two of the organisers, Eddie Copeland and Francesca Bria, about accessing and sharing data from the big tech companies and realising the ambitions of the project. The nonprofit Women Who Tech and primary sponsor Craig Newmark recently announced the winners of the Women Startup Challenge Europe. Women-led startup Simprints received the grand prize, a grant of €50,000 cash and one-on-one mentoring with Wikipedia Founder, Jimmy Wales. Click talks to Allyson Kapin, founder of Women Who Tech, about the prize. Sasha Kljakovic of The Institute for Innovation and Improvement at Waitemata DHB is about to start a pilot study using VR to train junior doctors in how to respond to emergencies. Simon Morton reports. The French pavilion for the Venice Art Biennale 2017 has been transformed by the artist Xavier Veilhan into a musical space in which professional musicians from all over the world will work throughout the duration of the exhibition. Gareth Mitchell talks Xavier Veilhan about the transformation. (Image caption: Touching Share © Getty Images Plus) Producer: Colin Grant

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Click from the 57th Venice Biennale  

In a special edition from the 57th Venice Biennale, Click examines how artists are using digital technology and how their work comments on the role of digital technology in our lives. The programme includes a tour of the Venetian waterways with a blind guide using the specially developed BlindWiki app; there is an interview with the world-renowned curator, Hans Ulrich Obrist on the use of the photocopier in the work of the Italian artist Alighiero Boetti – once described as the Andy Warhol of Europe; Philip Schütte presents his interactive SUN project; and there is a discussion with the artist Lisa Reihana in collaboration with James Pinker on the remarkable and innovative film from New Zealand, in Pursuit of Venus [infected], 2015-17, a cinematic reimagining of the French scenic wallpaper Les Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique, 1804-1805, also known as ‘Captain Cook’s voyages’. (Photo caption: Lisa Reihana’s Emissaries exhibition at the New Zealand Pavilion in Venice, projecting the film, in Pursuit of Venus [infected], 2015-17 © Michael Hall) Producer: Colin Grant

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Uber and the Investigating Regulators  

Uber’s woes continue with regulators around the world, but it is now answering allegations of building software to avoid regulators. Click gets an insight into what is going on from Alison van Diggelen in Silicon Valley. Tunisia youth have been using tech to help map their neighbourhood. Click talks to the NGO International Alert who are running a peace tech project and also hears from the youths about how they are empowered by Open Street Map. More than 300 million people around the world speak Arabic, but the language is badly under-represented online. A project in Wellington is aiming to position New Zealand as a 'digital Switzerland' and make Arabic materials easier for students and teachers to find, to access and to share. Click's Simon Morton reports. In July of 2016, Holocaust survivor Pinchas Gutter toured the Majdanek Concentration Camp in what he vowed would be his final visit. By marrying a stereo video capture of Pinchas within a photoreal roomscale experience, The Last Goodbye reaches profound levels of immersion in service of the first ever VR testimony that will be archived and preserved. Click’s Lauren Hutchinson reports on this extraordinary VR film. (Photo caption: An UBER application is shown as cars drive by in Washington, DC © Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images) Producer: Colin Grant

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The Politics of Tech Resistance  

Just over 100 days since President Trump’s inauguration Click’s Alison van Diggelen explores the notion of tech resistance, especially at the University of California’s Berkeley campus. She finds that technologists have woken up to the part they can play in the political conversation; that despite being at the epicentre of high tech, old school methods still have their place; and that some techies are keen to display their non- partisan credentials. A new start-up has just filmed a unique VR/360 film in North Korea. It gives people the chance to explore Pyongyang like Google street view, teleporting from place to place. It is one of several remarkable experiments with VR. Lauren Hutchinson reports on the premiere of Draw Me Close a world first in terms of VR and theatre, and one of the highlights of this year’s Tribeca Film Festival. Collaborating with inventors Nokia Bell Labs, and technologists Design I/O, singer songwriter Beatie Wolfe has created a ‘world’s first’ way to “stream” an album in the digital age - incorporating real-time AR visuals. Click talks to Beatie Wolfe about the launch of ‘The Raw Space Experience’ Producer: Colin Grant (Photo caption: Tech Resistance Demonstration © Chris Shipley, 100 Days Project)

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VR on the Rise at Tribeca  

The rise of VR and 360 degree films are on show at the Tribeca Film Festival. Click talks to Ingrid Kopp of Storyscape and Loren Hammonds an Associate Programmer of the festival about the latest innovations in VR films. Last Mile is a Cashless Africa initiative which focuses on the final stage of money transfer in Africa. Sasha Gankin reports from Lagos on how The Last Mile is fuelling a revolution in banking on the continent. Waiting for that download or the message to come through? Why not do something with those microments. Perhaps learn a language whilst you are waiting. Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed a series of apps called WaitSuite that test you on vocabulary words during idle moments. MIT’s Carrie Cai describes how it works. Often we are tempted to use our mobile devices when it is socially unacceptable or even dangerous - e.g when driving. What if you could interact with your device just through facial gestures. Denys Matthies discusses the latest research. (Photo caption: A guest participates in the VR/Immersive Press Preview during the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival © Monica Schipper/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival) Producer: Colin Grant

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Index on Censorship Freedom of Expression Awards  

On the eve of the Index on Censorship Freedom of Expression Awards ceremony Gareth Mitchell talks to its Head of Advocacy, Melody Patry, and one of the finalists, Alp Toker, the founder of Turkey Blocks, an organization that monitors real-time censorship data in Turkey. Ken Banks, mobile technologist, is in the studio to discuss how broadband could be expanded across Africa. The think tank Demos has just published a report on how they have used Natural Language Processing algorithms, a form of artificial intelligence, to analyse over one million posts on mental health issues that people have put on online forums. Josh Smith explains what data scraping from many chat rooms can reveal about what people are really thinking about mental health services. Hollywood studios are commissioning Virtual Reality experiences as new ways to showcase their latest releases. One example is the Ghost in the Shell, a sci-fi blockbuster starring Scarlett Johansson, that premiered in March this year. Alongside the film there is also a four-minute VR taster experience, which drops you in the middle of the action. Anthony Huertas from AMD, that provides the hardware that runs VR experiences, placed a headset on reporter Marnie Chesterton. (Image caption: Boarded up laptop © Getty Images) Editor: Deborah Cohen

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Click Reports from Convergence  

In a special edition, Click sets up at Convergence, a five-day event in London’s East End bringing together technology, music and art. It is not just a gadget fest but a chance to find out how everything from wearable tech to big data is changing our lives and the way we express ourselves through music, dance, coding and politics. Click hears from the Artistic Director, Glenn Max, the Creative Director of Another Space, Alexandros Tsolakis, the Designer of Extreme Experiences, Nelly Ben Hayoun, the musician Gwilym Gold and the choreographer, Holly Blakey. (Photo caption: Trying out an exhibit at Convergence 2017 © Antonio Pagano) Producer: Colin Grant

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The MIT Report to Combat Cyber Threats  

A report from CSAIL and CIS at MIT in Boston urges President Trump to take action on cybersecurity. Joel Brenner talks to Click about how to protect infrastructures like the electric grid from getting hacked. Mark O’Connell, the author of To Be a Machine, discusses transhumanism, cyborgs and whether technology will ever enable us to defer death indefinitely. ROVA - The Rover Outreach Vehicle App is an android app to help the homeless help themselves. It is the brainchild of the Hi Tech Rover, a high-tech camper van kitted out with technology to help the homeless improve their lives and work prospects. Alison van Diggelen reports from Silicon Valley on this altruistic initiative. The musician Gwilym Gold has developed Bronze, a tool which allows for an individual recording never to sound the same on subsequent playbacks. Gwilym Gold talks to Click about the myriad editions of a single piece of music. (Image caption: USA map – cybersecurity © Getty Images) Producer: Colin Grant

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European Prize for Women Innovators  

Michela Magas talks to Click about her recent top award at the European Prize for Women Innovators. Michela is founder of Stromatolite Design Innovation Labs, building a new generation of creative technology toolkits for innovation. Industry leaders from more than forty African countries gathered in Lagos last week to address The Future of Finance. Africa’s financial industry is attempting to adapt itself to the on-going disruptions in the Fintech space in light of the increasing demands of young and energetic customers. Click talks to Emmanuel Okoegwale, the organiser of Cashless Africa. One of the challenges for VR is getting enough data to each eye, so you are tricked into thinking that what you are seeing is actually real. A team of computer scientists in New Zealand think they may be a step closer to making VR more real. Andrew Chalmers gives Click’s Simon Morton a demonstration. This Thursday the UK interactive art studio Invisible Flock, and Quicksand, an Indian research and design lab, unveil DUET – an ambitious and evolving artwork, a series of dynamic interactive animated-light panels created from raw, single-line, real time conversations between two anonymous individuals across two continents. Click talks to Victoria Pratt from Invisible Flock. (Photo caption: Michela Magas named European Women Innovator of the Year © Music Tech Fest) Producer: Colin Grant

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Performing Surgery With a Hand-Mounted Exoskeleton  

A hand-mounted exoskeleton for surgeons is being demonstrated at the European Robotics Forum. Click talks to Dr Sanja Dogramadzi from the Bristol Robotics Laboratory about the research into the robotic exoskeleton that will help in intricate surgery, mimicking the actions of the surgeon’s hands. RIKEN’s K computer in Kobe, Japan, is used for a range of fields including earthquake and tsunami research and weather forecasting. Its fast calculations and high resolution simulations are revolutionising weather predictions. Geoff Marsh reports from Kobe. Weather prediction is being increasingly helped via social network sites. Click talks to Nataliya Tkachenko about how alerts on social networks and photographs are being used to augment weather prediction. A new study shows how mobile phone accelerometers can be spoofed by blasting them with rogue sounds and vibrations. Click talks to the University of Michigan Ph.D student Timothy Trippel about the threat to hardware in phones and other devices. (Photo caption: Exoskeleton prototype © UWE Bristol) Producer: Colin Grant

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Brain Wave for Controlling Bots  

What if we could control robots with our brains? Researchers at MIT and Boston University are looking into just that prospect. Click talks to Professor Daniela Rus from MIT. Noa Gafni Slaney, CEO of Impact Squared is a champion of the positive benefits of digital connectedness. She joins Click to talk about limiting fake news and her work with the UN in amplifying its 17 Development Goals. New Zealand tracking technology, pioneered in conservation work to protect the endangered bird the kiwi, could help solve one of the problems of dementia. Sixty percent of dementia patients wander and get lost. Simon Morton reports on a simple radio frequency tracking system called WandaTrak. Line-us is neither a plotter nor a printer, it's a drawer, which gives Line-us its own style and unique character. The magic bit is that Line-us draws in exactly the same order you did. Click talks to its inventors, Robert Poll and Durrell Bishop. (Photo caption: The feedback system enables human operators to correct the robot’s choice in real-time © Jason Dorfman, MIT CSAIL) Producer: Colin Grant

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How to Say 'No' to an Upgrade  

Do you really need to ‘upgrade’ your smart phone after a year or two? How many keyboards and mice have you thrown away that might be perfectly serviceable if a little less cool with the passage of time? How can we challenge the policies that drive the built-in obsolescence of technology? But maybe it has always been thus? Does it matter so much if tech hardware is thrown away in the developed world when it is then recycled in the developing world? What are the credits and deficits to recycling? An international cast from Lomé to Paulo Alto and Amsterdam debate how we might be inclined to make do and mend in the future. Click transforms the BBC Radio Theatre in London into a gadget repair shop as a panel of experts demonstrate how easy it is rejuvenate your tech with some simple DIY. In an era of maker spaces, homebrew electronics, and craft ale is it time to throw away throwaway culture and to become better acquainted with the inner workings of our phones, laptops and every day tech? (Photo: A man recycling a computer tower case courtesy of WoeLab)

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How to Say "No" to an Upgrade  

Do you really need to ‘upgrade’ your smart phone after a year or two? How many keyboards and mice have you thrown away that might be perfectly serviceable if a little less cool with the passage of time? How can we challenge the policies that drive the built-in obsolescence of technology? But maybe it has always been thus? Does it matter so much if tech hardware is thrown away in the developed world when it is then recycled in the developing world? What are the credits and deficits to recycling? An international cast from Lomé to Paulo Alto and Amsterdam debate how we might be inclined to make do and mend in the future. Click transforms the BBC Radio Theatre in London into a gadget repair shop as a panel of experts demonstrate how easy it is rejuvenate your tech with some simple DIY. In an era of maker spaces, homebrew electronics, and craft ale is it time to throw away throwaway culture and to become better acquainted with the inner workings of our phones, laptops and every day tech? (Photo courtesy of WoeLab) Producer: Colin Grant

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Retrofitting Democracy with Robust Digital Tools  

Democracy faces new and global challenges: new notions of expertise, fake news and a disillusioned electorate. Click talks to Nesta’s Director of Government Innovation, Eddie Copeland, about how a number of governments and parliaments around the world are using every day online platforms, forums and other digital tools in innovative ways to achieve broader participation. Plastics pose a big problem in the sea, as is reflected when they wash up on the shoreline. The Plastic Tide is an initiative to use drones to monitor this waste along the British coastline. They aim to unroll a similar project along the west coast of Africa next year. Click talks to Ellie Mackay, the co-founder of The Plastic Tide. Advances in sensors and hardware have enabled computers to more easily observe the physical world. These devices can monitor the physical environment and connect internet servers with physical places and objects. But how will we guard against the new vulnerabilities they open up? Roland Pease reports. Ahead of International Women's Day 2017 on March 8, Click discusses with Dr Sue Black the campaign #BeBoldForChange, a call for a more inclusive, gender equal world, and TechMums’schemes for retraining mothers aiming to go back into work. (Photo caption: Social Network Vector Concept © Thinkstock) Producer: Colin Grant

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Fake It or Leave It  

Both Facebook and Twitter have been in the firing line over fake news and online abuse. The social media platforms have taken action. But is it too little, too late? The scale of the problem is huge. Globally, billions of Facebook comments and hundreds of thousands of tweets are posted every day. Assuming even a small percentage have nefarious intent, eliminating abuse is a bit like King Canute trying to hold back the tide. Alison van Diggelen reports from Silicon Valley. A new competition is promoting innovative ways of conducting journalism in the future in Africa. Juliana Rotich joins Click to discuss judging the digital watchdog project that aims to fund projects such as the use of drones to shoot footage for news stories in inaccessible areas. How might your heart rate be used as a password? Click talks to the researchers Zhanpeng Jin and Linke Guo about securing medical data with the biometric password of your heart beat. The Stanford University researcher, Rahim Esfandyarpour, discusses the throwaway lab on a chip that will enable cheap and effective medical diagnosis in poor and remote areas of the globe. (Photo: Myth and reality word cloud © marekuliasz/Thinkstock)

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Digital Natives or Digital Exiles?  

Click discusses with a panel of experts in front of an audience at Dragon Hall at the UK’s Writers’ Centre Norwich, whether the internet could be an inclusive tool for participatory democracy, or whether human nature and polarised opinion inevitably turns it into rudeness and/or toxic fury - something that one of the contributors Professor Mary Beard has experienced. But why would academics be active on Twitter or Facebook? The panel also includes Paul Bernal an expert in cyber law who reflects on the broader privacy and security dimensions of the internet. In the age of fake news how can we verify and assert the primacy of the truth; where does this leave traditional content providers like BBC, newspapers, and journals. (Photo caption: Gareth Mitchell, Professor Mary Beard, Paul Bernal and Bill Thompson © WCN/BBC) Producer: Colin Grant

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AI Predicting Emotion in Conversations  

Researchers from MIT say that they are developing an artificially intelligent wearable system that can predict if a conversation is happy, sad or neutral based on a person’s speech patterns and vitals. Click talks with the MIT researchers, Tuka Alhanai and Mohammad Ghassemi. Why buy a router when you can build your own? Carlos Rey-Moreno, one of the team behind the LibreRouter, discusses this cheap networking tool that is expected to launch later this year. Project Tide, developed in collaboration with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, is a smartphone app to help health professionals in developing countries accurately diagnose TB. Project Tide’s Cyan Collier describes its development. China’s WeChat mobile phone platform has recently launched mini programs, as rivals to apps. Click talks to Matthew Brennan from China Channel about WeChat’s prominence in China. (Photo caption: Left to right: PhD student Fadel Adib, PhD student Mingmin Zhao, and Professor Dina Katabi pose with their EQ-Radio device, which can detect emotion using wireless signals © Jason Dorfman/MIT CSAIL) Producer: Colin Grant

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Asi Burak’s Games for Change  

Asi Burak is a veteran of the Games for Change movement which advocates using videogames to encourage empathy and understanding for people such as refugees in flight from war zones. Burak joins Click to discuss videogames such as Peace Maker which centres on the resolution of the Middle East conflict, and his decades-long involvement in the video games industry as highlighted in his new book, Power Play. Community Tablet Only a small percentage of the Mozambique population has regular access to the internet. Click talks to Dayn Amade about Community Tablet, his mobile internet truck that visits rural areas of Mozambique. Chayn This week sees the launch of a DIY online safety project, an open source feminist tech project, by the organisation Chayn. Hera Hussain and Aliya Bakheit join Click to discuss the online safety guide and especially the focus on social media as an aid to women who are being stalked online or who are in/have been in abusive relationships. SheSkills The digital rights activist, Nighat Dad, is a recent recipient of a Human Rights Tulip award. She joins Click to discuss her advocacy and her role in promoting SheSkills, a coding clubs for girls and women in Pakistan. (Photo caption: Asi Burak © Jemal Countess/Getty Images) Producer: Colin Grant

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Silicon Valley and Donald Trump’s Inauguration  

Silicon Valley took to the streets on Saturday to protest the country’s new president and the rise of fake news. Last month Donald Trump hosted a cordial summit with some top tech leaders but despite this, as Alison van Diggelen reports, many in this community are fearful of what his presidency might mean for innovation. UAVs Landing On a Sixpence Fixed wing UAVs have great difficulty landing in designated spots, but a team of researchers in southern England have conducted trials on a new design of wing and machine learning that enables greater precision in mimicking landing like birds. Zenvus The tech entrepreneur Ndubuisi Ekekwe through his company Zenvus plans to make farming in Africa smarter. He talks to Click about the sophisticated sensors which are part of an intelligent system that collects data from the soil. Gaza Sky Geeks Click talks to Ryan Sturgill, the director of Gaza Sky Geeks, about the campaign to launch a coding academy and to buy a generator to overcome the difficulties faced by the internet hub (Gaza Sky Geeks) because of intermittent electricity supply and restrictions on movement to and from Gaza. (Photo caption: Silicon Valley protests over President Trump and the rise of fake news © Alison van Diggelen) Producer: Colin Grant

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North sense and Cyborgs  

Cyborg Nest has developed a new ‘implanted’ device that will enable humans to always sense due north. Click talks to the developers about the cyborg-like device that they’ve recently had attached to their bodies. At the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this year the Zigbee Alliance launched a revolutionary new universal IOT language called dot dot. Click talks Tobin Richardson the CEO of the Zigbee Alliance about how this new development aims to further establish a standardised platform for digital devices to be able to talk to each other. Rebecca Allen’s VR work is part of a new show called Toute Seule that has just opened in London. She is an innovative and pioneering digital artist. She joins Click to discuss her work British researchers have been carrying out a massive content analysis project on material released by the British Library. The researchers have scrutinised local newspapers collected over the last 150 years to flesh out and confirm the build up to what then became historical events, and also to establish themes and shifts in culture. Click talks to Nello Cristianini, a professor of Artificial Intelligence, about what the analysis of big data tells us about British history. Producer: Colin Grant (Photo: North Sense device. © Cyborg Nest)

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